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Encyclopedia > Robert Christgau
Robert Christgau

2007
Born April 18, 1942 (1942-04-18) (age 65)

Robert Christgau (born April 18, 1942), is an American essayist, music journalist, and the self-declared "Dean of American Rock Critics".[1] In print, his name is sometimes abbreviated as Xgau. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 315 × 599 pixels Full resolution (520 × 989 pixel, file size: 170 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Robert Christgau Talk:Robert Christgau... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... An essayist is an author who writes compositions which can be about any particular subject. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Music critic. ... Music journalism is a specialized branch of entertainment journalism--especially criticism and reportage about music, usually rock, but also hip hop, classical, and electronica, among other forms. ...

Contents

Career summary

Christgau grew up in New York City, where he says he became a rock and roll fan when disk jockey Alan Freed moved to the city in 1954. He left New York for four years to attend Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, graduating in 1962. While at college, Christgau's musical interests turned to jazz, but he quickly returned to rock and roll after moving back to New York. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ...


He initially wrote short stories, before giving up on fiction in 1964 to become a sportswriter and, later, a police reporter for the Newark Star-Ledger. Christgau became a freelance writer after a story he wrote about the death of a woman in New Jersey was published by New York magazine. He was asked to take over the dormant music column at Esquire, which he began writing in early 1967. After Esquire discontinued the column, Christgau moved to the The Village Voice in 1969 and also worked as a college teacher. The Star-Ledger is the leading newspaper in New Jersey. ... Headquarters New York magazine is a weekly magazine, founded in 1968, concerned with the life, culture, politics, and style of New York City. ... Esquire is a magazine for men owned by the Hearst Corporation. ... This article is about a New York newspaper. ...


In early 1972, he accepted a full-time job as music critic for Newsday. Christgau returned to the Village Voice in 1974 as music editor. He remained there until August 2006 when he was fired "for taste" shortly after the paper's acquisition by New Times Media.[2] Two months later, Christgau became a contributing editor at Rolling Stone. Newsday is a daily tabloid-size newspaper that primarily serves Long Island and the New York City borough of Queens, although it is sold throughout the New York City metropolitan area. ... The New Times Media corporation was a national publisher of alternative weekly newspapers. ... This article is about the magazine. ...


Christgau has also written frequently for Playboy, Spin, Creem, and Blender. As of 2005, he is also an adjunct professor in the Clive Davis Department of Recorded Music at New York University (NYU). Playboy is an American mens magazine, founded in 1953 by Hugh Hefner and his associates, which has grown into Playboy Enterprises, Inc. ... Spin is a music magazine that reports on all the music that rocks. Founded in 1985 by publisher Bob Guccione, Jr. ... CREEM, Americas Only Rock n Roll Magazine, was a monthly rock n roll publication started in 1969 by Barry Kramer and founding editor Tony Reay. ... Blender is an American magazine that bills itself as the ultimate guide to music and more. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ...


Consumer Guide

Christgau is perhaps best known for his Consumer Guide columns, which have been published on a more-or-less monthly basis since 1969, mostly in the Village Voice but for a brief period in the New York daily newspaper Newsday. In December 2006, the column moved online to MSN Music, initially appearing every other month before switching to a monthly schedule in June 2007. In its original format, the Consumer Guide consisted of 18 to 20 single-paragraph album reviews, each of which was given a letter grade ranging from A+ to E-. "Christgau's blurbs," writes Jody Rosen, "are like no one else's—dense with ideas and allusions, first-person confessions and invective, highbrow references and slang."[1] New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Newsday is a daily tabloid-size newspaper that primarily serves Long Island and the New York City borough of Queens, although it is sold throughout the New York City metropolitan area. ... MSN Music was created by Microsoft in 2004 to compete with Apples iTunes Music Store. ...


In 1990, Christgau changed the format of the Consumer Guide in order to concentrate more on good albums at the expense of mediocre ones. The Consumer Guide now contains six to eight reviews graded upper-B+ or higher, one "Dud of the Month" review graded B or lower, and three lists: Honorable Mention (B+ albums deemed not worthy of full-paragraph reviews), Choice Cuts (excellent tracks on un-recommended albums), and Duds. For several years, there were two annual Consumer Guide columns which strayed from this format: The Turkey Shoot (typically published the week of Thanksgiving), which consisted entirely of reviews graded B- or lower, and a Christmas-season roundup of compilations and reissues, mostly graded A or A+. Both have been discontinued. The First Thanksgiving, painted by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris (1863-1930). ... Christmas is an annual holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus. ...


