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Encyclopedia > Robert Burnell

Robert Burnell (died October 25, 1292) was an English bishop who served as Lord Chancellor of England in the years 1274-1292. October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 67 days remaining. ... For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the British Isles Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. ... Events May 7 - In France the Second Council of Lyons opens to consider the condition of the Holy Land and to agree to a union with the Byzantine church. ... For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ...


He was born at Acton Burnell in Shropshire, and probably began his public life as a clerk in the royal chancery. He was soon in the service of Edward, the eldest son of King Henry III, and was constantly in attendance on the prince, whose complete confidence he appears to have enjoyed. Having received some ecclesiastical preferments, he acted as one of the regents of the kingdom from the death of Henry III in November 1272 until August 1274, when the new king, Edward I, returned from Palestine and made him his chancellor. Acton Burnell is a village in the English county of Shropshire. ... Shropshire (abbreviated Salop or Shrops) is a traditional, ceremonial and administrative county in the West Midlands region of England. ... Court of Chancery, London, late 18th century The Court of Chancery was one of the courts of equity in England and Wales. ... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) is one of the least-known British monarchs, considering the great length of his reign. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... Events May 7 - In France the Second Council of Lyons opens to consider the condition of the Holy Land and to agree to a union with the Byzantine church. ... Edward I (June 17, 1239–July 7, 1307), popularly known as Longshanks because of his 6 foot 2 inch frame and the Hammer of the Scots (his tombstone, in Latin, read, Hic est Edwardvs Primus Scottorum Malleus, Here lies Edward I, Hammer of the Scots), achieved fame as the monarch... Map of the British Mandate of Palestine. ...


In 1275 Burnell was elected Bishop of Bath and Wells where he built the hall and chapel at the Bishop's Palace. Three years later Edward repeated the attempt which he had made in 1270 to secure the archbishopric of Canterbury for his favourite. The bishop's second failure to obtain this dignity was probably due to the unacceptability of his lifestyle, which also partly accounts for the hostility between himself and his victorious rival, Archbishop Thomas Peckham. Events Eleanor de Montfort is captured by pirates in the employ of Edward I of England to prevent her marriage to Llywelyn the Last, prince of Jews over the age of 7 to wear the yellow badge and makes usury illegal Jean de Meun writes the second portion of the... The Bishop of Bath and Wells is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Bath and Wells in the Province of Canterbury. ... Arms of the see of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ...


As the chief adviser of Edward I during the earlier part of his reign, and as a trained and able lawyer, the bishop took a prominent part in the legislative acts of the "English Justinian," whose activity, in this direction coincides with Burnell's tenure of the office of chancellor. The bishop also influenced the king's policy with regard to France, Scotland and Wales; was frequently employed on business of the highest moment; and was the royal mouthpiece on several important occasions. In 1283 a council resembling a parliament met in his house at Acton Burnell, and he was responsible for the settlement of the court of chancery in London. In spite of his numerous engagements, Burnell found time to aggrandize his bishopric, to provide liberally for his nephews and other kinsmen, and to pursue his cherished but futile aim of founding a great family. He amassed great wealth; and on his death he left numerous estates in Shropshire, Worcestershire, Somerset, Kent, Surrey and elsewhere. Justinian I depicted on one of the famous mosaics of the St. ... Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within the UK Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... For an explanation of often confusing terms such as Great Britain, Britain, United Kingdom and England, see British Isles (terminology). ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... The British Houses of Parliament, London, UK A parliament is a legislature, especially in those countries whose system of government is based on the Westminster system derived from that of the United Kingdom. ... London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Shropshire (abbreviated Salop or Shrops) is a traditional, ceremonial and administrative county in the West Midlands region of England. ... Worcestershire (pronounced ; abbreviated Worcs) is a county located in the West Midlands region of central England. ... Somerset is a county in the south-west of England. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... Surrey is a county in southern England, part of the South East England region and one of the Home Counties. ...


Although Burnell passed away in Berwick, his body rests in the nave of his cathedral in Wells. The place-name Berwick may refer to: Berwick, Victoria, Australia Berwick, Sussex, England Berwick, Louisiana, United States Berwick, Maine, United States Berwick, Nova Scotia, Canada Berwick, Pennsylvania, United States Berwick-upon-Tweed, England North Berwick, East Lothian, Scotland This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages... A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Anglican, Roman Catholic and some Lutheran churches, which serves as the central church of a diocese, and thus as a bishops seat. ... The west front of Wells Cathedral Wells is a small city and civil parish in the Mendip district of Somerset. ...

Preceded by:
Walter de Merton
Lord Chancellor
1274–1292
Succeeded by:
John Langton
Preceded by:
William of Bitton II
Bishop of Bath and Wells
1275–1292
Succeeded by:
William of March

Walter de Merton (c. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. ... John Langton (died 1337), chancellor of England and bishop of Chichester, was a clerk in the royal chancery, and became chancellor in 1292. ... The Bishop of Bath and Wells is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Bath and Wells in the Province of Canterbury. ...

References

Primary sources

This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, a publication in the public domain. The 11th edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1910-1911) is the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


Online sources


  Results from FactBites:
 
Robert Burnell - LoveToKnow 1911 (389 words)
1292), English bishop and chancellor, was born at Acton Burnell in Shropshire, and began his public life probably as a clerk in the royal chancery.
In 1275 Burnell was elected bishop of Bath and Wells, and three years later Edward repeated the attempt which he had made in 1270 to secure the archbishopric of Canterbury for his favourite.
In 1283 a council, or, as it is sometimes called, a parliament, met in his house at Acton Burnell, and he was responsible for the settlement of the court of chancery in London.
Acton Burnell Castle (1012 words)
Acton Burnell Castle is the remains of a fortified manor house built in the 13th century by Robert Burnell, Chancellor of England and close friend of King Edward the First.
Acton Burnell Castle is a ruin of a fortified manor house built in the 13 century (1284) by Robert Burnell, a powerful landowner and friend of King Edward I. Acton Burnell is one of Shropshire’s two fortified manor houses, the second being Stokesay Castle at Craven Arms (English Heritage).
Robert Burnell left behind not only the castle, but was responsible for building the village up to what it is today and for St Mary’s Church (1260-1289) which sits between the castle and the hall.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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