FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Robert Mapplethorpe
The cover of Patti Smith's first album, Horses, featured a Robert Mapplethorpe photo.

Robert Mapplethorpe (November 4, 1946March 9, 1989) was an American photographer, known for his large-scale, highly stylized black & white portraits, photos of flowers and male nudes. The frank, erotic nature of some of the work of his middle period triggered a more general controversy about the public funding of artworks. Cover of the Patti Smith album Horses This is an album cover. ... Cover of the Patti Smith album Horses This is an album cover. ... Patricia Lee (Patti) Smith (born December 30, 1946) is an American musician, singer, and poet. ... Horses is the debut album by Patti Smith released in November 1975, produced by John Cale. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ...

Contents

Biography

Mapplethorpe was born and grew up as a Roman Catholic in Our Lady of the Snows Parish in Floral Park, New York, a neighborhood of Long Island, New York, of English and Irish heritage. He received a B.F.A. from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, where he majored in graphic arts.[1] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ... This article is about the state. ... Pratt Institute is a specialized, private college in New York City with campuses in Manhattan and Brooklyn, as well as in Utica, New York. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ...


Mapplethorpe took his first photographs soon thereafter, using a Polaroid camera. In the mid-1970s, he acquired a large-format press camera and began taking photographs of a wide circle of friends and acquaintances, including artists, composers, socialites, but it wasn't until he met Benjamin Green the pornographic film star, that he truly became inspired to push the envelope of sexuality and photographing the human body. Mapplethorpe was once quoted as saying, "Of all the men and women that I had the pleasure of photographing, Ben Green was the apple of my eye, my unicorn if you will. I could shoot him for hours and hours and no matter the position, each print captured the complete essence of human perfection" (New York Times). It was this relationship that inspired him during the 1980s, to refine his photographs with an emphasis on formal beauty. He concentrated on statuesque male and female nudes, delicate flower still lifes, and formal portraits of artists and celebrities. A Polaroid camera is a type of camera with self-developing film usually called an instant camera. The invention of modern instant cameras is generally credited to American scientist Edwin Land, who unveiled the first commercial instant camera, the Land Camera, in 1947, 10 years after founding the Polaroid Corporation. ...


His work

Mapplethorpe made most of his photographs in the studio. Common themes were flowers, especially orchids; portraits of famous individuals, including Andy Warhol, Deborah Harry, Richard Gere, Peter Gabriel, Grace Jones, and Patti Smith (Patti Smith's portrait [1]was inspired by Durer's 1500 self-portrait [2]) and nude works that include homoerotic imagery from classic nudes to sadistic and masochistic acts. Mapplethorpe is best known for his Portfolio X series, which sparked national attention because of its explicit content and the funding of the effort by the NEA, including a self-portrait with a bullwhip inserted in his anus. [3] [4] [5] His photographs of black men have been criticized as exploitive.[6] [7] For other uses, see Portrait (disambiguation). ... Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 — February 22, 1987), better known as Andy Warhol, was an American artist who was a central figure in the movement known as Pop art. ... Debbie Harry on the cover of her collection Most of All: Best Of Deborah Harry (born July 1, 1945) is a Miami-born American rock and roll musician who originally gained fame as the frontwoman for New Wave band Blondie, which originated in the late 1970s and achieved commercial success... Richard Tiffany Gere[1] (born August 31, 1949) is an American actor. ... Peter Brian Gabriel (born 13 February 1950, in Cobham,[1] Surrey, England) is an English musician. ... Grace Jones (born Grace Mendoza on May 19, 1948, in Spanish Town, Jamaica) is a model, singer and actress. ... Patricia Lee (Patti) Smith (born December 30, 1946) is an American musician, singer, and poet. ... Self-Portrait, 1493, Oil on Canvas Albrecht Dürer (May 21, 1471 - April 6, 1528) was a German painter, wood carver and engraver. ... Flogging demonstration at Folsom Street Fair 2004. ... The National Endowment for the Arts is a United States federally funded program that offers support and funding for projects that exhibit artistic excellence. ... A bullwhip is a single-tailed whip, usually made of braided leather, which was originally used as a farmers tool for working with livestock. ...


Mapplethorpe's work was regularly displayed at publicly funded exhibitions. Conservative and religious organizations, such as the American Family Association opposed supporting his kind of art, and he became something of a cause celebre for both sides in the National Endowment for the Arts funding debate. His The Perfect Moment exhibit in 1990 which included seven sadomasochistic portraits in Cincinnati resulted in the unsuccessful prosecution of the Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center and its director Dennis Barrie on charges of "pandering obscenity". The American Family Association (AFA) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that promotes conservative Christian values. ... The National Endowment for the Arts is a United States federally funded program that offers support and funding for projects that exhibit artistic excellence. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Cincinnati redirects here. ...


When it became known that Mapplethorpe was infected with HIV, the prices for his photos increased dramatically. In December 1988 his photos collected $500,000 each. Mapplethorpe died on the morning of March 9, 1989, in a Boston, Massachusetts hospital from complications arising from AIDS; he was 42 years old. His ashes were buried in Queens, New York, in his mother's grave, marked 'Maxey'. Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Queens (disambiguation) and Queen. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


UCE Controversy

In 1998, the University of Central England was involved in a controversy when a book by Mapplethorpe was confiscated. A final year undergraduate student was writing a paper on the work of Robert Mapplethorpe and intended to illustrate the paper with a few photographs. Unwisely she took the photographs to the local chemist to be developed and the chemist informed West Midlands Police because of the unusual nature of the images. The police confiscated the library book from the student and informed the university that the book would have to be destroyed. If the university agreed to the destruction then no further action would be taken. Birmingham City University (formerly Birmingham Polytechnic and the University of Central England in Birmingham) is a University in the city of Birmingham, England. ...


