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Encyclopedia > Robert Borden
The Right Honourable
Sir Robert Laird Borden


In office
October 10, 1911 – July 10, 1920
Preceded by Wilfrid Laurier
Succeeded by Arthur Meighen

Born June 26, 1854(1854-06-26)
Grand Pre, Nova Scotia
Died June 10, 1937 (aged 82)
Ottawa, Ontario
Political party Conservative, Unionist
Spouse Laura Bond
Religion Anglican

Sir Robert Laird Borden, PC, GCMG, KC (June 26, 1854June 10, 1937) was the eighth Prime Minister of Canada from October 10, 1911, to July 10, 1920, and the third Nova Scotian to hold this office. The Right Honourable (abbreviated Rt Hon, The Rt Hon, The Right Hon, Right Hon) is an honorific prefix that is traditionally applied to certain people in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the Anglophone Caribbean and in other Commonwealth Realms, and elsewhere. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Laurier” redirects here. ... Arthur Meighen, PC, QC, BA, LL.D (June 16, 1874 – August 5, 1960) was the ninth Prime Minister of Canada from July 10, 1920 to December 29, 1921 and June 29 to September 25, 1926. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Grand-Pré is an unincorporated community located in Kings County, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... The Conservative Party of Canada has gone by a variety of names over the years since Canadian Confederation. ... The Unionist Party was formed in 1917 by Members of Parliament (MPs) in Canada who supported the Union government formed by Sir Robert Borden during World War I. In May 1917, Conservative Prime Minister Borden proposed the formation of a national unity government or coalition government to Liberal leader Sir... Laura Bond Borden (1863-1940) was the wife of Sir Robert Laird Borden, the eighth Prime Minister of Canada. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... The Privy Council Office as it appeared in the 1880s The Queens Privy Council for Canada (French: Conseil privé de la Reine pour le Canada) is the council of advisers to the Queen of Canada, whose members are appointed by the Governor General of Canada for life on the... On the Orders insignia, St Michael is often depicted subduing Satan. ... Queens Counsel (postnominal QC), during the reign of a male Sovereign known as Kings Counsel (KC), are barristers or, in Scotland, advocates appointed by Letters patent to be one of Her Majestys Counsel learned in the law. They do not constitute a separate order or degree of... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867...

Contents

Early life and career

Robert Laird Borden was born and educated in Grand Pre, Nova Scotia, a farming community at the eastern end of the Annapolis Valley, where his great-grandfather Perry Borden, Sr. of Tiverton, Rhode Island had taken up Acadian land in 1760. Perry had accompanied his father, Samuel Borden, the chief surveyor chosen by the government of Massachusetts to survey the former Acadian land and draw up new lots for the Planters in Nova Scotia. Robert Borden was the last Canadian Prime Minister born before Confederation. He is distantly related to the infamous Massachusetts murderess Lizzie Borden. Grand-Pré is an unincorporated community located in Kings County, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... Annapolis Valley is a valley in western Nova Scotia, formed by a trough between two parallel mountain ranges along the shore of the Bay of Fundy. ... This is for the town, for the census designated place, see Tiverton (CDP), Rhode Island Tiverton is a town in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States. ... The Acadians (French: Acadiens) are the descendants of the 17th-century French colonists who settled in Acadia (located on the northern portion of North Americas east coast). ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The New England Planters were settlers from the New England colonies who responded to requests by the lieutenant governor and, subsequently, governor of Nova Scotia, Charles Lawrence, to settle lands left vacant by the Acadian Expulsion of 1755. ... We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ... For other persons named Lizzie Borden, see Lizzie Borden (disambiguation). ...


Borden's father Andrew Borden was judged by his son to be "a man of good ability and excellent judgement", of a "calm, contemplative and philosophical" turn of mind, but "He lacked energy and had no great aptitude for affairs". His mother Eunice Jane Laird was more driven, possessing "very strong character, remarkable energy, high ambition and unusual ability". Her ambition was transmitted to her first-born child who applied himself to his studies while assisting his parents with the farm work he found so disagreeable.


