FACTOID # 5: Minnesota and Connecticut are both in the top 5 in saving money and total tax burden per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Robert Bunsen
Robert Bunsen

Born 31 March 1811(1811-03-31)
Göttingen, Germany
Died 16 August 1899 (aged 88)
Heidelberg, Germany
Residence Germany
Nationality German
Field Chemist
Institutions Polytechnic School of Kassel
University of Marburg
University of Heidelberg
Alma mater University of Göttingen
Academic advisor   Friedrich Stromeyer
Notable students   Adolf von Baeyer

Georg Ludwig Carius
Adolph Wilhelm Hermann Kolbe
Adolf Lieben
Henry Enfield Roscoe
Carl Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig
Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 1811 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Göttingen marketplace with old city hall, Gänseliesel fountain and pedestrian zone Göttingen ( ) is a city in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Heidelberg is a city in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... A chemist pours from a round-bottom flask. ... University of Marburg - Department of Social Sciences and University library The old university The University of Marburg (German: Philipps-Universität Marburg Philips University, Marburg), was founded in 1527 by Landgrave Philipp I of Hesse (usually called the Magnanimous, although the updated meaning haughty is sometimes given) as the... The Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg (German Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; also known as simply University of Heidelberg) was established in the town of Heidelberg in the Rhineland in 1386. ... The Georg-August University of Göttingen (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, often called the Georgia Augusta) was founded in 1734 by George II, King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover, and opened in 1737. ... Friedrich Stromeyer (1776 - 1835) was a German chemist. ... Johann Friedrich Wilhelm Adolf von Baeyer (October 31, 1835 - August 20, 1917) was a German chemist who synthesized indigo, and was the 1905 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry . ... Image File history File links Nobel_prize_medal. ... Georg Ludwig Carius (1829 - 1875) was a German chemist born in Heidelberg. ... Adolph Wilhelm Hermann Kolbe (September 27, 1818 – November 25, 1884) was a chemist. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Sir Henry Enfield Roscoe (January 7, 1833 - 1915) English chemist, was born in London. ... Carl F.W. Ludwig (1816-1895) Carl Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig (b. ...

Viktor Meyer
Known for Discoveries of cesium and rubidium
Bunsen burner
Notable prizes Copley medal (1860)

Robert Wilhelm Eberhard Bunsen (31 March 181116 August 1899) was a German chemist. With his laboratory assistant, Peter Desaga, he developed the Bunsen burner. Bunsen also worked on emission spectroscopy of heated elements, and with Gustav Kirchhoff he discovered the elements cesium and rubidium. Bunsen developed several gas-analytical methods, he was a pioneer in photochemistry, and he did early work in the field of organoarsenic chemistry. Viktor Meyer (8 September 1848 – 8 August 1897) was a German chemist and significant contributor to knowledge of both organic and inorganic chemistry. ... General Name, Symbol, Number Caesium, Cs, 55 Series Alkali metals Group, Period, Block 1(IA), 6, s Density, Hardness 1879 kg/m3, 0. ... General Name, Symbol, Number rubidium, Rb, 37 Chemical series alkali metals Group, Period, Block 1, 5, s Appearance grey white Atomic mass 85. ... Look up Bunsen burner in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Copley Medal is a scientific award for work in any field of science, the highest award granted by the Royal Society of London. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 1811 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A chemist pours from a round-bottom flask. ... Instrument maker at the University of Heidelberg, who worked with Robert Wilhelm Bunsen. ... Look up Bunsen burner in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Electromagnetic spectroscopy a. ... Gustav Robert Kirchhof (March 12, 1824 – October 17, 1887) was a German physicist who contributed to the fundamental understanding of electrical circuits, spectroscopy, and the emission of black-body radiation by heated objects. ... General Name, Symbol, Number Caesium, Cs, 55 Series Alkali metals Group, Period, Block 1(IA), 6, s Density, Hardness 1879 kg/m3, 0. ... General Name, Symbol, Number rubidium, Rb, 37 Chemical series alkali metals Group, Period, Block 1, 5, s Appearance grey white Atomic mass 85. ... An organoarsenic compound in organic chemistry is an organic compound containing a chemical bond between arsenic and carbon. ...

