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Encyclopedia > Robert Menzies
The Rt Hon Sir Robert Menzies
Robert Menzies

In office
26 April 1939 – 26 August 1941
Preceded by Earle Page
Succeeded by Arthur Fadden
In office
19 December 1949 – 26 January 1966
Preceded by Ben Chifley
Succeeded by Harold Holt

Born 20 December 1894(1894-12-20)
Jeparit, Victoria
Died 15 May 1978 (aged 83)
Melbourne, Australia
Political party United Australia; Liberal
Religion Presbyterian

Sir Robert Gordon Menzies, KT, AK, CH, FRS, QC (20 December 189415 May 1978), Australian politician, was the twelfth and longest-serving Prime Minister of Australia, serving eighteen and a half years. He had a rapid rise to power, but his first term as Prime Minister was a failure. He spent eight years in opposition, during which he founded the Liberal Party. He was re-elected Prime Minister at the 1949 elections, and he then dominated Australian politics until his retirement in 1966. Menzies was renowned as a brilliant speaker, both on the floor of Parliament and on the hustings, but one example being the forgotten people. Image File history File links Information. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Judicial High Court Lower Courts Constitution State and territory governments Executive Governors and Administrators Premiers and Chief Ministers Legislative Parliaments and Assemblies State electoral systems ACT - NSW - NT - Qld. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on September 21, 1940. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on September 28, 1946. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on November 30, 1963. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... Sir Earle Christmas Grafton Page GCMG, CH (August 8, 1880–December 20, 1961), Australian politician, was the eleventh Prime Minister of Australia. ... Sir Arthur William Fadden (April 13, 1894 – April 21, 1973), Australian politician and 13th Prime Minister of Australia, born at Ingham, Queensland, the son of a Presbyterian police officer. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Joseph Benedict Chifley (22 September 1885 – 13 June 1951), Australian politician and 16th Prime Minister of Australia, was one of Australias most influential Prime Ministers. ... Harold Edward Holt CH (5 August 1908 – presumed dead 17 December 1967) was an Australian politician who became the 17th Prime Minister of Australia in 1966. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Jeparit, population 370, is situated on the Wimmera River in Western Victoria, Australia, 370 kilometres north west of Melbourne. ... “VIC” redirects here. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre. ... The United Australia Party or UAP was an Australian political party that was the political successor to the Nationalist Party of Australia. ... This article concerns the modern Australian political party. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... James VII ordained the modern Order. ... Insignia of a Companion of the Order of Australia. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... The Fellowship of the Royal Society was founded in 1660. ... For information about The Times satire Queens Counsel, see Queens Counsel (comic strip). ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Judicial High Court Lower Courts Constitution State and territory governments Executive Governors and Administrators Premiers and Chief Ministers Legislative Parliaments and Assemblies State electoral systems ACT - NSW - NT - Qld. ... This article concerns the modern Australian political party. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on December 10, 1949. ... Husting (Old English: hiesting; Old Norwegian: hzesthing), the thing or ting, i. ... The forgotten people is the name given to a 1942 speech delivered by Robert Menzies, an Australian politician who went on to become the countrys longest-serving Prime Minister. ...

Contents

Early life

Robert Gordon Menzies was born to James Menzies and Kate Menzies (nee Sampson) in Jeparit, a small town in the Wimmera region of western Victoria, on December 20, 1894. His father James was a storekeeper, the son of Scottish crofters who had Immigrated to Australia in the mid-1850s in the wake of the Victorian gold rush. His maternal grandfather, John Sampson, was a miner from Penzance who also came to seek his fortune on the gold-fields, in Ballarat, Victoria.[1] Both his father and one of his uncles had been members of the Victorian parliament, while another uncle had represented Wimmera in the House of Representatives.[2] He was proud of his Highland ancestry - his enduring nick-name, Ming, came from "Mingus," the Scots — and his own preferred — pronunciation of "Menzies". Jeparit, population 370, is situated on the Wimmera River in Western Victoria, Australia, 370 kilometres north west of Melbourne. ... The Wimmera is a region in the west of the Australian state of Victoria. ... Motto: Peace and Prosperity Other Australian states and territories Capital Melbourne Governor HE Mr John Landy Premier Steve Bracks (ALP) Area 237,629 km² (6th)  - Land 227,416 km²  - Water 10,213 km² (4. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... “Scot” redirects here. ... A croft is a fenced or enclosed area of land, usually small and arable with a crofters dwelling thereon. ... The Victorian gold rush was a period in the history of Victoria in Australia between approximately 1851 and the early 1860s. ... Penzance Harbour and surrounding area as seen from the air Penzance (Cornish: Pensans) is a civil parish and port town in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England, UK. Granted various Royal Charters from 1512 onwards and incorporated in 1614,[2] it has a population of 21,168[1] people and... Ballarat is a city in regional Victoria, Australia, approximately 120 kilometres north-west of Melbourne, with a population of 84,000 people. ... Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... Scots refers to the Anglic varieties spoken in parts of Scotland. ...