From 1868 to 1874, he worked as a teacher in Grand Pré and Matawan, New Jersey. Seeing no future in teaching, he returned to Nova Scotia in 1874 to article for four years at a Halifax law firm (without a formal university education) and was called to the Nova Scotia Bar in August 1878, placing first in the bar examinations. Borden went to Kentville, Nova Scotia as the junior partner of the Conservative lawyer John P. Chipman. In 1880 he was inducted into the Freemasons - (St Andrew's lodge #1)[1] and in 1882 he was asked by Wallace Graham to move to Halifax and join the Conservative law firm headed by Graham and Charles Hibbert Tupper. Borden became the senior partner in fall 1889 when he was only 35 following the departure of Graham and Tupper for the bench and politics. His financial future guaranteed, on September 25, 1889, he married Laura Bond (1863-1940), the daughter of a Halifax hardware merchant. They would have no children (Borden does have descendants, namely Jean Borden and her son Robert Borden). In 1894 he bought a large property and home on the south side of Quinpool Road which the couple called "Pinehurst". In 1893 Borden successfully argued the first of two cases which he took to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council. He represented many of the important Halifax businesses and sat on the boards of Nova Scotian companies including the Bank of Nova Scotia and the Crown Life Insurance Company. President of the Nova Scotia Barristers' Society in 1896, he took the initiative in organizing the founding meetings of the Canadian Bar Association in 1896 in Montreal. By the time he was prevailed upon to enter politics, Borden had what some judged to be the largest legal practice in the Maritime Provinces, and had become a wealthy man. Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Matawan is a borough located in Monmouth County, New Jersey. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The City of Halifax (1841-1996) was the capital of the province of Nova Scotia, and the largest city in Atlantic Canada. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Kentville is a town in Kings County, Nova Scotia. ... American Square & Compasses Freemasonry is a worldwide fraternal organization. ... Sir Charles Hibbert Tupper (August 3, 1855 – March 30, 1927) was a Canadian politician. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Laura Bond Borden (1863-1940) was the wife of Sir Robert Laird Borden, the eighth Prime Minister of Canada. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Judicial Committee of the Privy Council is one of the highest courts in the United Kingdom. ... Founded in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1832, the Bank launched its branch banking system by opening in Windsor, Nova Scotia. ... The Canadian Bar Association is the Canadian voluntary bar association organization formed in 1896 representing the interests of 38,000 lawyers, judges, notaries, law teachers, and law students from across Canada involved in the legal system. ...


Prime Minister 1911-1920

First World War

As Prime Minister of Canada during the First World War, Borden transformed his government to a wartime administration, passing the War Measures Act in 1914. Borden committed Canada to provide half a million soldiers for the war effort. However, volunteers had quickly dried up when Canadians realized there would be no quick end to the war. Borden's determination to meet that huge commitment led to the Military Service Act and the Conscription Crisis of 1917, which split the country on linguistic lines. The unpopular conscription issue would likely have meant defeat in the election of 1917, but Borden recruited members of the Liberals (with the notable exception of Wilfrid Laurier) to create a Unionist government. The 1917 election saw the "Government" candidates (including a number of Liberal-Unionists) crush the Opposition "Laurier Liberals" in English Canada resulting in a large parliamentary majority for Borden. Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The War Measures Act (enacted in August 1914, replaced by the Emergencies Act in 1988) was a Canadian statute that allowed the government to assume sweeping emergency powers. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... UK Military Service Act In January, 1916 David Lloyd George introduced the Military Service Act for the UK. Previous to this Act, the British Government had been relying on voluntary registration called the Derby Scheme. ... The Conscription Crisis of 1917 was a political and military crisis in Canada during World War I. // At the outbreak of war in 1914, over 30,000 volunteers joined the army, far more than expected. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1917 election The 1917 Canadian federal election (sometimes referred to as the khaki election) was held on December 17, 1917, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... The Unionist Party was formed in 1917 by Members of Parliament (MPs) in Canada who supported the Union government formed by Sir Robert Borden during World War I. In May 1917, Conservative Prime Minister Borden proposed the formation of a national unity government or coalition government to Liberal leader Sir... This article is part of or related to the Liberalism series Categories: Politics stubs | Liberal related stubs | UK political parties | Historical liberal parties ... Prior to the 1917 federal election in Canada, the Liberal Party of Canada split into two factions: the Laurier Liberals, who opposed conscription of soldiers to support Canadas involvement in World War I and who were led by former Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier; and the Liberal Unionists who... English Canada is a term used to describe one of the following: English Canadians, a term usually meaning English-speaking or anglophone Canadians, the official language majority in the country except New-Brunswick and Quebec as well. ...