Contents

Life and work

Bunsen was born in Göttingen. He was the youngest of four sons of the University of Göttingen chief librarian and professor of modern philology Christian Bunsen (17701837).[1] After attending school in Prozzie-Ville, he studied chemistry. During this time, he met Friedrich Runge (who discovered aniline and in 1819 isolated caffeine), Justus von Liebig in Gießen, and Alexander Mitscherlich in Bonn. Göttingen marketplace with old city hall, Gänseliesel fountain and pedestrian zone Göttingen ( ) is a city in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... The Georg-August University of Göttingen (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, often called the Georgia Augusta) was founded in 1734 by George II, King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover, and opened in 1737. ... Christian Bunsen may refer to Christian Charles Josias Bunsen (1791–1860), Prussian diplomatist and scholar Christian Bunsen (librarian)(1770–1837), Göttingens chief librarian and professor of modern philology, father of Robert Bunsen Category: ... For the village in Queensland, see 1770, Queensland. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Friedrich (or Friedlieb/Friedlob) Ferdinand Runge (born near Hamburg on 8 February 1795, died in Oranienburg on 25 March 1867) was an analytical chemist. ... Aniline, phenylamine or aminobenzene is an organic compound with the formula C6H5NH2. ... Caffeine is a xanthine alkaloid compound that acts as a stimulant in humans. ... Freiherr Justus von Liebig (May 12, 1803 in Darmstadt, Germany – April 18, 1873 in Munich, Germany) was a German chemist who made major contributions to agricultural and biological chemistry, and worked on the organization of organic chemistry. ... theatre in Giessen Architecture in Giessen Giessen (German spelling Gießen) is a city in the German federal state (Bundesland) of Hesse, capital of both the Giessen district and the Giessen Administrative Region. ... Alexander Mitscherlich (b. ... Bonn is the 19th largest city in Germany, located about 20 kilometres south of Cologne on the river Rhine in the Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia. ...


After his return to Germany, Bunsen became a lecturer at Göttingen and began experimental studies of the (in)solubility of metal salts of arsenous acid. Today, his discovery of the use of iron oxide hydrate as a precipitating agent is still the best known antidote against arsenic poisoning. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Salt (disambiguation). ... Arsenous acid, ,also known as arsenious acid, is the hydrolyzed form of arsenic trioxide and has the formula As(OH)3. ... Iron oxide pigment There are a number of iron oxides: Iron oxides Iron(II) oxide or ferrous oxide (FeO) The black-coloured powder in particular can cause explosions as it readily ignites. ... Hydrate is a term which means different things in inorganic chemistry and organic chemistry. ... Precipitation is the formation of a solid in a solution during a chemical reaction. ... An antidote is a substance which can counteract a form of poisoning. ... Arsenic poisoning kills by allosteric inhibition of essential metabolic enzymes, leading to death from multi-system organ failure. ...


In 1836, Bunsen succeeded Friedrich Wöhler at Kassel. Bunsen taught there for two years, and then accepted a position at the University of Marburg, where he studied cacodyl derivatives. Although Bunsen's work brought him quick and wide acclaim, cacodyl, (CH3)2As—As(CH3)2, is toxic, has a strong smell, and undergoes spontaneous combustion in dry air. Bunsen almost died from arsenic poisoning, and an explosion with cacodyl cost him sight in his right eye. In 1841, Bunsen created the Bunsen cell, using a carbon electrode instead of the expensive platinum electrode used in William Robert Grove's Grove cell. Friedrich Wöhler (July 31, 1800 - September 23, 1882) was a German chemist, best-known for his synthesis of urea, but also the first to isolate several of the elements. ... This article is about the city of Kassel in Hessen, Germany. ... University of Marburg - Department of Social Sciences and University library The old university The University of Marburg (German: Philipps-Universität Marburg Philips University, Marburg), was founded in 1527 by Landgrave Philipp I of Hesse (usually called the Magnanimous, although the updated meaning haughty is sometimes given) as the... Space-filling model of cacodyl Cacodyl, dicacodyl, tetramethyldiarsine, alkarsine or Cadets liquid (after the French chemist Louis Claude Cadet de Gassicourt) (CH3)2As—As(CH3)2 is a poisonous oily liquid with a garlicky odor. ... General Name, Symbol, Number arsenic, As, 33 Chemical series metalloids Group, Period, Block 15, 4, p Appearance metallic gray Standard atomic weight 74. ... Bunsens cell The Bunsen cell, is a zinc-carbon electric cell (colloquially called battery) composed of a zinc electrode in dilute sulphuric acid separated by a porous diaphragm from a carbon (graphite) electrode in nitric or chromic acid. ... For other uses, see Carbon (disambiguation). ... An electrode is an electrical conductor used to make contact with a metallic part of a circuit (e. ... General Name, Symbol, Number platinum, Pt, 78 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 10, 6, d Appearance grayish white Standard atomic weight 195. ... Sir William Robert Grove (1811 – 1896) was a British chemist born in Swansea in Wales. ... The Grove cell was an early electric cell named after its inventor, British chemist William Robert Grove, and consisted of a zinc electrode in dilute sulfuric acid and a platinum electrode in concentrated nitric acid, the two separated by a porous ceramic pot. ...