Menzies was first educated at a one-room school, then later at private schools in Ballarat and Melbourne, and read law at the University of Melbourne. Location of Ballarat in Victoria (red) Ballarat Base Hospital For the electoral division in the Australian House of Representatives, see Division of Ballarat. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre. ... The University of Melbourne, is a public university located in Melbourne, Victoria. ...


When World War I began Menzies was 19 and held a commission in the university's militia unit. Menzies resigned his commission at the very time others of his age and class clamoured to be allowed to enlist. It was later stated that since the family has made enough of a sacrifice to the war with the enlistment of these brothers, Menzies should stay to finish his studies. [citation needed] However, Menzies himself never explained the reason why he chose not to enlist. Subsequently he was prominent in undergraduate activities and won academic prizes and declared himself to be a patriotic supporter of the war and conscription. [1] He graduated in law in 1918. He soon became one of Melbourne's leading lawyers and began to acquire a considerable fortune. In 1920 he married Pattie Leckie, the daughter of a federal Nationalist Party MP, who was reputedly a moderating influence on him. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Robert and Pattie Menzies in the 1940s Dame Pattie Maie Menzies, GBE (2 March 1899 - 30 August 1995), was the wife of Australia’s longest serving Prime Minister, Sir Robert Menzies. ... The Nationalist Party of Australia was an Australian political party formed in 1917 from a merger of pro-conscription members of the Labor Party (who had been operating under the banner National Labor after their earlier split with the Labor party) with the Commonwealth Liberal Party. ...


Rise to power

In 1928, Menzies gave up his lucrative law practice to enter state parliament as a member of the Victorian Legislative Council representing the Nationalist Party of Australia. His candidacy was nearly defeated when a group of ex-servicemen attacked him in the press for not having enlisted, but he survived this crisis. The following year he shifted to the Legislative Assembly, and was a minister in the conservative Victorian government from 1932 to 1934, and became Deputy Premier of Victoria in 1932. Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Legislative Council, or upper house, is one of the two chambers of the Parliament of Victoria, Australia. ... The Nationalist Party of Australia was an Australian political party formed in 1917 from a merger of pro-conscription members of the Labor Party (who had been operating under the banner National Labor after their earlier split with the Labor party) with the Commonwealth Liberal Party. ... The Legislative Assembly, or lower house, is one of the two chambers of the parliament of Victoria in Australia. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Menzies entered federal politics in 1934, representing the United Australia Party (UAP) in the upper-class Melbourne electorate of Kooyong. He was immediately appointed Attorney-General and Minister for Industry in the Joseph Lyons government, and soon became deputy leader of the UAP. He was seen as Lyons's natural successor and was accused of wanting to push Lyons out, a charge he denied. In 1938 he was given the pejorative nickname "Pig Iron Bob", the result of his industrial battle with waterside workers who refused to load scrap iron being sold to Imperial Japan. In 1939, however, he resigned from the Cabinet in protest at what he saw as the government's inaction. Shortly afterwards, on 7 April 1939, Lyons died. The United Australia Party or UAP was an Australian political party that was the political successor to the Nationalist Party of Australia. ... The Division of Kooyong is an Australian Electoral Division in the state of Victoria. ... Joseph Aloysius Lyons (15 September 1879 – 7 April 1939), Australian politician, tenth Prime Minister of Australia. ... The ensign of Imperial Japanese Navy was a prominent symbol of Imperial Japan. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


