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Encyclopedia > Robert Jervis

Robert Jervis, the Adlai E. Stevenson Professor of International Affairs at Columbia University, is one of the most influential scholars of international relations. His work on perceptions and misperceptions revolutionized the study of foreign policy decision making. Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Congressman from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... Columbia University is a private university in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City and a member of the Ivy League. ... International Relations (IR), a branch of political science, is the study of foreign affairs of and relations among states within the international system, including the roles of states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ...


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  • Biography at Columbia University

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Columbia News ::: National Academy of Sciences Honor Political Science's Robert Jervis (139 words)
The National Academy of Sciences has announced that Robert Jervis, the Adlai E. Stevenson Professor of International Politics, will receive the 2006 Award for Behavioral Research Relevant to the Prevention of Nuclear War.
The prize of $20,000 is awarded every three years for basic research in any field of cognitive or behavioral science that uses rigorous formal and empirical methods to advance our understanding of issues relating to the risk of nuclear war.
Jervis was selected "for showing, scientifically and in policy terms, how cognitive psychology, politically contextualized, can illuminate strategies for the avoidance of nuclear war."
Jervis, R.: Perception and Misperception in International Politics. (293 words)
The perspective established by Jervis remains an important counterpoint to structural explanations of international politics, and from it has developed a large literature on the psychology of leaders and the problems of decision making under conditions of incomplete information, stress, and cognitive bias.
Jervis begins by describing the process of perception (for example, how decision makers learn from history) and then explores common forms of misperception (such as overestimating one's influence).
Jervis proved that, once a leader believed something, that perception would influence the way the leader perceived all other relevant information.
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