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Encyclopedia > Robert Shaw (conductor)
Robert Shaw
Background information
Birth name Robert Shaw
Born 30 April 1916(1916-04-30)
Flag of the United States Red Bluff, California, USA
Died 25 January 1999 (aged 82)
New Haven, Connecticut, USA
Genre(s) Classical
Occupation(s) Composer, conductor
Years active 1947-1999

Robert Shaw (April 30, 1916January 25, 1999) was an American conductor most famous for his work with his namesake Chorale, with the Cleveland Orchestra and Chorus, and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus. Shaw received 14 Grammy awards, four ASCAP awards for service to contemporary music, the first Guggenheim Fellowship ever awarded to a conductor, the Alice M. Ditson Conductor's Award for Service to American Music; the George Peabody Medal for outstanding contributions to music in America, the Gold Baton Award of the American Symphony Orchestra League for "distinguished service to music and the arts, the American National Medal of Arts, France's Officier des Arts et des Lettres, England's Gramophone Award, and was a 1991 recipient of the Kennedy Center Honors.[1][2] If you hold the copyright to an image (e. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Red Bluff (pop. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the city in Connecticut. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about Western art music from 1000 AD to the 2000s . ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... A conductor conducting at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... A conductor conducting at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Cleveland Orchestra is one of the major symphony orchestras in the United States. ... The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra (ASO) is an American orchestra based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... The American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP) is an organization known as a collecting society that protects intellectual property, ensuring that music which is broadcast, commercially recorded, or otherwise used for profit, pays a fee to compensate the creators of that music. ... Guggenheim Fellowships are awarded annually by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation to those who have demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts. ... The Ditson Conductors Award was first made in 1945. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...


Biography

Shaw was born in Red Bluff, California. In 1941, he founded the Collegiate Chorale, a group notable in its day for its racial integration. In 1945, the group performed Ludwig Van Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 with the NBC Symphony and Arturo Toscanini, who famously remarked, "In Robert Shaw I have at last found the maestro I have been looking for." [3] Shaw continued to prepare choirs for Toscanini until March 1954, when they sang in Te Deum by Verdi and the prologue to Mefistofele by Boito. Shaw's choirs participated in the NBC broadcast performances of three Verdi operas: Aida, Falstaff and A Masked Ball. They can be seen on the home videos of the telecasts of Aida and Beethoven's Ninth Symphony (from April 1948). Shaw himself took a bow at the end of the Beethoven telecast. Red Bluff is the county seat of Tehama County, California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... The Collegiate Chorale is a symphonic choir in New York City. ... Children at a parade in North College Hill, Ohio Racial integration, or simply integration includes desegregation (the process of ending systematic racial segregation). ... “Beethoven” redirects here. ... Composer Ludwig van Beethoven The Symphony No. ... The NBC Symphony Orchestra was an orchestra established as a commercial venture in 1937 by General David Sarnoff of NBC in order to coax the recently retired conductor Arturo Toscanini to come to America. ... Arturo Toscanini (March 25, 1867 – January 16, 1957) was an Italian musician. ... Te Deum is an early Christian hymn of praise. ... VERDI is an acronym for the Italian unification movement, named after the composer Giuseppe Verdi (ardent supporter of the movement) VERDI stands for Vittorio Emmanuelle, Re D Italia (Victor Emmanuel, King of Italy) Categories: Historical stubs ... Mefistofele is the only completed opera by the Italian composer Arrigo Boito. ... Arrigo Boito (February 24, 1842 – June 10, 1918) was an Italian poet, novelist and composer, best known today for his opera libretti and his own opera, Mefistofele. ... AIDA is an acronym used in marketing that describes a common list of events that are very often undergone when a person is selling a product or service: A - Attention (Awareness): attract the attention of the customer. ... Adolf Schrödter: Falstaff and his page Sir John Falstaff is a fictional character who appears in three plays by William Shakespeare as a companion to Prince Hal, the future King Henry V. A fat, vainglorious, and cowardly knight, Falstaff leads the apparently wayward Prince Hal into trouble, but he... Un Ballo in Maschera, or A Masked Ball, is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi with text by Antonio Somma. ... AIDA is an acronym used in marketing that describes a common list of events that are very often undergone when a person is selling a product or service: A - Attention (Awareness): attract the attention of the customer. ... The Symphony No. ...


He went on to found the Robert Shaw Chorale in 1949, a group which produced numerous recordings on RCA Records up until his appointment in Atlanta. The Chorale visited 30 countries in tours sponsored by the U.S. State Department. Shaw was named music director of the San Diego Symphony in 1953 and served in that post for four years. Only after his San Diego tenure did he become an apprentice again, studying the art of conducting with George Szell and serving as his assistant at the Cleveland Orchestra for eleven seasons. He also took over the fledgling Cleveland Orchestra Chorus and fine-tuned it into one of the finest all-volunteer choral ensembles sponsored by an American symphony orchestra. From 1967-1988 he was music director and conductor of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra.[4] In 1970, he founded the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Chorus and worked to recreate the success he had had for Cleveland in preparing them for performances and recordings with their namesake symphony orchestra. The Robert Shaw Chorale was a professional chorus founded in New York City in 1948 by Robert Shaw, a Californian who had been drafted out of college a decade earlier by Fred Waring to conduct his Glee Club in radio broadcasts. ... RCA Records is one of the flagship labels of Sony BMG Music Entertainment. ... Department of State redirects here. ... Categories: Musical group stubs | American orchestras ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Cleveland Orchestra is one of the major symphony orchestras in the United States. ... The title of music director is used by many symphony orchestras to designate the primary conductor and artistic leader of the orchestra. ... The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra (ASO) is an American orchestra based in Atlanta, Georgia. ...


