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Encyclopedia > Robert Browning
Robert Browning

Born: May 7, 1812
Flag of England Camberwell, England
Died: December 12, 1889
Flag of Italy Venice, Italy
Occupation: Poet
Playwright

Robert Browning (May 7, 1812December 12, 1889) was a British poet and playwright whose mastery of dramatic verse, especially dramatic monologues, made him one of the foremost Victorian poets. Image File history File links Robert_Browning_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_13103. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Camberwell is a district of London, England, in the London Borough of Southwark. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the United Kingdom anthem is God Save the Queen. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venetian: Venezsia, Latin: Venetia) is a city in northern Italy, the capital of region Veneto, and has a population of 271,251 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... Verse drama is any drama written as verse to be spoken; another possible general terms is poetic drama. ... A dramatic monologue is a type of poem, developed during the Victorian period, in which a character in fiction or in history delivers a speech explaining his or her feelings, actions, or motives. ... Charles Dickens is still one of the best known English writers of any era. ...

Contents

Youth

Robert Browning was born in Camberwell[1], a suburb of London,England, on May 7, 1812, the first son of Robert and Sarah Wiedemann Browning. His father was a man of fine intellect and equally fine character, who worked as a well-paid clerk in the Bank of England and so managed to amass a library of around 6,000 books — many of them highly obscure and arcane. Thus Robert was raised in a household with good literary resources. His mother, to whom he was ardently attached, was a devout Nonconformist, the daughter of a German shipowner who had settled in Dundee, and was alike intellectually and morally worthy of his affection. The only other member of the family was a younger sister, also highly gifted, who was the sympathetic companion of his later years. They lived simply, but his father encouraged Robert's interest in literature and the arts. Camberwell is a district of London, England, in the London Borough of Southwark. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the United Kingdom anthem is God Save the Queen. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... Headquarters Coordinates , , Governor Mervyn King Central Bank of United Kingdom Currency Pound Sterling ISO 4217 Code GBP Base borrowing rate 5. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... A nonconformist is an English or Welsh Protestant of any non-Anglican denomination, chiefly advocating religious liberty. ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ...


In his childhood he was distinguished by his love of poetry and natural history. At twelve, he had written a book of poetry which he destroyed when he could not find a publisher. After being at one or two private schools, and showing an insuperable dislike of school life, he was educated by a tutor. In British, Australian, New Zealand, and some Canadian universities, a tutor is often but not always a postgraduate student or a lecturer assigned to conduct a seminar for undergraduate students, often known as a tutorial. ...


He was a rapid learner and by the age of fourteen was fluent in French, Greek, Italian, and Latin as well as his native English. He became a great admirer of the Romantic poets, especially Shelley. In imitation of the latter, he briefly became an atheist and a vegetarian, but in later life he looked back on this as a passing phase. At age sixteen, he attended University College, London, but dropped out after his first year. His mother’s strong evangelical faith prevented him from attending Oxford or Cambridge, which were then still closed to people who were not members of the Church of England. Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Romantic poetry was part of the Romantic movement of European literature during the 18th-19th centuries. ... -1... For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ... For animals adapted to eat primarily plants, sometimes referred to as vegetarian animals, see Herbivore. ... The Front Quad University College London, commonly known as UCL, is one of the colleges that make up the University of London. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... Geography Status City (1951) Region East of England Admin. ... The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ...


Through his mother he inherited some musical talent, and composed settings for various songs. His grandmother was also of Creole blood. Thomas Chase wrote of Browning's dark complexion skin, and his curly hair. The same was true of his Jamaican English-born wife, Elizabeth Barrett. This article is about an ethnic culture in Louisiana, USA. For uses of the term Creole in other countries and cultures, see Creole (disambiguation). ... Elizabeth Barrett Browning Elizabeth Barrett Browning (March 6, 1806 – June 29, 1861) was a member of the Barrett family and one of the most respected poets of the Victorian era. ...


