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Encyclopedia > Robert Southey
Robert Southey, English poet
Robert Southey, English poet

Robert Southey (August 12, 1774March 21, 1843) was an English poet of the Romantic school, one of the so-called "Lake Poets", and Poet Laureate. Although his fame tends to be eclipsed by that of his contemporaries and friends William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Southey's verse enjoys enduring popularity. Moreover, he was a literary scholar, writing a number of biographical studies of historical interest, notably on the life and works of John Bunyan and John Wesley. Robert Southey - Project Gutenberg eText 13619 - http://www. ... Robert Southey - Project Gutenberg eText 13619 - http://www. ... August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (81st in leap years). ... 1843 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... A poet is someone who writes poetry. ... Romantic poetry was part of the Romantic movement of European literature during the 18th-19th centuries. ... The Lake Poets all lived in the Lake District of England at the turn of the nineteenth century. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Wordsworth redirects here. ... Samuel Taylor Coleridge (October 21, 1772 – July 25, 1834) (pronounced ) was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and one of the Lake Poets. ... John Bunyan. ... John Wesley (June 17, 1703–March 2, 1791) was an 18th-century Anglican clergyman and Christian theologian who was an early leader in the Methodist movement. ...

Contents

Life

He was born in Bristol to Thomas Southey and Margaret Hill and educated at Westminster School (from which he was expelled for writing a magazine article condemning flogging) and Balliol College, Oxford (of his time at Oxford Southey was later to say "All I learnt was a little swimming ... and a little boating."). After experimenting with a writing partnership with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, he published his first collection of poems in 1794. The same year, he, Coleridge and a few others discussed setting up an idealistic community in America ("pantisocracy"). Bristol (IPA: ) is a city, unitary authority and ceremonial county in South West England, 115 miles (185 km) west of London and between the cities of Bath, Gloucester and the borough of Swindon. ... The Royal College of St. ... Whipping on a post Flagellation is the act of whipping (Latin flagellum, whip) the human body. ... College name Balliol College Named after John de Balliol Established 1263 Sister College St Johns Master Andrew Graham JCR President Jack Hawkins Undergraduates 403 MCR President Chelsea Payne Graduates 228 Homepage Boatclub Balliol College, founded in 1263, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in... Samuel Taylor Coleridge (October 21, 1772 – July 25, 1834) (pronounced ) was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and one of the Lake Poets. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...

Their wants would be simple and natural; their toil need not be such as the slaves of luxury endure; where possessions were held in common, each would work for all; in their cottages the best books would have a place; literature and science, bathed anew in the invigorating stream of life and nature, could not but rise reanimated and purified. Each young man should take to himself a mild and lovely woman for his wife; it would be her part to prepare their innocent food, and tend their hardy and beautiful race.

Later iterations of the plan moved the commune to Wales, but Southey was later the first of the group to reject the idea as unworkable.


Southey's wife, Edith, was the sister of Coleridge's wife. The Southeys set up home at Greta Hall, Keswick, in the Lake District, living on a tiny income. From 1809, he contributed to the Quarterly Review, and had become so well-known by 1813 that he was appointed Poet Laureate. The Moot Hall in the centre of Keswick. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Quarterly Review was a review journal started by John Murray, the celebrated London publisher, in March 1809 (though it bore a title page date of February), in rivalry with the Edinburgh Review, which had been seven years in possession of the field, and was exerting, as he judged, an evil... 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


In 1819, through a mutual friend (John Rickman), Southey met leading civil engineer Thomas Telford and struck up a strong friendship. From mid-August to 1 October 1819, Southey accompanied Telford on an extensive tour of his engineering projects in the Scottish Highlands, keeping a diary of his observations. This was published posthumously in 1929 as Journal of a tour in Scotland in 1819. 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... John Rickman (1771-1840) was an English statistician and government official of the early 19th century. ... The term civil engineer refers to an individual who practices civil engineering. ... Thomas Telford (August 9, 1757 - September 2, 1834) was born in Westerkirk, Scotland. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Scottish Highlands are the mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ...


In 1838, Edith died and Southey married Caroline Anne Bowles, also a poet. Many of his poems are still read by British schoolchildren, the best-known being The Inchcape Rock and After Blenheim (possibly one of the earliest anti-war poems). | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Mrs. ... Combatants England,[1] Austria, Dutch Republic, Prussia, Denmark, Hesse, Hanover France, Bavaria Commanders Duke of Marlborough, Eugene of Savoy Duc de Tallard, Maximilian II Emanuel, Ferdinand de Marsin Strength 52,000, 60 guns[2] 56,000, 90 guns Casualties 4,542 killed, 7,942 wounded 20,000 killed, drowned, or...


