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Encyclopedia > Robert Schuman
Robert Schuman


In office
September 5, 1948 – September 11, 1948
Preceded by André Marie
Succeeded by Henri Queuille

In office
November 24, 1947 – July 26, 1948
Preceded by Paul Ramadier
Succeeded by André Marie

Born June 29, 1886
Died September 4, 1963
Political party MRP

Robert Schuman (June 29, 1886September 4, 1963) was a noted Luxembourg-born German-French politician, a Christian Democrat (M.R.P.) who is regarded as one of the founders of the European Union. There have been several people named Robert Schumann: Robert Schumann (1810–1856), a German composer of the 19th century. ... German Historic Musem website: http://www. ... The Prime Minister of France (Premier ministre de la France) is the functional head of the Cabinet of France. ... There were several Fourth Republics in the course of history. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... French prime minister André Marie André Marie (1897-1974) was a French Radical politician who served as Prime Minister during the Fourth Republic in 1948. ... Henry Queuille, French prime minister Henri Queuille (1884-1970) was a French Radical politician prominent in governments of the Third and Fourth Republics. ... The Prime Minister of France (Premier ministre de la France) is the functional head of the Cabinet of France. ... There were several Fourth Republics in the course of history. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... French prime minister Paul Ramadier Paul Ramadier (March 17, 1888 - October 14, 1961) was a prominent French Socialist politician of the Third and Fourth Republics. ... French prime minister André Marie André Marie (1897-1974) was a French Radical politician who served as Prime Minister during the Fourth Republic in 1948. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Popular Republican Movement (Mouvement Républicain Populaire or MRP) was a French Christian democratic party of the Fourth Republic. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the country in western Europe. ... Christian Democracy is a political ideology, born at the end of the 19th century, largely as a result of the papal encyclical Rerum Novarum of Pope Leo XIII, in which the Vatican recognizes workers misery and agrees that something should be done about it, in reaction to the rise of... The Popular Republican Movement (Mouvement Républicain Populaire or MRP) was a French Christian democratic party of the Fourth Republic. ...

Contents

Biography

 robert schuman is an artard!!!!!! 

After the death of his mother in a coach accident Schuman may have briefly considered the religious life, but resolved to pursue a lay apostolate. He remained single and celibate throughout his life. He became a lawyer, and was judged medically unfit for military call-up. (He served in a civilian capacity during the First World War and never wore a German uniform.) He was a member of the city council of Metz as well as the German Katholikentag. After the First World War, Alsace-Lorraine was retaken by France and Schuman became active in French politics. In 1919 he was first elected as deputy to parliament on a regional list later serving as the deputy for Thionville until 1958 with an interval during the war years. He had a major contribution to drafting and parliamentary passage of Lex Schuman in French parliament. Schuman investigated and patiently uncovered postwar corruption in Lorraine steel industries. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Imperial Province of Elsaß-Lothringen Alsace-Lorraine (German: , generally Elsass-Lothringen) was a territorial entity created by the German Empire in 1871 after the annexation of most of Alsace and parts of Lorraine in the Franco-Prussian War. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Thionville (German: , Luxembourgish: Diedennuewen), is a town and commune in the Moselle département, in the Lorraine région, France. ... Jan. ...


In 1940, because of his expertise on Germany, Schuman was called to become a member of Paul Reynaud's wartime government. Later that year he was arrested for acts of resistance and protestation at Nazi methods. He was interrogated by the Gestapo. Thanks to an honourable German he was saved from being sent to Dachau.Transferred as a personal prisoner of the vicious Nazi Gauleiter Joseph Buerckel, he escaped in 1942 and joined the French Resistance. Although his life was still at risk he spoke to friends about a Franco-German and European reconciliation that must take place after the end of hostilities, as he had done also in 1939-40. Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The   (contraction of Geheime Staatspolizei: “secret state police”) was the official secret police of Nazi Germany. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Croix de Lorraine, the symbol of the resistance chosen by de Gaulle French Resistance is the name used for resistance movements during World War II which fought the Nazi German occupation of France and the collaborationist Vichy regime. ...

