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Encyclopedia > Robert Reich

Robert Bernard Reich (born June 24, 1946) was the twenty-second United States Secretary of Labor, serving under President Bill Clinton from 1993 to 1997. Reich is a former Harvard University professor and the former Maurice B. Hexter Professor of Social and Economic Policy at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. He is currently a professor at the University of California, Berkeley's Goldman School of Public Policy. Mr. Reich is also on the board of directors of Tutor.com He is a trustee of the Economists for Peace and Security. He is an occasional political commentator, notably on Hardball with Chris Matthews. is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Secretary of Labor is the head of the United States Department of Labor. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The Heller School for Social Policy and Management is one of the graduate schools of Brandeis University. ... Usen Castle, the most recognized building on campus Brandeis University is a private university located in Waltham, Massachusetts, United States. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... The Richard and Rhoda Goldman School of Public Policy (GSPP) is one of 14 schools and colleges at the University of California, Berkeley. ... Hardball with Chris Matthews is a talk show on MSNBC broadcast weekdays at 5 and 7 PM hosted by Chris Matthews. ...

The official portrait of Robert Reich hangs in the Department of Labor
The official portrait of Robert Reich hangs in the Department of Labor

Contents

Image File history File linksMetadata Rbreich. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Rbreich. ...

Early life and career

Reich was born in Scranton, Pennsylvania, in 1946. He grew up in the suburban community of South Salem, New York, where his father owned a clothing store. Reich was born with Fairbanks disease, a rare genetic disorder which affects bone ossification, which is the cause of his short stature (four feet, 10.5 inches): were he half an inch shorter, he would meet the medical definition of dwarfism.) The City of Scranton is the county seat of Lackawanna CountyGR6 in Northeastern Pennsylvania, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 76,415 (2003 estimate: 74,320). ... South Salem is a hamlet in Lewisboro, Westchester County, New York. ... Fairbanks disease or multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is a rare genetic disorder (dominant form--1 in 10,000 births) which affects the growing ends of bones. ... A rare disease (sometimes known as an orphan disease) has such a low prevalence in a population that a doctor in a busy general practice would not expect to see more than one case a year. ... A genetic disorder is a disease caused by abnormalities in genes or chromosomes. ... Grays Anatomy illustration of a human femur. ... Ossification is the process of bone formation, in which connective tissues, such as cartilage are turned to bone or bone-like tissue. ... see dwarf, and for insular dwarfism and other meanings see Dwarf (disambiguation). ...


Reich attended Dartmouth College, where he was involved in numerous campus activities and was a member of Casque and Gauntlet and the staff of the Dartmouth Jack-O-Lantern humor magazine. He graduated in 1968, and won a Rhodes Scholarship, earning a Master of Arts degree from University College, Oxford. He later attended Yale Law School, receiving his J.D. in 1973. Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... Casque and Gauntlet (also known as C&G) is one of eight senior societies at Dartmouth College. ... The Dartmouth Jack OLantern (sometimes spelled Jack-O-Lantern) was founded at Dartmouth College in 1908. ... Many colleges and universities publish satirical journals conventionally referred to as humor magazines. ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A B.A. issued as a certificate A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... College name University College Collegium Magnae Aulae Universitatis Named after Established 1249 Sister College Trinity Hall Master Lord Butler of Brockwell JCR President Peter Surr Undergraduates 420 MCR President Monte MacDiarmid Graduates 144 Homepage Boatclub Crest of University College, Oxford University College (in full, the The Master and Fellows of... The Sterling Law Building Sculptural ornamentation on the Sterling Law Building Yale Law School, or YLS, is the law school of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Doctor of Law, Doctor of Jurisprudence, or Juris Doctor (abbreviated J.D. or JD, from the Latin, Teacher of Law) is a professional degree in law offered by universities in a number of countries. ...


For more than 20 years, he lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts with his wife, Clare Dalton, a law professor at Northeastern University who started and runs Northeastern's Center on Domestic Violence. Reich now lives in Berkeley, California. He has two sons, Sam and Adam. Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... Northeastern University, occasionally abbreviated as NU or NEU, is a top-tier private research university in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Berkeley is a city on the east shore of San Francisco Bay in northern California, in the United States. ...


