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Encyclopedia > Robert Altman
Robert Altman

Birth name Robert Bernard Altman
Born February 20, 1925(1925-02-20)
Kansas City, Missouri
Died November 20, 2006 (aged 81)
Los Angeles, California (leukemia)
Years active 1947 - 2006
Spouse(s) LaVonne Elmer (1946-1949)
Lotus Corelli (1950-1955)
Kathryn Reed (1959-2006)
Children Christine Altman (b.1947)
Mike Altman (b.1955)
Stephen Altman (b.1957)
Robert Reed Altman (b.1960)
Matthew R. Altman (b.1966)

Robert Bernard Altman (February 20, 1925November 20, 2006) was an American film director known for making films that are highly naturalistic, but with a stylized perspective. In 2006, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences recognized his work with an Academy Honorary Award. Robert Altman may refer to: Robert Altman (born February 20, 1925, died November 2006), an American film director Robert Altman (photographer) (born October 20, 1944), a noted professional photographer Robert T. Altman (born 1940), a retired Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Category: ... Image File history File links This is a publicity photo of American filmmaker Robert Altman on the set of The Gingerbread Man (1998). ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Leukemia or leukaemia (see spelling differences) is a cancer of the blood or bone marrow and is characterized by an abnormal proliferation (production by multiplication) of blood cells, usually white blood cells (leukocytes). ... The year 1947 in film involved some significant events. ... // Please note that following the tradition of the English language film industry, these are the top grossing films that were first released in the United States and Canada in 2006; because they may have made most of their income in a later year, they may not be the top-grossing... Mike Altman (born 1955) is the son of film director Robert Altman. ... Robert Reed Altman has served as a Camera operator and Director of Photography on an impressive number of award-winning feature films and television series since the maverick days of American filmmaking in the 1970s. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Honorary Award is given irregularly by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to celebrate motion picture achievements that are not covered by existing Academy Awards. ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... Winners of the BAFTA Award for Best Direction presented by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts. ... The Player (1992) is a movie that tells the story of Griffin Mill (Tim Robbins), a Hollywood studio executive who believes he is being blackmailed by a screenwriter whose script he once rejected. ... This page lists the winners and nominees for the BAFTA Award for Best Film, BAFTA Award for Best Film not in the English Language and Alexander Korda Award for Best British Film for each year, in addition to the retired earlier versions of those awards. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... An Emmy Award. ... Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series is a Primetime Emmy Award given out during the primetime Emmys telecast. ... Tanner 88 was a groundbreaking HBO television series. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Director - Motion Picture has been awarded annually since 1944 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... Naturalism is a movement in theater, film, and literature that seeks to replicate a believable everyday reality, as opposed to such movements as Romanticism or Surrealism, in which subjects may receive highly symbolic, idealistic, or even supernatural treatment. ... // Please note that following the tradition of the English language film industry, these are the top grossing films that were first released in the United States and Canada in 2006; because they may have made most of their income in a later year, they may not be the top-grossing... Pickford Center for Motion Picture Study in Hollywood, California Founded on May 11, 1927 in California, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is a professional honorary organization dedicated to the advancement of the arts and sciences of motion pictures. ... The Academy Honorary Award is given irregularly by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to celebrate motion picture achievements that are not covered by existing Academy Awards. ...


His films MASH and Nashville have been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry. MASH is a 1970 satirical American dark comedy film directed by Robert Altman and based on the novel M*A*S*H: A Novel About Three Army Doctors by Richard Hooker. ... Nashville is a 1975 film which mixes themes of U.S. presidential politics with those of the country music and gospel music businesses in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life and career

Altman was born in Kansas City, Missouri, the son of wealthy insurance man/gambler Bernard Clement Altman, who came from an upper-class family, and Helen Mathews, a Mayflower descendant from Nebraska. Altman's ancestry was German, English and Irish;[1][2] his paternal grandfather, Frank Altman, Sr., changed the family name from "Altmann" to "Altman".[2] Altman had a strong Catholic upbringing.[3] He attended St. Peter's School for elementary school. He later attended high school at Rockhurst High School and Southwest High School in Kansas City, and was then sent to Wentworth Military Academy in nearby Lexington, Missouri, where he attended through junior college. In 1943, at the age of 18, Altman joined the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) and flew as a co-pilot on B-24 bombers during World War II. It was while training for the Army Air Corps in California that Altman had first seen the bright lights of Hollywood and became enamored of it. Upon his discharge in 1947, Altman began living in Los Angeles and tried out acting, writing and directing. Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... Mayflower in Plymouth Harbor by William Halsall (1882) The Mayflower was the famous ship that transported the Pilgrims from Plymouth, England, to Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts (United States), in 1620. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Lexington is a city located in Lafayette County, Missouri, United States. ... The United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was the aviation component of the United States Army primarily during World War II. The title of Army Air Forces succeeded the prior name of Army Air Corps in June 1941 during preparation for expected combat in what came to be known as... Royal Canadian Air Force B-24 Liberator The Consolidated B-24 Liberator was produced in greater numbers than any other American combat aircraft, and was used by most of the Allied air forces in World War II. Designed as a heavy bomber, it served with distinction not only in that... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Classical Hollywood cinema designates both a visual and sound style for making motion pictures and a mode of production that arose in the Los Angeles film industry of the 1910s and 1920s. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ...