Part of the Politics series on
Christian Democracy For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Christian democracy is a diverse political ideology and movement. ...

Parties

Christian Democratic parties
Christian Democrat International
European People's Party
European Democratic Party
Euro Christian Political Movement
Christian Dem Org of America
This is a list of Christian Democratic parties, i. ... The Christian Democrat International (CDI) was formerly known as the Christian Democrat and Peoples Parties International. ... The European Peoples Party (EPP) is the largest transnational European political party. ... For the eurosceptic informal grouping, see European Democrats. ... The European Christian Political Movement (ECPM) is an European political association for reflection and working on Christian-democratic politics in Europe from an explicit Christian Social view. ... you suck wener and WE THINK THAT UR STUPID WEBSITE SHOULD GO TO HELL ALL OF YOU FOR MAKING US EAT BROCOLLI>>>> WOMAN<<< SALAD FINGERS HAD A TREAT WHILE RUBBING HIS FINGERS ON METAl IT WAS QUITE ORGASMICAL AND FAIRTAILING YOUR ASS BUMM! BOOTOOM DRIBBLING DOWN MY FACE. ...

Ideas

Social conservatism
Social market economy
Sphere sovereignty
Communitarianism
Stewardship
Catholic social teaching
Distributism
Neo-Calvinism
Neo-Thomism
Social conservatism generally refers to a political ideology or personal belief system that advocates the conservation or resurrection of what one, or ones community, considers to be traditional morality and social structure. ... The Social market economy was the German and Austrian economic model during the Cold War era. ... In Neo-Calvinism, sphere sovereignty is the concept that each sphere (or sector) of life has its own distinct responsibilities and authority or competence, and stands equal to other spheres of life. ... Communitarianism as a group of related but distinct philosophies began in the late 20th century, opposing radical individualism, and other similar philosophies while advocating phenomena such as civil society. ... Stewardship is a concept in theology. ... Catholic social teaching comprises those aspects of Catholic doctrine which relate to matters dealing with the collective aspect of humanity. ... Distributism, also known as distributionism and distributivism, is a third-way economic philosophy formulated by such Roman Catholic thinkers as G. K. Chesterton and Hilaire Belloc to apply the principles of social justice articulated by the Roman Catholic Church, especially in Pope Leo XIIIs encyclical Rerum Novarum[1] and... Neo-Calvinism, a form of Dutch Calvinism, is the movement initiated by the theologian and former Dutch prime minister Abraham Kuyper. ... Thomism is the philosophical school that followed in the legacy of Thomas Aquinas. ...

Important documents

Rerum Novarum (1891)
Stone Lectures (Princeton 1898)
Graves de Communi Re (1901)
Quadragesimo Anno (1931)
Laborem Exercens (1981)
Sollicitudi Rei Socialis (1987)
Centesimus Annus (1991)
Rerum Novarum (Translation: Of New Things) is an encyclical issued by Pope Leo XIII on May 15, 1891. ... The steeple of Alexander Hall Princeton Theological Seminary is a theological seminary located in the Borough of Princeton, New Jersey in the United States. ... The steeple of Alexander Hall Princeton Theological Seminary is a theological seminary located in the Borough of Princeton, New Jersey in the United States. ... Graves de Communi Re was an encyclical written by Pope Leo XIII in 1901, on Christian Democracy. ... Quadragesimo Anno is an encyclical by Pope Pius XI, issued 15 May 1931, 40 years after Rerum Novarum (thus the name, Latin for the fortieth year). Written as a response to the Great Depression, it calls for the establishment of a social order based on the principle of subsidiarity. ... Laborem Exercens was an encyclical written by Pope John Paul II in 1981, on human work. ... Sollicitudi Rei Socialis was an encyclical written by Pope John Paul II in 1987, on the twentieth anniversary of Populorum Progressio. ... Centesimus Annus (which is Latin for hundredth year) was an encyclical written by Pope John Paul II in 1991, on the hundredth anniversary of Rerum Novarum. ...

