FACTOID # 24: Looking for table makers? Head to Mississippi, with an overwhlemingly large number of employees in furniture manufacturing.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Robert Benchley
Robert Benchley
Robert Benchley, photographed for Vanity Fair in the late 1910s.
Born September 15, 1889
Worcester, Massachusetts
Died November 21, 1945
California
Education Bachelor's degree, Harvard University
Occupation Columnist
Actor
Screenwriter
Spouse Gertrude Benchley
Parents Charles Benchley
Maria Benchley
Children Nathaniel Benchley
Robert Benchley, Jr.

Robert Charles Benchley (September 15, 1889November 21, 1945) was an American humorist best known for his work as a newspaper columnist and film actor. From his beginnings at the Harvard Lampoon while attending Harvard University, through his many years writing essays and articles for Vanity Fair and The New Yorker, and his acclaimed short films, Benchley's style of humor brought him respect and success during his life, from New York City and his peers at The Algonquin Round Table to contemporaries in the burgeoning film industry. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 465 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (480 × 619 pixel, file size: 22 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo was taken for Vanity Fair, which Benchley worked for until 1919. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Worcester County Settled 1673 Incorporated 1684 Government  - Type Council-manager also known as Plan E  - City Manager Michael V. OBrien  - Mayor Konstantina B. Lukes  - City Council Dennis L. Irish Michael C. Perotto Joseph M. Petty Gary Rosen Kathleen... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945and died 2007 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... A bachelors degree (Artium Baccalaureus, A.B. or B.A.) is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Screenwriters, scenarists or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... Nathaniel Benchley (November 13, 1915 - December 14, 1981) was an American author. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945and died 2007 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... A humorist is an author who specializes in short, humorous articles or essays. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Algonquin Round Table was a group of New York City writers, critics, actors and wits that met from 1919 until about 1929, though its legacy endured long afterward. ...


Benchley is best remembered for his contributions to The New Yorker, where his unique essays, whether topical or absurdist, influenced many modern humorists. He also made a name for himself in Hollywood, when his short film How to Sleep was a popular success and won Best Short Subject at the 1935 Academy Awards, and his many memorable appearances in films such as Alfred Hitchcock's Foreign Correspondent and a dramatic turn in Nice Girl?. His legacy includes written work and numerous short film appearances. The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ... ... Short subject is an American film industry term that historically has referred to any film in the format of two reels, or approximately 20 minutes running time, or less. ... How to Sleep is an award-winning short film by Robert Benchley. ... The 7th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1934, were held on February 27, 1935 at the Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles, California. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was a highly influential British film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Foreign Correspondent is a 1940 film which tells the story of an American reporter who becomes involved in espionage in England during the onset of World War II. It stars Joel McCrea, George Sanders, Laraine Day, Herbert Marshall, Albert Bassermann and Robert Benchley. ...

Contents

Biography

Although Benchley was known for misleading and fictional autobiographical statements about himself (at one point asserting that he wrote A Tale of Two Cities before being buried at Westminster Abbey[1]), he actually was the great-grandchild of the founder of Benchley, Texas: Henry Wetherby Benchley who was jailed for his help with the Underground Railroad.[2] Robert Benchley was born on 15 September 1889 in Worcester, Massachusetts, to Charles and Maria Benchley, an unplanned birth.[3] A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a historical novel by Charles Dickens. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... Benchley, Texas is a small community in Robertson County, Texas. ... Henry Wetherby Benchley was an American politician. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Worcester County Settled 1673 Incorporated 1684 Government  - Type Council-manager also known as Plan E  - City Manager Michael V. OBrien  - Mayor Konstantina B. Lukes  - City Council Dennis L. Irish Michael C. Perotto Joseph M. Petty Gary Rosen Kathleen...

Robert (left) with his brother, Edmund. Edmund would perish in the Spanish-American War, profoundly affecting Robert and influencing his later pacifist views.
Robert (left) with his brother, Edmund. Edmund would perish in the Spanish-American War, profoundly affecting Robert and influencing his later pacifist views.

Robert's older brother, Edmund Benchley, was thirteen years older, and died in 1898 in the Spanish-American War, when Robert was only nine. (Upon learning of Edmund's death, Maria Benchley was believed to have cried out "Why couldn't it have been Robert?!", a comment for which Maria spent a long time atoning.) His brother's death had a considerable effect on Robert's life, as his later writings would show distinct pacifist leanings.[4] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (480 × 640 pixel, file size: 30 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Believed to be from family collection. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (480 × 640 pixel, file size: 30 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Believed to be from family collection. ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties Unknown[1] The Spanish–American... Pacifism is the opposition to war or violence as a means of settling disputes. ...


Robert Benchley married Gertrude Darling; they met while Benchley was in high school in Worcester, engaged during his senior year at Harvard, married in June 1914,[5] and their first child, Nathaniel Benchley was born a year later. A second son, Robert Benchley, Jr., was born in 1919.[6] Nathaniel Benchley (November 13, 1915 - December 14, 1981) was an American author. ...


