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Encyclopedia > Robert J. Sawyer
Robert J. Sawyer

Born April 29, 1960 (1960-04-29) (age 47)
Ottawa, Ontario
Occupation novelist
Nationality Flag of Canada Canadian
Genres science fiction, mystery
Debut works Golden Fleece
Website http://www.sfwriter.com/

Robert J. Sawyer is a Canadian hard science fiction writer, born in Ottawa in 1960 and now resident in Mississauga. He has published 17 novels[1], and his short fiction has appeared in Analog Science Fiction and Fact, Amazing Stories, On Spec, Nature, and numerous anthologies[2][3]. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1728 × 2304 pixel, file size: 2. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... This article is about work. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Look up mystery in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... Motto: Pride in our past, Faith in our future Area: 288. ... April 1997 issue of Analog. ... Amazing Stories magazine, sometimes retitled Amazing Science Fiction, began in April 1926, becoming the first science fiction magazine and one of the pioneers of science fiction in the United States. ... On Spec is a digest-sized, perfect-bound, Canadian quarterly magazine publishing stories and poetry in science fiction, fantasy, and allied genres. ... This article is about the physical universe. ...

Contents

Awards and Honors

Robert James Sawyer has won forty-one national and international awards for his fiction, most prominently the 1995 Nebula Award[4] for his novel The Terminal Experiment; the 2003 Hugo Award[5] for his novel Hominids, first volume of his Neanderthal Parallax trilogy; and the 2006 John W. Campbell Memorial Award[6] for his novel Mindscan. He has had two additional Nebula nominations, nine additional Hugo nominations, and two additional Campbell Memorial Award nominations[7]. Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The Terminal Experiment is a science fiction novel by Canadian novelist Robert J. Sawyer. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel has been awarded every year since 1973, except in 1994. ...


His books have appeared on the top-ten national mainstream bestsellers' lists in Canada, as published by The Globe and Mail and Maclean's magazine, and they have reached number one on the bestsellers' list published by Locus[8], the trade-journal of the SF field. Translated editions have appeared in Bulgarian, Chinese, Czech, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, and Spanish[1], and he has won major SF awards in Canada, China, France, Japan, Spain, and the United States[1]. The Globe and Mail is a Canadian English-language nationally distributed newspaper, based in Toronto and printed in six cities across the country. ... A cover of the Canadian magazine Macleans. ... Locus Magazine is subtitled The Magazine Of The Science Fiction & Fantasy Field. It reports on the science fiction writing industry, including comprehensive listings of new books published in the field. ...


In 2002, Sawyer received Ryerson University's Alumni Award of Distinction in honor of his international success as a science fiction writer[9] (Sawyer graduated from Ryerson in 1982 with a Bachelor of Applied Arts in Radio and Television Arts)[1]. On June 2, 2007, Sawyer received an honorary doctorate (Doctor of Letters, honoris causa) from Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario.[10] Laurentian University (Université Laurentienne), founded in 1960, is a mid-sized bilingual university in Greater Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. ... Greater Sudbury (2001 census population 155,219) is a city in Northern Ontario. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area...


Critical Studies

Critical studies and scholarly reviews of Sawyer's work have appeared in The Gospel According to Science Fiction by Gabriel McKee; in Worlds of Wonder: Readings in Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy Literature edited by Jean-Francois Leroux and Camille R. La Bossiere; in The New York Review of Science Fiction; in the SFRA Review[11][12][13][14]; in a scholarly afterword by Valerie Broege in Sawyer's own essay collection Relativity; and in such publications as Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice.[15] The New York Review of Science Fiction is a monthly, long-running science fiction critical journal edited by David G. Hartwell and others. ...


His fiction has received starred reviews (denoting "books of exceptional merit") in Publishers Weekly, Library Journal[16], Booklist[17], Quill & Quire[17], Kliatt, and Anatomy of Wonder: A Critical Guide to Science Fiction, Fifth Edition, by Neil Barron. Publishers Weekly is a weekly trade news magazine targeted at publishers, librarians, booksellers, and literary agents. ... Library Journal is a trade publication for librarians. ...


Sawyer is profiled in The Canadian Encyclopedia[18], Canadian Who's Who[19], The Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature, Contemporary Authors volume 212[20], Something About the Author volume 81, St. James Guide to Science Fiction Writers, and The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction. The hour-long documentary In the Mind of Robert J. Sawyer premiered on Canadian television on January 8, 2003[21], and has been shown numerous times since on various channels, including Space: The Imagination Station, for which Sawyer is a frequent commentator.