Pazz & Jop

In 1971, Christgau inaugurated the annual Pazz & Jop music poll. The results are published in the Village Voice every February, and compile "top ten" lists submitted by music critics across the nation. Throughout Christgau's career at the Voice, every poll was accompanied by a lengthy Christgau essay analyzing the results, and pondering the year's overall musical output. The Voice has continued the feature despite Christgau's dismissal, and although he no longer oversees the poll, Christgau continues to vote in it. The Pazz & Jop critics poll is a highly influential poll of music critics run by The Village Voice newspaper. ...


Style and tastes

In music-critic circles, he was an early supporter of hip hop and the riot grrl movement, along with other music styles. In the 1980s Christgau was a fervent booster of Afro-pop, a stance that alienated him from some in the critical community, as he seemed insufficiently interested in American and British rock music. In the 1990s, however, Christgau's interest in indie rock seemed to increase. Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Riot grrl (also frequently spelled riot grrrl) is a form of hardcore punk rock music, known for its militant feminist stance. ... Musical genres are categories which contain music which share a certain style or which have certain elements in common. ... African popular music, like African traditional music, is vast and varied. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ...


He is well known for his opposition to violent and misogynistic material in many hip hop songs, particularly gangsta rap. Some examples include his dismissal of such well-known hip hop offerings as Ice Cube's Death Certificate and N.W.A.'s Straight Outta Compton, despite their tremendous influence on the genre. However he has praised other rappers reputed to be equally misogynst, including Eminem.This is best understood in terms of Christgau's long-stated preference for humor and irony. Christgau calls Eminem's work a "satiric, cautionary fiction," entirely different from the humorlessness of much hip hop. Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... For the Ice T album, see Gangsta Rap (album). ... OShea Jackson (born June 15, 1969) better known by his stage name, Ice Cube, is an American rapper, actor and film director. ... Death Certificate is the second solo album from rapper Ice Cube, released by Priority Records on October 29, 1991. ... This article is about the album. ... Marshall Bruce Mathers III (born October 17, 1972), better known as Eminem or Slim Shady, is a Grammy and Academy Award-winning American rapper, record producer and actor from the Detroit, Michigan area. ...


In December 1980, Christgau provoked angry responses from Voice readers when his column approvingly quoted his wife's reaction to the murder of John Lennon: "Why is it always John Lennon and John F. Kennedy? Why isn't it ever Paul McCartney and Richard Nixon?" Christgau later conceded that it was a poor decision to print this comment. John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


Jody Rosen describes Christgau's writing as "often maddening, always thought-provoking… With Pauline Kael, Christgau is arguably one of the two most important American mass-culture critics of the second half of the 20th century. … All rock critics working today, at least the ones who want to do more than rewrite PR copy, are in some sense Christgauians."[1] Pauline Kael (June 19, 1919 – September 3, 2001) was an American film critic who wrote for The New Yorker magazine. ...


Notes and references

  1. ^ a b c Jody Rosen, X-ed Out: The Village Voice fires a famous music critic, Slate, September 5, 2006. Retrieved on 15 October 2006.
  2. ^ Longtime Rock Critic, Christgau, Axed at 'Village Voice' in Latest Layoffs, Editor & Publisher, August 31, 2006 Retrieved on 20 October 2006.

is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Robert Christgau - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (537 words)
Robert Christgau (sometimes abbreviated in print to "Xgau"), born April 18, 1942, is an American essayist, music journalist, and rock critic.
In the 1980s Christgau was a fervent booster of world music, a stance that alienated him from some in the critical community, as he seemed insufficiently interested in American and British rock music.
Christgau is perhaps best known for his Consumer Guide columns, which have been published on a more-or-less monthly basis since 1969, mostly in the Village Voice but for a brief period in the New York daily newspaper Newsday.
The Memphis Flyer: Music Book - June 10 - 16, 1999 (554 words)
Christgau is probably best known for his Consumer Guide record-review column in The Village Voice, where he's been a staffer for the last 25 years.
Robert Christgau, not Greil Marcus or Dave Marsh or Peter Guralnick or the late Lester Bangs, is the greatest of all rock critics.
An element of Christgau's writing common to academia but sorely missing from most mainstream criticism is a concentration on audiences, a belief in the collective creation of public art.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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