Early career

A younger Robert Browning
A younger Robert Browning

In May 1833, Browning's Pauline: A Fragment of a Confession was published anonymously by Saunders and Otley. In many ways a vanity publication financed by his family, this marked the beginning of his career as a poet. A lengthy confessional poem, it was intended by its young author to be merely one of a series of works produced by various fictitious versions of himself (the poet, the composer, etc.), but Browning abandoned the larger project. He was much embarrassed by Pauline in later life, contributing a somewhat contrite preface to the 1868 edition of his Collected Poems asking for his readers' indulgence when reading what in his eyes was practically a piece of juvenilia, before undertaking extensive revisions to the poem in time for the 1888 edition, with the remark "twenty years' endurance of an eyesore seems long enough". File links The following pages link to this file: Robert Browning ... File links The following pages link to this file: Robert Browning ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Modern confessional in the Church of the Holy Name, Dunedin, New Zealand. ... Poetry (ancient Greek: poieo = create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... Childhood (song) Childhood is a broad term usually applied to the phase of development in humans between infancy and adulthood. ...


In 1834, he paid his first visit to Italy, in which so much of his future life was to be passed.


In 1835, Browning wrote the lengthy dramatic poem Paracelsus, essentially a series of monologues spoken by the Swiss doctor and alchemist Paracelsus and his friends. Published under Browning's own name, in an edition financed by his father, the poem was a small commercial and critical success and gained the notice of Carlyle, Wordsworth, and other men of letters, giving him a reputation as a poet of distinguished promise. Around this time the young poet was very much in demand in literary circles for his ready wit and flamboyant sense of style, and he embarked upon two ill-considered ventures: a series of plays for the theatre, all of which were dismally unsuccessful and none of which are much remembered today; and Sordello, a very lengthy poem in rhymed pentameter and loosely drawing upon a historical character who also (briefly) appears in Dante's Divine Comedy. Set against the backdrop of the conflict between the Guelphs and Ghibellines, Sordello was already difficult to understand for a Victorian audience that was accustomed to the annotation in historical fiction. Browning's syntax, style, and - perhaps most of all - his plot made an already confusing subject virtually incomprehensible, and the young poet became the butt of a number of satirical quips, such as Mrs. Carlyle's celebrated comment that she had read the entire thing through without being able to work out whether Sordello was a man, a city or a book. The effect on Browning's career was catastrophic, and he would not recover his good public standing — and the good sales that accompanied it — until the publication of The Ring and the Book nearly thirty years later. For other uses, see Alchemy (disambiguation). ... Presumed portrait of Paracelsus, attributed to the school of Quentin Matsys. ... The most familiar view of Carlyle is as the bearded sage with a penetrating gaze. ... William Wordsworth (April 7, 1770 – April 23, 1850) was a major English romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped launch the Romantic Age in English literature with their 1798 joint publication, Lyrical Ballads. ... Look up Wit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sordello was a 13th-century Italian troubadour, born in Mantua. ... In poetry, a pentameter is a line of verse consisting of five metrical feet: Be what you can if thus your heart so deem, For more the man will less the foible seem. ... DANTE is also a digital audio network. ... Dante shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, in Michelinos fresco. ... The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in central and northern Italy during the 12th and 13th centuries. ... The Ring and the Book is a long dramatic narrative poem of 21,000 lines by Robert Browning, published in four installments in 1868-9. ...


Throughout the early 1840s he continued to publish volumes of plays and shorter poems, under the general series title Bells and Pomegranates. Although the plays, with the exception of Pippa Passes — in many ways more of a dramatic poem than an actual play — are almost entirely forgotten, the volumes of poetry (Dramatic Lyrics, first published in 1842, and 1845's Dramatic Romances and Lyrics) are often considered to be among the poet's best work, containing many of his best-known poems, such as The Pied Piper of Hamelin, My Last Duchess and the paired poems Meeting at Night and Parting at Morning. Though much admired now, the volumes were largely ignored at the time in the wake of the Sordello debacle. // First use of general anesthesia in an operation, by Crawford Long The first electrical telegraph sent by Samuel Morse on May 24, 1844 from Baltimore to Washington, D.C.. First signing of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi, Northland New Zealand. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pippa Passes was a dramatic piece, as much play as poetry, by Robert Browning published in 1841 as the first volume of his Bells and Pomegranates series. ... Dramatic Lyrics is a collection of English poems by Robert Browning, first published in 1842 as the second volume in a series of self-published books entitled Bells and Pomegranates. ... Dramatic Romances and Lyrics is a collection of English poems by Robert Browning, first published in 1845 as the seventh volume in a series of self-published books entitled Bells and Pomegranates. ... The oldest picture of Pied Piper (watercolour) copied from the glass window of Marktkirche in Hamelin by Freiherr Augustin von Moersperg. ... My Last Duchess is a poem by Robert Browning, frequently anthologized as an outstanding example of the dramatic monologue. ...