Important figures

Thomas Aquinas · John Calvin
Pope Leo XIII · Abraham Kuyper
Maritain · Adenauer · De Gasperi
Pope Pius XI · Schuman
Pope John Paul II · Kohl
James Skillen Saint Thomas Aquinas, O.P.(also Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino; c. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was a French Protestant theologian during the Protestant Reformation and was a central developer of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism or Reformed theology. ... Pope Leo XIII (March 2, 1810—July 20, 1903), born Vincenzo Gioacchino Raffaele Luigi Pecci, was the 256th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church, reigning from 1878 to 1903, succeeding Pope Pius IX. Reigning until the age of 93, he was the oldest pope, and had the third longest pontificate... Abraham Kuyper (October 29, 1837, Maassluis – November 8, 1920 The Hague; name officially Kuijper) was a Dutch politician, journalist, statesman and theologian. ... Jacques Maritain Jacques Maritain (November 18, 1882 – April 28, 1973) was a French Catholic philosopher. ... For other uses, see Konrad Adenauer (disambiguation). ... Alcide De Gasperi (3 April 1881 – 19 August 1954) was an Italian statesman and politician. ... Pope Pius XI (Latin: ; Italian: Pio XI; May 31, 1857 – February 10, 1939), born Ambrogio Damiano Achille Ratti, reigned as Pope from February 6, 1922 and as sovereign of Vatican City from 1929 until his death on February 10, 1939. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... Helmut Josef Michael Kohl (born April 3, 1930) is a German conservative politician and statesman. ... Dr. James W. Skillen is a Christian theologian and author. ...

Politics Portal · edit

After the war Schuman rose to great prominence. He was Minister of Finance, then twice Prime Minister from 1947–1948. He was part of the Third Force coalition governments which opposed to both the Communists and Gaullists. He became Foreign Minister in the latter year. Schuman's government proposed the creation of a European Assembly, the first government to do so. This proposal saw life as the Council of Europe and was created within the schedule Schuman had set. At the signing of its Statutes at St James's Palace, London, 5 May 1949, the founding States agreed to defining the frontiers of Europe based on the principles of human rights and fundamental freedoms that Schuman enunciated there. In September 1948 as Foreign Minister, he announced before the United Nations General Assembly, France's aim to create a democratic organisation for Europe which a post-Nazi and democratic Germany could join. In 1949-50, he made a series of speeches in Europe and North America about creating a supranational European Community. This structure, he said, would create lasting peace between States. On May 9, 1950,these principles of supranational democracy were announced in a Declaration jointly prepared by Paul Reuter, the legal adviser at the Foreign Ministry, his chef-de Cabinet, Bernard Clappier and Jean Monnet and two of his team.The French Government agreed to the Schuman Declaration which invited the Germans and all other European countries to manage their coal and steel industries jointly and democratically in Europe's first supranational Community with its five foundational institutions. On 18 April 1951 six founder members signed the Treaty of Paris that formed the basis of the European Coal and Steel Community. They declared this date and the corresponding democratic, suprantional principles to be the 'real foundation of Europe'. Three Communities have been created so far. The Treaties of Rome, 1957, created the Economic community and the nuclear non-proliferation Community, Euratom. Together with intergovernmental machinery of later treaties, these eventually evolved into the European Union. The Schuman Declaration, was made on 9 May 1950 and to this day May 9 is designated Europe Day. The Prime Minister of France (Premier ministre de la France) is the functional head of the Cabinet of France. ... The Third Force (Troisième Force) was a French coalition during the Fourth Republic (1947-1958) which gathered the Socialist SFIO party, the UDSR center-right party, the Radicals, the Christian-Democrat Popular Republican Movement (MRP) and other centerist politicians, opposed both to the French Communist Party (PCF) and the... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Charles de Gaulle, in his generals uniform Gaullism (French: Gaullisme) is a French political ideology based on the thought and action of Charles de Gaulle. ... In 1589, the four French Secretaries of State became specialized, with one of the secretaries responsible for foreign affairs. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jean Omer Marie Gabriel Monnet (November 9, 1888 – March 16, 1979) is regarded by many as the architect of European Unity. ... Members of the European Coal and Steel Community Flag of the European Coal and Steel Community The European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) was founded in 1951 (Treaty of Paris), by France, West Germany, Italy, Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands to pool the steel and coal resources of its member... The Quai dOrsay, home of the French Foreign Office. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Council of Europe (COE) has developed a series of European symbols for the continent of Europe, and these have since been shared with the European Union (EU). ...


