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Encyclopedia > Robert Adam
Robert Adam
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Robert Adam

Robert Adam (3 July 1728 - 3 March 1792) was a Scottish architect, interior designer and furniture designer, born in Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland. He is considered by many to be the greatest architect of the late 18th century, a leader of the neo-classical revival in England and Scotland from around 1760 until his death. Sir William Chambers was the leading British official architect of the era, but Adam received many important commissions from private clients and had a more lasting stylistic influence. Image File history File links Robert-adam. ... Image File history File links Robert-adam. ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... Events Astronomical aberration discovered by the astronomer James Bradley Swedish academy of sciences founded at Uppsala The founding of the University of Havana (Universidad de la Habana), Cubas most well-established university. ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Motto: (Latin for No one provokes me with impunity)1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots 2 Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen of the UK Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification... Architect at his drawing board, 1893 An Ciara Danille Bowers is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... Interior design is a multi-faceted profession in which creative and technical solutions are applied within a structure to achieve a built interior environment. ... A list of furniture designers, cabinet makers and people involved in that trade Robert Adam Mario Bellini Matthew Boulton William Chambers Thomas Chippendale Thomas Chippendale, the younger Giovanni Cipriani Henry Copland Le Corbusier Charles Eastlake Uwe Fischer Norman Foster Frank O. Gehry Grinling Gibbons George Hepplewhite William Ince Arne Jacobsen... Kirkcaldy (pron. ... Fife (Fìobh in Gaelic) is a council area of Scotland, situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with landward boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. ... Motto: (Latin for No one provokes me with impunity)1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots 2 Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen of the UK Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification... Architect at his drawing board, 1893 An Ciara Danille Bowers is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... Motto: (Latin for No one provokes me with impunity)1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots 2 Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen of the UK Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification... The central courtyard of Chambers Somerset House in London. ...


Robert Adam was the second son of William Adam (1684-1748) of Maryburgh, Fife, a stonemason and architect of some note. His younger brother and business partner James Adam was also an architect of some note, but was overshadowed by Robert, and two further Adam brothers followed the family profession, but without achieving lasting fame. William Adam (1684 - 1748) was a Scottish architect and builder, born in Fife, Scotland. ... The art and craft of the stonemason has existed since the dawn of civilization - creating buildings, structures and sculpture using stone and other raw materials from the earth. ... James Adam (21 July 1732 – 20 October 1794) was a Scottish architect and furniture designer, but was often overshadowed by his older brother and business partner, Robert Adam. ...

Contents

Training

Kedleston Hall. The South front by Robert Adam, based on the Arch of Constantine in Rome
Kedleston Hall. The South front by Robert Adam, based on the Arch of Constantine in Rome

Robert studied at the Royal High School, Edinburgh, then entered the University of Edinburgh in 1743 only for his studies to be interrupted by illness and the Jacobite Rising of 1745. In 1746, he joined his elder brother, John Adam, as an assistant to his father, and after their father's death in 1748, the two brothers became partners in the family business, now known as 'Adam Brothers'. Kedleston Hall. ... Kedleston Hall. ... Kedleston Hall was Brettinghams opportunity to prove himself capable of designing a house to rival Holkham Hall. ... The Arch of Constantine seen from the Colosseum The arch seen from Via Triumphalis Detail of the arch (southern side, left) The Arch of Constantine is a triumphal arch in Rome, situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1,285 km²  (496. ... The Royal High School (RHS) in Edinburgh can trace its roots back to 1128, and is generally considered as the oldest school in Scotland and one of the oldest in Europe; it may even be one of the oldest surviving in the world. ... Edinburgh (pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second-largest city. ... The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1583, is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Each Jacobite Rising formed part of a series of military campaigns by Jacobites attempting to restore the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland (and after 1707, Great Britain) after James VII of Scotland and II of England was deposed in 1688 and the thrones claimed by his...