Major works

Robert Southey
Robert Southey
  • Fall of Robespierre ( 1794 ).
  • Joan of Arc: An Epic Poem ( 1796 )
  • Poems ( 1797 - 99 )
  • Letters from Spain ( 1797 )
  • Devil's Thoughts ( 1799 )
  • Thalaba the Destroyer ( 1801 )
  • Amadis de Gaula ( 1803 ). Translation
  • Madoc ( 1805 )
  • Letters from England ( 1807 ) ISBN 0-86299-130-7, (Alan Sutton, Paperback).
  • Palmerin of England ( 1807 ). Translation.
  • The Cid ( 1808 ). Translation
  • The Curse of Kehama ( 1810 )
  • The Life of Nelson ( 1813 )
  • Roderick, the Last of the Goths ( 1814 )
  • Wat Tyler: A Dramatic Poem ( 1817 )
  • Journal of a Tour in Scotland in 1819 ( 1929, posthumous )
  • The Life of Wesley, and the rise and progress of Methodism (c.1820)
  • A Vision of Judgment ( 1821 )
  • Life of Cromwell ( 1821 )
  • Thomas More ( 1829 )
  • The Pilgrim's Progress with a Life of John Bunyan (1830)
  • Cowper ( 1833 )
  • The Doctors ( 1834 ). Includes the first published version of the fairy tale-like The Three Bears.
  • Select Lives of Cromwell and Bunyan (1846)
  • The Inchcape Rock
  • After Blenheim

Image File history File links Robert_Southey_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_13103. ... Maximilien François Marie Isidore de Robespierre, (May 6, 1758–July 28, 1794), known also to his contemporaries as the Incorruptible, is one of the best known of the leaders of the French Revolution. ... Image of Joan of Arc, painted between 1450 and 1500 (Centre Historique des Archives Nationales, Paris, AE II 2490). ... Amadís de Gaula (English, Amadis of Gaul) is a landmark work among the knight-errantry tales which were in vogue in 16th century Spain, and formed the earliest reading of many Renaissance and Baroque writers. ... This article is about the legendary Welsh prince. ... Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar (c. ... Wat Tylers Death Walter Tyler, commonly known as Wat Tyler (died June 15, 1381) was the leader of the English Peasants Revolt of 1381. ... John Wesley (June 17, 1703–March 2, 1791) was an 18th-century Anglican clergyman and Christian theologian who was an early leader in the Methodist movement. ... Sir Thomas More (7 February 1478 — 6 July 1535), posthumously known also as Saint Thomas More, was an English lawyer, author, and statesman. ... John Bunyan. ... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into The Three Bears. ... Bell Rock Lighthouse Inchcape or the Bell Rock is a notorious reef off the east coast of Angus, Scotland, near Dundee and Fife (). Bell Rock Lighthouse , an automatic lighthouse, occupies the reef. ...

Politics

Although originally a radical supporter of the French Revolution, Southey followed the trajectory of fellow Romantic poets, Wordsworth and Coleridge, towards conservatism. Embraced by the Tory Establishment as Poet Laureate, and from 1807 in receipt of a yearly stipend from them, he vigorously supported the repressive Liverpool government. He argued against parliamentary reform ("the railroad to ruin with the Devil for driver"), blamed the Peterloo Massacre on the allegedly revolutionary "rabble" killed and injured by government troops, and opposed Catholic emancipation. In 1817 he privately proposed penal transportation for those guilty of "libel" or "sedition". He had in mind figures like Thomas Jonathan Wooler and William Hone, whose prosecution he urged. Such writers were guilty, he wrote in the Quarterly Review, of "inflaming the turbulent temper of the manufacturer and disturbing the quiet attachment of the peasant to those institutions under which he and his fathers have dwelt in peace." (Wooler and Hone were acquitted, but the threats caused another target, William Cobbett, to emigrate to the United States.) Wordsworth redirects here. ... Samuel Taylor Coleridge (October 21, 1772 – July 25, 1834) (pronounced ) was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and one of the Lake Poets. ... The son of George IIIs close adviser Charles Jenkinson, 1st Earl of Liverpool and his part-Indian first wife, Amelia Watts, Robert Jenkinson was educated at Charterhouse School and Christ Church, Oxford. ... Print of the Peterloo Massacre published by Richard Carlile Peterloo Massacre of August 16, 1819 was the result of a cavalry charge into the crowd at a public meeting at St Peters Fields, Manchester, England. ... This picture depicts women in England mourning their lovers who are soon to be transported to Botany Bay. ... The publisher Thomas Jonathan Wooler (1786–29 October 1853) was active in the Radical movement of early 19th century Britain, best known for his satirical journal The Black Dwarf. ... William Hone (June 3, 1780 - November 6, 1842) was an English writer and bookseller. ... William Cobbett, portrait in oils possibly by George Cooke around 1831. ...