First term as Prime Minister

Sir Robert Menzies

On 26 April 1939, following a period during which the Country Party leader, Sir Earle Page, was caretaker Prime Minister, Menzies was elected Leader of the UAP and was sworn in as Prime Minister. But a crisis arose when Page refused to serve under him. In an extraordinary personal attack in the House, Page accused Menzies of cowardice for not having enlisted in the War, and of treachery to Lyons. Menzies then formed a minority government. When Page was deposed as Country Party leader a few months later, Menzies reformed the Coalition with Page's successor, Archie Cameron. (Menzies later forgave Page, but Pattie Menzies never spoke to him again.) Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Earle Christmas Grafton Page GCMG, CH (August 8, 1880–December 20, 1961), Australian politician, was the eleventh Prime Minister of Australia. ... Archie Galbraith Cameron (22 March 1895 _ 9 August 1956). ...


In September 1939, with Britain's declaration of war against Nazi Germany, Menzies found himself a wartime Prime Minister. He did his best to rally the country, but the bitter memories of the disillusionment which followed the First World War made this difficult, and the fact that Menzies had not served in that war and that as Attorney General and Deputy Prime Minister, Menzies had made an official visit to Germany in 1938 and had expressed his admiration for the regime undermined his credibility. At the 1940 election, the UAP was nearly defeated, and Menzies' government survived only thanks to the support of two independent MPs. The Australian Labor Party, under John Curtin, refused Menzies's offer to form a war coalition. Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... John Joseph Curtin (8 January 1885 – 5 July 1945), Australian politician and 14th Prime Minister of Australia, led Australia when the Australian mainland came under direct military threat during the Japanese advance in World War II. He is widely regarded as one of the countrys greatest Prime Ministers. ...


In 1941 Menzies spent months in Britain discussing war strategy with Winston Churchill and other leaders, while his position at home deteriorated. The Australian historian David Day has suggested that Menzies hoped to replace Churchill as British Prime Minister, and that he had some support in Britain for this. Other Australian writers, such as Gerard Henderson, have rejected this theory. When Menzies came home, he found he had lost all support, and was forced to resign, first, on 28 August, as Prime Minister, and then as UAP leader. The Country Party leader, Arthur Fadden, became Prime Minister. Menzies was very bitter about what he saw as this betrayal by his colleagues, and almost left politics. “Churchill” redirects here. ... David Day (born 1949, Melbourne) is an Australian historian. ... Gerard Henderson is a well known conservative Australian newspaper columnist for the Sydney Morning Herald, and is executive director of the Sydney Institute, a conservative think-tank. ... Sir Arthur William Fadden (April 13, 1894 – April 21, 1973), Australian politician and 13th Prime Minister of Australia, born at Ingham, Queensland, the son of a Presbyterian police officer. ...


Return to power

Robert and wife Pattie Menzies in the 1940s

Labor came to power later in October 1941 under John Curtin, following the defeat of the Fadden government in Parliament. In 1943 Curtin won a huge election victory. During 1944 Menzies held a series of meetings at 'Ravenscraig' an old homestead in Aspley to discuss forming a new anti-Labor party to replace the moribund UAP. This was the Liberal Party, which was launched in early 1945 with Menzies as leader. But Labor was firmly entrenched in power and in 1946 Curtin's successor, Ben Chifley, was comfortably re-elected. Comments that "we can't win with Menzies" began to circulate in the conservative press. Image File history File links Menziesandwife. ... Image File history File links Menziesandwife. ... Robert and Pattie Menzies in the 1940s Dame Pattie Maie Menzies, GBE (2 March 1899 - 30 August 1995), was the wife of Australia’s longest serving Prime Minister, Sir Robert Menzies. ... Joseph Benedict Chifley (22 September 1885 – 13 June 1951), Australian politician and 16th Prime Minister of Australia, was one of Australias most influential Prime Ministers. ...


Over the next few years, however, the anti-communist atmosphere of the early Cold War began to erode Labor's support. In 1947, Chifley announced that he intended to nationalise Australia's private banks, arousing intense middle-class opposition which Menzies successfully exploited. In 1949 a bitter coal-strike, engineered by the Communist Party, also played into Menzies's hands. In December 1949 he won the election and again became Prime Minister. For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... The Communist Party of Australia was founded in 1920 and dissolved in 1991. ...