Nathaniel became a writer himself, and penned a biography of his father in 1955[7] as well as becoming a well-respected children's book author.[8] Nathaniel had talented sons as well: Peter Benchley was best known for the book Jaws (which inspired the film of the same name),[9] and Nat Benchley wrote and performed in an acclaimed one-man production based on Robert's life.[10] Basic Characteristics There is some debate as to what constitutes childrens literature. ... Peter Bradford Benchley (May 8, 1940 – February 11, 2006) was an American author best known for writing the novel Jaws and co-writing the screenplay for its highly successful film adaptation. ... Peter Bradford Benchley (May 8, 1940 – February 11, 2006) was an American author best known for writing the novel Jaws and co-writing the screenplay for its highly successful film adaptation. ... Jaws is a 1975 horror thriller film directed by Steven Spielberg, based on Peter Benchleys best-selling novel of the same name, which was inspired in turn by the Jersey Shore Shark Attacks of 1916. ... Nathaniel Robert Nat Benchley is a writer and actor who has performed on stage, television, and film. ...


Education

Robert grew up and attended school in Worcester and was involved in academic and traveling theatrical productions during high school. Thanks to financial aid from his late brother's fiancee, Lillian Duryea, he could attend Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, New Hampshire for his final year of high school.[11] Benchley reveled in the atmosphere at the Academy, and he remained active in creative extracurricular activities, thereby damaging his academic credentials toward the end of his term.[12] Phillips Exeter Academy (most commonly called Exeter, also Phillips Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9–12, located on 619 acres[1] in Exeter, New Hampshire, USA, fifty miles north of Boston. ... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Rockingham County Incorporated 1638  - Board of Selectmen Paul Binette, Chairman Robert Eastman Joe Pace William Campbell Lionel Ingram Area    - Town 51. ...


Benchley enrolled at Harvard University in 1908, again with Duryea's financial help.[13] He joined the Delta Upsilon fraternity in his freshman year, and continued to partake in the camaraderie that he had enjoyed at Phillips Exeter while still doing well in school. He did especially well in his English and government classes. His humor and style began to reveal itself during this time; Benchley was often called upon to entertain his fraternity brothers, and his impressions of classmates and professors became very popular. His performances gave him some local fame, and most entertainment programs on campus and many off-campus meetings recruited Benchley's talents.[14] Delta Upsilon (ΔΥ) is a non-secret international gentlemens fraternity founded on November 4, 1834 at Williams College. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...


During his first two years at Harvard, Benchley worked with the Harvard Advocate and the Harvard Lampoon. He was elected to the Lampoon's board of directors in his third year.[15] The election of Benchley was unusual, as he was the publication's art editor and the board positions typically fell to the foremost writers on the staff. The Lampoon position opened a number of other doors for Benchley, and he was quickly nominated to the Signet Society meeting club as well as becoming the only undergraduate member of the Boston Papyrus Club at the time.[16] The Harvard Advocate, the premier literary magazine of Harvard College, the undergraduate component of Harvard University, has a particularly rich history, and is the oldest continuously published college literary magazine in the country. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... In relation to a company, a director is an officer (that is, someone who works for the company) charged with the conduct and management of its affairs. ... The Signet Society of Harvard University was founded in 1870 by members of the class of 1871. ... The Papyrus Club was a literary organization in Boston, Massachusetts. ...


Along with his duties at the Lampoon, Benchley acted in a number of theatrical productions, including Hasty Pudding productions of The Crystal Gazer and Below Zero.[17] Benchley kept these achievements in mind as he began to contemplate a career for himself after college. Charles Townsend Copeland, an English professor, recommended that Benchley go into writing, and Benchley and future Benchley illustrator Gluyas Williams from the Lampoon considered going into freelance work writing and illustrating theatrical reviews. Another English professor recommended that Benchley speak with the Curtis Publishing Company; but Benchley was initially against the idea, and ultimately took a position at a civil service office in Philadelphia. Owing to an academic failure in his senior year due to an illness,[18] Benchley would not receive his Bachelor of Arts from Harvard until the completion of his credits in 1913, and took a position with Curtis shortly after he received his diploma.[19] Hasty pudding is a porridge-like dish of cooked grain. ... Charles Townsend Copeland (27 April 1860 - 24 July 1952) was a professor, poet, and writer. ... Gluyas Williams (July 23, 1888 – February 13, 1982) was an American cartoonist. ... During the early 20th century The Curtis Publishing Company was one of the largest and most influential publishers in America. ... The Byzantine civil service in action. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... A B.A. issused as a certificate Bachelor of Arts (B.A., BA or A.B.), from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus is an undergraduate bachelors degree awarded for either a course or a program in the liberal arts or the sciences, or both. ...


Early professional career

Benchley did some copy work for the Curtis Publishing Company during the summer following graduation (1913) while doing other odd service jobs, such as translating a number of French catalogs for the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.[20] In September 1913 he was hired by Curtis as a full-time staff member, preparing copy for their new house publication, Obiter Dicta.[21] The first issue was soundly criticized by management, who felt it was "too technical, too scattering, and wholly lacking in punch."[22] Things did not improve for Benchley and Obiter Dicta, and a failed practical joke at a company banquet further strained the relationship between Benchley and his superiors.[23] He continued his attempts to develop his own voice within the publication, but Benchley and Curtis were not a good match and he eventually left,[24] as Curtis was considering eliminating Benchley's role and Benchley was offered a position in Boston with a better salary.[25] Copy (written) refers to written material, in contrast to photographs or other elements of layout, in a large number of contexts, including magazines and advertising. ... Paul Gauguin, Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? (Doù venons-nous? Que faisons-nous? Où allons-nous?) (1897). ... A house organ is magazine or periodical published by a company in order to promote that companys products. ...