Altman tried acting briefly, appearing in a nightclub scene as an extra in the Danny Kaye vehicle The Secret Life of Walter Mitty. He then wrote a vague storyline (uncredited) for the United Artists picture Christmas Eve, and sold to RKO the script for the 1948 motion picture Bodyguard, which he co-wrote with Richard Fleischer. This sudden success encouraged Altman to move to the New York area and forge a career as a writer. There, Altman found a collaborator in George W. George, with whom he wrote numerous published and unpublished screenplays, musicals, novels, and magazine articles. Altman was not as successful this trip, but back in Hollywood, he tried out one more big money-making scheme. His pet care company soon went bankrupt, and in 1950 Altman returned to his friends and family in Kansas City, broke and hungry for action, and itching for a second chance to get into movies. Kaye entertaining U.S. troops at Sasebo, Japan, 25 Oct 1945 David Daniel Kaminsky, known as Danny Kaye (January 18, 1913 – March 3, 1987) was an American actor, singer and comedian. ... For the 1947 film, see The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (1947 film). ... The current United Artists logo (a variant was used during the 1980s). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... RKO could stand for: RKO Pictures The R.K.O. - finishing manoever (and initials) of WWE professional wrestler Randy Orton. ... The year 1948 in film involved some significant events. ... Richard Fleischer (born December 8, 1916) is an American film director. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Industrial film experience

To get experience as a filmmaker, in the absence of film schools, Altman joined the Calvin Company, the world's largest industrial film production company and 16mm film laboratory, headquartered in Kansas City. Altman, fascinated by the company and their equipment, started as a film writer, and within a few months began to direct films. This led to his employment at the Calvin Company as a film director for almost six years. Until 1955, Altman directed 60 to 65 industrial short films, earning $250 a week while simultaneously getting the necessary training and experience that he would need for a successful career in filmmaking. The ability to shoot rapidly on schedule and to work within the confines of both big and low budgets would serve him well later in his career. On the technical side, he learned all about "the tools of filmmaking": the camera, the boom mic, the lights, etc. The Calvin Company was a Kansas City, Missouri-based educational and industrial film production company that for nearly half a century was the largest film producer of its type in the world. ... Sponsored film, or ephemeral film, as defined by film archivist Rick Prelinger, is film made by a particular sponsor for a specific purpose other than as a work of art: the films were designed to serve a specific pragmatic purpose for a limited time. ...


However, Altman soon tired of the industrial film format and sought more challenging projects. He occasionally went to Hollywood and tried to write scripts, but then returned months later, broke, to the Calvin Company. According to Altman, the Calvin people dropped him another notch in salary each time. The third time, the Calvin people declared at a staff meeting that if he left and came back one more time, they were not going to keep him.


First feature film

In 1955 Altman left the Calvin Company. He was soon hired by Elmer Rhoden Jr., a local Kansas City movie theater exhibitor, to write and direct a low-budget exploitation film on juvenile crime, titled The Delinquents, which would become his first feature film. Altman wrote the script in one week and filmed it with a budget of $63,000 on location in Kansas City in two weeks. Rhoden wanted the film to kick-start his career as a film producer. Altman wanted the film to be his ticket into the elusive Hollywood circles. The cast was made up of the local actors and actresses from community theater who also appeared in Calvin Company films, Altman family members, and three imported actors from Hollywood, including the future Billy Jack, Tom Laughlin. The crew was made up of Altman's former Calvin colleagues and friends with whom Altman planned to make his grand "Kansas City escape." In 1956, Altman and his assistant director Reza Badiyi left Kansas City for good to edit The Delinquents in Hollywood. The film was picked up for distribution for $150,000 by United Artists and released in 1957, grossing nearly $1,000,000. Exploitation film is a type of film that eschews the expense of quality productions in favor of making films on-the-cheap, attracting the public by exciting their more prurient interests. ... The Delinquents is a 1957 motion picture which Robert Altman wrote, produced, and directed in his hometown of Kansas City, Missouri during the summer of 1956 on a $45,000 budget. ... Billy Jack is the second, and highest grossing, in a series of motion pictures centering on a fictional character of the same name, played by Tom Laughlin. ... Tom Laughlin as Billy Jack Tom Laughlin (born August 10, 1931) is an American actor and director. ... Reza Badiyi was born in Tehran, Iran on April 17th 1930. ... The year 1957 in film involved some significant events. ...


Television work

The Delinquents was no runaway success, but it did catch the eye of Alfred Hitchcock, who was impressed and asked Altman to direct a few episodes of his Alfred Hitchcock Presents television series. From 1958 to 1964, Altman directed numerous episodes of television series, including Combat!, Bonanza, Whirlybirds and Route 66, and wrote and directed a 1961 episode of Maverick about a lynching called "Bolt From the Blue" featuring Roger Moore. One episode of Bus Stop which he directed was so controversial, due to an ending in which a killer is not apprehended or punished for his crime, that Congressional hearings were held, and the show was cancelled at the end of the season. This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Screenshot of opening sequence of Alfred Hitchcock Presents Alfred Hitchcock Presents was a half-hour anthology television series hosted by Alfred Hitchcock. ... The year 1958 in television involved some significant events. ... See also: 1963 in television, other events of 1964, 1965 in television and the list of years in television. For the American network television schedule, please see 1964-65 American network television schedule. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Bonanza logo was superimposed upon a map of a wild west frontier area. ... Whirlybirds (sometimes mistakenly called The Whirlybirds) was a U.S. television show that aired from 1957 to 1959 with a total of 111 episodes. ... Route 66 was an American TV series in which two young men traveled across America. ... Maverick is a comedy-western television series created by Roy Huggins that ran from September 22, 1957 to July 8, 1962 on ABC and featured James Garner, Roger Moore, and Jack Kelly as poker-playing travelling gamblers. ... For other persons named Roger Moore, see Roger Moore (disambiguation). ...


Altman co-composed the hit single "Black Sheep" by country music recording artist John Anderson. John Anderson (born December 13, 1954) is a country singer and musician. ...


Mainstream success

Altman then struggled for several years after quarreling with Jack Warner, and it was during this time that he first formed his "anti-Hollywood" opinions and entered a new stage of filmmaking. He did a few more feature films without any success, until 1969 when he was offered the script for MASH, which had previously been rejected by dozens of other directors. Altman directed the film, and it was a huge success, both with critics and at the box office. It was Altman's highest grossing film. Altman's career took firm hold with the success of MASH, and he followed it with other critical breakthroughs such as McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971), The Long Goodbye (1974), and Nashville (1975), which made the distinctive, experimental "Altman style" well known. This article is about Jack Warner, the head of Warner Brothers. ... MASH is a 1970 satirical American dark comedy film directed by Robert Altman and based on the novel M*A*S*H: A Novel About Three Army Doctors by Richard Hooker. ... McCabe & Mrs. ... The Long Goodbye is a 1973 film adaptation of Raymond Chandlers novel The Long Goodbye. ... Nashville is a 1975 film which mixes themes of U.S. presidential politics with those of the country music and gospel music businesses in Nashville, Tennessee. ...