He has worked as a faculty member at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, director of Policy Planning Staff of the Federal Trade Commission under President Carter, assistant to the Solicitor General under President Ford, and former chairman of the political magazine The American Prospect, which he co-founded. He was also one of the original founders of the Economic Policy Institute in 1986. He was part of the online faculty of the Western Behavioral Sciences Institute (WBSI) in the late 1980s. Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... John F. Kennedy School of Government The John F. Kennedy School of Government is a public policy school and one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... FTC headquarters, Washington, D.C. The Federal Trade Commission (or FTC) is an independent agency of the United States government, established in 1914 by the Federal Trade Commission Act. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... The United States Solicitor General is the individual appointed to argue for the Government of the United States in front of the Supreme Court of the United States, when the government is party to a case. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... The American Prospect is a monthly magazine which focuses on US politics and public policy. ... The Economic Policy Institute or EPI is a progressive United States think tank based in Washington, D.C. and concerned with, as its name implies, the formulation of economic policy. ... The Western Behavioral Sciences Institute, known as WBSI, was founded in 1958, in La Jolla, California, as an independent, nonprofit organization devoted to research, education and advanced study in human affairs. ...


In 1992 Reich hosted the PBS documentary miniseries Made In America, which took an in-depth look at the then-current difficulties of American manufacturing in the face of stiff competition from overseas, particularly Japan, and what American companies could do to become more competitive. Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ...


Serving in Clinton administration

A longtime friend of Bill and Hillary Clinton, going back to their days together at Oxford and Yale Law School respectively, he was invited to head Clinton's economic transition team. He later joined the administration as Secretary of Labor. During his tenure, he implemented the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), fought sweatshops, successfully promoted increasing the minimum wage, improved workplace safety, successfully lobbied to pass the Pension Protection Act and the School-to-Work Jobs Act, and launched a number of job training programs. William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... The Sterling Law Building Sculptural ornamentation on the Sterling Law Building Yale Law School, or YLS, is the law school of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. ... The United States Secretary of Labor is the head of the United States Department of Labor. ... The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (Public Law 103-3, enacted February 5, 1993) was one of the first major new laws enacted by United States President Bill Clinton in his first term, fulfilling a campaign promise. ...


At the same time, he lobbied Clinton to address bigger societal issues, and pushed for improvement of conditions for those in poverty. He had moderate success until the 1996 presidential campaign began, when Clinton, heeding the advice of political advisor Dick Morris, shifted right and promoted policies designed to appeal to the suburban swing voter as understood by Morris. Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Dick Morris (born November 28, 1948 in New York City) is an American political author, newspaper columnist, and commentator who previously worked as a pollster, political campaign consultant, and general political consultant. ...


In addition, Reich used the office as a platform for focusing the nation's attention on the need for American workers to adapt to the new economy. He advocated that the country provide more opportunities for workers to learn more technology, and predicted the shrinkage of the middle class due to a gap between unskilled and highly skilled workers.


After the Clinton administration

In 1997, soon after Clinton's second inauguration, he decided to leave the department to spend more time with his sons, then in their teen years. He published his experiences working for the Clinton administration in Locked in the Cabinet. The memoir was criticized for factual inaccuracies and was revised in the paperback edition. (See links below.)


Reich became a professor at Brandeis University, teaching courses for undergraduates as well as in the Heller School for Social Policy and Management. In 2003, he was elected the Professor of the Year by the undergraduate student body. Usen Castle, the most recognized building on campus Brandeis University is a private university located in Waltham, Massachusetts, United States. ... The Heller School for Social Policy and Management is one of the graduate schools of Brandeis University. ...


In 2002, he ran for Governor of Massachusetts. He also published an associated campaign book, I'll Be Short. Reich was the first Democratic candidate for a major political office to support same-sex marriage. He also pledged support for abortion rights, and strongly condemned capital punishment. His campaign staff was largely made up of his Brandeis students. Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... International recognition Civil unions and Domestic partnerships Recognized in some regions Unregistered co-habitation Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      Same-sex marriage is a term for a governmentally, socially, or religiously recognized... The morality and legality of abortion are controversial topics. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ...


Although his campaign had little funding, he surprised many and came in second in the Democratic primary with 25% of the vote. The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ...


In 2003, he was awarded the prestigious Vaclav Havel Vision Foundation Prize, by the former Czech president, for his writings in economics and politics. In 2001 Reich received a LL.D. from Bates College. Václav Havel [VAWTS-lav HA-vel] (born October 5, 1936) is a Czech writer and dramatist. ... Bates College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1855 by abolitionists, located in Lewiston, Maine, in the United States. ...


In 2004, he published Reason, a handbook on how liberals can forcefully argue for their position in a country increasingly dominated by what he calls "radcons", or radical conservatives. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In addition to his professorial role, he is a weekly contributor to the American Public Media public radio program Marketplace, and a regular columnist for the American Prospect. American Public Media logo American Public Media is the brand under which Minnesota Public Radio distributes public radio programming outside of the state of Minnesota. ... Public broadcasting (also known as public service broadcasting or PSB) is the dominant form of broadcasting around the world, where radio, television, and potentially other electronic media outlets receive funding from the public. ... Marketplace is a radio program that focuses on business, the economy, and events that influence them. ... The American Prospect is a monthly magazine which focuses on US politics and public policy. ...