Style and Themes

Sawyer's style is simple, with clear prose, in the mode of Isaac Asimov[22]. He also has a tendency to include pop-culture references in his novels (his fondness for the original Star Trek and Planet of the Apes is impossible to miss), and he is unusual even among Canadian SF writers for the blatantly Canadian settings and concerns addressed in his novels, all of which are issued by New York houses. Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920?[1] – April 6, 1992), pronounced , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов [1], was a Russian-born American author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... Planet of the Apes is a 1968 science fiction film about an astronaut (Charlton Heston) who finds himself stranded on an Earth-like planet two thousand years in the future. ...


Sawyer's politics are often described as liberal, even by Canadian standards (although he contributed a Hugo Award-nominated story called "The Hand You're Dealt"[23] to the Libertarian SF anthology Free Space, and another called "The Right's Tough"[24] to the Prometheus Award-winning Libertarian SF anthology Visions of Liberty). He holds citizenship in both Canada and the United States, and has been known to criticize the politics of both countries. He often has American characters visiting Canada (such as Karen Bessarian in Mindscan) or Canadian characters visiting the U.S. (such as Pierre Tardivel in Frameshift and Mary Vaughan in Humans and Hybrids) as a way of comparing and contrasting the perceived values of the two countries. The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Prometheus Award is an award for libertarian science fiction novels given out annually by the Libertarian Futurist Society (which also publishes a quarterly journal, Prometheus). ...


Sawyer's work frequently explores the intersection between science and religion, with rationalism always winning out over mysticism (see especially Far-Seer, The Terminal Experiment, Calculating God, and the three volumes of the Neanderthal Parallax [Hominids, Humans, and Hybrids], plus the short story "The Abdication of Pope Mary III," originally published in Nature, July 6, 2000). He also has a great fondness for paleontology, as evidenced in his Quintaglio Ascension trilogy (Far-Seer, Fossil Hunter, and Foreigner), about an alien world to which dinosaurs from Earth were transplanted, and his time-travel novel End of an Era. In addition, the main character of Calculating God is a paleontologist, and the Neanderthal Parallax novels deal with an alternate version of Earth where Neanderthals did not become extinct. In epistemology and in its broadest sense, rationalism is any view appealing to reason as a source of knowledge or justification (Lacey 286). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The cover of Far Seer, the first book in the Quintaglio Ascension Trilogy. ...


He often explores the notion of copied or uploaded human consciousness, most fully in his novel Mindscan, but also in Golden Fleece and The Terminal Experiment, plus the Hugo-, Nebula-, and Aurora-award-nominated novella "Identity Theft," its sequel the Aurora-winning short story "Biding Time," and the Hugo- and Aurora-award-nominated short story "Shed Skin." His interest in quantum physics, and especially quantum computing, inform the short stories "You See But You Do Not Observe"[25] (a Sherlock Holmes pastiche) and "Iterations,"[26] and the novels Factoring Humanity and Hominids. SETI, the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, plays a role in the plots of Golden Fleece, Factoring Humanity, Mindscan, Rollback, the novelette "Ineluctable," and the short stories "You See But You Do Not Observe" and "Flashes." Fig. ... Molecule of alanine used in NMR implementation of error correction. ... A portrait of Sherlock Holmes by Sidney Paget from the Strand Magazine, 1891 Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. ... This article is about the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence. ...


Sawyer gives cosmology a thorough workout in his far-future Starplex. Real-life science institutions are often used as settings by Sawyer, including TRIUMF in End of an Era, CERN in Flashforward, the Royal Ontario Museum in Calculating God, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory in Hominids and its sequels, and the Arecibo Observatory in Rollback. TRIUMF, which stands for Tri-University Meson Facility, is a particle accelerator laboratory located on the University of British Columbia campus in the University Endowment Lands, just outside the city limits of Vancouver, British Columbia. ... CERN logo The European Organization for Nuclear Research (French: ), commonly known as CERN (see Naming), pronounced (or in French), is the worlds largest particle physics laboratory, situated just northwest of Geneva on the border between France and Switzerland. ... The Royal Ontario Museum, commonly known as the ROM (rhyming with Tom), is a major museum for world culture and natural history in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Artists concept of SNOs detector. ... The Arecibo Observatory is located approximately 9 miles south-southwest from Arecibo, Puerto Rico (near the extreme southwestern corner of Arecibo pueblo). ...