As a director, Altman favored stories showing the interrelationships between several characters; he stated that he was more interested in character motivation than in intricate plots. As such, he tended to sketch out only a basic plot for the film, referring to the screenplay as a "blueprint" for action, and allowed his actors to improvise dialogue. This is one of the reasons Altman was known as an "actor's director," a reputation that helped him work with large casts of well-known actors. Look up plot in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sample from a screenplay, showing dialogue and action descriptions. ...


He frequently allowed the characters to talk over each other in such a way that it is difficult to make out what each of them is saying. He noted on the DVD commentary of McCabe & Mrs. Miller that he lets the dialogue overlap, as well as leaving some things in the plot for the audience to infer, because he wants the audience to pay attention. He uses a headset to make sure everything pertinent comes through without attention being drawn to it. Similarly, he tried to have his films rated R (by the MPAA rating system) so as to keep children out of his audience – he did not believe children have the patience his films require. This sometimes spawned conflict with movie studios, who do want children in the audience for increased revenues. Size comparison: A 12 cm Sony DVD+RW and a 19 cm Dixon Ticonderoga pencil. ... A major selling point of DVD video is that its storage capacity allows for a wide variety of extra features in addition to the feature film itself. ... McCabe & Mrs. ... The MPAA film rating system is used in the United States and its territories to rate a movies suitability for certain audiences. ... A movie studio is a controlled environment for the making of a film. ...


Altman made films that no other filmmaker and/or studio would. He was reluctant to make the original 1970 Korean War comedy MASH because of the pressures involved in filming it, but it still became a critical success. It would later inspire the long-running TV series of the same name. Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... M*A*S*H is an American television series developed by Larry Gelbart, inspired by the 1968 novel M*A*S*H: A Novel About Three Army Doctors by Richard Hooker (penname for H. Richard Hornberger) and its sequels, but primarily by the 1970 film MASH, and influenced by the...


In 1975, Altman made Nashville, which had a strong political theme set against the world of country music. The stars of the film wrote their own songs; Keith Carradine won an Academy Award for the song "I'm Easy". Nashville is a 1975 film which mixes themes of U.S. presidential politics with those of the country music and gospel music businesses in Nashville, Tennessee. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Keith Carradine (born August 8, 1949, in San Mateo, California) is an actor and Academy Award-winning songwriter born into a family of actors. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Im Easy was a popular music hit in 1976 in the United States. ...


The way Altman made his films initially didn't sit well with audiences. In 1976, he attempted to expand his artistic freedom by founding Lions Gate Films. The films he made for the company include A Wedding, 3 Women, and Quintet. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Lions Gate Films. ... A Wedding is a 1978 black comedy directed by Robert Altman, starring Carol Burnett, Lillian Gish, Geraldine Chaplin, Vittorio Gassman, Mia Farrow, Lauren Hutton, Pam Dawber, Desi Arnaz, Jr. ... 3 Women is a 1977 film directed by Robert Altman. ... Quintet is an post-apocalyptic science fiction film by Robert Altman produced in 1979. ...


Later career and renaissance

In 1980, he attempted a musical, Popeye based on the comic strip/cartoon Popeye, which starred Robin Williams in his big-screen debut. The film was seen as a failure by some critics, but it did make money, and was in fact the second highest grossing film Altman directed to that point (Gosford Park is now the second highest). During the 1980s, Altman did a series of films, some well-received (the Richard Nixon drama Secret Honor) and some critically panned (O.C. & Stiggs). He also garnered a good deal of acclaim for his presidential campaign "mockumentary" Tanner '88, for which he earned an Emmy Award and regained critical favor. Still, popularity with audiences continued to elude him. Popeye is a 1980 live-action film directed by Robert Altman, based on the comic strip and cartoon character Popeye the Sailor. ... For other uses, see Popeye (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Robin Williams, see Robin Williams (disambiguation). ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Secret Honor is a 1984 film written by Donald Freed and Arnold M. Stone, and directed by Robert Altman and starring Philip Baker Hall as former president Richard M. Nixon, a fictional account attempting to gain insight into Nixons personality, life, attitudes and behavior. ... O.C. and Stiggs is a mid-1980s film directed by Robert Altman, based on two characters featured in a series of stories published in National Lampoon. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Tanner 88 was a groundbreaking HBO television series. ... An Emmy Award. ...


Altman's career was revitalized when he directed 1992's The Player, a satire on Hollywood and its troubles, which was nominated for three Academy Awards including Best Director, though Altman did not win. He was, however, awarded Best Director by the Cannes Film Festival, BAFTA, and the New York Film Critics Circle, and the film reminded Hollywood (which had shunned him for a decade) that Altman was as creative as ever. This is a list of film-related events in 1992. ... The Player (1992) is a movie that tells the story of Griffin Mill (Tim Robbins), a Hollywood studio executive who believes he is being blackmailed by a screenwriter whose script he once rejected. ... Cannes Film Festival logo. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... New York Film Critics Circle Awards are given annually to honor excellence in cinema worldwide by an organization of film reviewers from New York City-based publications. ...


