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Encyclopedia > Robert Novak

Robert David Sanders Novak (born February 26, 1931) is a conservative American political commentator and journalist. Over his career, Bob Novak has become well-known as a columnist (writing Inside Report since 1963) and as a television personality (appearing on many shows for CNN, most notably on three former programs, The Capital Gang, Crossfire, and Evans, Novak, Hunt, and Shields). His memoirs entitled Prince of Darkness: Fifty Years Reporting in Washington were published in July 2007 by Crown Forum, a division of Random House. "Prince of Darkness" was a nickname given Novak by his friend, the reporter John Lindsay, because he thought for a young man, [Novak] took a very dim view of the prospects for our civilization."[1] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 707 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,980 × 1,680 pixels, file size: 830 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 707 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,980 × 1,680 pixels, file size: 830 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... A celebrity is a person who is widely recognized in a society. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... ... December 6, 2004 edition of Crossfire. ... Rowland Evans (?? - 2001) is an American journalist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ...

Contents

Early years

Novak was born into a Jewish family in Joliet, Illinois. His journalism career began when he wrote for the Joliet Herald-News, his hometown newspaper. The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Incorporated City in 1834. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ...


After high school, he attended the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign from 1948-1952. However, after four years, he was one course short of graduating, and he left the university to become a full-time journalist. (Novak did not receive an actual college degree until some forty years later, when the University awarded him sufficient credits from his work in journalism to qualify for a degree, and he finally bacame an Illini alumnus.) While attending U of I, he became a brother of Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity. He continued gaining journalism experience at The Daily Illini (the DI is the University's student newspaper), where he was a leading sportswriter. However, his disappointment at not being named Sports Editor his senior year caused him the quit the DI and go to work for The Champaign-Urbana Courier, also as a sportswriter. A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi) is currently the only international Jewish college fraternity in North America, with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... The Daily Illini is an independent, student-run newspaper published for the community of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ...


During the Korean War, Novak served in the U.S. Army, attaining the rank of lieutenant. After the war, he joined the Associated Press and became a political correspondent in Indianapolis. In 1957, Novak was transferred to Washington, D.C. where he reported on Congress; he left the AP to join the D.C. bureau of The Wall Street Journal in 1958, covering the Senate, and in 1961 becoming their chief congressional correspondent. Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... This article is about the use of the term rank. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Congress in Joint Session. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... Jan. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States...


In 1963, he teamed up with Rowland Evans to create the "Evans-Novak Political Report" until Evans died of cancer in 2001. Novak's column is syndicated by the Chicago Sun-Times. His columns often contain original reporting in addition to analysis and opinion. For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Rowland Evans (?? - 2001) is an American journalist. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ...


Novak is one of many reporters mentioned in Timothy Crouse's seminal non-fiction book about reporters covering the 1972 U.S. presidential campaign, The Boys on the Bus. Son of Russel Crouse and brother of Lindsay Crouse, Timothy Crouse is the author of The Boys on the Bus, a largely critical look at the journalists who covered the 1972 US presidential campaign. ... Boys on the Bus (1973) is author Timothy Crouses seminal non-fiction book detailing life on the road for reporters covering the United States 1972 presidential campaign. ...


Personal life

Novak's wife Geraldine, was a secretary for President Lyndon Johnson. They have a son, Alex, who works as an editor at Regnery Publishing[2]. Unfit for Command, published by Regnery Publishing. ...


Political and religious views

Novak is a registered Democrat despite his right-leaning views. He held more centrist views in his early career; indeed, he supported the Democratic presidential candidacies of John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, of whom he was a friend.[2] Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... LBJ redirects here. ...


Today, Novak tends toward low-tax small-government conservative views, but his disagreements with mainstream Republicans and neoconservatives — specifically his opposition to the Iraq War — have earned him the label of being a "paleoconservative." Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In July 2007 Novak expressed support for Ron Paul's bid for the presidency.[3] Ronald Ernest Paul (born August 20, 1935) is a 10th-term United States congressman from Lake Jackson, Texas, a member of the Republican Party, a pro-life physician, and a candidate for the Republican nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ...


Born Jewish, Novak converted to Catholicism in 1996, after meeting Peter Vaghi, whom he had known before Fr. Vaghi switched from politics to the priesthood. Catholic Church redirects here. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The Reverend Monsignor Peter Vaghi is an American Roman Catholic priest and former lawyer. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... A priesthood is a body of priests, shamans, or oracles who are thought to have special religious authority or function. ...