The ALP retained control of the Senate, however, and made Menzies's life very difficult. In 1951 Menzies introduced legislation to ban the Communist Party, hoping that the Senate would reject it and give him an excuse for a double dissolution election, but Labor let the bill pass. It was subsequently ruled unconstitutional by the High Court. But when the Senate rejected his banking bill, he called a double dissolution and won control of both Houses. This article deals with elections to the Australian Parliament. ... The Communist Party v The Commonwealth (1951) 83 CLR 1, also known as the The Communist Party Case, is a very famous case of the High Court of Australia Background Taking advantage of Cold War concerns. ... High Court entrance The High Court of Australia is the final court of appeal in Australia, the highest court in the Australian court hierarchy. ...


Later in 1951 Menzies decided to hold a referendum to change the Constitution to permit him to ban the Communist Party. The new Labor leader, Dr H.V. Evatt, campaigned against the referendum on civil liberties grounds, and it was narrowly defeated. This was one of Menzies's few electoral miscalculations. He sent Australian troops to the Korean War and maintained a close alliance with the United States. Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Rt Hon Dr H.V. Evatt Dr Herbert Vere Evatt (April 30, 1894 - November 2, 1965), Australian jurist, politician and writer (generally known in his lifetime as Dr H.V. Evatt and popularly known as Doc) was born in Maitland, New South Wales, to a working-class family of Anglo... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders...


Economic conditions, however, deteriorated, and Evatt was confident of winning the 1954 elections. Shortly before the elections, Menzies announced that a Soviet diplomat in Australia Vladimir Petrov (see Petrov affair), had defected, and that there was evidence of a Soviet spy ring in Australia, including members of Evatt's staff. This Cold War scare enabled Menzies to win the election. Labor accused Menzies of arranging Petrov's defection, but this has since been disproved: he had simply taken advantage of it. Soviet redirects here. ... Vladimir Petrov The Petrov Affair was a Cold War spy drama in Australia in April 1954, involving the defection of Vladimir Petrov, third secretary in the Soviet embassy in Canberra. ... Vladimir Petrov The Petrov Affair was a Cold War spy drama in Australia in April 1954, involving the defection of Vladimir Petrov, third secretary in the Soviet embassy in Canberra. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


The aftermath of the 1954 election caused a split in the Labor Party, and Menzies was comfortably re-elected over Evatt in 1955 and 1958. By this time the post-war economic boom was in full swing, fuelled by massive immigration and the growth in housing and manufacturing that this produced. Prices for Australia's agricultural exports were also high, ensuring rising incomes. Labor's rather old-fashioned socialist rhetoric was no match for Menzies and his promise of stability and prosperity for all.


Labor's new leader, Arthur Calwell, gave Menzies a scare after an ill-judged squeeze on credit - an effort to restrain inflation - caused a rise in unemployment. At the 1961 election Menzies was returned with a majority of only two seats. But Menzies was able to exploit Labor's divisions over the Cold War and the American alliance, and win an increased majority in the 1963 elections. An incident in which Calwell was photographed standing outside a South Canberra hotel while the ALP Federal Executive (dubbed by Menzies the "36 faceless men") was determining policy also contributed to the 1963 victory. This was the first "television election," and Menzies, although nearly 70, proved a master of the new medium. He was created a Knight of the Thistle in the same year. Rt Hon Arthur Calwell (with young migrant, 1949) Arthur Augustus Calwell (August 28, 1896 - July 8, 1973) Australian politician, was Leader of the Australian Labor Party from 1960 to 1967. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on December 9, 1961. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on November 30, 1963. ... The National Executive is the highest elected body of the Australian Labor Party, one of the major political parties in Australia. ... James VII ordained the modern Order. ...


In 1965 Menzies made the fateful decision to commit Australian troops to the Vietnam War, and also to reintroduce conscription. These moves were initially popular, but later became a problem for his successors. Despite his pragmatic acceptance of the new power balance in the Pacific after World War II and his strong support for the American alliance, he publicly professed continued admiration for links with Britain, exemplified by his admiration for Queen Elizabeth II, and famously described himself as "British to the bootstraps". Over the decade, Australia's ardour for Britain and the monarchy faded somewhat, but Menzies' had not. At a function, Menzies quoted Elizabethan poet Barnabe Googe, "I did but see her passing by, and yet I love her till I die." Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... This article is about Elizabeth I of England. ... Barnabe Googe (June 11, 1540 - February, 1594), English poet, son of Robert Googe, recorder of Lincoln, was born at Alvingham, Lincolnshire. ...