After the success of The Player, Altman directed 1993's Short Cuts, an ambitious adaptation of several short stories by Raymond Carver, which portrayed the lives of various citizens of the city of Los Angeles over the course of several days. The film's large cast and intertwining of many different storylines harkened back to his 1970s heyday and earned Altman another Oscar nomination for Best Director. It was acclaimed as Altman's best film in decades, and Altman himself considered this his most creative work, along with Tanner '88 and Brewster McCloud.[citation needed] In 1998, Altman made The Gingerbread Man, critically praised although a commercial failure, and in 1999 Cookie's Fortune, a critical success. In 2001, Altman's film Gosford Park gained a spot on many critics' lists of the ten best films of that year. The year 1993 in film involved many significant films. ... Short Cuts is a 1993 film directed by Robert Altman. ... Raymond Clevie Carver, Jr. ... The Gingerbread Man is a 1998 legal thriller film directed by Robert Altman and based on a discarded John Grisham manuscript. ... Cookies Fortune is a 1999 comedy film directed by Robert Altman and starring an ensemble cast, including Patricia Neal, Charles Dutton, Julianne Moore, Glenn Close, Liv Tyler and Chris ODonnell. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Working with independent studios such as Fine Line (now Picturehouse), Artisan (now Lions Gate, ironically the studio Altman helped to found), and USA Films (now Focus Features), gave Altman the edge in making the kinds of films he has always wanted to make without outside studio interference. A movie version of Garrison Keillor's public radio series A Prairie Home Companion was released in June 2006. Altman was still developing new projects up until his death. Picturehouse is a specialty film company formed in 2005 as a joint venture of New Line Cinema and HBO, as such it is a subsidiary of Time Warner. ... Lions Gate Films is a Canadian film production and distribution company that is currently the largest and most successful independent film distributor/studio in North America. ... Focus Features is the art house films division of Universal Pictures, and acts as both a producer and distributor for its own films and a distrubutor for foreign films. ... A Prairie Home Companion (previously known as The Last Broadcast) is a 2006 ensemble comedy film elegy directed by Robert Altman, his final film released just five months before his death. ... Garrison Keillor (born Gary Edward Keillor on August 7, 1942) is an American author, humorist, columnist, musician, satirist, and radio personality. ... This article is about the radio show. ...


After five Oscar nominations for Best Director and no wins, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences awarded Altman an Academy Honorary Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2006. During his acceptance speech for this award, Altman revealed that he had received a heart transplant approximately ten or eleven years earlier. The director then quipped that perhaps the Academy had acted prematurely in recognizing the body of his work, as he felt like he might have four more decades of life ahead of him. Pickford Center for Motion Picture Study in Hollywood, California Founded on May 11, 1927 in California, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is a professional honorary organization dedicated to the advancement of the arts and sciences of motion pictures. ... The Academy Honorary Award is given irregularly by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to celebrate motion picture achievements that are not covered by existing Academy Awards. ...


Personal life

In the 1960s, Altman lived for nine years with his second wife in Mandeville Canyon in Brentwood, California, according to author Peter Biskind in Easy Riders, Raging Bulls (Touchstone Books, Simon and Schuster, New York, 1998). He then moved to Malibu but sold that home and the Lion's Gate production company in 1981. "I had no choice," he told the New York Times. "Nobody was answering the phone" after the flop of Popeye. He moved his family and business headquarters to New York, but eventually moved back to Malibu where he lived until his death. The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... This article is about the neighborhood in Los Angeles. ... Location of Malibu in Los Angeles County, California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Incorporated (city) 1991-03-28 [2] Government  - Mayor Ken Kearsley [1] Area  - City  100. ... For other uses, see Popeye (disambiguation). ...


City Councilmember Sharon Barovsky, who lives down the street from the Altman home on Malibu Road, remembered the director as a friend and neighbor. "He was salty," she said, "but with a great generosity of spirit." Barovsky added that Malibu had a special place in the director's heart. "He loved Malibu," she said. "This is where he came to decompress."


He had claimed that he would move to Paris, France, if George W. Bush were elected, but he did not actually do so, saying later that he had actually meant Paris, Texas. He noted that "the state would be better off if he (Bush) is out of it."[4] Altman was an outspoken marijuana user, even serving as a member of the NORML advisory board.[5] [6] George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... This article is about the city in Northeast Texas. ... A Cannabis sativa plant The drug cannabis, also called marijuana, is produced from parts of the cannabis plant, primarily the cured flowers and gathered trichomes of the female plant. ... The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws or NORML (pronounced normal) is a US-based non-profit corporation founded in 1970 to, according to their most recent mission statement, move public opinion sufficiently to achieve the repeal of marijuana prohibition so that the responsible use of cannabis by...


Death

Altman died on November 20, 2006 at age 81 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, in Los Angeles. According to his production company in New York, Sandcastle 5 Productions, he died of complications from leukemia. Altman is survived by his wife, Kathryn Reed Altman; six children, Christine Westphal, Michael Altman, Stephen Altman (his set decorator of choice for many films), Connie Corriere, Robert Reed Altman and Matthew Altman; 12 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. [7][8] He was buried at Forest Lawn Hollywood Hills in Los Angeles. is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cedars-Sinai Medical Center is a world-renowned hospital located in Los Angeles, California. ... This article is about the largest city in California. ... Leukemia or leukaemia (see spelling differences) is a cancer of the blood or bone marrow and is characterized by an abnormal proliferation (production by multiplication) of blood cells, usually white blood cells (leukocytes). ... Robert Reed Altman has served as a Camera operator and Director of Photography on an impressive number of award-winning feature films and television series since the maverick days of American filmmaking in the 1970s. ... Forest Lawn - Hollywood Hills Cemetery is located at 6300 Forest Lawn Drive in Los Angeles, California, on the south edge of the San Fernando Valley by Burbank (and on the north side of the Santa Monica Mountains from Hollywood). ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ...