Marriage and major monologues

Robert Browning married Elizabeth Barrett at St Marylebone Parish Church in 1846 after a courtship that lasted two years and gave rise to one of the most celebrated epistolary correspondences in literary history. After their elopement and secret marriage, the pair left England. Doctors had recommended Elizabeth to live in Italy because the warmer climate would help her lung condition. This coincided happily with the fact that the cost of living was very much lower in Italy than England, and the couple were totally dependent on Elizabeth’s small income, since Browning had yet to earn anything much from his writing. They moved to Pisa, Italy, and then to Florence, Italy, where their son Robert Wiedemann Barrett Browning (1849-1912), who was known to the family as "Pen", was born in 1849. They lived in apartments in a palace known as the Casa Guidi in Florence, although they made some trips to England and France. Elizabeth Barrett Browning Elizabeth Barrett Browning (Moulton) (March 6, 1806-June 29, 1861) was the most respected female poet of the Victorian era. ... // St Marylebone Parish Church is a church in London, from which Marylebone gets its name. ... Pisas coat of arms. ... Florence (Italian, Firenze) is a city in the center of Tuscany, in central Italy, on the Arno River, with a population of around 400,000, plus a suburban population in excess of 200,000. ...


During this period Elizabeth published several major works: most notably Casa Guidi Windows, a long poem, and Aurora Leigh, a verse novel. Robert published a volume of theological poetry - Christmas-Eve and Easter-Day - and wrote the two volumes on which his reputation was principally to rest during the Twentieth Century: Men and Women (1855) and Dramatis Personae (1864). In these collections, Browning included many of the finest examples of the dramatic monologue, a form of poetry of which he and Tennyson were the principal pioneers and that was to exert a significant influence upon such later poets as T.S. Eliot and Ezra Pound. Amongst the canonical examples of this form are such among Browning's monologues of this period as: "Andrea del Sarto", "Fra Lippo Lippi", "Bishop Blougram's Apology", "A Death in the Desert", "Caliban upon Setebos" and "Mr. Sludge, "The Medium"". Aurora Leigh (1856) is a lengthy poem by Elizabeth Barrett Browning and the name of its eponymous heroine. ... Men and Women is a collection of English poems published by Robert Browning in 1855. ... Dramatis personae is a Latin phrase (literally the persons of the drama) for the characters in the plot of a play, and is used to refer collectively to the characters represented in a dramatic work (various forms of theater, but also on screen) to be played by the acting cast... A dramatic monologue is a type of poem, developed during the Victorian period, in which a character in fiction or in history delivers a speech explaining his or her feelings, actions, or motives. ... Lord Tennyson, Poet Laureate Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (August 6, 1809 - October 6, 1892) is generally regarded as one of the greatest English poets. ... Thomas Stearns Eliot (September 26, 1888 - January 4, 1965), was a major Modernist Anglo-American poet, dramatist, and literary critic. ... Ezra Pound in 1913. ... Caliban upon Setebos is a poem written by the British poet Robert Browning. ...


Although the period of his marriage was not a prolific one compared with Browning's youth or later life, it saw a steady rise in his reputation and produced some of his most enduring works. When Elizabeth died in 1861, Browning moved back to London with his son. Within four years, two selected editions of his earlier work and the eighteen new poems in Dramatis Personae brought him fame and critical recognition. For the first time in his life, he could live on his earnings from writing and enjoyed celebrity status in London society in his own right, rather than being known primarily as Elizabeth Barrett’s husband. Dramatis personae is a Latin phrase (literally the persons of the drama) for the characters in the plot of a play, and is used to refer collectively to the characters represented in a dramatic work (various forms of theater, but also on screen) to be played by the acting cast...