Benchley held a number of similar jobs in following years. His re-entry into public speaking followed the annual Harvard–Yale football game in 1914, where he presented a practical joke involving "Professor Soong" giving a question-and-answer session on football in China. In what the local press dubbed "the Chinese professor caper", Soong was played by a Chinese-American who had lived in the United States for over thirty years, and pretended to answer questions in Chinese while Benchley "translated."[26] While his public profile rose, Benchley continued with freelance work, which included his first paid piece for Vanity Fair in 1914, titled "Hints on Writing a Book,"[27] a parody of the non-fiction pieces then popular. While Benchley's pieces were bought by Vanity Fair from time to time, his consistent work dried up, and Benchley took a position with the New York Tribune.[28] Half-time festivities at The Game, Yale Bowl The Game (always capitalized) is a title given to several U.S. college football rivalry games, but most particularly the annual contest between Harvard and Yale. ... Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... The New York Tribune building - today the site of Pace Universitys building complex of One Pace Plaza in New York City The New York Tribune was established by Horace Greeley in 1841 and was long considered one of the leading newspapers in the United States. ...


Benchley started at the Tribune as a reporter. He was a very poor one, unable to get statements from people quoted in other papers, and eventually had greater success covering lectures around the city. He was promised a position at the Tribune's Sunday magazine when it launched, and he was moved to the magazine's staff soon after he was hired, eventually becoming chief writer. He wrote two articles a week; the first a review of non-literary books, the other a feature-style article about whatever he wanted. The liberty gave his work new life, and the success of his pieces in the magazine convinced his editors to give him a signed byline column in the Tribune proper.[29] The byline on a newspaper or magazine article gives the name, and often the position, of the writer of the article. ...


Benchley filled in for P. G. Wodehouse at Vanity Fair at the beginning of 1916, reviewing theatre in New York. The experience at Vanity Fair inspired Benchley's fellow staff at the Tribune magazine with creative topics for articles (such as arranging for the producers of The Thirteenth Chair to cast Benchley as a corpse), but the situation at the magazine deteriorated as the pacifist Benchley became unhappy with the Tribune's position on World War I, and the Tribune editors were unhappy with the evolving tone and irreverence of the magazine. In 1917, the Tribune shut down the magazine, and Benchley was out of work again. When a rumored opening for an editorial position at Vanity Fair fell through, Benchley decided he would continue freelancing, having made a name for himself at the magazine.[30] P. G. Wodehouse, pictured in 1904, became famous for his complex plots, ingenious wordplay, and prolific output Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse KBE (October 15, 1881 – February 14, 1975) (IPA: ) was an English comic writer who enjoyed enormous popular success for more than seventy years. ... Pacifist may mean: an advocate of pacifism. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


This freelancing attempt did not start out well, with Benchley selling just one piece to Vanity Fair and accumulating countless rejections in two months. When a job as a press agent for Broadway producer William A. Brady was offered, Benchley took the position against the advice of many of his peers. This experience was a poor one, as Brady was extremely difficult to work for, and Benchley resigned to became a publicity director for the federal government's Aircraft Board at the beginning of 1918. His experience there was not much better, and when an opportunity was offered to return to the Tribune under new editorial management, Benchley took it.[31] Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... William Aloysius Brady (June 19, 1863 - January 6, 1950) was an American theatre actor, producer, and sports promoter. ... The Aircraft Board was a United States federal government organization founded in 1917. ...


At the Tribune, Benchley, along with new editor Ernest Gruening, was in charge of a twelve-page pictorial supplement titled the Tribune Graphic. The two were given a good deal of freedom, but Benchley's coverage of the war and focus on African-American regiments as well as provocative pictorials about lynching in the southern United States earned him and Gruening scrutiny from management. Amid accusations that both were pro-German (the United States was fighting Germany at the time), Benchley tendered his resignation in a terse letter, citing the lack of "rational proof that Dr. Gruening was guilty of...charges made against him..." and management's attempts to "smirch the character and the newspaper career of the first man in three years who has been able to make the Tribune look like a newspaper."[32] Bronze by George Anthonisen. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Lynching is a form of violence, usually murder, conceived of by its perpetrators as extrajudicial punishment for offenders or as a terrorist method of enforcing social domination. ...


Benchley was forced to take a publicity position with the Liberty Loan program, and he continued to freelance until Collier's contacted him with an associate editor position. Benchley took this offer to Vanity Fair to see if they could match it, as he felt Vanity Fair was the better magazine, and Vanity Fair offered him the position of managing editor.[33] Benchley accepted, and began work there in 1919.[34] Liberty Bond poster by Winsor McCay A Liberty Bond was a special type of war bond that was sold in the United States to support the allied cause in World War I. It could be redeemed for the original value of the bond plus interest. ... Colliers Weekly was a United States magazine that was published between 1888 and 1957. ...