Retirement and posterity

Sir Robert Menzies

Menzies retired in January 1966, and was succeeded as Liberal Party leader and Prime Minister by his former Treasurer, Harold Holt. After his retirement the Queen appointed him to the ancient office of Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports. He toured the United States giving lectures, and published two volumes of memoirs. His retirement was spoiled, however, when he suffered strokes in 1968 and 1971. Thereafter he faded from public view, and in old age became very embittered towards his former colleagues. He died from a heart attack in Melbourne in 1978 and was accorded a state funeral. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Harold Edward Holt CH (5 August 1908 – presumed dead 17 December 1967) was an Australian politician who became the 17th Prime Minister of Australia in 1966. ... Flag of the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports The Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports is a ceremonial official in the United Kingdom. ... Acute myocardial infarction (AMI or MI), more commonly known as a heart attack, is a disease state that occurs when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. ...


Menzies was Prime Minister for a total of 18 years, five months and 12 days, by far the longest term of any Australian Prime Minister, and during his second term he dominated Australian politics as no-one else has ever done. He managed to live down the failures of his first term in office, and to rebuild the conservative side of politics from the depths of 1943. These were great political achievements. He also did much to develop higher education in Australia, and made the development of Canberra one of his pet projects. For other uses, see Canberra (disambiguation). ...


Critics say that Menzies's success was mainly due to the good luck of the long post-war boom and his manipulation of the anti-communist fears of the Cold War years, both of which he exploited with great skill. He was also crucially aided by the crippling dissent within the Labor Party in the 1950s and especially by the ALP split of 1954. But his reputation among conservatives is untarnished, and he remains the Liberal Party's greatest hero. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Several books have been filled with anecdotes about him and with his many witty remarks. While he was speaking in Williamstown, Victoria in 1954, a heckler shouted, "I wouldn’t vote for you if you were the Archangel Gabriel" – to which Menzies coolly replied "If I were the Archangel Gabriel, I’m afraid you wouldn’t be in my constituency." Royal Yacht Club of Victoria, Williamstown Nelson Place, a popular street to visit in Williamstown consisting of many cafés. ... 12th-century icon of Archangel Gabriel from Novgorod. ...


Planning for an official biography of Menzies began soon after his death, but were long delayed by Dame Pattie Menzies's protection of her husband's reputation and her refusal to co-operate with the appointed biographer, Frances McNicoll. In 1991, the Menzies family appointed Professor A.W. Martin to write a biography, which appeared in two volumes, in 1993 and 1999.


See also

The First Menzies Ministry was the twenty-sixth Australian Commonwealth ministry, and ran from 26th April 1939 to 14th March 1940. ... The Second Menzies Ministry was the twenty-seventh Australian Commonwealth ministry, and ran from 14th March 1940 to 28th October 1940. ... The Third Menzies Ministry was the twenty-eighth Australian Commonwealth ministry, and ran from 28th October 1940 to 28th August 1941. ... The Fourth Menzies Ministry was the thirty-fifth Australian Commonwealth ministry, and ran from 19th December 1949 to 11th May 1951. ... The Fifth Menzies Ministry was the thirty-sixth Australian Commonwealth ministry, and ran from 11th May 1951 to 9th July 1954. ... The Sixth Menzies Ministry was the thirty-seventh Australian Commonwealth ministry, and ran from 9th July 1954 to 11th January 1956. ... The Seventh Menzies Ministry was the thirty-eighth Australian Commonwealth ministry, and ran from 11th January 1956 to 10th December 1958. ... The Eighth Menzies Ministry was the thirty-ninth Australian Commonwealth ministry, and ran from 10th December 1958 to 22nd December 1961. ... The Ninth Menzies Ministry was the fortieth Australian Commonwealth ministry, and ran from 22nd December 1961 to 18th December 1963. ... The Tenth Menzies Ministry was the forty-first Australian Commonwealth ministry, and ran from 18th December 1963 to 21st January 1966. ...