CIA leak scandal

In 2003, he identified Valerie Plame as a CIA "operative" in his column. Novak reported the information was provided to him by two "senior administration officials." These were eventually revealed to be Richard Armitage, with Novak assuming Karl Rove's comments as confirmation.[4] During 2005, there were questions in the press regarding the apparent absence of focus on Novak by the special prosecutor Fitzgerald and the grand jury, specifically questions suggesting he may have already testified about his sources despite insisting publicly that he would not do so. On July 12, 2006, Novak published a column at Human Events stating: The Plame Affair began in July 2002 when journalist Robert Novak wrote a column revealing that Valerie Plame, the wife of former United States Ambassador Joseph C. Wilson, was an operative of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency who worked on weapons of mass destruction issues. ... The CIA leak scandal (sometimes known as the Plame affair) (cf. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Valerie Elise Plame Wilson (born Valerie Elise Plame 19 April 1963, in Anchorage, Alaska), known as Valerie Plame, Valerie E. Wilson, and Valerie Plame Wilson, is a former United States CIA officer who worked as a classified covert intelligence agent for over twenty years and the wife of former Ambassador... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Richard L. Armitage Richard Lee Armitage (born April 26, 1945) was the 13th United States Deputy Secretary of State, the second-in-command at the State Department, serving from 2001 to 2005, Previously, he was a high-ranking troubleshooter and negotiator in the Departments of State and Defense. ... Karl Christian Rove (born December 25, 1950) is Deputy Chief of Staff to President George W. Bush until the end of August 2007. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A special prosecutor is a lawyer from outside the government appointed by the attorney general or Congress to investigate a federal official for misconduct while in office. ... Patrick J. Fitzgerald (born December 22, 1960) is an American attorney and the current United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois. ... In the American common law legal system, a grand jury is a type of jury which determines if there is enough evidence for a trial. ...

Special Prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald has informed my attorneys that, after two and one-half years, his investigation of the CIA leak case concerning matters directly relating to me has been concluded. That frees me to reveal my role in the federal inquiry that, at the request of Fitzgerald, I have kept secret. I have cooperated in the investigation while trying to protect journalistic privileges under the First Amendment and shield sources who have not revealed themselves. I have been subpoenaed by and testified to a federal grand jury. Published reports that I took the Fifth Amendment, made a plea bargain with the prosecutors or was a prosecutorial target were all untrue.[5]

When Richard Armitage admitted to being a source, Novak wrote an op-ed column describing Armitage's self-disclosure as "deceptive."[6] “First Amendment” redirects here. ... A subpoena is a command to appear at a certain time and place to give testimony upon a certain matter. ... In American criminal law, taking the fifth is the act of refusing to testify under oath in a court of law or any other tribunal (such as a Congressional committee) on the grounds that the answers that would be given could be used as evidence against the witness to convict... A plea bargain (also plea agreement, plea deal or copping a plea) is an agreement in a criminal case in which a prosecutor and a defendant arrange to settle the case against the defendant. ...


Killian documents

Main articles: Killian documents, George W. Bush military service controversy

Critics complain that Novak has been inconsistent as he insists it would violate journalistic ethics to reveal the source of the Plame leak, but later called on CBS to reveal the source of the memos that were part of the larger news story dealing with the president's alleged evasion of National Guard service. Other journalists have insisted that the CBS sources lost their right to confidentiality when the memos were proven to be forgeries. One of the Killian documents. ... 1st Lt. ... Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... The Plame affair (also known as the CIA leak scandal or the CIA leak case) is a political controversy in the United States, involving high-level officials of the George W. Bush administration and members of the media, and resulting in a federal grand jury investigation, a criminal trial, and... This article is about the broadcast network. ... It has been suggested that Attribution (journalism) be merged into this article or section. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The United States National Guard is a reserve forces component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). ...


Swift Boat Veterans

In August 2004, after other journalists had reported on it, Novak admitted that his son, Alex Novak, is the Director of Marketing for the Swift Boat Veterans' publisher, Regnery Publishing. At the time he said that he didn't "think it relevant." Two months later Salon.com reported that Regnery's owner is also the publisher of Novak's own US$297 (annual rate) newsletter and that Novak is on the board of a foundation whose chief holdings are the stock of Regnery's parent company.[7] Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Swift Vets and POWs for Truth, formerly known as the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth (SBVT), is an organization of American Swift boat veterans and former prisoners of war of the Vietnam War, formed during the 2004 presidential election campaign for the purpose of opposing John Kerrys bid for... Unfit for Command, published by Regnery Publishing. ... Salon. ...

Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ...

Israeli-Palestinian conflict

Novak has been accused of anti-Israel bias[8]. In his syndicated column, Novak has blamed Israel for the plight and mass exodus of Palestinian Christians. He has also met with Hamas Education Minister Naser al-Shaer. Based on this meeting, Novak claimed that Hamas supports a two-state solution, something which the Hamas Covenant explicitly forbids. Novak praised former president Jimmy Carter in asserting that there is "apartheid" in Israel.[9] Palestinian Christians make up 6% of the worlds Palestinian population, according to Bernard Sabella. ... Hamas (; acronym: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement,[1]) is a Palestinian Islamic militant organization and political party. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ...


Animal fighting

In 2002, Novak's attitudes towards animal welfare came under scrutiny when he stated in an interview that he attended a cockfight in Puerto Rico and "enjoyed it tremendously", adding that the United States has "too many" anti-cruelty statutes. He also expressed his support of dog fighting and bullfighting.[10] Animal welfare is the viewpoint that animals, especially those under human care, should not suffer unnecessarily, including where the animals are used for food, work, companionship, or research. ... The Cock Fight by Jean-Léon Gérôme (1847) Training for a cockfight in Hell-Bourg, Réunion A cockfight is a blood sport between two specially trained roosters held in a ring called a cockpit. ... Two dogs fighting Dog fighting is a physical fight between canines, sometimes involving the pitting of two dogs against each other for the entertainment of spectators, and for the purpose of gambling. ... Bullfighting, Edouard Manet, 1865-1866. ...


Amnesty, Abortion and Acid

On April 25, 1972, George McGovern won the Massachusetts primary and journalist Bob Novak phoned Democratic politicians around the country, who agreed with his assessment that blue-collar workers voting for McGovern did not understand what he really stood for.[11] On April 27, 1972 Novak reported in a column that an unnamed democratic senator had talked to him about McGovern.[12] "The people don’t know McGovern is for amnesty, abortion and legalization of pot," the Senator said.[12] "Once middle America - Catholic middle America, in particular - finds this out, he’s dead."[12] The label stuck and McGovern became known as the candidate of "amnesty, abortion and acid."[11][13] is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert David Novak (born February 26, 1931) is a U.S. conservative columnist (Inside Report, since 1963; until 1993 co-written with Rowland Evans) who is also well known as a television personality, appearing on programs like CNNs Capital Gang or Crossfire or NBCs Meet the Press. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Novak was accused of manufacturing the quote.[12] To rebut the criticism, Novak took the senator to lunch after the campaign and asked whether he could identify him as the source.[12] The senator said he would not allow his identity to be revealed.[12] "Oh, he had to run for re-election", said Novak.[11] The McGovernites would kill him if they knew he had said that." Novak added.[11]


On July 15, 2007, Novak disclosed on Meet the Press that the unnamed senator was Thomas Eagleton.[11] Political analyst Bob Shrum says that Eagleton would never have been selected as McGovern's running mate if it had been known at the time that Eagleton was the source of the quote.[11] "Boy, do I wish he would have let you publish his name. Then he never would have been picked as vice president," said Shrum.[11] "Because the two things, the two things that happened to George McGovern—two of the things that happened to him—were the label you put on him, number one, and number two, the Eagleton disaster. We had a messy convention, but he could have, I think in the end, carried eight or 10 states, remained politically viable. And Eagleton was one of the great train wrecks of all time."[11] is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Meet the Press (MTP) is a weekly television news show produced by NBC. It started as a radio show in 1945 as American Mercury Presents: Meet the Press, originating from WRC-AM in Washington. ... Robert M. Bob Shrum, (born 1943) is an American political consultant. ...