Vanity Fair and its aftermath

Benchley began at Vanity Fair with fellow Harvard Lampoon alumnus Robert Emmet Sherwood and future friend and collaborator Dorothy Parker, who had taken over theatre criticism from P. G. Wodehouse years earlier. The format of Vanity Fair fit Benchley's style very well, allowing his columns to have a humorous tone, often as straight parodies.[35] Benchley's work was typically published twice a month. Some of Benchley's columns, featuring a character he created, were attributed to his pseudonym Brighton Perry, but most were attributed to Benchley himself.[36] Sherwood, Parker, and Benchley became close, often having long lunches at the Algonquin Hotel. When the editorial managers went on a European trip, the three took advantage of the situation, writing articles mocking the local theatre establishment and offering parodic commentary on a variety of topics, such as the effect of Canadian hockey on United States fashion. This worried Sherwood, as he felt it could jeopardize his forthcoming raise.[37] Robert Emmet Sherwood (4 April 1896–14 November 1955) American playwright, editor, and screenwriter. ... Dorothy Parker (August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967) was an American writer and poet, best known for her caustic wit, wisecracks, and sharp eye for 20th century urban foibles. ... A pseudonym (Greek pseudo + -onym: false name) is an artificial, fictitious name, also known as an alias, used by an individual as an alternative to a persons true name. ... The Algonquin Hotel opened in 1902. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a ball, or a hard, round disc called a puck, into the opponents net or goal, using a hockey stick. ... Fashion illustration by George Barbier of a gown by Jeanne Paquin, 1912, from La Gazette du bon ton, the most influential fashion magazine of its era. ...


The situation at Vanity Fair deteriorated on the managerial team's return. The management sent out a memo forbidding the discussion of salaries in an attempt to reign in the staff. Benchley, Parker, and Sherwood responded with a memo of their own, followed by placards around their necks detailing their exact salaries for all to see. Management attempted to issue "tardy slips" for staff who were late; on one of these, Benchley filled out, in very small handwriting, an elaborate excuse involving a herd of elephants on 44th Street. These issues contributed to a general deterioration of morale in the offices, culminating in Parker's termination, allegedly due to complaints by the producers of the plays she skewered in her theatrical reviews. Upon learning of her termination, Benchley tendered his own resignation. Word of it was published in Time by Alexander Woollcott, who was at a lunch with Benchley, Parker, and others. Given that Benchley had two children at the time of his resignation, Parker referred to it as "the greatest act of friendship I'd ever seen."[38] Time (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... Alexander Woollcott, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1939 Alexander Humphreys Woollcott (January 19, 1887 – January 23, 1943) was a critic and commentator for The New Yorker magazine, and a member of the Algonquin Round Table. ...


Following word of Benchley's resignation, freelance offers began piling up. He was offered $200 per basic subject article for The Home Sector,[39] and a weekly freelance salary from New York World to write a book review column three times per week for the same salary he received at Vanity Fair.[40] The column, titled "Books and Other Things," ran for one year and roved beyond literature to mundane topics such as Bricklaying in Modern Practice.[41] Unfortunately for Benchley, however, his writing a syndicated column for David Lawrence drew the ire of his World bosses, and "Books and Other Things" was dropped.[42] The New York World was a newspaper published in New York from 1860 until 1931. ... David Lawrence can refer to many different People: David L. Lawrence is the former Pennsylvania governer. ...


Benchley continued to freelance, submitting humor columns to a variety of publications, including The New Yorker and Life (where fellow humorist James Thurber believed Benchley's columns were the only reason the magazine was read).[43] He continued meeting with his friends at the Algonquin, and the group became popularly known as the Algonquin Round Table.[44] In April 1920, Benchley landed a position with Life writing theatre reviews, which he would continue doing regularly through 1929, eventually taking complete control of the drama section.[45] His reviews were known for their flair, and he often used them as a soapbox for issues of concern to him, whether petty (people who cough during plays) or more important (such as racial intolerance).[46] Philippe Halsmans famous portrait of Marilyn Monroe Life generally refers to two American magazines: A humor and general interest magazine published from 1883 to 1936; A publication created by Time founder Henry Luce in 1936, with a strong emphasis on photojournalism. ... James Grover Thurber (December 8, 1894–November 2, 1961) was a U.S. humorist and cartoonist. ... The Algonquin Round Table was a group of New York City writers, critics, actors and wits that met from 1919 until about 1929, though its legacy endured long afterward. ...


Things changed again for Benchley a number of years into the arrangement. A theatrical production by the members of the Round Table was put together in response to a challenge from actor J. M. Kerrigan, who was tired of the Table's complaints about the ongoing theatre season. The result was No Sirree! (the name being a pun of the European revue Le Chauve Souris), "An Anonymous Entertainment by the Vicious Circle of the Hotel Algonquin." Benchley's contribution to the program, "The Treasurer's Report," featured Benchley as a nervous, disorganized man attempting to summarize an organization's yearly expenses. The revue was applauded by both spectators and fellow actors, with Benchley's performance in particular receiving the biggest laughs. A reprise of "The Treasurer's Report" was often requested for future events, and Irving Berlin hired Benchley for $500 a week to perform it nightly during Berlin's Music Box Revue.[47] Joseph M. Kerrigan (December 16, 1884 - April 29, 1964), better known as J. M. Kerrigan, born in Dublin, Ireland, was a character actor who had very little screen time in movies which he starred as minor roles. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... Le Chauve-Souris (translated: The Bat) was the name of a touring revue during the early 1900s. ... Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989) was an American composer and lyricist, one of the most prodigious and famous American songwriters in history. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... Music Box Revue was a musical theatre revue with music by Irving Berlin. ...


Hollywood and The New Yorker call

Benchley had continued to receive positive responses from his performing, and in 1925 he accepted a standing invitation from film producer Jesse L. Lasky for a six-week term writing screenplays at $500. While the session did not yield significant results, Benchley did get writing credit for producing the title cards on the Raymond Griffith silent film You'd Be Surprised, and was invited to do some titling for two other films.[48] Jesse Louis Lasky (September 13, 1880 - January 13, 1958) was a pioneer Hollywood film producer. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In motion pictures, an intertitle is a piece of filmed, printed text edited into the midst of (i. ... Raymond Griffith (January 23, 1895 - November 25, 1957) one of the great silent movie comedians. ... A silent film is a film which has no accompanying soundtrack. ... Youd Be Surprised is a silent film released in 1926 starring Raymond Griffith. ... In motion pictures, an intertitle is a piece of filmed, printed text edited into the midst of (i. ...