As Prime Minister and Foreign Minister Schuman was instrumental in the creation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, NATO. Schuman also signed the Treaty of Washington for France.The defensive principles of Nato's Article 5 were also repeated in the European Defence Community Treaty which failed as the French National Assembly declined to vote its ratification. Schuman was a proponent of an Atlantic Community. This was strongly resisted by Communists, ultranationalists and Gaullists.


Schuman later served as Minister of Justice and first President of the European Parliamentary Assembly which bestowed on him by acclamation the title 'Father of Europe'. In 1958 he received the Karlspreis, an Award by the German city of Aachen to people who contributed to the European idea and European peace, commemorating Charlemagne, ruler of what is today France and Germany, who resided and is buried at Aachen. He was also a knight of the Order of Pope Pius IX. Bill Clinton received the Karlspreis in 2000. ... Oche redirects here; in darts the oche is the line from which players must throw. ... Charlemagne (left) and Pippin the Hunchback. ...


Celibate, modest and un-ostentatious, Schuman was an intensely religious man and Bible scholar. He was strongly influenced by the writings of Pope Pius XII, St. Thomas Aquinas and Jacques Maritain. It was announced on 15 May 2004 that the diocesan investigation of the cause of beatification would soon conclude; this might have as its result that Schuman will be declared "Blessed" by the Roman Catholic Church.[citation needed] Pope Pius XII (Latin: ), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (March 2, 1876 – October 9, 1958), reigned as the 260th pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City, from March 2, 1939 until his death. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas, O.P.(also Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino; c. ... Jacques Maritain Jacques Maritain (November 18, 1882 – April 28, 1973) was a French Catholic philosopher. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ...


Miscellaneous

The Schuman District of Brussels (including a metro station, square and railway station) is named in his honour. Around the square ("Rond Point Schuman") can be found various European institutions, including the Berlaymont building which is the headquarters of the European Commission, as well as key European Parliament buildings. A Social Science University named after him lies in Strasbourg, France. For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ... Exterior open entrance to a metro station (Tribunal station in Madrid) A metro station is a railway station for a rapid transit system, often known by names such as metro and subway. It is often underground or elevated. ... A town square is an open area commonly found in the heart of a traditional town used for community gatherings. ... Passengers bustle around the typical grand edifice of Londons Broad Street station in 1865. ... The Berlaymont building is an important governmental building in Brussels, Belgium. ... Berlaymont, the Commissions seat The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive branch of the European Union. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... For other uses, see Strasburg. ...


In Luxembourg there are:

Schuman's place of birth house was restored by the European Parliament and can be visited; as can his home in Scy-Chazelle just outside Metz. The N51 is a road in Luxembourg City, in southern Luxembourg. ...