Eagleton died March 4, 2007, "relieving me of the need to conceal his identity," Novak wrote.[12] Some of Eagleton’s former aides are livid angry Eagleton never authorized his name to be attached to a quote that makes Eagleton look duplicitous.[12] Asked about the story, Novak acknowledged that disclosing Eagleton’s identity was "a judgment on my part."[12] If there’s any disagreement, Eagleton could settle it with him in heaven "or wherever we end up," Novak added.[12]


Clinton-Obama column

In November 2007, Novak claimed "Agents of Sen. Hillary Clinton are spreading the word in Democratic circles that she has scandalous information about her principal opponent for the party's presidential nomination, Sen. Barack Obama, but has decided not to use it." Obama responded by stating, "She of all people, having complained so often about 'the politics of personal destruction,' should move quickly to either stand by or renounce these tactics." Clinton's campaign replied, "A Republican-leaning journalist runs a blind item designed to set Democrats against one another. Experienced Democrats see this for what it is. Others get distracted and thrown off their games. We have no idea what Mr. Novak's item is about and reject it totally."[14] REDIRECT Hillary Rodham Clinton   This is a redirect from a title with another method of capitalisation. ... “Barack” redirects here. ...


2005 Inside Politics incident and departure from CNN

On August 4, 2005, Novak walked off the set during a live broadcast of the CNN show Inside Politics, on which he appeared along with Democratic strategist and analyst James Carville (whom Novak had debated with for years on Crossfire), and moderator Ed Henry. is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Carville James Carville (born October 25, 1944) is an American political consultant, commentator, media personality and pundit. ...


During a discussion of Republican Representative Katherine Harris's just-announced 2006 campaign for the U.S. Senate and her claim that newspapers tried to tarnish her image by manipulating photos of her, Novak claimed he had experienced the same thing leading to a skeptical response from Carville. Katherine Harris (born April 5, 1957, Key West, Florida) is a former Secretary of State of Florida and member of the US House of Representatives. ... Seats up for election. ...


Novak responded by saying, "Don't be too sure she's going to lose... all the establishment's against her and I've seen these Republican – anti-establishment candidates who do pretty well." Novak mentioned Ronald Reagan and Tom Coburn before seeing Carville preparing to talk. Novak cut into his comments and said "Just let me finish what I'm going to say, James. Please, I know you hate to hear me, but you have..." Carville cut in and said that Novak "got to show these right-wingers that he's got backbone, you know. It's why The Wall Street Journal editorial page is watching you. Show 'em you're tough." Reagan redirects here. ... Thomas Allen Tom Coburn, M.D. (born March 14, 1948) is a medical doctor and a Republican U.S. Senator from Oklahoma. ...


Novak responded "Well, I think that's bullshit. And I hate that." Novak then removed his microphone and walked off the set. After the segment ended, host Ed Henry apologized to viewers for Novak's leaving the set "a little early". "I had told him in advance that we were going to ask him about the CIA leak case. He was not here for me to be able to ask him about that. Hopefully, we'll be able to ask him about that in the future." Horseshit redirects here. ... “Microphones” redirects here. ...


They were never able to ask Novak about the CIA leak case. This was the last time he would be seen on CNN. In response to the incident, CNN indefinitely suspended Novak calling the outburst "inexcusable and unacceptable," and apologized to its viewers. August 4th proved to be the last time Novak would appear on CNN, which was seen as monumental because Novak was the last surviving person to have appeared on the network's first weekend back in 1980.


Novak later denied that the CIA leak case was the reason for his walkout. However, Novak had avoided comment on the Plame affair in previous interviews by claiming that his lawyers had advised him not to speak. Reporters interviewing Novak were warned that any attempt to raise his role in the Plame affair would cause the interview to be immediately terminated. [15] On August 1st however, Novak wrote a column on the affair in his Chicago Sun-Times column (“Ex-CIA official’s remark is wrong”). The fact that Novak had addressed the affair in print meant that CNN could not allow his previous "legal advice" excuse to stand without comment.


On December 16, 2005, FOX News spokesman Brian Lewis confirmed that Novak had signed a contract to do unspecified work for the network. Novak stated that he still would have left CNN even if he had not been kicked off in the August incident and, despite arguments stating otherwise, did not go to FOX NEWS due to the fact that the network was more friendly to his point of view. "In 25 years I was never censored by CNN and I said some fairly outrageous things and some very conservative things. I don't want to give the impression that they were muzzling me and I had to go to a place that wouldn't muzzle me," Novak said. is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On December 23, 2005 Novak retired from CNN after 25 years, stating that his relationship with the network lasted "longer than most marriages." Novak also said he had "no complaints" about CNN. is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ...


Novak is third in the most amount of appearances on NBC's Meet the Press behind (in order) David Broder of the Washington Post and the late May Craig of the Portland Times Herald. He was invited on the Meet the Press 50th anniversary show although he had not been on the show in some years due to being on CNN. He currently writes a column for the Chicago Sun-Times.[16] Meet the Press (MTP) is a weekly television news show produced by NBC. It started as a radio show in 1945 as American Mercury Presents: Meet the Press, originating from WRC-AM in Washington. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ...