The war effort also enabled Canada to assert itself as an independent power. Borden wanted to create a single Canadian army, rather than have Canadian soldiers split up and assigned to British divisions. Sam Hughes, the Minister of Militia, generally ensured that Canadians were well-trained and prepared to fight in their own divisions, although with mixed results such as the Ross Rifle, and Arthur Currie provided sensible leadership for the Canadian divisions in Europe, although they were still under overall British command. Nevertheless Canadian troops proved themselves to be among the best in the world, fighting at the Somme, Ypres, Passchendaele, and especially at the Battle of Vimy Ridge. Sam Hughes The Honourable Sir Samuel Hughes, PC (January 8, 1853 – August 23, 1921) was the Canadian Minister of Militia and Defence during World War I. // Early life Samuel pooes was born January 8, 1853, at Solina near Bowmanville in what was then Canada West. ... Ross rifle in Royal Canadian Regiment Military Museum in London, Ontario Ross rifle in Royal Canadian Regiment Military Museum in London, Ontario Mechanism comparison between Ross Mk III (1910) and Mk II** (1907) The Ross rifle was a straight-pull bolt-action . ... General Sir Arthur William Currie, GCMG, KCB (December 5, 1875 – November 30, 1933) was the first Canadian commander of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (a corps of four divisions) on the Western Front during World War I. Currie was among the most successful generals of the war; he is still considered... Combatants British Empire Australia Canada New Zealand Newfoundland South Africa United Kingdom France German Empire Commanders Douglas Haig Joseph Joffre Max von Gallwitz Fritz von Below Strength 13 British & 11 French divisions (initial) 51 British and 48 French divisions (final) 10. ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province West Flanders Arrondissement Ypres Coordinates , , Area 130. ... Passchendaele village, before and after the Battle of Passchendaele The Battle of Passchendaele, otherwise known as the Third Battle of Ypres, was one of the major battles of World War I, fought by British, ANZAC, and Canadian soldiers against the German army near Ypres ( Ieper in Flemish) in West Flanders... Combatants Canada United Kingdom  German Empire Commanders Julian Byng Arthur Currie Ludwig von Falkenhausen Strength 200,000 Unknown Casualties 3,598 dead, 7,004 wounded[1][2] 20,000 dead or wounded, 4,000 captured The Battle of Vimy Ridge was one of the opening battles in a larger British...


Borden and Canadian independence

In world affairs, Borden played a crucial role in transforming the British Empire into a partnership of equal states, the Commonwealth of Nations, a term that was first discussed at an Imperial Conference in London during the war. Borden also introduced the first Canadian income tax, which at the time was meant to be temporary, but was never repealed. The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2006 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Don McKinnon since 1 April 2000 Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total... Imperial Conferences were gatherings of British Empire government leaders in London in 1887, 1897, 1902, 1907, 1911, 1921, 1923, 1926, 1930 and 1937. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income...