In 1852, Bunsen took the position of Leopold Gmelin at Heidelberg. There he used electrolysis to produce pure metals, such as chromium, magnesium, aluminium, manganese, sodium, barium, calcium and lithium. A ten-year collaboration with Henry Enfield Roscoe began in 1852, in which they studied the photochemical formation of hydrogen chloride from hydrogen and chlorine. Leopold Gmelin (August 2, 1788 - April 13, 1853) was a German chemist. ... The Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg (German Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; also known as simply University of Heidelberg) was established in the town of Heidelberg in the Rhineland in 1386. ... This article is about the chemical process. ... For alternative meanings see metal (disambiguation). ... General Name, symbol, number chromium, Cr, 24 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 6, 4, d Appearance silvery metallic Standard atomic weight 51. ... General Name, symbol, number magnesium, Mg, 12 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, period, block 2, 3, s Appearance silvery white solid at room temp Standard atomic weight 24. ... “Aluminum” redirects here. ... General Name, symbol, number manganese, Mn, 25 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 7, 4, d Appearance silvery metallic Standard atomic weight 54. ... For sodium in the diet, see Edible salt. ... For other uses, see Barium (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Calcium (disambiguation). ... This article is about the chemical element named Lithium. ... Sir Henry Enfield Roscoe (January 7, 1833 - 1915) English chemist, was born in London. ... R-phrases , S-phrases , , , , Flash point non-flammable Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ... General Name, Symbol, Number hydrogen, H, 1 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 1, 1, s Appearance colorless Atomic mass 1. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Bunsen discontinued his work with Roscoe in 1859 and joined Gustav Kirchhoff to study emission spectra of heated elements, a research area called spectrum analysis. For this work, Bunsen and his laboratory assistant, Peter Desaga, had perfected a special gas burner by 1855, influenced by an earlier one of Michael Faraday. The newer design of Bunsen and Desaga is now called simply the "Bunsen burner".[2][3] Gustav Robert Kirchhof (March 12, 1824 – October 17, 1887) was a German physicist who contributed to the fundamental understanding of electrical circuits, spectroscopy, and the emission of black-body radiation by heated objects. ... Origins: There is considerable evidence that spectrum analysis actually had its origin in western Pennsylvania. ... Instrument maker at the University of Heidelberg, who worked with Robert Wilhelm Bunsen. ... Michael Faraday, FRS (September 22, 1791 – August 25, 1867) was an English chemist and physicist (or natural philosopher, in the terminology of that time) who contributed significantly to the fields of electromagnetism and electrochemistry. ... Look up Bunsen burner in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


When Bunsen retired at the age of 78, he shifted his work solely to geology and mineralogy, an interest which he had pursued throughout his career. He died in Heidelberg, and is buried there. This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Mineralogy is an earth science that involves the chemistry, crystal structure, and physical (including optical) properties of minerals. ... Heidelberg is a city in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ...


For further reading

Bunsen's grave in Heidelberg's Bergfriedhof
Bunsen's grave in Heidelberg's Bergfriedhof[4]
  • Gasometry: Comprising the Leading Physical and Chemical Properties of Gases by Robert Bunsen (1857) London: Walton and Maberly (translated by Henry Roscoe)
  • Robert Wilhelm Bunsen, G. Lockeman, 1949.
  • Gasometrische Methoden (reprint), with extended foreword by F. M. Schwandner (in German); Ostwalds Klassiker der Naturwissenschaften 269, 2006, ISBN 3-8171-3296-4. (includes an extensive list of Bunsen's students)
  • Sir Henry Roscoe's "Bunsen Memorial Lecture," Trans. Chem. Soc., 1900, reprinted (in German) with other obituary notices in an edition of Bunsen's collected works published by Ostwald and Bodenstein in 3 vols. at Leipzig in 1904.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 6. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 6. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ (1900) "Profesor Robert W. Bunsen". The Journal of the American Chemical Society 23: 89 – 107. Retrieved on 2007-09-11. 
  2. ^ Jensen, William B. (2005). "The Origin of the Bunsen Burner". Journal of Chemical Education 82 (4). 
  3. ^ See Michael Faraday's Chemical Manipulation, Being Instructions to Students in Chemistry (1827)
  4. ^ See http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heidelberger Bergfriedhof

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikisource has an original article from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica about:
Bunsen, Robert Wilhelm von
Persondata
NAME Bunsen, Robert
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Chemist
DATE OF BIRTH 31 March 1811
PLACE OF BIRTH Göttingen, Germany
DATE OF DEATH 16 August 1899
PLACE OF DEATH Heidelberg, Germany

  Results from FactBites:
 
Robert Wilhelm Bunsen (2043 words)
Bunsen was born on March 31, 1811 in Göttingen, Germany, the youngest of four sons.
In 1836, Bunsen was nominated to succeed Wöhler at Kassel.
Bunsen's habit was to assign a scientific task to his students and then to work with a student only as long as required to reach some measure of independence.
Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Robert Wilhelm Bunsen (338 words)
Robert Wilhelm Bunsen (March 30, 1811-August 16, 1899) was a German chemist.
After his return to Germany, Bunsen became a lecturer at Göttingen and began experimental studies of the (in)solubility of metal salts of arsenious acid[?].
For that purpose, Bunsen developed a special gas burner in 1885 that was later named the "Bunsen burner".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m