Their first major commission was the decoration of the grand state apartments on the first floor at Hopetoun House, near South Queensferry west of Edinburgh, followed by projects at Fort George, Dumfries House and Inveraray. In 1754, Robert Adam set off for Europe on the Grand Tour of France and Italy, studying classical architecture and honing his drawing skills (his art tutors included French architect Charles Lois Clérisseau and architect and archaeologist Giovanni Battista Piranesi). During this journey, he studied intensively the ruins of Diocletian's palace at Split in Dalmatia, later publishing The Ruins of the Palace of Diocletian in 1764. A State Room in a large European mansion, is usually one of a suite of very grand rooms which were designed to impress, they were the most luxurious in the house and contained the finest works of art. ... Hopetoun House is the traditional residence of the Earl of Hopetoun (later the Marquess of Linlithgow). ... Queensferry (often referred to as South Queensferry to distinguish it from North Queensferry), originally a Royal Burgh in West Lothian is now part of the City of Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Fort George, Ardersier, Highland, Scotland, is a large 18th century fortress near Inverness with perhaps the mightiest artillery fortifications in Europe. ... Inveraray is a burgh in Argyll and Bute, Scotland, located on the western shore of Loch Fyne near its head, and on the A83 road. ... The interior of the Pantheon in the 18th century, painted by Giovanni Paolo Panini In the 18th century, the Grand Tour was a kind of education for wealthy British noblemen, wherein the primary educational value was exposure to the cultured artifacts of antiquity and the Renaissance as well as the... Giovanni Battista (also Giambattista) Piranesi (4th October 1720 in Mogliano Veneto (near Treviso) - 9th November 1778 in Rome) was an Italian artist famous for his etchings of Rome and of fictitious and atmospheric prisons {Carceri dInvenzione). ... Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus ( 245– 312), born Diocles (Greek Διοκλής) and known in English as Diocletian,[1] was Roman Emperor from November 20, 284 to May 1, 305. ... Look up Split in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Map of Dalmatia, in present day Croatia highlighted Dalmatia (Croatian: Dalmacija, Italian: Dalmazia) is a region on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, in modern Croatia, spreading between the island of Rab in the northwest and the Gulf of Kotor (Boka Kotorska) in the southeast. ...


Business

Mistley Towers, Essex
Mistley Towers, Essex

He returned to Great Britain in 1758 and set up in business in London with his brothers James and William, focused on designing complete schemes for the decoration and furnishing of houses. Palladian design was popular, and Robert designed a number of country houses in this style [1], but Robert evolved a new, more flexible style incorporating elements of classic Roman design alongside influences from Greek, Byzantine and Baroque styles.[2] The Adam brothers' success can also be attributed to a desire to design everything down to the smallest detail, ensuring a sense of unity in their designs. Mistley towers, Mistley, Essex, England. ... Mistley towers, Mistley, Essex, England. ... James Adam (21 July 1732 – 20 October 1794) was a Scottish architect and furniture designer, but was often overshadowed by his older brother and business partner, Robert Adam. ... Palladian architecture is a European style of architecture derived from the designs of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio (1508–1580). ... The Romans adopted the external language of classical Greek architecture for their own purposes, which were so different from Greek buildings as to create a new architectural style. ... Byzantine architecture is the architecture of the Byzantine Empire. ... Adoration, by Peter Paul Rubens. ...


Projects

Osterley Park, London
Osterley Park, London
Details for Derby House in Grosvenor Square, an example of the Adam Brothers' decorative designs.
Details for Derby House in Grosvenor Square, an example of the Adam Brothers' decorative designs.