Late success

In 1868, Browning finally completed and published the long blank-verse poem The Ring and the Book, which would finally make him rich, famous and successful, and which ensured his critical reputation among the first rank of English poets. Based on a convoluted murder case from 1690s Rome, the poem is composed of twelve volumes, essentially comprising ten lengthy dramatic poems narrated by the various characters in the story showing their individual take on events as they transpire, bookended by an introduction and conclusion by Browning himself. Extraordinarily long even by Browning's own standards (over twenty thousand lines), The Ring and the Book was the poet's most ambitious project and has been hailed as a tour de force of dramatic poetry. Published separately in four volumes from November 1868 through to February 1869, the poem was a huge success both commercially and critically, and finally brought Browning the renown he had sought and deserved for nearly thirty years of work. The Ring and the Book is a long dramatic narrative poem of 21,000 lines by Robert Browning, published in four installments in 1868-9. ... Events and Trends Thomas Neale designed Seven Dials The Salem Witchcraft Trials are held in Massachusetts Bay Colony (1692). ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5...

1882 Caricature from Punch
1882 Caricature from Punch

With his fame and fortune secure, Browning again became the prolific writer he had been at the start of his career. In the remaining twenty years of his life, as well as travelling extensively and frequenting London literary society again, he managed to publish no less than fifteen new volumes. None of these later works gained the popularity of The Ring and the Book, and they are largely unread today. However, Browning's later work has been undergoing a major critical re-evaluation in recent years, and much of it remains of interest for its poetic quality and psychological insight. After a series of long poems published in the early 1870s, of which Fifine at the Fair and Red Cotton Night-Cap Country were the best-received, Browning again turned to shorter poems. The volume Pacchiarotto, and How He Worked in Distemper included a spiteful attack against Browning's critics, especially the later Poet Laureate Alfred Austin. Download high resolution version (570x876, 52 KB)1881 caricature of Robert Browning: scanned from Punch magazine, 22nd July 1882, page 34. ... Download high resolution version (570x876, 52 KB)1881 caricature of Robert Browning: scanned from Punch magazine, 22nd July 1882, page 34. ... // The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ... Pacchiarotto, and How He Worked in Distemper is a short collection of English poems by Robert Browning, published in 1876. ... A Poet Laureate is a poet officially appointed by a government and often expected to compose poems for state occasions and other government events. ... Alfred Austin Alfred Austin (May 3, 1835 – 1913) was an English poet, who was appointed Poet Laureate in 1896 upon the death of Tennyson. ...


According to some reports Browning became romantically involved with Lady Ashburton in the 1870s, but did not re-marry. In 1878, he returned to Italy for the first time since Elizabeth's death, and returned there on several occasions. // The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ...


The Browning Society was formed for the appreciation of his works in 1881.


In 1887, Browning produced the major work of his later years, Parleyings with Certain People of Importance In Their Day. It finally presented the poet speaking in his own voice, engaging in a series of dialogues with long-forgotten figures of literary, artistic, and philosophic history. Once more, the Victorian public was baffled by this, and Browning returned to the short, concise lyric for his last volume, Asolando (1889). The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her accession to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ...


He died at his son's home Ca' Rezzonico in Venice on 12 December 1889, the same day Asolando was published, and was buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey; his grave now lies immediately adjacent to that of Alfred Tennyson. Ca Rezzonico is a palazzo on the Grand Canal in Venice. ... Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venetian: Venezsia, Latin: Venetia) is a city in northern Italy, the capital of region Veneto, and has a population of 271,251 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Poets corner Poets Corner is the name traditionally given to a section of the South Transept of Westminster Abbey due to the number of poets, playwrights and writers now buried and commemorated there. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... Lord Tennyson, Poet Laureate Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (August 6, 1809 - October 6, 1892) is generally regarded as one of the greatest English poets. ...


Browning's poetic style

Browning’s fame today rests mainly on his dramatic monologues, in which the words not only convey setting and action but also reveal the speaker’s character. Perhaps the most sensational of these monologues is Porphyria’s Lover. The opening lines provide a sinister setting for the macabre events that follow. It is plain that the speaker is insane, as he strangles his lover with her own hair to try and preserve for ever the moment of perfect love she has shown him. These monologues greatly influenced many later poets, including Ezra Pound and T S Eliot.