Another Sawyer hallmark is the mortally ill main character. Pierre Tardivel in Frameshift suffers from Huntington's disease, Thomas Jericho in Calculating God has lung cancer, and Jacob Sullivan in Mindscan has an arteriovenous malformation in his brain; one of the main characters in Rollback vividly suffers from that most fatal illness of all, old age. Sawyer nonetheless is known for tales that end on an upbeat, and even transcendent, note. Arteriovenous malformation or AVM is a congenital disorder of the veins and arteries that make up the vascular system . ...


SF/Mystery Crossovers

Sawyer's work often crosses over from science fiction to mystery; he won both Canada's top SF award (the Aurora Award) and its top mystery-fiction award (the Arthur Ellis Award) for his 1993 short story "Just Like Old Times."[27] Illegal Alien is a courtroom drama with an extraterrestrial defendant; Hominids puts one Neanderthal on trial by his peers for the apparent murder of another Neanderthal; Mindscan has the rights of uploaded consciousnesses explored in a Michigan probate court; and Golden Fleece, Fossil Hunter, The Terminal Experiment, Frameshift, and Flashforward are all, in part, murder mysteries. Of Sawyer's shorter SF works, the novella "Identity Theft" and the short stories "Biding Time," "Flashes," "Iterations," "Shed Skin," "The Stanley Cup Caper," "You See But You Do Not Observe," and the aforementioned "Just Like Old Times" are all also crime or mystery fiction. The Prix Aurora Awards are given out annually for the best Canadian science fiction and fantasy literary works from that year, and are awarded in both English and French. ... The Arthur Ellis Awards are a group of Canadian literary awards, presented annually by the Crime Writers of Canada for the best Canadian crime and mystery writing. ...


Other Activities

In addition to his own writing, Sawyer edits the Robert J. Sawyer Books science-fiction imprint for Red Deer Press, part of Canadian publisher Fitzhenry & Whiteside; contributes to The New York Review of Science Fiction; is The Canadian Encyclopedia's authority on science fiction[28]; and is a judge for L. Ron Hubbard's Writers of the Future[29] contest. The New York Review of Science Fiction is a monthly, long-running science fiction critical journal edited by David G. Hartwell and others. ... Writers of the Future (WOTF) is a science fiction and fantasy story contest that was originated by L. Ron Hubbard in the early 1980s. ...


Sawyer wrote the original series bible for Charlie Jade, an hour-long science-fiction TV series that first aired in 2005-2006, and he did conceptual work in 2003 for reviving Robotech. He has also written and narrated documentaries about science fiction for CBC Radio's Ideas series. He provided analysis of the British science fiction series Doctor Who for the CBC's online documentary The Planet of the Doctor[30], frequently comments on science fiction movies for TVOntario's Saturday Night at the Movies, and co-edited an essay collection in honor of the fortieth anniversary of Star Trek with David Gerrold, entitled Boarding the Enterprise. Charlie Jade is the name of a science fiction television program filmed mainly in Cape Town, South Africa. ... Robotech science fiction and anime universe. ... CBC Radio is the English language radio division of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. ... This article is about the television series. ... Radio-Canada redirects here. ... TVOntario, officially the Ontario Educational Communications Authority, is an educational public television broadcaster in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Saturday Night at the Movies is a weekly television series on TVOntario, the public educational television network in Ontario, Canada. ... David Gerrold, born Jerrold David Friedman (January 24, 1944), in Chicago, Illinois, is an award-winning science fiction author who started his career in 1966 as a college student by submitting an unsolicited story outline for the television series Star Trek. ...