Given his departure from radicalism, and his attempts to have former fellow travellers prosecuted, it is unsurprising that contemporaries who kept the faith attacked Southey. They saw him as a selling out for money and respectability. In his portrait of Southey in The Spirit of the Age William Hazlitt wrote: "He wooed Liberty as a youthful lover, but it was perhaps more as a mistress than a bride; and he has since wedded with an elderly and not very reputable lady, called Legitimacy." He was often mocked for what were seen as sycophantic odes to the king, most notably in Byron's long ironic dedication of Don Juan to Southey. William Hazlitt (10 April 1778 – 18 September 1830) was an English writer remembered for his humanistic essays and literary criticism, often esteemed the greatest English literary critic after Samuel Johnson. ... Lord Byron, English poet Lord Byron (1803), as painted by Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, (January 22, 1788 – April 19, 1824) was the most widely read English language poet of his day. ... Byrons Don Juan (Penguin Classics version) Don Juan is a long narrative poem by Lord Byron, based on the legend of Don Juan. ...


Trivia

  • In 1808, Southey used the pseudonym Don Manuel Alvarez Espriella to write Letters From England, an account of a tour of the country supposedly from a foreigner's perspective. The book is said to contain a more accurate picture of English ways at the beginning of the nineteenth century than exists anywhere else. [2]
  • Byron wrote a scornful dedication to his celebrated narrative poem Don Juan addressed to Southey, who is dismissed as insolent, narrow and shabby. This was based both on Byron's disrespect for Southey's literary talent, and his disdain for Southey's conservative politics. There is a satirical portrait of Southey in Byron's poem 'The Vision of Judgment', which is a parody of Southey's 'A Vision of Judgment'.

1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... R-phrases S-phrases Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ... The Cornish people are a British ethnic group originating in Cornwall. ... Sir Humphry Davy. ... 1808 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... A pseudonym (Greek pseudo + -onym: false name) is an artificial, fictitious name, also known as an alias, used by an individual as an alternative to a persons true name. ... Lord Byron, Anglo-Scottish poet George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron (January 22, 1788–April 19, 1824) was an Anglo-Scottish poet and a leading figure in Romanticism. ... Byrons Don Juan (Penguin Classics version) Don Juan is a long narrative poem by Lord Byron, based on the legend of Don Juan. ... Lewis Carroll. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Wikipedia Links

Mrs. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into The Three Bears. ... Illustration by Arthur Rackham from a 1918 English Fairy Tales, by Flora Annie Steel. ...

External links

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Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Project Gutenberg (often abbreviated as PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive, and distribute cultural works. ... The Welsh (Cymry) are an ethnic group or nation associated with Wales and the Welsh language, which is a Celtic language. ... This article is about the legendary Welsh prince. ...

Notes

Preceded by
Henry James Pye
British Poet Laureate
1813–1843
Succeeded by
William Wordsworth
Romanticism
18th century - 19th century
Romantic music: Beethoven - Berlioz - Brahms - Chopin - Grieg - Liszt - Puccini - Schumann - Tchaikovsky - The Five - Verdi - Wagner
   Romantic poetry: Blake - Burns - Byron - Coleridge - Goethe - Hölderlin - Hugo - Keats - Lamartine - Leopardi - Lermontov - Mickiewicz - Nerval - Novalis - Pushkin - Shelley - Słowacki - Wordsworth   
Visual art and architecture: Brullov - Constable - Corot - Delacroix - Friedrich - Géricault - Gothic Revival architecture - Goya - Hudson River school - Leutze - Nazarene movement - Palmer - Turner
Romantic culture: Bohemianism - Romantic nationalism
<< Age of Enlightenment Victorianism >>
Realism >>

  Results from FactBites:
 
Robert Southey - LoveToKnow 1911 (2575 words)
ROBERT SOUTHEY (1774-1843), English poet and man of letters, was born at Bristol on the 12th of August 1774.
Southey's uncle, the Rev. Herbert Hill, chaplain of the British factory at Lisbon, who had paid for his education at Westminster, determined to send him to Oxford with a view to his taking holy orders, but the news of his escapade at Westminster had preceded him, and he was refused at Christ Church.
Southey's eldest son, Herbert, died in 1816, and a favourite daughter in 1826; Sara Coleridge married in 1829; in 1834 his eldest daughter, Edith, also married; and in the same year Mrs Southey, whose health had long given cause for anxiety, became insane.
Robert Southey - MSN Encarta (249 words)
Robert Southey (1774-1843), English poet, generally considered a member of the romantic movement (see Romanticism) and one of the Lake Poets.
Southey became a political conservative and was appointed poet laureate in 1813.
Southey wrote essays on moral issues, edited works of Sir Thomas Malory and produced volumes of history.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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