Benchley was also hired to help with the book for a Broadway musical, Smarty, starring Fred Astaire. This experience was not as positive, and most of Benchley's contributions were excised and the final product, Funny Face, did not have Benchley's name attached. Worn down, Benchley moved to his next commitment, an attempt at a talking film version of "The Treasurer's Report." The filming went by quickly, and though he was convinced he was not good, The Treasurer's Report was a financial and critical success upon its release in 1928. Benchley participated in two more films that year: a second talking film he wrote, The Sex Life of the Polyp, and a third starring but not written by him, The Spellbinder. The two enjoyed similar success and were critically acclaimed, and Benchley was signed to a deal to produce more films before heading back to New York to continue writing. As Life would say following his eventual resignation in 1929, "Mr Benchley has left Dramatic Criticism for the Talking Movies."[49] Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theater combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... Funny Face is a 1927 musical composed by George Gershwin, with lyrics by Ira Gershwin. ... The Treasurers Report is a v short film written and performed by Robert Benchley. ... The Sex Life of the Polyp is a 1928 short film written and performed by Robert Benchley. ...


During the time that Benchley was filming various short films, he also began working at The New Yorker, which had started in February of 1925 under the control of Benchley's friend Harold Ross. While Benchley, along with many of his Algonquin acquaintances, was wary of getting involved with another publication for various reasons, he completed some freelance work for The New Yorker over the first few years, and was later invited to be newspaper critic. Benchley initially wrote the column under the pseudonym Guy Fawkes (the lead conspirator in the English Gunpowder Plot), and the column was very well received. Benchley tackled issues ranging from careless reporting to European fascism,[50] and the publication flourished. Benchley was invited to be theatre critic for The New Yorker in 1929, leaving Life, and contributions from Woollcott and Parker became regular features in the magazine. The New Yorker published an average of forty-eight Benchley columns per year during the early 1930s.[51] Harold Wallace Ross (November 6, 1892 - December 6, 1951) was an American journalist and founder of The New Yorker magazine, which he edited from 1925 to his death. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...


With the emergence of The New Yorker, Benchley was able to stay away from Hollywood work for a number of years. In 1931, he was persuaded to do voice work for Radio Pictures for a film that would eventually be titled Sky Devils, and he acted in his first feature film, The Sport Parade, in 1932. The work on The Sport Parade caused Benchley to miss the fall theatre openings, which embarrassed him (even if the relative success of The Sport Parade was often credited to Benchley's role), but the lure of filmmaking did not disappear, as RKO offered him a writing and acting contract for the following year for more money than he was making writing for The New Yorker.[52] This article is about the film production company. ... RKO could stand for: RKO Pictures The R.K.O. - finishing manoever (and initials) of WWE professional wrestler Randy Orton. ...


Benchley on film and sleep

Benchley re-entered Hollywood at the height of the Great Depression, and the large-scale introduction of the talkie films he had began working with years before. His arrival put him on the scene of a number of productions almost instantly. While Benchley was more interested in writing than acting, one of his more important roles as an actor was as a salesman in Rafter Romance, and his work attracted the interest of MGM, who offered Benchley a lot of money to complete a series of short films. Benchley, who had also been offered a syndicated column by Hearst, was able to film the shorts in New York and keep up with his new column. Before heading back to New York, Benchley took a role in the Clark Gable film Dancing Lady.[53] The Great Depression was a time of economic down turn, which started after the stock market crash on October 29, 1929, known as Black Tuesday. ... Rafter Romance is a 1933 film directed by William A. Seiter and starring Ginger Rogers, Norman Foster, George Sidney, Robert Benchley, Laura Hope Crews and Guinn Williams. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... Print Syndication is a form of syndication in which news articles, columns, or comic strips are made available to newspapers and magazines. ... The Hearst Corporation is a large privately-held media conglomerate based in New York City. ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Dancing Lady is a 1933 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer musical comedy film starring Joan Crawford, Clark Gable and Franchot Tone, as well as Robert Benchley, Nelson Eddy, Fred Astaire, and Ted Healy and his Three Stooges. ...

Benchley demonstrating How to Sleep. The short film became his best-known work, and earned him an Academy Award.
Benchley demonstrating How to Sleep. The short film became his best-known work, and earned him an Academy Award.

In 1934, Benchley returned to Hollywood, completing the short film How to Break 90 at Croquet, and the feature-length Gable production China Seas. Upon completion, MGM invited Benchley to write and perform in a short production inspired by a Mellon Institute study on sleep commissioned by the Simmons Mattress Company. The resulting film, How to Sleep, was filmed in two days, and featured Benchley as both the narrator and sleeper, the latter a role Benchley claimed was "not much of a strain, as [he] was in bed most of the time."[54] The film was well-received in preview screenings, and promotions took over, with a still from the film being used in Simmons advertisements. The only group not pleased was the Mellon Institute, who did not approve of the studio mocking their study.[55] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The China Sea can refer to the: South China Sea, or East China Sea This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Mellon Institute combined with the Carnegie Institute of Technology to form todays Carnegie Mellon University. ... Simmons Bedding Company is a major manufacturer of mattresses and related bedding products. ... How to Sleep is an award-winning short film by Robert Benchley. ... A test screening is a preview screening of a movie conducted before its general release, in order to gauge audience reaction. ...