Ironically, Browning’s style, which seemed modern and experimental to Victorian readers, owes much to his love of the seventeenth century poems of John Donne with their abrupt openings, colloquial phrasing and irregular rhythms.


Trivia

The last two lines of the famous "Song" from Pippa Passes — "God's in his heaven, All's right with the world!" — are parodied in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World with the hypnopaedic slogan: - "Ford's in his flivver, all's right with the world!" The lines are also used in the Japanese animations Neon Genesis Evangelion, RahXephon, and Black Lagoon. In another Japanese animation, R.O.D. the T.V., the final line is a take off stating "The Paper's in her heaven, All's right in the world." Pippa Passes was a dramatic piece, as much play as poetry, by Robert Browning published in 1841 as the first volume of his Bells and Pomegranates series. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Brave New World is a dystopian novel by Aldous Huxley, first published in 1932. ... The word Flivver is most commonly meant to indicate a Ford Model T. In a more general sense, a small, cheap car is meant. ... Original run October 4, 1995 – March 27, 1996 No. ... Original run January 2002 – September 2002[1] No. ... Serialized in Sunday GX Original run 19 April 2002 – ongoing No. ...


Robert Browning was the first person to ever have his voice heard after his death. On a recording[1] made by Thomas Edison in 1889, Browning reads "How They Brought the Good News from Ghent to Aix" (including apologizing when he forgets the words). It was first played in Venice in 1890. Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman who developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph and a long lasting light bulb. ...


John Lennon's song "Grow old with me," which was inspired by the Robert's poem Rabbi ben Ezra, appears on his album Milk and Honey. John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Rabbi ben Ezra is a poem by Robert Browning about Abraham ibn Ezra (1092-1167), one of the great poets, mathematicians and scholars of the 12th Century. ... Milk And Honey is a posthumous album by John Lennon first released in 1984. ...


Stephen King's Dark Tower series was inspired by Browning's poem Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came. Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author of over 200 stories including over 50 bestselling horror novels. ... The Dark Tower can refer to one of several things: The Dark Tower (series) — a series of novels by Stephen King. ... Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came painted by Thomas Moran in 1859 Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came is a poem by Robert Browning, written in 1855, first published that same year in the collection entitled Men and Women. ...


In the Get Carter remake, at the opening of the film, the quote "That's all we can expect of man, this side of the grave; his good is ... knowing he is bad" is shown on the screen Get Carter is a 2000 remake of the classic 1971 Michael Caine crime thriller, this time with Sylvester Stallone in the role of Jack Carter, and directed by Stephen Kay. ...


Anthony Powell used Browning's work for the titles of two of his novels; What's Become of Waring 1939 inspired by "Waring" from Dramatic Romances and Lyrics and secondly "The Soldier's Art" part of the "A Dance to the Music Of Time" sequence is named for a line from Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came. Anthony Dymoke Powell, CH (December 21, 1905 - March 28, 2000) was a British novelist best known for his A Dance to the Music of Time duodecalogy published between 1951 and 1975. ... What’s Become of Waring is the fifth novel by the English writer Anthony Powell. ... Dramatic Romances and Lyrics is a collection of English poems by Robert Browning, first published in 1845 as the seventh volume in a series of self-published books entitled Bells and Pomegranates. ... Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came painted by Thomas Moran in 1859 Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came is a poem by Robert Browning, written in 1855, first published that same year in the collection entitled Men and Women. ...


In Frasier epside "Good Grief", Frasier Crane is trying to pen an operetta about the Brownings. Frasier is an American situation comedy starring Kelsey Grammer as psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane. ... Dr. Frasier Winslow Crane (b. ... Operetta (literally, little opera) is a performance art-form similar to opera, though it generally deals with less serious topics. ...