Osterley Park, London. ... Osterley Park, London. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (576x756, 104 KB) Summary Details for the interiors of Derby House (26 Grosvenor Square) by Robert and James Adam. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (576x756, 104 KB) Summary Details for the interiors of Derby House (26 Grosvenor Square) by Robert and James Adam. ... The north side of Grosvenor Square in the 18th or early 19th century. ... The Adam brothers Adelphi Buildings in an 18th-century print; the terrace stood upon riverfront warehousing. ... Old Admiralty House, Whitehall, London, Thomas Ripley, architect, 1723-26, was not admired by his contemporaries and earned him some scathing couplets from Alexander Pope The Admiralty was historically the authority in the United Kingdom responsible for the command of the Royal Navy. ... Whitehall, London, looking south towards the Houses of Parliament. ... Alnwick Castle, from the east, across the pastures and the River Aln Alnwick Castle is a castle and stately home in Alnwick, Northumberland, England. ... Northumberland is a county in northern England. ... Apsley House in 1829 by TH Shepherd. ... Ayrshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Àir in Scottish Gaelic) is a region of south-west Scotland, located on the shores of the Firth of Clyde. ... Bowood House from Morriss County Seats (1880). ... Calne is a town located in central Wiltshire, in the South West England region of the United Kingdom. ... Wiltshire (abbreviated Wilts) is a large southern English county. ... Bute House in Charlotte Square, official residence of the First Minister of Scotland Charlotte Square is a street in Edinburgh, Scotland part of the New Town, designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. ... Culzean Castle (pronounced cull-ANE) is a castle near Maybole on the Ayrshire coast of Scotland. ... The University of Edinburgh was founded in 1583 as a renowned centre for teaching in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Fitzroy Square is one of the most beautiful Georgian Squares in London and is the only one found in the central London area known as in Fitzrovia. ... Gosford House is the family seat of the Charteris family and is situated near Longniddry in East Lothian, Scotland. ... Longniddry is a village in East Lothian, Scotland, United Kingdom. ... East Lothian (Lodainn an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland, and a lieutenancy Area. ... Harewood House as of 2005, seen from the garden Harewood House from A Complete History of the County of York by Thomas Allen (1828–30), showing the house before Barry altered the facades and added an extra storey to the pavilions. ... West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England. ... Kedleston Hall was Brettinghams opportunity to prove himself capable of designing a house to rival Holkham Hall. ... Derby (pronounced dar-bee ) is a city in the East Midlands of England. ... Kenwood House Kenwood House (also known as the Iveagh Bequest) is a former stately home in Hampstead Heath in London. ... Hampstead is an area in the London Borough of Camden. ... Lansdowne House is a house in Berkeley Square, London. ... Berkeley Square in 1830. ... South-west facade of Luton Hoo, Bedfordshire. ... Bedfordshire is a county in England and forms part of the East of England region. ... Marlborough House is a mansion in Brighton on the south coast of England. ... Statistics Population: 155,919[1] Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TQ315065 Administration District: Brighton & Hove Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: East Sussex Historic county: Sussex Services Police force: Sussex Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South East Coast Post office and... Mellerstain House is the home of the 13th Earl of Haddington. ... // Kelso has several meanings: Places United Kingdom Kelso, Scotland, a burgh in the Scottish Borders Kelso Abbey Canada Kelso, a small village in Halton Regional Municipality, Ontario, located beside Lake Kelso Australia Kelso, New South Wales, a suburb of Bathurst Kelso, Tasmania a small village in the north of Tasmania... Scottish Borders (often referred to locally as The Borders or The Borderland) is one of 35 local government unitary council areas of Scotland. ... Mistley Towers. ... The Strand front of Northumberland House in 1752 by Canaletto. ... Nostell Priory in 1880. ... Osterley House with Stable Block to right Design for the entrance facade of Osterley House by Robert Adam A design for one of the walls of the Estruscan dressing room at Osterly Park by Robert Adam. ... Paxton House Paxton House is a historic house in the Scottish Borders, near Berwick-upon-Tweed. ... Map sources for Berwick-upon-Tweed at grid reference NT9952 Berwick-upon-Tweed from across the river Berwick-upon-Tweed, (pronounced Berrick) situated in the county of Northumberland, is the northernmost town in England, situated on the east coast on the mouth of the river Tweed. ... Portland Place is a street in the Marylebone district of central London. ... Pulteney Bridge and the weir at Bath Pulteney Bridge is a bridge that crosses the River Avon, located in Bath, England and completed in 1773. ... For other uses, see Bath (disambiguation). ... Saltram House ca. ... Plymouth is a city in the southwest of England, or alternatively the Westcountry, and is situated within the traditional county of Devon. ... Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... Shardeloes is a large 18th century country house 1 mile northwest of Amersham in Buckinghamshire, England. ... Amersham (previously Agmondesham) is a market town 27 miles north west of London, in the Chiltern Hills, England. ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... Syon House and its 200 acre (800,000 m²) park is in southwest London, in England. ... Brentford is a suburb in the London Borough of Hounslow at the confluence of the River Thames and the River Brent in South West London, situated approximately 8 miles (12. ... Wedderburn Castle, Duns, Berwickshire is a historic home of the Earls of Home. ... Location within the British Isles Duns is a town in the Scottish Borders. ... Berwickshire (Siorrachd Bhearaig in Gaelic) is a committee area of the Scottish Borders Council and a Lieutenancy area of Scotland, on the border with England. ...