Actors who have played Menzies

  • In the 1984 mini series The Last Bastion, Menzies was portrayed by John Wood.
  • In the 1987 mini series Vietnam, he was portrayed by Noel Ferrier.
  • In the 1988 mini series True Believers, he was portrayed by John Bonney.
  • In the 2007 film Curtin, he was portrayed by Bille Brown.
  • Max Gillies has caricatured Menzies on stage and in the comedy satire series The Gillies Report.

John Wood (born July 14, 1946 in Melbourne, Victoria) is an Australian actor, best known for his role as Senior Sergeant Tom Croydon in the Seven Networks long running police drama Blue Heelers. ... Curtin is a telemovie about the wartime Prime Minister of Australia, John Curtin. ... Bille Brown (born 1952 at Biloela, Queensland, Australia), studied drama at the University of Queensland. ... Max Gillies (born November 16, 1941 in Melbourne, Victoria) is an Australian actor. ... Airing in 1984/85 the ABC television series the Gillies Report, was a satire show sending up the politicians and media personalities of the day (e. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Australian Academy of Science: Biographical Memoirs of Deceased Fellows: Robert Gordon Menzies 1894-1978
  2. ^ Australia's Prime Ministers website: Robert Menzies

Further reading

  • Alan Martin, Robert Menzies: A Life, two volumes, Melbourne University Press, 1993 and 1999 (this competent but uninspiring official biography was delayed for many years by the un-cooperative attitude of Dame Pattie Menzies.)
  • Judith Brett, Robert Menzies' Forgotten People, Macmillan, 1992 (a sharply critical psychological study)
  • Michelle Grattan, "Australian Prime Ministers", New Holland Publishers , 2000 (very good summary of his life and career)

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Robert Menzies
  • Robert Menzies - Australia's Prime Ministers / National Archives of Australia
  • The Menzies Foundation
  • Robert Menzies College
  • The Menzies Virtual Museum
  • The Menzies Centre for Australian Studies, London
  • The Liberal Party's Robert Menzies website
  • The Legacy of Sir Robert Menzies National Library of Australia
  • Australia's Prime Ministers - Meet A PM: Robert Menzies
  • Sir Robert Menzies at the National Film and Sound Archive
Political offices
Preceded by
Earle Page
Prime Minister of Australia
1939 – 1941
Succeeded by
Arthur Fadden
Preceded by
Richard Casey
Treasurer of Australia
1940 – 1941
Succeeded by
Percy Spender
Preceded by
Arthur Fadden
Leader of the Opposition
1943 – 1949
Succeeded by
Ben Chifley
Preceded by
Ben Chifley
Prime Minister of Australia
1949 – 1966
Succeeded by
Harold Holt
Parliament of Australia
Preceded by
John Latham
Member for Kooyong
1934 – 1966
Succeeded by
Andrew Peacock
Party political offices
New Title Leader of the Liberal Party
1945 – 1966
Succeeded by
Harold Holt
Honorary titles
Preceded by
Sir Winston Churchill
Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports
1966 – 1978
Succeeded by
Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother
Prime Ministers of Australia
Barton | Deakin | Watson | Reid | Fisher | Cook | Hughes | Bruce | Scullin | Lyons | Page | Menzies | Fadden | Curtin | Forde | Chifley | Holt | McEwen | Gorton | McMahon | Whitlam | Fraser | Hawke | Keating | Howard
Leaders of the Liberal Party of Australia
Menzies | Holt | Gorton | McMahon | Snedden | Fraser | Peacock | Howard | Peacock | Hewson | Downer | Howard
Persondata
NAME Menzies, Robert
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Australian politican
DATE OF BIRTH December 20, 1894
PLACE OF BIRTH Jeparit, Victoria
DATE OF DEATH May 15, 1978
PLACE OF DEATH Melbourne, Australia

  Results from FactBites:
 
Robert Menzies - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2015 words)
Menzies was renowned as a brilliant speaker, both on the floor of Parliament and on the hustings.
Menzies was born in Jeparit, a small town in the Wimmera region of western Victoria, the son of a storekeeper and state Member of Parliament of Scottish descent.
Menzies was first educated at a one-room school, then later at private schools in Ballarat and Melbourne, before studying law at the University of Melbourne.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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