Filmography

Motion pictures

The Delinquents is a 1957 motion picture which Robert Altman wrote, produced, and directed in his hometown of Kansas City, Missouri during the summer of 1956 on a $45,000 budget. ... The James Dean Story is a 1957 American documentary. ... Countdown is a 1968 film starring James Caan, Robert Duvall and Joanna Moore. ... A film by Robert Altman, shot in Vancouver, Canada, and set in the year 1969. ... M*A*S*H is a 1970 satirical American dark comedy film directed by Robert Altman, based extremely loosely on the novel written by Richard Hooker. ... Brewster McCloud is a 1970 movie directed by Robert Altman; it centers on a young recluse who lives in a fallout shelter of the Houston Astrodome building a pair of wings so hell be able to fly. ... McCabe & Mrs. ... Images is a 1972 psychological thriller directed by Robert Altman. ... The Long Goodbye is a 1973 film adaptation of Raymond Chandlers novel The Long Goodbye. ... Thieves Like Us is a 1974 film directed by Robert Altman and starring Keith Carradine and Shelley Duvall. ... California Split is a 1974 film directed by Robert Altman and starring Elliott Gould and George Segal as a pair of gamblers. ... Nashville is a 1975 film which mixes themes of U.S. presidential politics with those of the country music and gospel music businesses in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Buffalo Bill and the Indians, or Sitting Bulls History Lesson is a 1976 film directed by Robert Altman and starring Paul Newman as Buffalo Bill. ... 3 Women is a 1977 film directed by Robert Altman, starring Shelley Duvall, Sissy Spacek, Dennis Christopher and Craig Richard Nelson. ... A Wedding is a 1978 black comedy directed by Robert Altman, starring Carol Burnett, Lillian Gish, Geraldine Chaplin, Vittorio Gassman, Mia Farrow, Lauren Hutton, Pam Dawber, Desi Arnaz, Jr. ... Quintet is an post-apocalyptic science fiction film by Robert Altman produced in 1979. ... A Perfect Couple is a 1979 film directed by Robert Altman. ... Filthy Rich: Cattle Drive logo Filthy Rich: Cattle Drive is a reality television program on the E! network. ... Popeye is a 1980 live-action film directed by Robert Altman, based on the comic strip and cartoon character Popeye the Sailor. ... Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean is a play by Ed Graczyk, and its film version, directed by Robert Altman, and starring Sandy Dennis, Cher, Mark Patton (his first film role), Karen Black, Sudie Bond and Kathy Bates. ... Streamers is a 1983 film by Robert Altman. ... Secret Honor is a 1984 film written by Donald Freed and Arnold M. Stone, and directed by Robert Altman and starring Philip Baker Hall as former president Richard M. Nixon, a fictional account attempting to gain insight into Nixons personality, life, attitudes and behavior. ... O.C. and Stiggs is a mid-1980s film directed by Robert Altman, based on two characters featured in a series of stories published in National Lampoon. ... Fool for Love is a 1985 film directed by Robert Altman. ... Beyond Therapy is a 1987 film directed by Robert Altman, who adapted to screenplay with Christopher Durang, who also wrote the theater play. ... Aria is a 1987 British film, in Italian, French and German, made up of ten short pieces directed by a variety of different directors, based on pieces of classical music. ... Vincent & Theo is a 1990 biography drama directed by Robert Altman, starring Tim Roth and Paul Rhys. ... The Player (1992) is a movie that tells the story of Griffin Mill (Tim Robbins), a Hollywood studio executive who believes he is being blackmailed by a screenwriter whose script he once rejected. ... Short Cuts is a 1993 film directed by Robert Altman. ... Prêt-à-Porter (English: Ready to Wear) is a 1994 satirical black comedy written, directed and produced by Robert Altman and shot during the Paris, France, Fashion Week with a host of international stars, models and designers. ... Kansas City is a 1996 film, directed by Robert Altman, and featuring numerous jazz tracks. ... The Gingerbread Man is a 1998 legal thriller film directed by Robert Altman and based on a discarded John Grisham manuscript. ... Cookies Fortune is a 1999 comedy film directed by Robert Altman and starring an ensemble cast, including Patricia Neal, Charles Dutton, Julianne Moore, Glenn Close, Liv Tyler and Chris ODonnell. ... Dr. T & the Women is a 2000 comedy / romance movie that stars Richard Gere, Helen Hunt, Farrah Fawcett, Laura Dern, Kate Hudson, Liv Tyler and Tara Reid. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Company is a film about the Joffrey Ballet of Chicago. ... A Prairie Home Companion (previously known as The Last Broadcast) is a 2006 ensemble comedy film elegy directed by Robert Altman, his final film released just five months before his death. ...

Television work

TV movies and miniseries

Harold Pinter, CH, CBE (born 10 October 1930) is an English playwright, screenwriter, poet, actor, director, author, and political activist. ... The Dumb Waiter is a one-act play by Harold Pinter, written in 1957. ... The Room has strong ties to The Birthday Party, also by Harold Pinter. ... Tanner 88 was a groundbreaking HBO television series. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Herman Wouk (May 27, 1915 —) is a bestselling American author with a number of notable novels to his credit, including The Caine Mutiny, The Winds of War, and War and Remembrance. ... McTeague is a novel by Frank Norris. ... McTeague is a novel by Frank Norris. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Black and Blue is a musical revue celebrating the black culture of dance and music in Paris between World War I and World War II. Based on an idea by Mel Howard and conceived by Hector Orezzoli and Caludio Segovia, it consists of songs by artists such as W. C... Great Performances was a television series devoted to the performing arts which ran on the US television station PBS from 1972. ... Kansas City is a 1996 film, directed by Robert Altman, and featuring numerous jazz tracks. ... Tanner on Tanner was a 2004 comedy and the sequel series to the 1988 Robert Altman written and Garry Trudeau directed mini-series about a failed presidential candidate. ... Sundance Channel logo used from 1996 to 2002. ...