Public life

Adam was elected a member of the Royal Society of Arts in 1758 and of the Society of Antiquaries in 1761, the same year he was appointed Architect of the King’s Works (jointly with Sir William Chambers). His younger brother James succeeded him in this post when he relinquished the role in 1768 in order to devote more time to his elected office as Member of Parliament for Kinross. The Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) is a British multi-disciplinary institution, based in London. ... See: Society of Antiquaries of London Society of Antiquaries of Scotland This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Ministry of Works was a department of the UK Government formed in 1943 to organise the requisitioning of property for wartime use. ... The central courtyard of Chambers Somerset House in London. ... Location within the British Isles Kinross is a burgh in Perth and Kinross, Scotland. ...


Robert Adam died suddenly at his home, 11 Albermarle Street, London, after a blood vessel in his stomach burst. He was 64. He was buried in Westminster Abbey. He left nearly 9,000 drawings, most of which were purchased by the architect John Soane and are now at the Soane Museum in London. The Abbeys western façade The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to as Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often considered one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... Sir John Soane (10 September 1753 - 20 January 1837) was a British architect who specialised in the Neo-Classical tradition. ... The Soane Museum is a museum of architecture, and was formerly the house and studio of Sir John Soane. ...


Further reading

  • During their lifetime Robert and James Adam published two volumes of their designs, Works in Architecture of Robert and James Adam (in 1773-78 and 1779; a third volume was published posthumously, in 1822).
  • A comprehensive account of Robert’s furniture work is given in The Furniture of Robert Adam by Eileen Harris (published by Alec Tiranti, London, 1963) ISBN 0-85458-929-5. Harris later published The Genius of Robert Adam: His Interiors (2001) ISBN 0-300-08129-4
  • John Fleming, Robert Adam and his Circle (1962) ISBN 0-7195-0000-1
  • Doreen Yarwood, Robert Adam (1970) ISBN 0-460-03824-9 and ISBN 0-460-02130-3 (1973 paperback)
  • Damie Stillman, The Decorative Work of Robert Adam (1966) ISBN 0-85458-160-X
  • Arthur T. Bolton, The Architecture of Robert & James Adam, 1785–1794, 2 volumes (1922, reprinted 1984) ISBN 0-907462-49-9 (1984 edition)
  • James Lees-Milne's The Age of Adam (1947) is aimed at the general reader.

James Lees-Milne (1908-1997) was an English writer and expert on country houses. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Robert and James Adam

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... The Adam style (or Adamesque) is a style of neoclassical architecture and design as practised by Scottish architect Robert Adam (1728_ 1792) and his brothers. ... Angelica Kauffmann Miranda and Ferdinand in The Tempest, 1782. ...

References

  1. ^ Roth, Leland M. (1993). Understanding Architecture: Its Elements, History and Meaning, First, Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 397. ISBN 0-06-430158-3.
  2. ^ Roth, Leland M. (1993). Understanding Architecture: Its Elements, History and Meaning, First, Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 402. ISBN 0-06-430158-3.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Robert Adam - definition of Robert Adam in Encyclopedia (523 words)
He was the second son of William Adam (1689-1748) of Maryburgh, Fife, a stonemason and architect of some note, appointed Surveyor of the King's Works in Scotland in 1729 and Mason to the Board of Ordnance a year later.
Robert studied at Edinburgh High School, then entered Edinburgh University in 1743 only for his studies to be interrupted by illness and the Jacobite Rising of 1745.
Robert was elected a member of the Royal Society of Arts in 1758 and of the Society of Antiquaries in 1761, the same year he was appointed Architect of the King’s Works (jointly with Sir William Chambers).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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