The early success of How to Sleep prompted MGM to rush two more short films featuring Benchley, How to Train a Dog, a spoof of dog-training techniques, and How to Behave, which lampooned etiquette norms. How to Sleep was named Best Short Subject at the 1935 Academy Awards, while the latter two shorts were not as well received.[56] How to Train a Dog is a 1936 short film released through MGM Studios starring Robert Benchley. ... How to Behave is a short film released through MGM Studios starring Robert Benchley. ... It has been suggested that Office etiquette be merged into this article or section. ... The 7th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1934, were held on February 27, 1935 at the Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles, California. ...


Benchley returned to the cinema in 1937, cast in the revue Broadway Melody of 1938, and in his largest role to that point, the critically-panned Live, Love and Learn. A short that Benchley completed for MGM, A Night at the Movies, was Benchley's greatest success since How to Sleep, and won him a contract for more short films that would be produced in New York. These films were produced more quickly than his previous efforts (while How to Sleep needed two days, the later short How to Vote needed less than twelve hours), and took their toll on Benchley. He still completed two shoots in one day (one of which was The Courtship of the Newt), but rested for a while following the 1937 schedule.[57] Broadway Melody of 1938 is a 1937 musical film, produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, directed by Roy Del Ruth. ... A Night At The Movies is the nineteenth episode in the third series of the popular American forensic crime drama CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, which is set in Las Vegas, Nevada. ...


Benchley's return yielded two more short films, and his high profile prompted negotiations for sponsorship of a Benchley radio program and numerous appearances on television shows, including the first television entertainment program ever broadcast, an untitled test program using an experimental antenna on the Empire State Building. The radio program, Melody and Madness, was more a showcase for Benchley's acting, as he did not participate in writing it. It was not well received, and was removed from the schedule.[58] The Empire State Building in New York The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in New York, NY. Its name is derived from the nickname for the state of New York. ...


Later life

1939 was a bad year for Benchley's career. Besides the cancellation of his radio show, Benchley learned that MGM did not plan to renew his contract, and The New Yorker, frustrated with Benchley's film career taking precedence over his theatre column, hired a new critic. Following his final New Yorker column in 1940, Benchley headed back to Hollywood and completed some shorts for Paramount Pictures. Benchley also received two more feature-length roles: Walt Disney's The Reluctant Dragon, where Benchley played himself as written by other people, and Nice Girl?, considered Benchley's greatest non-comedic performance.[59] Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... The Reluctant Dragon film poster The Reluctant Dragon is a film produced by Walt Disney, directed by Alfred J. Werker, and released by RKO Radio Pictures on June 20, 1941. ...


Benchley's roles primarily came as a freelance actor, as his Paramount contract was not providing enough money. Benchley was cast in minor roles for various romantic comedies, some shoots going better than others. Paramount did not renew his contract in 1943, and Benchley signed back with MGM with an exclusive contract. The situation was not positive for Benchley, as the studio "mishandled" him and kept Benchley too busy to complete his own work. His contract concluded with only four short films completed and no chance of signing another contract. Following the printing of two books of his old New Yorker columns, Benchley gave up writing for good in 1943, signing one more contract with Paramount in December of that year.[60] Romantic comedy films are a sub-genre of comedy films as well as of romance films. ...


While Benchley's books and Paramount contract were giving him financial security, he was still unhappy with the turn his career had taken. His experience with Weekend at the Waldorf was especially upsetting, as Benchley considered the writing to be subpar. He continued to fill his schedule, despite being diagnosed with cirrhosis of the liver caused by a drinking problem which had developed later in his life. While he completed his year's work, his condition continued to deteriorate, and Benchley died in a New York hospital on 21 November 1945. His family opted for a private funeral service, and his body was cremated and interred in a family plot on the island of Nantucket.[61] Cirrhosis of the liver is a consequence of chronic liver disease characterized by replacement of liver tissue by fibrotic scar tissue as well as regenerative nodules, leading to progressive loss of liver function. ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945and died 2007 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Nantucket is an island south of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, formed of glacial moraine. ...


Humor style

Benchley's humor was molded during his time at Harvard. While his skills as an orator were already known by classmates and friends, it was not until his work at the Lampoon that his style was formed. The prominent styles of humor were then "crackerbarrel," which relied on devices such as dialects and a disdain for formal education in the style of humorists such as Artemis Ward and Petroleum Vesuvius Nasby, and a more "genteel" style of humor, very literary and upper-class in nature, a style popularized by Oliver Wendell Holmes. While the two styles were, at first glance, diametrically opposed, they coexisted in magazines such as Vanity Fair and Life. The Lampoon primarily used the latter style, which suited Benchley. While some of his pieces would not have been out of place in a crackerbarrel-style presentation, Benchley's reliance on puns and wordplay resonated more with the literary humorists, as shown by his success with The New Yorker, known for the highbrow tastes of its readers.[62] Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Charles Farrar Browne, (April 23, 1834 - March 6, 1867) was a United States humorous writer, best known under his nom de plume of Artemus Ward. ... David Ross Locke (his pseudonym was Petroleum V. Nasby) (1833 - 1888) was a U.S. journalist. ... Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. ... Philippe Halsmans famous portrait of Marilyn Monroe Life generally refers to two American magazines: A humor and general interest magazine published from 1883 to 1936; A publication created by Time founder Henry Luce in 1936, with a strong emphasis on photojournalism. ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ...