Convinced that Canada had become a nation on the battlefields of Europe, Borden demanded that it have a separate seat at the Paris Peace Conference. This was initially opposed not only by Britain but also by the United States, who perceived such a delegation as an extra British vote. Borden responded by pointing out that since Canada had lost more men than the U.S. in the war, she at least had the right to the representation of a "minor" power. British Prime Minister David Lloyd George eventually relented, and convinced the reluctant Americans to accept the presence of separate Canadian, Australian, New Zealand and South African delegations. Not only did Borden's persistence allow him to represent Canada in Paris as a nation, it also ensured that each of the dominions could sign the Treaty of Versailles in its own right, and receive a separate membership in the League of Nations. Map of the World with the Participants in World War I. The Allies are depicted in green, the Central Powers in orange, and neutral countries in grey. ... David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor, OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman who was Prime Minister throughout the latter half of World War I and the first four years of the subsequent peace. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... This article is about Dominions of the British Empire and of the Commonwealth of Nations. ... This article is about the Treaty of Versailles of June 28 1919, which ended World War I. For other uses, see Treaty of Versailles (disambiguation) . The Treaty of Versailles (1919) was a peace treaty which officially ended World War I between the Allied and Associated Powers and Germany. ... The League of Nations was an international organization founded as a result of the Paris Peace Conference in 1919–1920. ...


At Borden's insistence, the treaty was ratified by the Canadian Parliament. Borden was the last prime minister to be knighted after the House of Commons indicated its desire for the discontinuation of the granting of any future titles to Canadians in 1919 with the adoption of the Nickle Resolution. Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Senate Chamber of Parliament Hill in Ottawa. ... A statue of an armoured knight of the Middle Ages For the chess piece, see knight (chess). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Nickle Resolution, adopted by the Canadian House of Commons on 22 May 1919, marked the earliest attempt to establish a Canadian government policy forbidding the British, and, later, Canadian, Sovereign from granting knighthoods, baronetcies, and peerages to Canadians, and set the precedent for later policies prohibiting Canadians from accepting...


Post-war government

That same year, Borden approved the use of troops to put down the Winnipeg General Strike. It should also be remembered that between 1914 and 1917, in response to xenophobia aimed at citizens of the Austro-Hungarian empire arising out of the First World War, 8,579 [2]Eastern Europeans were interned. Crowd gathered outside old City Hall during the Winnipeg General Strike, June 21, 1919 The Winnipeg General Strike of 1919 was one of the most influential strikes in Canadian history. ... Look up xenophobia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Official languages Latin, German, Hungarian Established church Roman Catholic Capital & Largest City Vienna pop. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Ukrainian Canadian internment was part of the confinement of enemy aliens in Canada during World War I, lasting from 1914 to 1920. ...


Post-political career

Sir Robert Borden retired from office in 1920. He was the Chancellor of Queen's University from 1924 to 1930, and stood as president of two financial institutions. Borden died on June 10th 1937 and is buried in the Beachwood Cemetery in Ottawa. Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Queens University, generally referred to simply as Queens, is a coeducational, non-sectarian public university located in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Honours

  • Borden was one of the last Canadian Prime Ministers to be knighted, since, due to subsequent legislation, no others have been.
  • Sir Robert Borden is depicted on the Canadian $100 bill.
  • Sir Robert Borden was honoured by having a high school named after him in the Nepean part of Ottawa.
  • Sir Robert Borden was also honoured by having a junior high school named after him in Cole Harbour, Nova Scotia.

The Canadian $100 bill is one of five different banknotes of Canadian currency. ...

See also

The Conscription Crisis of 1917 was a political and military crisis in Canada during World War I. // At the outbreak of war in 1914, over 30,000 volunteers joined the army, far more than expected. ... Ross rifle in Royal Canadian Regiment Military Museum in London, Ontario Ross rifle in Royal Canadian Regiment Military Museum in London, Ontario Mechanism comparison between Ross Mk III (1910) and Mk II** (1907) The Ross rifle was a straight-pull bolt-action . ...

Supreme Court appointments

Borden chose the following jurists to sit as justices of the Supreme Court of Canada: The Supreme Court of Canada (French: Cour suprême du Canada) is the highest court of Canada and is the final court of appeal in the Canadian justice system. ...