See also

This page is for the diplomat. ...

References

  1. ^ Solomon, Deborah (2007-07-15). Questions for Robert Novak: The Plame Game. New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-07-15.
  2. ^ Rhoads, Mark (2006-09-11). Illinois Hall of Fame: Robert Novak. Illinois Review. Retrieved on 2006-09-18.
  3. ^ Pfieffer, Eric (2007-07-31). Novak likes the idea of President Paul. Washington Times. Retrieved on 2007-07-31.
  4. ^ Carol D. Leonnig and Amy Goldstein (2007-01-25). Ex-CIA Official Testifies About Libby's Calls. Retrieved on 2007-01-26.
  5. ^ Novak, Robert (2006-07-12). My Role in the Valerie Plame Leak Story. Retrieved on 2006-09-08.
  6. ^ Novak, Robert (2006-09-14). Armitage's Leak. Retrieved on 2006-09-14.
  7. ^ Jacoby, Mary (2004-10-01). The Operative. Retrieved on 2006-09-08.
  8. ^ Why Won’t Prominent Republicans Criticize Novak for Anti-Israel Writings? National Jewish Democratic Council
  9. ^ [http://www.nypost.com/seven/11052007/postopinion/opedcolumnists/carters_clarity__end_occupation_438102.htm Carter's Clarity: End 'Occupation' New York Post 11/05/2007]
  10. ^ Should cockfighting be outlawed in Oklahoma?. CNN (2002-11-26). Retrieved on 2006-10-12.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h Meet the Press Transcript for July 15, 2007. "Interview with Robert Novak
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Kansas City Star. "With another disclosure, Novak bedevils the dead" by Steve Kraske. July 28, 2007. The original story is a dead link. An archival copy is available here.
  13. ^ Columbia Tribune. "A slice of history: Biographers of the late U.S. Sen. Thomas Eagleton of Missouri will find some vivid anecdotes when they comb through his large collection of journals, letters and transcripts housed in Columbia" by Terry Ganey. August 19, 2007
  14. ^ Clinton camp fires back over column. Reuters (November 17, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-11-18.
  15. ^ http://washingtonmonthly.com/features/2004/0412.sullivan.html
  16. ^ [1] Index of his columns from www.suntimes.com. - Accessed July, 4 2007.

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David Margolick is a longtime contributing editor at Vanity Fair, where he writes about culture, the media, and politics. ... American actress Demi Moore, on a typical Vanity Fair cover (August, 1991) Vanity Fair is a glossy American glamour magazine monthly that offers a mixture of articles based on sensational exaggerations, jet-set and entertainment-business personalities, politics, and lies. ... Salon. ... The Washington Monthly is a magazine based in Washington DC which covers American politics and government. ... This article is about the literary magazine. ...

Notes

  • ^  Bauder, David, "CNN suspends Novak after he walks off set." Associated Press. August 5, 2005.
  • Steinberg, Jacques. "Novak walks off live CNN program." New York Times. August 5, 2005.
  • "Robert Novak apologizes for outburst." CNN. August 6, 2005.
  • A full transcript of the broadcast can be viewed here
  • A video of the incident can be seen here.
  • The Democratic National Committee issued a press release, viewable here.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Robert Novak: Biography and Much More from Answers.com (2493 words)
Novak has been frequently criticized as acting as a political operative of the Republican Party while posing as a journalist; his controversial public comments and actions both on and off the air have provoked critics from many groups.
Novak also has been implicated in a number of political scandals and violations of journalistic ethics and standards, the most recent of which is the Plame affair.
Critics complain that Novak has been inconsistent as he insists it would violate journalistic ethics to reveal the source of the Plame leak, but later called on CBS to reveal the source of the memos that were part of the larger news story dealing with the president's alleged evasion of National Guard service.
Robert Novak (504 words)
Novak carried on alone, writing his columns and appearing as a perpetual talking head on TV without his longtime companion.
Novak's biggest "scoop" was his weird involvement in exposing a CIA agent in 2003.
As Wilson started getting media attention, Novak reported on 14 July 2003 that "two senior administration officials" had told him that it was Valerie Plame, a CIA agent specializing in weapons of mass destruction and married to Wilson, who'd suggested sending her husband to Niger.
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