After stepping down from his Atlanta post in 1988, Shaw continued to conduct the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra as its Music Director Emeritus and Conductor Laureate, was a regular guest conductor with other orchestras including Cleveland, and taught in a series of summer festivals and week-long Carnegie Hall workshops for choral conductors and singers. Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ... A conductor conducting at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ...


Although noted in classical repertoire, Shaw hardly limited himself to that genre. His discography also includes recordings of sea shanties, glee club songs, sacred music and spirituals, musical theater numbers, Irish folk tunes, and, most notably, Christmas albums that have remained bestsellers ever since their release.


During his long career, Shaw drew attention to choral music and came to be considered the "dean" of American choral conductors, mentoring a number of younger conductors—including Jameson Marvin, Margaret Hillis, Maurice Casey, Ken Clinton, Donald Neuen, and Ann Howard Jones—and inspiring thousands of singers with whom he worked around the United States. His work set new choral standards in the United States, and many of his recordings are considered benchmarks for choral singing.[1] Although his formative years and much of his work occurred before the rise of mainstream interest in informed historic performance practice, his recordings, reflecting his insistence that clearly-projected texts serve as the foundation for musical interpretation, do not sound dated in comparison to more modern efforts by frequently smaller forces. He recorded many of the great choral-orchestral works more than once, and his performances of Handel's Messiah, Bach's Mass in B Minor, Beethoven's Missa Solemnis, Orff’s Carmina Burana, and other similar masterworks remain highly regarded. Jameson Marvin (b. ... Margaret Hillis (October 1, 1921 – February 5, 1998) was an American conductor. ... HANDEL was the code-name for the UKs National Attack Warning System in the Cold War. ... Messiah (HWV 56), is an oratorio by George Frideric Handel based on a libretto by Charles Jennens. ... In music, the BACH motif is the sequence of notes B flat, A, C, B natural. ... The Mass in B Minor (BWV 232) is a work of music by Johann Sebastian Bach. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... Ludwig van Beethovens Missa Solemnis in D Major, Op. ... Carl Orff Carl Orff (July 10, 1895 – March 29, 1982) was a 20th-century German composer, most famous for Carmina Burana (1937). ... This article is about Carl Orffs musical composition based on the medieval collection of poems. ...


Shaw was a champion of modern music from the beginning of his career. He commissioned the newly-naturalized German composer Paul Hindemith to write a requiem for Franklin Roosevelt, who responded with When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd, a setting of the Walt Whitman poem in memory of Abraham Lincoln. Shaw led the premiere of the work in 1946 with the Collegiate Chorale and continued to champion the work well into the last decade of his life.[5] Paul Hindemith aged 28. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), often referred to as FDR, was the 32nd (1933–1945) President of the United States. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wikisource. ... Walter Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist, journalist, and humanist. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...


Shaw recorded for a variety of labels, beginning with a single record for American Decca and numerous releases on RCA Victor during the 78 rpm era. From the late 1970s, most of his recordings appeared on the Telarc label. For that company he led not only the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus but also the Robert Shaw Chamber Singers, which drew its personnel largely from the Atlanta Symphony Chamber Chorus, and the Robert Shaw Festival Singers, a group assembled for Shaw's summer choral workshops in France. His last recording was of Dvořák's Stabat Mater with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, chorus, and soloists. It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ... Telarc International Corporation is a Cleveland, Ohio based independent record label, founded in 1977 by two classically trained musicians and former teachers, Jack Renner and Robert Woods. ... Antonín Leopold Dvořák ( ; September 8, 1841 – May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer of Romantic music, who employed the idioms and melodies of the folk music of his native Bohemiaand Moravia in symphonic, oratorial, chamber and operatic works. ... Mater dolorosa became an iconic type, as in this sixteenth-century Spanish version by Luis de Morales (c. ...


Shaw died in New Haven, Connecticut, of a stroke. This article is about the city in Connecticut. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ...


References

  1. ^ Robert Shaw. Telarc. Retrieved on 2007-09-19.
  2. ^ Singers.com website, Robert Shaw, http://www.singers.com/choral/robertshaw.html
  3. ^ Joseph A. Mussulman (1979). Dear People...Robert Shaw, Hinshaw Music, Inc. ISBN 0-937276-18-9
  4. ^ Nick Jones (1999), The Legacy of Robert Shaw, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra website, http://www.atlantasymphony.org/abouttheaso/legacyofrobertshaw.aspx
  5. ^ Sullivan, Jack (1999-05-16). American Composer's Orchestra, May 16, 1999: Whitman and Music.
  • Robert K. Dean, The Foreign Tours of the Robert Shaw Chorale. Dissertation Abstracts. 2000

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Preceded by
Henry Sopkin
Music Directors, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra
1967–1988
Succeeded by
Yoel Levi

  Results from FactBites:
 
1999-01-27 Conductor Robert Shaw dies at 82 (504 words)
Shaw died in New Haven, Conn., of a stroke.
Shaw and attended the Ontario church where his father was a minister, said singing was in his blood.
Shaw and Stamm attended a discussion by Sigmund Spaeth, a musical theorist who believed that it only took a certain number of notes to make all the music in the world.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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