Television episodes

  • Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1957–58)
    • ep. 3-9: "The Young One" (air-date Dec 1 57)
    • ep. 3-15: "Together" (a.d. Jan 12 58)
  • M Squad (1958) ep. 1-21: "Lover's Lane Killing" (a.d. Feb 14 58)
  • Peter Gunn (1958)
  • The Millionaire aka If You Had A Million (1958–59)
    directed by Altman
    • ep #148 / 5-14: "Pete Hopper: Afraid of the Dark" (a.d. Dec 10 58)
    • ep #162 / 5-28: "Henry Banning: The Show Off" (a.d. Apr 1 59)
    • ep #185 / 6-14: "Jackson Greene: The Beatnik" (a.d. Dec 22 59)
    written by Altman
    • ep #160 / 5-26: "Alicia Osante: Beauty and the Sailor" (a.d. Mar 18 59)
    • ep #174 / 6-3: "Lorraine Dagget: The Beach Story" [story] (a.d. Sep 29 59)
    • ep #183 / 6-12: "Andrew C. Cooley: Andy and Clara" (a.d. Dec 8 59)
  • Whirlybirds (1958–59)
    • ep. #71 / 2-32: "The Midnight Show" (a.d. Dec 8 58)
    • ep. #79 / 3-1: "Guilty of Old Age" (a.d. Apr 13 59)
    • ep. #80 / 3-2: "Matter of Trust" (a.d. Apr 6 59)
    • ep. #81 / 3-3: "Christmas in June" (a.d. Apr 20 59)
    • ep. #82 / 3-4: "Til Death Do Us Part" (unknown air-date, probably Apr 27 59)
    • ep. #83 / 3-5: "Time Limit" (a.d. May 4 59)
    • ep. #84 / 3-6: "Experiment X-74" (a.d. May 11 59)
    • ep. #87 / 3-9: "The Challenge" (a.d. June 1 59)
    • ep. #88 / 3-10: "The Big Lie" (a.d. June 8 59)
    • ep. #91 / 3-13: "The Perfect Crime" (a.d. June 29 59)
    • ep. #92 / 3-14: "The Unknown Soldier" (a.d. July 6 59)
    • ep. #93 / 3-15: "Two of a Kind" (a.d. July 13 59)
    • ep. #94 / 3-16: "In Ways Mysterious" (a.d. July 20 59)
    • ep. #97 / 3-19: "The Black Maria" (a.d. Aug 10 59)
    • ep. #98 / 3-20: "Sitting Duck" (a.d. Aug 17 59)
  • U.S. Marshal (original title: Sheriff of Cochise) (1959)
    verified
    • ep. 4-17: "The Triple Cross"
    • ep. 4-23: "Shortcut to Hell"
    • ep. 4-25: "R.I.P." (a.d. June 6 59)
    uncertain; some sources cite Altman on these eps; no known source cites anybody else
    • ep. 4-18: "Third Miracle"
    • ep. 4-31: "Kill or Be Killed"
    • ep. 4-32: "Backfire"
  • Troubleshooters (1959) (13 episodes)
  • Hawaiian Eye (1959) ep. 8: "Three Tickets to Lani" (a.d. Nov 25 59)
  • Sugarfoot (1959–60)
    • ep. #47 / 3-7: "Apollo With A Gun" (a.d. Dec 8 59)
    • ep. #50 / 3-10: "The Highbinder" (a.d. Jan 19 60)
  • Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse (1960)
    • ep. "The Sound of Murder" (a.d. Jan 1 60)
    • ep. "Death of a Dream"
  • The Gale Storm Show aka Oh! Susanna (1960) ep. #125 / 4-25: "It's Magic" (a.d. Mar 17 60)
  • Bronco (1960) ep #41 / 3-1: "The Mustangers" (a.d. Oct 17 60)
  • Maverick (1960) ep. #90: "Bolt From the Blue" (a.d. Nov 27 60)
  • The Roaring '20's (1960–61)
    • ep. 1-5: "The Prairie Flower" (a.d. Nov 12 60)
    • ep. 1-6: "Brother's Keeper" (a.d. Nov 19 60)
    • ep. 1-8: "White Carnation" (a.d. Dec 3 60)
    • ep. 1-12: "Dance Marathon" (a.d. Jan 14 61)
    • ep. 1-15: "Two a Day" (a.d. Feb 4 61)
    • ep. 1-28&29: "Right Off the Boat" Parts 1 & 2 (a.d. May 13/20 61)
    • ep. 1-31: "Royal Tour" (a.d. June 3 61)
    • ep. 2-4: "Standing Room Only" (a.d. Oct 28 61)
  • Bonanza (1960–61)
    • ep. 2-13: "Silent Thunder" (a.d. Dec 10 60)
    • ep. 2-19: "Bank Run" (a.d. Jan 28 61)
    • ep. 2-25: "The Duke" (a.d. Mar 11 61)
    • ep. 2-28: "The Rival" (a.d. Apr 15 61)
    • ep. 2-31: "The Secret" (a.d. May 6 61)
    • ep. 2-32 "The Dream Riders" (a.d. May 20 61)
    • ep. 2-34: "Sam Hill" (a.d. June 3 61)
    • ep. 3-7: "The Many Faces of Gideon Finch" (a.d. Nov 5 61)
  • Lawman (1961) ep. #92 / 3-16: "The Robbery" (a.d. Jan 1 61)
  • Surfside 6 (1961) ep. 1-18: "Thieves Among Honor" (a.d. Jan 30 61)
  • Bus Stop (1961–62)
    • ep. 4: "The Covering Darkness" (a.d. Oct 22 61)
    • ep. 5: "Portrait of a Hero" (a.d. Oct 29 61)
    • ep. 8: "Accessory By Consent" (a.d. Nov 19 61)
    • ep. 10: "A Lion Walks Among Us" (a.d. Dec 3 61)
    • ep. 12: "... And the Pursuit of Evil" (a.d. Dec 17 61)
    • ep. 15: "Summer Lightning" (a.d. Jan 7 62)
    • ep. 23: "Door Without a Key" (a.d. Mar 4 62)
    • ep. 25: "County General" [possibly failed pilot] (a.d. Mar 18 62)
  • Route 66 (1961)
    • ep. #40/2-10: "Some of the People, Some of the Time' (a.d. Dec 1 61)
    • ep. 3-17: "A Gift For A Warrior" (a.d. Jan 18 63) - often incorrectly cited, Altman did not direct this
  • The Gallant Men (1962) pilot: "Battle Zone" (a.d. Oct 5 62)
  • Combat! (1962–63)
    • ep. 1-1: "Forgotten Front" (a.d. Oct 2 62)
    • ep. 1-2: "Rear Echelon Commandos" (a.d. Oct 9 62)
    • ep. 1-4: "Any Second Now" (a.d. Oct 23 62)
    • ep. 1-7: "Escape to Nowhere" (a.d. Dec 20 62)
    • ep. 1-9: "Cat and Mouse" (a.d. Dec 4 62)
    • ep. 1-10: "I Swear By Apollo" (a.d. Dec 11 62)
    • ep. 1-12: "The Prisoner" (a.d. Dec 25 62)
    • ep. 1-16: "The Volunteer" (a.d. Jan 22 63)
    • ep. 1-20: "Off Limits" (a.d. Feb 19 63)
    • ep. 1-23: "Survival" (a.d. Mar 12 63)
  • Kraft Suspense Theater (1963)
    • ep 1-8: "The Long Lost Life of Edward Smalley" (also writer) (a.d. Dec 12 63)
    • ep 1-9: "The Hunt" (also writer) (a.d. Dec 19 63)
    • ep 1-21: "Once Upon a Savage Night"
      released as TV-Movie "Nightmare in Chicago" in 1964
  • The Long Hot Summer (1965) pilot
  • Nightwatch (1968) pilot: "The Suitcase"
  • Premiere (1968) ep. "Walk in the Sky" (a.d. July 15 68)
  • Saturday Night Live (1977) ep. #39 / 2-16 "h: Sissy Spacek", seg. "Sissy's Roles" (a.d. Mar 12 77)
  • Gun (aka Robert Altman's Gun) (1997) ep. 4: "All the President's Women" (a.d. May 10 97)
    this episode, along with another, was released on DVD as Gun: Fatal Betrayal; subsequently, the entire six-episode series was released