Schuman's First Government, November 24 1947 – July 26 1948

  • Robert Schuman - President of the Council
  • Georges Bidault - Minister of Foreign Affairs
  • Pierre-Henri Teitgen - Minister of National Defense
  • Jules Moch - Minister of the Interior
  • René Mayer - Minister of Finance and Economic Affairs
  • Robert Lacoste - Minister of Commerce and Industry
  • Daniel Mayer - Minister of Labour and Social Security
  • André Marie - Minister of Justice
  • Marcel Edmond Naegelen - Minister of National Education
  • François Mitterrand - Minister of Veterans and War Victims
  • Pierre Pflimlin - Minister of Agriculture
  • Paul Coste-Floret - Minister of Overseas France
  • Christian Pineau - Minister of Public Works and Transport
  • Germaine Poinso-Chapuis - Minister of Public Health and Population
  • René Coty - Minister of Reconstruction and Town Planning

Changes Georges Bidault, French statesman Georges-Augustin Bidault (October 5, 1899 – January 27, 1983) was a French politician and active in the French Resistance and Organisation de lArmée Secrète (OAS). ... Pierre-Henri Teitgen was born in Rennes on May 29th, 1908 and died on April, 6th 1997 in Paris . ... Jules Moch , a French politician, was born in Paris on March 15, 1893 and died on August 1, 1985 in Cabris (Alpes-Maritimes). ... René Mayer, French prime minister René Mayer (1895-1972) was a French Radical politician of the Fourth Republic who served briefly as Prime Minister during 1953. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Daniel Mayer (1909-1996) was a member of the French Socialist Party. ... French prime minister André Marie André Marie (1897-1974) was a French Radical politician who served as Prime Minister during the Fourth Republic in 1948. ...   IPA: (October 26, 1916 – January 8, 1996) served as President of France from 1981 to 1995, elected as representative of the Socialist Party (PS). ... Pierre Pflimlin (February 5, 1907 in Roubaix - June 27, 2000 in Strasbourg) was a French Christian Democratic politician who served as the penultimate Prime Minister of the Fourth Republic for a few weeks in 1958, before being replaced by Charles de Gaulle during the crisis of that year. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline for Biographies. ... Christian Pineau, French resistance leader and statesman Christian Pineau (October 14, 1904 - April 5, 1995) was a noted French Resistance fighter. ... French statesman René Coty René-Jules-Gustave Coty (March 20, 1882 - November 22, 1962) was President of France from 1954 to 1959. ...

  • February 12, 1948 - Édouard Depreux succeeds Naegelen as Minister of National Education.

is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Edouard Depreux was a French politician in the 1950s. ...

Schuman's Second Government, September 5 1948 – September 11 1948

  • Robert Schuman - President of the Council and Minister of Foreign Affairs
  • René Mayer - Minister of National Defense
  • André Marie - Vice President of the Council
  • Jules Moch - Minister of the Interior
  • Christian Pineau - Minister of Finance and Economic Affairs
  • Robert Lacoste - Minister of Commerce and Industry
  • Daniel Mayer - Minister of Labour and Social Security
  • Robert Lecourt - Minister of Justice
  • Tony Revillon - Minister of National Education
  • Jules Catoire - Minister of Veterans and War Victims
  • Pierre Pflimlin - Minister of Agriculture
  • Paul Coste-Floret - Minister of Overseas France
  • Henri Queuille - Minister of Public Works, Transport, and Tourism
  • Pierre Schneiter - Minister of Public Health and Population
  • René Coty - Minister of Reconstruction and Town Planning
Preceded by
Emmanuel Temple
Minister of Justice
1955–1956
Succeeded by
François Mitterand
Preceded by
Paul Ramadier
Prime Minister of France
1947–1948
Succeeded by
André Marie
Preceded by
André Marie
Prime Minister of France
1948
Succeeded by
Henri Queuille