Sawyer has taught science-fiction writing at the University of Toronto, Ryerson University, Humber College, and the Banff Centre. In 2000, he served as Writer-in-Residence at the Richmond Hill, Ontario Public Library. In 2003, he was Writer-in-Residence at the Toronto Public Library's Merril Collection of Science Fiction, Speculation and Fantasy (the first person to hold this post since Judith Merril herself in 1987)[31]. In 2006, he was Writer-in-Residence at the Odyssey Writing Workshop. Also in 2006, he was the Edna Staebler Writer-in-Residence at the Kitchener Public Library in the Region of Waterloo, Ontario[32], following on the Region of Waterloo's choice of Sawyer's Hominids as the "One Book, One Community"[33] title that all 490,000 residents were encouraged to read in 2005. The University of Toronto (U of T) is a public research university in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Ryerson University is a public university located in downtown Toronto, Canada. ... Humber College Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning (generally referred to as Humber) is a college in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... The Banff Centre is a highly respected arts, cultural, and educational institution in Banff, Alberta Canada. ... Motto: En la rose, je fleuris (French for Like the rose, I flourish) Map showing Richmond Hills location in York Region Country Canada Province Ontario Region York Region Incorporated 1873 Government  - Mayor Dave Barrow  - Governing Body Richmond Hill Town Council  - MPs Lui Temelkovski, Bryon Wilfert Population (2006)[1]  - City... Judith Merril (January 21, 1923, New York, New York - September 12, 1997, Canada) was an North American science fiction author and anthologist. ... Founded in 1996 by World Fantasy Award winning editor Jeanne Cavelos, the Odyssey Writing Workshop is one of the most highly respected workshops for writers of fantasy, science fiction, and horror. ... The Regional Municipality of Waterloo (or Waterloo Region or Region of Waterloo) is located in the Canadian province of Ontario. ...


Sawyer is a frequent keynote speaker about technology topics[34][35], and has served as a consultant to Canada's Federal Department of Justice on the shape future genetics laws should take[36].


He has long been an advocate of Canadian science fiction. He lobbied hard for the creation of the Canadian Region of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. The Canadian Region was established in 1992, and Sawyer served for three years on SFWA's Board of Directors as the first Canadian Regional Director (1992-1995). He also edited the newsletter of the Canadian Region, called Alouette in honor of Canada's first satellite; the newsletter was nominated for an Aurora Award for best fanzine. Science Fiction Writers of America, or SFWA (pronounced // or //), was founded in 1965 by Damon Knight. ... The Prix Aurora Awards are given out annually for the best Canadian science fiction and fantasy literary works from that year, and are awarded in both English and French. ... A fanzine (see also: zine) is a nonprofessional publication produced by fans of a particular cultural phenomenon (such as a literary or musical genre) for the pleasure of others who share their interest. ...


In 1998, Sawyer was elected president of SFWA on a platform that promised a referendum on various contentious issues, including periodic membership requalification and the creation of a Nebula Award for best script; he won, defeating the next-closest candidate, past-SFWA-president Norman Spinrad, by a 3:2 margin. However, Sawyer's actual time in office was marked by considerable opposition to membership requalification and negative reaction to his dismissing, with the majority support of the Board of Directors, one paid SFWA worker and one volunteer. He resigned after completing half of his one-year term, and was automatically succeeded by then-incumbent vice-president Paul Levinson. Prior to resigning, Sawyer's promised referendum was held, resulting in significant changes to SFWA's bylaws and procedures, most notably allowing appropriate non-North American sales to count as membership credentials, allowing appropriate electronic sales to count as membership credentials, and creating a Nebula Award for best script. Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Norman Richard Spinrad (born September 15, 1940) is an American science fiction author. ... Paul Levinson, 2002 Paul Levinson (b. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ...


Sawyer is active in other writers' organizations, including the Crime Writers of Canada and The Writers' Union of Canada (for which he has served on the membership committee), and he is a member of the Writers Guild of Canada and the Horror Writers Association.[37] The Crime Writers of Canada is a national organization for Canadian crime writers. ...


Current Project

Sawyer's current project, under contract to Penguin USA's Ace Science Fiction imprint and Penguin Canada, is a trio of novels dealing with the notion of a self-aware World Wide Web; the individual volumes have the working titles of Wake, Watch, and Wonder, making this the WWW trilogy.[38]