The Right Honourable Sir Louis Henry Davies, PC , KCMG (May 4, 1845 – May 1, 1924) was a Prince Edward Island (PEI) lawyer, businessman and politician. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... A Puisne Justice or Puisne Judge (pronounced puny) is the title for a regular member of a Court. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Honourable Pierre-Basile Mignault (September 30, 1854 – October 15, 1945) was a Canadian lawyer and Puisne Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

  • Borden, Robert. Robert Laird Borden : his memoirs / edited and with an introduction by Henry Borden. Toronto:Macmillan, 1938. 2 volumes.
  • Brown, Robert Craig. Robert Laird Borden : a biography. Toronto : Macmillan of Canada, 1975-1980. v. 1, 1854-1914 ISBN 0-7705-1317-4. v. 2, 1914-1937 ISBN 0-7705-1854-0. A brilliant biography with many photographs interspersed.
  • English, John. The decline of politics : the Conservatives and the party system 1901-20. Toronto : University of Toronto Press, 1977. ISBN 0-8020-5386-6. Reprinted 1993 ISBN 0-8020-6956-8.
  • English, John. Borden : his life and world. Toronto : McGraw-Hill Ryerson, 1977. ISBN 0-07-082303-0. Excellent illustrations.

External links

  • Borden monument at Grand Pré with maps and genealogy of Borden family
  • Biography at the Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online
  • Political Biography from the Library of Parliament
  • Canada and the peace; a speech on the Treaty of peace, delivered in the Canadian House of Commons on Tuesday, September 2, 1919 at archive.org
  • Canadian constitutional studies by Robert Borden at archive.org
  • Comments on the Senate's rejection of the Naval Aid Bill by Robert Borden at archive.org
Political offices
Preceded by
Charles Tupper
Leader of the Conservative Party
1901 – 1920
Succeeded by
Arthur Meighen
Preceded by
Wilfrid Laurier
Prime Minister of Canada
1911 – 1920
Preceded by
William James Roche
Secretary of State for External Affairs
1912 – 1920
Parliament of Canada
Preceded by
John F. Stairs
MP for Halifax, NS
1896 – 1904
Succeeded by
Michael Carney
Preceded by
Edward Kidd
MP for Carleton, ON
1905 – 1909
Succeeded by
Edward Kidd
Preceded by
Michael Carney
MP for Halifax, NS
1909 – 1917
Succeeded by
Michael A. MacLean
Preceded by
Arthur deWitt Foster
MP for Kings, NS
1917 – 1921
Succeeded by
Ernest W. Robinson
Academic offices
Preceded by
William Christopher Macdonald
Chancellor of McGill University
1918 – 1920
Succeeded by
Edward Wentworth Beatty
Preceded by
Edward Wentworth Beatty
Chancellor of Queen's University
1924 – 1929
Succeeded by
James Armstrong Richardson, Sr.
Persondata
NAME Borden, Robert Laird
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION 8th Prime Minister of Canada (1911-1920)
DATE OF BIRTH June 26, 1854
PLACE OF BIRTH Grand Pre, Nova Scotia
DATE OF DEATH [[[June 10]], 1937
PLACE OF DEATH Ottawa

  Results from FactBites:
 
Robert Borden - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1426 words)
Borden went to Kentville, Nova Scotia as the junior partner of the Conservative lawyer John P. Chipman.
Borden also introduced the first Canadian income tax, which at the time was meant to be temporary, but was never repealed.
Borden was the last prime minister to be knighted after the House of Commons indicated its desire for the discontinuation of the granting of any future titles to Canadians in 1919 with the adoption of the Nickle Resolution.
Robert Borden - definition of Robert Borden in Encyclopedia (783 words)
In world affairs Borden played a crucial role in transforming the British Empire into a partnership of equal states, the Commonwealth of Nations, a term that was first discussed at an Imperial Conference in London during the war.
Borden would be the last prime minister to be knighted after Parliament abolished all future titles for Canadians in 1919 by passing the Nickle Resolution.
Sir Robert Borden retired in 1920 and died in Ottawa on June 10, 1937.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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