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The President of the European Parliament oversees all the activities of the European Parliament and its constituent bodies. ... Paul-Henri Charles Spaak   listen? (January 25, 1899 - July 31, 1972) was a Belgian Socialist politician and statesman. ... Alcide De Gasperi (3 April 1881 – 19 August 1954) was an Italian statesman and politician. ... Giuseppe Pella (April 18, 1902-1981) was an Italian Christian Democratic politician who served as Prime Minister of Italy from 1953 to 1954. ... Hans Furler (b. ... Hans Furler (b. ... Gaetano Martino (Messina, November 25, 1900 - Rome, July 21, 1967) was an Italian politician and university teacher. ... Jean Duvieusart (10 April 1900 - 10 October 1977) was a Belgian Catholic politician and minister of finance (1947-1950, 1952-1954). ... Victor Leemans (21 July 1901, Stekene - 3 March 1971, Leuven) was a Belgian (Flemish) sociologist, politician and a prominent ideologist of the radical Flemish movement in the 1930s. ... Alain Poher (17 April 1909 - 9 December 1996) was a French politician. ... Mario Scelba (1901-1991) was an Italian Christian Democratic politician who served as Prime Minister of Italy from 1954-1955. ... Walter Behrendt (September 18, 1914 in Dortmund - July 23, 1997) was a German politician of SPD and president of the European parliament (1971-1973). ... Cornelis Berkhouwer was a Dutch-European politician who was born on 1919-03-19 in Alkmaar, Netherlands. ... Georges Spénale (1913 - 20 August 1983) is a French writer, poet and politician. ... Emilio Colombo (born April 11, 1920) is an Italian diplomat and politician. ... Simone Veil Simone Veil (born Simone Annie Jacob, July 13, 1927) is a French lawyer and politician who currently serves as a member of the Constitutional Council of France. ... Piet Dankert (January 8, 1934 - June 21, 2003) was a Dutch politician, a member of the Partij van de Arbeid. ... Pierre Pflimlin (February 5, 1907 in Roubaix - June 27, 2000 in Strasbourg) was a French Christian Democratic politician who served as the penultimate Prime Minister of the Fourth Republic for a few weeks in 1958, before being replaced by Charles de Gaulle during the crisis of that year. ... Charles Henry Plumb, Baron Plumb (born March 27, 1925) is a British Conservative politician and farmers leader. ... Enrique Barón Crespo (born March 27, 1944, Madrid) is a Spanish politician and lawyer. ... Dr. Egon Alfred Klepsch (born January 30, 1930 in Bodenbach an der Elbe, Sudetenland) is a German politician (CDU). ... Klaus Hänsch (born December 15, 1938 in Sprottau) is a German Politician. ... José María Gil-Robles (June 17, 1935 in Madrid) is a Spanish politician. ... Nicole Fontaine (born 16 January 1942) is a French politician and Member of the European Parliament for the ÃŽle-de-France. ... Pat Cox during a discussion at the 2004 Karlspreis ceremonies Pat Cox (born 28 November 1952) is an Irish politician and former television current affairs presenter. ... Josep Borrell Josep Borrell Fontelles (born April 24, 1947) is a Spanish politician. ... Hans-Gert Pöttering (often written as Poettering; born September 15, 1945 in Bersenbrück, Lower Saxony) is a German conservative politician (CDU), and has been President of the European Parliament since January 2007. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Robert Schuman at AllExperts (1006 words)
Robert Schuman (June 29 1886 &ndash; September 4 1963) was a noted Luxembourg-born French politician, a Christian Democrat (M.R.P.) who is regarded as one of the founders of the European Union.
Robert's mother, Eugénie Duren (1864–1911), a Luxembourgian lady born in Bettembourg, became German by marriage in 1884.
Schuman's pursued his secondary education at the Athénée de Luxembourg secondary school in Luxembourg, a former Jesuit College, but as the Luxembourg secondary school diploma was not valid in Germany, he had to pass for his Abitur in Metz.
Robert Schuman (682 words)
Robert Schuman (June 29, 1886 - September 4, 1963) was a noted German-born French politician, a Christian Democrat (M.R.P.) who with Jean Monnet is regarded as one of the founders of the European Union.
Robert's mother, Eugénie Duren (1864-1911), a Luxembourgois born in Bettembourg, became German by marriage in 1884.
Schuman's pursued his secondary education at the Athénée de Luxembourg secondary school in Luxembourg, a former Jesuit College, where the Luxembourg secondary school diploma was not valid in Germany and he had to sit for the Abitur in Metz.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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