Bibliography

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... The cover of Far Seer, the first book in the Quintaglio Ascension Trilogy. ... The cover of Far Seer, the first book in the Quintaglio Ascension Trilogy. ... Ace Books is the oldest continuing publisher of science fiction & fantasy novels, founded in 1953 by magazine publisher A. A. Wyn. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... The Terminal Experiment is a science fiction novel by Canadian novelist Robert J. Sawyer. ... Astounding Stories was a seminal science fiction magazine founded in 1930. ... HarperCollins is a publishing company owned by News Corporation. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Astounding Stories was a seminal science fiction magazine founded in 1930. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Tor Books is an imprint of Tom Doherty Associates, LLC which publishes popular fiction, and is particularly noted for its science fiction and fantasy titles. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Illegal Alien is a science fiction and mystery novel by Canadian novelist Robert J. Sawyer. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Flashforward is a science fiction novel by Canadian author Robert J. Sawyer. ... This article is about the year. ... Calculating God is a science fiction novel by Robert J. Sawyer. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Neanderthal Parallax is a trilogy of novels by Robert J. Sawyer. ... The Neanderthal Parallax is a trilogy of novels by Robert J. Sawyer. ... Astounding Stories was a seminal science fiction magazine founded in 1930. ... The Neanderthal Parallax is a trilogy of novels by Robert J. Sawyer. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Neanderthal Parallax is a trilogy of novels by Robert J. Sawyer. ... ISFiC Press is the small press publishing arm of ISFiC. Although the press officially released its first book, Robert J. Sawyers Relativity, on November 12, 2004, the people responsible for the press issued a filk CD two years earlier, entitled A Walk on the Windy Side. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Astounding Stories was a seminal science fiction magazine founded in 1930. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Awards Details

Awards for Sawyer's work include:

  • 1991 Aurora Award for Best Long Work in English, for Golden Fleece
  • 1992 Homer Award for Best Novel, for Far-Seer
  • 1993 Arthur Ellis Award for Best Short Story, for Just Like Old Times
  • 1993 Homer Award for Best Novel, for Fossil Hunter
  • 1995 Le Grand Prix de l'Imaginaire for Best Foreign Short Story, "You See But You Do Not Observe"
  • 1995 Nebula Award for Best Novel, for The Terminal Experiment
  • 1995 Aurora Award for Best Long Work in English, for The Terminal Experiment
  • 1996 Seiun Award for Best Foreign Novel, for End of an Era
  • 1996 Aurora Award for Best Long Work in English, for Starplex
  • 1997 Science Fiction Chronicle Reader Award for Best Short Story, for "The Hand You're Dealt"
  • 1999 Aurora Award for Best Long Work in English, for Flashforward
  • 2000 Seiun Award for Best Foreign Novel, for Frameshift
  • 2002 Seiun Award for Best Foreign Novel, for Illegal Alien
  • 2003 Hugo Award for Best Novel, for Hominids
  • 2005 Analog Analytical Laboratory Award for Best Short Story, for "Shed Skin"
  • 2005 Aurora Award for Best Work in English (Other) for Relativity
  • 2006 John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel, for Mindscan
  • 2007 Toronto Public Library Celebrates Reading Award
  • 2007 Galaxy Award (China) for "Most Popular Foreign Author"
  • 2007 Aurora Award for Best Short Work in English, for "Biding Time"

Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... The Prix Aurora Awards are given out annually for the best Canadian science fiction and fantasy literary works from that year, and are awarded in both English and French. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... The Arthur Ellis Awards are a group of Canadian literary awards, presented annually by the Crime Writers of Canada for the best Canadian crime and mystery writing. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... The Prix Aurora Awards are given out annually for the best Canadian science fiction and fantasy literary works from that year, and are awarded in both English and French. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The Prix Aurora Awards are given out annually for the best Canadian science fiction and fantasy literary works from that year, and are awarded in both English and French. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... This article is about the year. ... The Prix Aurora Awards are given out annually for the best Canadian science fiction and fantasy literary works from that year, and are awarded in both English and French. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Astounding Stories was a seminal science fiction magazine founded in 1930. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel has been awarded every year since 1973, except in 1994. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Prix Aurora Awards are given out annually for the best Canadian science fiction and fantasy literary works from that year, and are awarded in both English and French. ...