The book in question was Mapplethorpe, published by Jonathan Cape 1992. The university Vice-Chancellor, Dr Peter Knight, supported by the Senate took the view that the book was a legitimate book for the university library to hold and that the action of the police was a serious infringement of academic freedom. The Vice-Chancellor was interviewed by the police, under caution, with a view to prosecution under the terms of the Obscene Publications Act. This Act defines obscenity as material that is likely to deprave and corrupt. It was used unsuccessfully in the famous 'Lady Chatterley's Lover' trial. Curiously the police were not particularly interested in some of the more notorious images, nor any of the images of children, which could have been covered by other legislation. They focused on one particular image, 'Jim and Tom, Sausalito 1977'.


After the interview with the Vice-Chancellor a file was sent to the Crown Prosecution Service as the Director of Public Prosecutions has to take the decision as to whether or not to proceed with a trial. After a delay of about six months the affair came to an end when Dr Knight was informed by the DPP that no action would be taken as 'there was insufficient evidence to support a successful prosecution on this occasion'. The original book was returned, in a slightly tattered state, and restored to the university library. [2]


Posthumously

In 2003, Arena Editions published Autoportrait, a collection of black and white Polaroid self-portraits that Mapplethorpe took between 1971 and 1973. This was the first time these early works became available for widespread viewing since the 1970s. An instant camera is a type of camera with self-developing film. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ...


In 2006, a Mapplethorpe print of Andy Warhol was auctioned for $643,200, making it the 6th most expensive photograph ever sold. Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 — February 22, 1987), better known as Andy Warhol, was an American artist who was a central figure in the movement known as Pop art. ...


References in popular culture

  • In Grampa vs. Sexual Inadequacy, an episode of The Simpsons, Homer Simpson accidentally grabs a racy photography book by Robert Mapplethorpe at a bookstore.
  • Wes Anderson's 1996 film Bottle Rocket features a character with the name Bob Mapplethorpe.
  • Mapplethorpe is satirized in the Family Guy episode, "A Picture's Worth A Thousand Bucks". In the episode, Mapplethorpe is shown as an artist at an amusement park who draws caricatures. When a child comes to have his caricature drawn, Mapplethorpe asks who the child's favorite athlete is, and proceeds to state that he will draw him defecating on the child's chest.
  • In The Birdcage, Republican Senator Kevin Kealey (Gene Hackman) is told that his daughter's future father in law (Robin Williams) is a cultural attaché, to which he responds: "are they the ones who funded the Mapplethorpe exhibit?"

Grampa vs. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Homer Simpson is also a character in the book and film The Day of the Locust. ... Wesley Wales Anderson (born May 1, 1969) is an American writer, producer, and director of films and commercials. ... Bottle Rocket is a 1996 film and director Wes Andersons first feature film. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... The Birdcage is a 1996 comedy film directed by Mike Nichols, and stars Robin Williams, Nathan Lane, Gene Hackman, Dianne Wiest, Dan Futterman, Calista Flockhart, Hank Azaria and Christine Baranski. ... Eugene Allen Gene Hackman[1] (born January 30, 1930) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ... For other persons named Robin Williams, see Robin Williams (disambiguation). ...

See also

// Dianora Niccolini Diane Arbus Laurie Toby Edison Sarah Kent Annie Leibovitz Ellen von Unwerth Male nude taken by Edgar de Evia in the 1970s. ... Diane Arbus Identical Twins #10 on the list of most expensive photographs. ...

Bibliography

  • Patricia Morrisroe (1995) Robert Mapplethorpe: A Biography (Papermac: London and New York)
  • Arthur C. Danto (1996) Playing with the Edge: the Photographic Achievement of Robert Mapplethorpe (University of California Press: London and Los Angeles)
  • Gary Banham (2002) "Mapplethorpe, Duchamp and the Ends of Photography" Angelaki 7.1
  • Mark Jarzombek. "The Mapplethorpe Trial and the Paradox of its Formalist and Liberal Defense: Sights of Contention," AppendX, No. 2 (Spring 1994), 58-81
  • Allen Ellenzweig (1992), "The Homoerotic Photograph: Male Images from Durieu/Delacroix to Mapplethorpe" (New York: Columbia University Press)

Mark Jarzombek is a US-born author and architectural historian, and (since 1995) Director of the History Theory Criticism Section of the Department of Architecture at MIT, Cambridge MA, USA. Jarzombek received his architectural training at the ETH Zurich, where he graduated in 1980. ...

References

  1. ^ Glueck, Grace. "Fallen Angel", The New York Times, June 25, 1995. Accessed October 14, 2007. "Growing up in a blue-collar precinct of Floral Park and steeped in Catholicism, Mapplethorpe developed -- to his alarm -- an adolescent interest in gay pornographic magazines.... So at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, where his father had studied engineering and Robert majored in graphic arts (but stopped short of getting a degree)..."
  2. ^ UCE pages on the Mapplethorpe controversy, the page has been deleted so now here via archive.org

The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Robert Mapplethorpe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (587 words)
Robert Mapplethorpe (November 4, 1946 – March 9, 1989) was an American photographer, famous for his large-scale, highly-stylized fl and white portraits, photos of flowers and male nudes.
Mapplethorpe is best known for his Portfolio X series that sparked national attention because of its explicit content and the funding of the effort by the NEA, including a photo of himself with a bullwhip inserted in his anus.
Mapplethorpe died on the morning of March 9, 1989, in a Boston, Massachusetts hospital from complications arising from AIDS; he was 42 years old.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m