Benchley's characters were typically exaggerated representations of the common man. They were designed to create a contrast between himself and the masses, who had less common sense. The character is often befuddled by many of the actions of society and is often neurotic in a "different" way — the character in How to Watch Football, for instance, finds it sensible for a normal fan to forgo the live experience and read the recap in the local papers.[63] This character, labeled the "Little Man" and in some ways similar to many of Mark Twain's protagonists, was based on Benchley himself; he did not persist in Benchley's writing past the early 1930s, but survived in his speaking and acting roles. This character was apparent in Benchley's Ivy Oration during his Harvard graduation ceremonies,[64] and would appear throughout his career, such as during "The Treasurer's Report" in the 1920s[65] and his work in feature films in the 1930s.[66] The term common man emphasizes the similarities between a politician and the average citizen. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 — April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, writer, and lecturer. ...


Topical, current-event style pieces written for Vanity Fair during the war did not lose their levity, either. He was not afraid to poke fun at the establishment (one piece he wrote was titled "Have You a Little German Agent in Your Home?"), and his common man observations often veered into angry rants, such as his piece "The Average Voter," where the namesake of the piece "[F]orgets what the paper said...so votes straight Republicrat ticket."[67] His lighter fare did not hesitate to touch upon topical issues, drawing analogies between a football game and patriotism, or chewing gum and diplomacy and economic relations with Mexico.[68] This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Chewing gum Chewing gum is a type of confectionery which is designed to be chewed rather than swallowed. ...


In his films, the common man exaggerations continued. Much of his time in the films was spent spoofing himself,[69] whether it was the affected nervousness of the treasurer in The Treasurer's Report or the discomfort in explaining The Sex Life of the Polyp to a women's club.[70] Even the longer, plot-driven shorts, such as Lesson Number One, Furnace Trouble, and Stewed, Fried and Boiled, show a Benchley character overmatched by seemingly mundane tasks.[71] Even the more stereotypical characters held these qualities, such as the incapable sportscaster Benchley played in The Sport Parade.[72]


Benchley's humor inspired a number of later humorists and filmmakers. Dave Barry, author, onetime humor writer for the Miami Herald, and judge of the 2006 Robert Benchley Society Award for Humor,[73] has called Benchley his "idol"[74] and he "always wanted to write like [Benchley]."[75] Horace Digby claimed that, "[M]ore than anyone else, Robert Benchley influenced [his] early writing style."[76] Outsider filmmaker Sidney N. Laverents lists Benchley as an influence as well,[77] and James Thurber used Benchley as a reference point, citing Benchley's penchant for presenting "the commonplace as remarkable" in The Secret Life of Walter Mitty.[78] For the English musician, see Dave Berry (musician). ... The Miami Herald is a daily newspaper owned by Knight Ridder. ... Horace J. Digby (Born 1950 in Longview, Washington) is an American humorist living in the Pacific Northwest. ... James Grover Thurber (December 8, 1894–November 2, 1961) was a U.S. humorist and cartoonist. ... For the 1947 film, see The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (1947 film). ...


The Algonquin Round Table

Main article: Algonquin Round Table

The Algonquin Round Table was a group of New York City writers and actors who met regularly between 1919 and 1929 at the Algonquin Hotel. Initially consisting of Benchley, Dorothy Parker, and Alexander Woollcott during their time at Vanity Fair, the group eventually expanded to over a dozen regular members of the New York media and entertainment, such as playwrights George S. Kaufman and Marc Connelly, actor Harpo Marx, and journalist/critic Heywood Broun, who gained prominence due to his positions during the Sacco and Vanzetti trial. The table gained prominence due to the media attention the members drew as well as their collective contributions to their respective areas. The Algonquin Round Table was a group of New York City writers, critics, actors and wits that met from 1919 until about 1929, though its legacy endured long afterward. ... The Algonquin Hotel opened in 1902. ... George Simon Kaufman (November 16, 1889 - June 2, 1961) was an American playwright, director, producer, humorist, and drama critic noted for his many collaborations with other writers and his contributions to 20th century American comedy. ... Marc Connelly photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 Marcus Cook Connelly (December 13, 1890 - December 21, 1980) was a member of the Algonquin roundtable and composed several musicals with playwright George S. Kaufman: 1921 Dulcy 1922 Merton of the Movies 1925 Beggar on Horseback Categories: 1890 births | 1980 deaths ... Adolph Arthur Marx, popularly known as Harpo Marx, (November 23, 1888 – September 28, 1964) was one of the Marx Brothers, a group of Vaudeville entertainers who later achieved fame as comedians in the Motion Picture industry. ... Heywood Broun was a reporter, sportswriter and newspaper columnist in New York City. ... Bartolomeo Vanzetti (left) and Nicola Sacco in handcuffs Nicola Sacco (April 22, 1891 – August 23, 1927) and Bartolomeo Vanzetti (June 11, 1888 – August 23, 1927) were two Italian-born American anarchists, who were arrested, tried, and executed via electrocution in Massachusetts. ...


Works

Benchley produced over 600 essays,[79] which were initially compiled in twelve volumes, during his writing career.[80] He also appeared in a number of films, including 48 short treatments that he mostly wrote or co-wrote and numerous feature films.[81] Robert Benchley produced over 600 essays,[1] initially compiled over twelve volumes, during his writing career. ...