Screenshot of opening sequence of Alfred Hitchcock Presents Alfred Hitchcock Presents was a half-hour anthology television series hosted by Alfred Hitchcock. ... M Squad was an American television series that ran from 1957 to 1960 on NBC. Set in Chicago, Illinois, it starred Lee Marvin as police lieutenant Frank Ballinger of the Chicago Police Departments special M Squad. ... Peter Gunn was an American private eye television series which aired on the NBC and later ABC television networks from 1958 to 1961. ... The Millionaire, a television drama anthology series (CBS, 19 January 1955-28 September 1960), explored the ways unexpected wealth changed life for better or for worse. ... Hawaiian Eye was an American television series that ran from October 1959 to September 1963 on the American Broadcasting Company television network. ... Sugarfoot was the title of a TV western that aired from 1957 to 1961. ... The Gale Storm Show was a sitcom co-produced by ITC Entertainment and Hal Roach Studios. ... Bronco was a Western series. ... Maverick is a comedy-western television series created by Roy Huggins that ran from September 22, 1957 to July 8, 1962 on ABC and featured James Garner, Roger Moore, and Jack Kelly as poker-playing travelling gamblers. ... The Bonanza logo was superimposed upon a map of a wild west frontier area. ... Surfside 6 was a television series (1960-1962) about a Miami Beach detective agency set on a houseboat, featuring Van Williams as Kenny Madison (a character recycled from Bourbon Street Beat, a similar series that had appeared the the same time slot the season before), Lee Patterson as Dave Thorne... Route 66 was an American TV series in which two young men traveled across America. ... The Gallant Men was a 1962-63 ABC television series which depicted an infantry company of American soldiers fighting their way through Italy in World War II. Their commander was Capt. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article is about the American television series. ... Mary Elizabeth Sissy Spacek (born December 25, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning American actress and singer. ...

Early independent projects

In the early Calvin years in Kansas City during the 1950s, Altman was as busy as he ever was in Hollywood, shooting hours and hours of footage each day, whether for Calvin or for the many independent film projects he pursued in Kansas City in attempts to break into Hollywood:

  • Corn's-A-Poppin' (1951) (Altman wrote the screenplay for this poor Kansas City-produced feature film)
  • Fashion Faire (1952) (A half-hour fashion parade written and directed by Altman for a fashion show agency)
  • The Model's Handbook (1952) (A half-hour pilot for an unrealized television series sponsored by Eileen Ford and her agency and directed by Altman)
  • The Pulse of the City (1953–54) (A low-budget television series about crime and ambulance chasing produced and filmed in Kansas City by Altman and co-creator Robert Woodburn using local talent. Ran for one season on the independent DuMont Television Network)

The DuMont Television Network was the worlds first commercial television network, beginning operation in the United States in 1946. ...

Selected Calvin industrial films

Out of approximately 65 industrial films directed by Altman for the Calvin Company, all less than 30 minutes long, eleven are notable for their relationship to the director's later work, or for garnering national or international festival awards:

  • The Sound of Bells (1950) - A Christmas-themed "sales" film produced for B.F. Goodrich, about Santa Claus visiting a service station on Christmas Eve
  • Modern Football (1951) - A documentary-style training film on the rules and regulations of football, shot on location in the Southwest
  • The Dirty Look (1952) - A sales film for Gulf Oil featuring "special guest" William Frawley as a prattling barber for comic relief. (Calvin often used Hollywood stars in cameo or starring roles in their films to sell the film's message to viewers more easily.)
  • King Basketball (1952) - Another rules-of-sports film shot on location in the Southwest.
  • The Last Mile (1953) - A bleak highway safety film also serving as an ad for Caterpillar Tractor's road-building equipment. Won awards from the Association of Industrial Filmmakers and the National Safety Council in 1953
  • Modern Baseball (1953) - Rules-of-sports film
  • The Builders (1954) - Promotional film for Southern Pine Association
  • Better Football (1954) - Rules-of-sports film, once again starring William Frawley as comic relief
  • The Perfect Crime (1955) - Another award-winning highway safety film, once again from Caterpillar
  • Honeymoon for Harriet (1955) - A promotional film for International Harvester, starring Altman's then-wife Lotus Corelli, who also appears in The Delinquents
  • The Magic Bond (1956) - A documentary film sponsored by the Veterans of Foreign Wars, one of Calvin's and Altman's highest budgets to date, and one of Altman's last Calvin films. Also includes a startling opening sequence not only using the later Altman trademarks of an ensemble cast and overlapping dialogue, but also the sort of anti-war message later featured in Altman's episodes of the TV series Combat!,
Awards
Preceded by
Alan Parker
for The Commitments
BAFTA Award for Best Direction
for The Player