Complete list of works

Sordello was a 13th-century Italian troubadour, born in Mantua. ... Pippa Passes was a dramatic piece, as much play as poetry, by Robert Browning published in 1841 as the first volume of his Bells and Pomegranates series. ... Dramatic Lyrics is a collection of English poems by Robert Browning, first published in 1842 as the second volume in a series of self-published books entitled Bells and Pomegranates. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... My Last Duchess is a poem by Robert Browning, frequently anthologized as an outstanding example of the dramatic monologue. ... The oldest picture of Pied Piper (watercolour) copied from the glass window of Marktkirche in Hamelin by Freiherr Augustin von Moersperg. ... Dramatic Romances and Lyrics is a collection of English poems by Robert Browning, first published in 1845 as the seventh volume in a series of self-published books entitled Bells and Pomegranates. ... Luria refers to: Salvador Luria, Itaian physician Solomon Luria, Polish poskim Alexander Romanovich Luria, Russian neuropsychologist Isaac Luria, Spanish kabbalist Luria, a long poem by Robert Browning published in 1847 Others Luria-Delbruck experiment Luria Broth This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise... Men and Women is a collection of English poems published by Robert Browning in 1855. ... A Toccata of Galuppis is a poem by Robert Browning, originally publishing in the 1855 collection Men and Women. ... Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came painted by Thomas Moran in 1859 Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came is a poem by Robert Browning, written in 1855, first published that same year in the collection entitled Men and Women. ... Fra Lippo Lippi is an 1855 dramatic monologue written by the Victorian poet Robert Browning. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wikisource. ... Dramatis personae is a Latin phrase (literally the persons of the drama) for the characters in the plot of a play, and is used to refer collectively to the characters represented in a dramatic work (various forms of theater, but also on screen) to be played by the acting cast... Caliban upon Setebos is a poem written by the British poet Robert Browning. ... Rabbi ben Ezra is a poem by Robert Browning about Abraham ibn Ezra (1092-1167), one of the great poets, mathematicians and scholars of the 12th Century. ... The Ring and the Book is a long dramatic narrative poem of 21,000 lines by Robert Browning, published in four installments in 1868-9. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Prince Hohenstiel-Schwangau, Saviour of Society is a long poem by Robert Browning, first published in 1871. ... Pacchiarotto, and How He Worked in Distemper is a short collection of English poems by Robert Browning, published in 1876. ... Jocoseria is a collection of short poems by Robert Browning, first published in 1883. ... Ferishtahs Fancies is a book of poetry by Robert Browning first published in 1884. ...

Timeline


See also

Elizabeth Barrett Browning Elizabeth Barrett Browning (March 6, 1806 – June 29, 1861) was a member of the Barrett family and one of the most respected poets of the Victorian era. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/rb/rbbio.html
  • DeVane, William Clyde. A Browning handbook. 2nd. Ed. (Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1955)
  • Drew, Philip. The poetry of Robert Browning: A critical introduction. (Methuen, 1970)
  • Hudson, Gertrude Reese. Robert Browning's literary life from first work to masterpiece. (Texas, 1992)
  • Karlin, Daniel. The courtship of Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett. (Oxford, 1985)
  • Kelley, Philip et al. (Eds.) The Brownings' correspondence. 15 vols. to date. (Wedgestone, 1984-) (Complete letters of Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Robert Browning, so far to 1849.)
  • Maynard, John. Browning's youth. (Harvard Univ. Press, 1977)
  • Chesterton, G.K. Robert Browning (1903)

For the town of Chesterton in Cambridgeshire, see Chesterton (Cambridge). ...

External links

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Robert Browning (871 words)
Robert Browning was born in Camberwell, south London, as the son of Robert Browning, a wealthy clerk in the Bank of England, and Sarah Anna Wiedemann, of German-Scottish origin.
Browning Society was founded in 1881 as an indication of the poets status as a sage and celebrity.
The Courtship of Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett
Robert Browning - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1728 words)
Robert Browning was born in Camberwell, Surrey, the first son of Robert and Sarah Wiedemann Browning.
Published under Browning's own name, in an edition financed by his father, the poem was a small commercial and critical success and gained the notice of Carlyle, Wordsworth, and other men of letters, giving him a reputation as a poet of distinguished promise.
In early 1845, Browning began corresponding with Elizabeth Barrett, a semi-invalid, and the two conducted a secret courtship away from the eyes of her domineering father before marrying in secret in 1846 - a union of ideal happiness - and eloping to Italy.
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