Posthumously, Benchley's works continue to be released in books such as the 1983 Random House compilation The Best of Robert Benchley,[82] and the 2005 collection of short films Robert Benchley and the Knights of the Algonquin, which compiled many of Benchley's popular short films from his years at Paramount with other works from fellow humorists and writers Alexander Woollcott and Donald Ogden Stewart.[83] Random House is a publishing division of the German media conglomerate Bertelsmann based in New York City. ... Donald Ogden Stewart (1894-1980) an American author and screenwriter, member of the Algonquin Round Table. ...


Works cited

W. W. Norton & Company is an American book publishing company that has remained independent since its founding. ... January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation,which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The McGraw-Hill Companies logo. ... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Harcourt Trade Publishers is a U.S. publishing firm, and one of the worlds largest publishers of textbooks. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... February 18 is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... January 25 is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

References

  1. ^ Rosmond, 17.
  2. ^ Yates, 13.
  3. ^ Gaines, 4.
  4. ^ Benchley, 26–30; Gaines, 4.
  5. ^ Benchley, 33–36, 44, 68–69.
  6. ^ Benchley, 138–139.
  7. ^ Robert Benchley: A Biography.
  8. ^ HarperCollins.
  9. ^ BBC.
  10. ^ Washington Post.
  11. ^ Yates, 13.
  12. ^ Altman, 31.
  13. ^ Altman, 33.
  14. ^ Altman, 35–41.
  15. ^ Yates, 18.
  16. ^ Altman, 40–42.
  17. ^ Yates, 13–14.
  18. ^ Altman, 43–51.
  19. ^ Yates, 13–14.
  20. ^ Altman, 55–56
  21. ^ Yates, 31–32.
  22. ^ Altman, 61.
  23. ^ Altman, 61–68.
  24. ^ Yates, 31–34.
  25. ^ Altman, 67–68.
  26. ^ Altman, 72–74.
  27. ^ Originally, "No Matter What Angle You Look at It, Alice Brookhausen Was a Girl Whom You Would Hesitate to Invite into Your Own Home." Yates, 38–39.
  28. ^ Altman, 75–82.
  29. ^ Altman, 84–89.
  30. ^ Altman, 99–102.
  31. ^ Altman, 105–108, 128–131.
  32. ^ Altman, 130–134.
  33. ^ Altman, 134–136.
  34. ^ Yates, 49.
  35. ^ Altman, 139–145.
  36. ^ Yates, 51.
  37. ^ Altman, 139–148.
  38. ^ Altman, 148–158.
  39. ^ Altman, 160.
  40. ^ Yates, 52.
  41. ^ Altman 162–163.
  42. ^ Yates, 53–54.
  43. ^ Yates, 53–55.
  44. ^ Altman, 165–178.
  45. ^ Yates, 53–54.
  46. ^ Altman, 193–196.
  47. ^ Altman, 199, 204–208
  48. ^ Altman, 241–243.
  49. ^ Altman, 243–254.
  50. ^ Altman, 256–264.
  51. ^ Altman, 270.
  52. ^ Altman, 285, 289–29.
  53. ^ Altman, 295–298.
  54. ^ Altman, 302–303.
  55. ^ Altman, 305.
  56. ^ Altman, 306–307.
  57. ^ Altman, 321–325.
  58. ^ Altman, 325, 327–328.
  59. ^ Altman, 330, 334, 340–342.
  60. ^ Altman, 343–348.
  61. ^ Altman, 352–362.
  62. ^ Yates, 18–20.
  63. ^ Yates, 61–62.
  64. ^ Yates, 24–27.
  65. ^ Yates, 67.
  66. ^ Yates, 135–136.
  67. ^ Yates, 44–45.
  68. ^ Yates, 44.
  69. ^ Yates, 94.
  70. ^ Altman, 249–251.
  71. ^ Altman, 252–253.
  72. ^ Altman, 289.
  73. ^ The Robert Benchley Society.
  74. ^ The Writer Magazine.
  75. ^ Time
  76. ^ The Blue Pencil interview.
  77. ^ New York Times.
  78. ^ The Paris Review.
  79. ^ Yates, 58–59.
  80. ^ Altman, 363.
  81. ^ Altman, 364–367.
  82. ^ Amazon.com listing for The Best of Robert Benchley.
  83. ^ Amazon.com listing for Robert Benchley and the Knights of the Algonquin.

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Robert Benchley

  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia: Robert Benchley (1266 words)
Robert Charles Benchley (September 15, 1889 in Worcester, Massachusetts – November 21, 1945) was an American humorist, newspaper columnist, film actor, and drama editor.
In 1928, Benchley starred in The Treasurer's Report, a short comedy film that was possibly the first all-talkie film shown in theaters (as opposed to The Jazz Singer (1927), which was primarily silent, and The Lights of New York (later in 1928), the first full-length talkie feature film).
On his passing in 1945, Robert Benchley was interred in the family plot at Prospect Hill Cemetery in Nantucket, Massachusetts.
Worcester Area Writers - Robert Benchley - Bio (1135 words)
Benchley's younger years were spent during a time that most called the "Gay Nineties," a period of enjoyment for many in America during that decade.
Robert Benchley died on November 21, 1945 at the age of 56 of a cerebral hemorrhage.
Robert Benchley was one of the pioneering humorists in his field.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m