See also

This is a list of Canadian literary figures, including poets, novelists, childrens writers, essayists, and scholars. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d Robert J. Sawyer (2007). Robert J. Sawyer Curriculum Vitae. Retrieved on 2007-08-08.
  2. ^ Robert J. Sawyer (2007). Short-Fiction Bibliography. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  3. ^ Charles N. Brown and William G. Contento (2007). The Locus Index to Science Fiction (1984-1998). Retrieved on 2007-12-06.
  4. ^ SFWRITER.COM Inc. (1995). Nebula Award win for The Terminal Experiment. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  5. ^ SFWRITER.COM Inc. (2003). Hugo Award win for Hominids. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  6. ^ SFWRITER.COM Inc. (2006). John W. Campbell Memorial Award win for Mindscan. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  7. ^ Mark R. Kelly (2007). Locus Index to Science Fiction Awards. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  8. ^ Locus (2001). Bestsellers List for October 2001. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  9. ^ Ryerson University (2002). Ryerson Alumni Achievement Awards 2002. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  10. ^ Robert J. Sawyer blog (2007). Honorary Doctorate for Robert J. Sawyer. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  11. ^ Janice M. Bogstad (2001). SFRA Review on Calculating God. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  12. ^ Warren G. Rochelle (2002). SFRA Review on Hominids. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  13. ^ Warren G. Rochelle (2003). SFRA Review on Humans. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  14. ^ Philip Snyder (2005). SFRA Review on Mindscan. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  15. ^ Nick W. Peterson (2006). Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice reviews Hybrids. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  16. ^ Jackie Cassada (2007). Library Journal reviews Rollback. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  17. ^ a b Margaret Cannon, Orson Scott Card, Cori Dusmann, R. John Hayes, Roberta Johnson, Trevor Klassen, Moira L. MacKinnon, Henry Mietkiewicz, Shane Neilson, Marc Piche, Philip Snyder, Hayden Trenholm, Robert J. Wiersma, and anonymous (1990-2007). Review Tearsheets. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  18. ^ Historica Foundation of Canada (2007). The Canadian Encyclopedia on Robert J. Sawyer. Retrieved on 2007-12-04.
  19. ^ University of Toronto Press (2007). Canadian Who's Who on Robert J. Sawyer. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  20. ^ Robert J. Sawyer (2007). Autobiography from Contemporary Authors. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  21. ^ MSN TV (2003). In the Mind of Robert J. Sawyer. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  22. ^ Orson Scott Card (1990). Review of Golden Fleece. Retrieved on 2007-08-11.
  23. ^ Robert J. Sawyer (1997). The Hand You're Dealt (short story). Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  24. ^ Robert J. Sawyer (2004). The Right's Tough (short story). Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  25. ^ Robert J. Sawyer (1995). You See But You Do Not Observe (short story). Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  26. ^ Robert J. Sawyer (2000). Iterations (short story). Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  27. ^ Robert J. Sawyer (1993). Just Like Old Times (short story). Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  28. ^ Robert J. Sawyer (2007). Science Fiction in The Canadian Encyclopedia. Retrieved on 2007-12-04.
  29. ^ Writers of the Future (2007). List of Judges. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  30. ^ Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (2005). Planet of the Doctor. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  31. ^ SFWRITER.COM Inc. (2003). Merril Collection Writer-in-Residence. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  32. ^ Robert J. Sawyer blog (2006). Edna Staebler Writer-in-Residence. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  33. ^ Region of Waterloo (2005). One Book, One Community chooses Hominids. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  34. ^ Robert J. Sawyer (2007). Keynotes and Talks. Retrieved on 2007-12-05.
  35. ^ Speakers' Spotlight (2007). Robert J. Sawyer: The Challenge of Tomorrow. Retrieved on 2007-12-05.
  36. ^ Steven H. Silver (2003). Genetics Future Forum Includes Author. Retrieved on 2007-12-05.
  37. ^ The Writers' Union of Canada (2007). Membership Directory. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  38. ^ Robert J. Sawyer blog (2007). New Deal with Penguin in Canada and USA. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Interviews

  • Robert J. Sawyer interviewed by John Scalzi (text)
  • Robert J. Sawyer interviewed by CBC's Words at Large (text)
  • Robert J. Sawyer interviewed by Wotmania.com (text)
  • Robert J. Sawyer interviewed by MarsDust.com (text)
  • Robert J. Sawyer interviewed by HardSF.net (text)
  • Robert J. Sawyer interviewed by CBC Radio's Sounds Like Canada (audio)
  • Robert J. Sawyer interviewed by CJAD Montreal (audio)
  • Robert J. Sawyer interviewed by SpaceChannel.tv (video)

External links

  • Robert J. Sawyer's website
  • Robert J. Sawyer's blog
  • Robert J. Sawyer discussion group
  • Book-club discussion guides for Sawyer novels
  • Profile in Quill & Quire
  • Entry on Robert J. Sawyer in The Canadian Encyclopedia
  • Listing for Sawyer in the Locus Index to Science Fiction Awards
  • Listing for Sawyer in the Locus Index to Science Fiction (1984-1998)
  • Robert J. Sawyer at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database
  • Robert J. Sawyer Books -- the publishing imprint he edits

 
 

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