In September 2005 he testified against John Roberts at his confirmation hearings for Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in September September 28 : Constance Baker Motley September 25 : M. Scott Peck September 25 : Don Adams September 20 : Simon Wiesenthal September 14 : Robert Wise September 10 : Hermann Bondi September 8 : Donald Horne September 7 : Moussa Arafat... John Glover Roberts Jr. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States...


He was a featured speaker in the May 2007 commencement for Pacific Lutheran University, held in the Tacoma Dome. May 2007 is the fifth month of that year. ... The university is located near Tacoma, Washington Pacific Lutheran University is located in the Parkland suburb of Tacoma, Washington. ... The Tacoma Dome (constructed by Tacoma Dome Associates, led by McGranahan Messenger Architects a design build enity) is an indoor arena located in Tacoma, Washington, USA. Completed in 1983 for $44 millon and opened on April 21, the arena seats 17,100 for basketball. ...


Trivia

  • A selection from his book Locked in the Cabinet is featured in The Lanahan Readings in the American Polity, Fourth Edition
  • He made his first video blog (vblog) debut on Vimeo.com on March 7, 2007 where he revealed he dated Hillary Clinton while in university.

Late Night with Conan OBrien is an American late night talk show on NBC that is also syndicated worldwide. ... This article is about CNBC U.S., the business news channel in the U.S.. For other uses, see CNBC (disambiguation). ... Kudlow & Company is a news television program about U.S. business and politics hosted by Lawrence Kudlow that airs on the CNBC U.S. television channel at 5 PM ET since 2005-02-14. ... A video blog, sometimes shortened to vlog,[1][2][3] is a blog that comprises video. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ...

Books

  • 2004: Reason: Why Liberals Will Win the Battle for America ISBN 1-4000-7660-9
  • 2002: I'll Be Short: Essentials for a Decent Working Society ISBN 0-8070-4340-0
  • 2000: The Future of Success: Working and Living in the New Economy ISBN 0-375-72512-1
  • 1997: Locked in the Cabinet ISBN 0-375-70061-7
  • 1991: The Work of Nations: Preparing Ourselves for 21st Century Capitalism ISBN 0-679-73615-8
    probably his most important work, it has been translated into at least 22 languages
  • 1990: Public Management in a Democratic Society ISBN 0-13-738881-0
  • 1988: The Power of Public Ideas (editor) ISBN 0-674-69590-9
  • 1989: The Resurgent Liberal: And Other Unfashionable Prophecies ISBN 0-8129-1833-9
  • 1987: Tales of a New America: The Anxious Liberal's Guide to the Future ISBN 0-394-75706-8
  • 1985: New Deals: The Chrysler Revival and the American System (with John Donahue) ISBN 0-14-008983-7
  • 1983: The Next American Frontier ISBN 0-8129-1067-2
  • 1982: Minding America's Business: The Decline and Rise of the American Economy (with Ira Magaziner) ISBN 0-394-71538-1

Ira Magaziner (born November 8, 1947?[1]) was an aide to President Clinton and later became his chief Internet policy advisor. ...

See also

The Trap (TV Documentary Series) Reich features in "The Trap", a BBC documentary. The Trap: What Happened to Our Dream of Freedom is a BBC documentary series by British filmmaker Adam Curtis, well known for other documentaries including The Century of the Self and The Power of Nightmares. ...


References

External links

Preceded by
Lynn Morley Martin
United States Secretary of Labor
Served Under: Bill Clinton

1993—1997
Succeeded by
Alexis Herman
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Robert Reich

  Results from FactBites:
 
Robert Reich - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1133 words)
Robert Bernard Reich (born June 24, 1946) was the twenty-second United States Secretary of Labor, serving under President Bill Clinton from 1993 to 1997.
Reich is formerly a University Professor and Maurice B. Hexter Professor of Social and Economic Policy at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University, and he is currently a professor at the University of California, Berkeley's Goldman School of Public Policy.
Robert Reich was born in Scranton, Pennsylvania in 1946, and grew up in the suburban community of South Salem, New York State, where his father owned a clothing store.
Robert Reich / Biography (376 words)
Reich continues his research into the causes and consequences of widening inequality in the United States and in other nations, and into the future of work.
Reich will establish a Center on Jobs, the Economy and Society based at Brandeis university's Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare, continuing the work that has filled his career, first at Harvard University and later in the Cabinet.
Reich lives in Cambridge, Mass., with his wife, Professor Clare Dalton an associate dean at Northeastern University Law School in Boston, and their two sons, Adam and Sam aged 12 and 15.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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