1992
Succeeded by
Steven Spielberg
for Schindler's List
Preceded by
Ang Lee
for Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Golden Globe Award for Best Director - Motion Picture
for Gosford Park

2002
Succeeded by
Martin Scorsese
for Gangs of New York
Preceded by
Sidney Lumet
Academy Honorary Award
2006
Succeeded by
Ennio Morricone

Categories: Companies traded on NYSE | Stub | Aerospace manufacturing companies | Fortune 500 companies | Companies based in North Carolina ... A typical depiction of Santa Claus. ... Gulf Oil was a major global oil company from the 1900s to the 1980s. ... William Clement Frawley (February 26, 1887 – March 3, 1966) began in vaudeville and as a screen actor, with well over a hundred films to his credit, but gained greater fame as Fred Mertz on I Love Lucy. ... Caterpillar Inc. ... The National Safety Council of the US is a not-for-profit safety organization that was chartered by the US government in 1913. ... Navistar (formerly International Harvester) started in Chicago, United States, which produced agricultural machinery, construction equipment and vehicles. ... The Delinquents is a 1957 motion picture which Robert Altman wrote, produced, and directed in his hometown of Kansas City, Missouri during the summer of 1956 on a $45,000 budget. ... The Veterans of Foreign Wars, or VFW, is an American organization whose members are current or former members of the U.S. armed forces. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Alan Parker on the set of Pink Floyd The Wall Sir Alan Parker (born February 14, 1944) is a British film director, producer, writer, and actor. ... The Commitments (1987) is a novel by Irish writer Roddy Doyle, and is the first episode in The Barrytown Trilogy. ... Winners of the BAFTA Award for Best Direction presented by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts. ... The Player (1992) is a movie that tells the story of Griffin Mill (Tim Robbins), a Hollywood studio executive who believes he is being blackmailed by a screenwriter whose script he once rejected. ... Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Ang Lee (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) (born October 23, 1954) is an Academy-Award winning film director from Taiwan. ... Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) is a Chinese-language wuxia (chivalric and martial arts) 2000 Academy Award winning film. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Director - Motion Picture has been awarded annually since 1944 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, writer and producer and founder of the World Cinema Foundation. ... Gangs of New York is a 2002 film set in the middle 19th century in the Five Points district of New York City. ... Portrait of Sidney Lumet, May 7, 1939. ... The Academy Honorary Award is given irregularly by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to celebrate motion picture achievements that are not covered by existing Academy Awards. ... Ennio Morricone (born November 10, 1928; sometimes also credited as Dan Savio or Leo Nichols) is an Italian composer especially noted for his film scores. ...

Bibliographies

Additional resources

  • The director's commentary on the McCabe & Mrs. Miller DVD, while focusing on that film, also to some degree covers Altman's general methodology as a director.
  • Judith M. Kass. Robert Altman: American Innovator early (1978) assessment of the director's work and his interest in gambling. Part of Leonard Maltin's Popular Library filmmaker series.
  • Patrick McGilligan's biography of Altman, Jumping Off the Cliff (St. Martin's Press, 1989) is greatly detailed in its writing about the Altman family's involvement in early Kansas City, Altman's childhood, his first films, and the workings of his mind and personality. This book is the source of this article's information on Altman's childhood, military service, and early years of filmmaking in Kansas City.
  • The English band Maxïmo Park have a song named "Robert Altman", a b-side to their single "Our Velocity"
  • The Criterion Collection has released several of Altman's films on DVD (Short Cuts, 3 Women, Tanner '88, Secret Honor) which include audio commentary and video interviews with him that shed light on his directing style.

Caravaggio, The Cardsharps, c. ... Leonard Maltin (born December 18, 1950 in New York City) is a widely known and respected American film critic. ... Popular Library was a paperback book company established by Ned Pines in 1942, who at the time was a major pulp magazine publisher. ... Maxïmo Park are an British indie rock band, signed to Warp Records, who formed in 2000. ... Our Earthly Pleasures track listing Girls Who Play Guitars (1) Our Velocity (2) Books From Boxes (3) Our Velocity is the first single from Our Earthly Pleasures, the second album from the band, Maxïmo Park. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Lemons, Stephen. "Robert Altman", Salon.com, pp. 2. Retrieved on 2006-11-22. 
  2. ^ a b The Daily Telegraph. "Robert Altman, 81, Mercurial Director of Masterworks and Flops", The New York Sun, 2006-11-22. Retrieved on 2006-11-22. 
  3. ^ The Religious Affiliation of Robert Altman. Adherents.com (2005-07-28). Retrieved on 2006-11-22.
  4. ^ [1]
  5. ^ http://film.guardian.co.uk/interview/interviewpages/0,,1207121,00.html
  6. ^ http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=5471
  7. ^ [2]
  8. ^ [3]

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Obituaries

  • CNN obituary
  • The Guardian obituary
  • The Times (London) obituary
Persondata
NAME Altman, Robert Bernard
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Film director
DATE OF BIRTH February 20, 1925
PLACE OF BIRTH Kansas City, Missouri
DATE OF DEATH November 20, 2006
PLACE OF DEATH Los Angeles, California (leukaemia)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Robert Altman - MSN Encarta (512 words)
Robert Altman, born in 1925, American motion-picture director, producer, and screenwriter, known for his idiosyncratic, iconoclastic, and innovative feature films.
Robert Bernard Altman was born in Kansas City, Missouri, where he apprenticed making films with the Calvin Company.
Altman became renowned for his unorthodox production methods (during the filming of M*A*S*H, the cast and crew lived on the “Army camp” set), daring style (such as overlapping, improvisational dialogue, and semidocumentary-style camerawork and editing), and irreverence toward Hollywood’s authorities and conventions.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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