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Encyclopedia > Robbie Robertson
Robbie Robertson

Born July 5, 1943 (1943-07-05) (age 64)
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Genre(s) Folk-rock
Country rock
Affiliation(s) The Band
Label(s) Geffen
Years active 1958Present
Official site Artist Website at Capitol Records

Robbie Robertson (born Jaime Robert Robertson, 5 July 1943, Toronto, Ontario, Canada) is a songwriter, guitarist and singer, best known for his membership in The Band. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 420 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (437 × 623 pixel, file size: 35 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Diversity Our Strength Image:Toronto, Ontario Location. ... Folk rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Band. ... Geffen Records is an American record label, owned by Universal Music Group, and operates as one third of UMGs Interscope-Geffen-A&M label group. ... See also: 1957 in music, other events of 1958, 1959 in music, 1950s in music and the list of years in music // Events January 28 - Little Richard begins attending classes at Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama February 14 - The Iranian government bans rock & roll because they claim that the form... The present is the time that is perceived directly, not as a recollection or a speculation. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Diversity Our Strength Image:Toronto, Ontario Location. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area [1] Ranked... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A singer is a musician who uses their voice to produce music. ... For other uses, see Band. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

Born to a Jewish father and a Mohawk mother, (he took his stepfather's last name after his mother remarried), Robertson had his earliest exposure to music at Six Nations 40, Ontario, where he spent summers with his mother's family. He studied guitar from his youth and was writing songs and performing from his teen years. The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Languages English, Mohawk Religions Christianity, Longhouse Related ethnic groups other Iroquoian peoples The Mohawk (Kanienkeh, Kanienkehaka or Kanien’Kahake, meaning People of the Flint) are an indigenous people of North America originally from the Mohawk Valley in upstate New York to Southern Quebec and Eastern Ontario. ... Six Nations of the Grand River is the name applied to two contiguous Indian reserves southeast of Brantford, Ontario, Canada – Six Nations reserve no. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A song is a relatively short musical composition. ...


By 1958, Robertson was performing in various groups around Toronto. By 1959 he had met singer Ronnie Hawkins, who headed up a band called The Hawks (after relocating to Canada). In 1960 he joined the group, which toured often, before splitting from Hawkins in 1963. Ronnie Hawkins, born January 10, 1935 in Huntsville, Arkansas, United States, is a pioneering rock and roll musician and cousin to fellow rockabilly pioneer Dale Hawkins. ...


The quintet styled themselves as The Canadian Squires and Levon and the Hawks [1], but (after rejecting such tongue-in-cheek names as The Honkies and The Crackers), ultimately called themselves The Band. Sarcasm is the making of remarks intended to mock the person referred to (who is normally the person addressed), a situation or thing. ... White cracker, or simply cracker, was originally a pejorative term for a white person mainly used by blacks in the Southern United States, a usage that is now somewhat archaic. ... For other uses, see Band. ...


The Band

Bob Dylan hired The Band for his famed, controversial tours of 1965 and 1966, his first wide exposure as an electrified rock and roll performer rather than his earlier acoustic folk sound. Robertson's distinctive guitar sound was an important part of the music; Dylan famously praised him as "the only mathematical guitar genius I’ve ever run into who doesn’t offend my intestinal nervousness with his rearguard sound." Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman, May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, author, musician, and poet who has been a major figure in popular music for more than four decades. ... See also: 1964 in music, other events of 1965, 1966 in music, 1960s in music and the list of years in music // January 4 - Fender Guitars is sold to CBS for $13 million. ... // January 3 - Hullabaloo shows promotional videos of The Beatles songs Day Tripper and We Can Work It Out. January 8 - Shindig! airs for the last time on ABC, with musical guests the Kinks and the Who January 14 - Young singer David Jones changes his last name to Bowie to avoid... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... It has been suggested that Unplugged be merged into this article or section. ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the...


From their first album, Music from Big Pink (1968), The Band was praised as one of rock music's preeminent groups. Rolling Stone magazine praised The Band and gave its music extensive coverage. Robertson sang only a few songs with The Band, but was the group's primary songwriter, and was in the later years of the Band often seen as the de facto bandleader. Music From Big Pink is the 1968 debut album by folk-rock band The Band. ... See also: 1967 in music, other events of 1968, 1969 in music, 1960s in music and the list of years in music // January 4 - Guitarist Jimi Hendrix is jailed by Stockholm police, after trashing a hotel room during a drunken fist fight with bassist Noel Redding. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... This article is about the magazine. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without...


In 1976, Robertson decided to break up The Band, reporting that he was exhausted by nearly sixteen years touring with them. In the Martin Scorsese film The Last Waltz (1978) he noted that he had been playing live rock and roll music almost since rock and roll began. Also, as the band's chief song-writer, he was able to live off the song royalties, and no longer needed to tour. The Band reformed in 1983 without Robertson. The Last Waltz was a concert by the Canadian-American rock group, The Band, held on Thanksgiving Day, November 25, 1976, at Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco. ... See also: 1970s in music. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Robertson's composition "Broken Arrow" was a part of the Grateful Dead's rotation of live songs 1993-95 (sung by bassist Phil Lesh), and later with Phil Lesh and Friends.


Solo career

From 1987 onwards, Robertson released a series of four solo albums that began with a self-titled album. In 1990, he contributed to Japanese musician Ryuichi Sakamoto's album Beauty. An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ... Ryuichi Sakamoto at his New York City studio September 2003 Ryuichi Sakamoto (坂本 龍一 Sakamoto Ryūichi, born January 17, 1952, Nakano, Tokyo, Japan) is a Japanese musician, composer, producer and actor. ...


On 9 February 2002, Robertson performed "Stomp Dance (Unity)" as part of the Opening Ceremony of the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah. An athlete carries the Olympic torch The Winter Olympic Games are a winter multi-sport event held every four years. ... Salt Lake City is the capital and the most populous city of the U.S. state of Utah. ...


At the 2003 commencment ceremonies at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, Robertson delivered an address to the graduating class and was awarded an honorary degree by the university. In 2006, he announced plans to write his autobiography. Queens University, generally referred to simply as Queens, is a coeducational, non-sectarian, public university located in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... Murney Tower, Kingston The Fort Henry Guard performing an historical demonstration The Prince George Hotel. ... An honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum, not to be confused with an honors degree) is an academic degree awarded to an individual as a decoration, rather than as the result of matriculating and studying for several years. ... Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ...


In 2003, Robertson was inducted into Canada's Walk of Fame.


In 2006, Robertson recorded with Jerry Lee Lewis on "Last man standing" on track "Twilight". Robertson has three children and has been married to Québécoise Dominique Bourgeois since 1968 - despite a two-and-a-half year separation when he and Last Waltz director Martin Scorsese lived a "bachelor" lifestyle in Scorsese's Mulholland Drive house (during editing on "The Last Waltz.") This article or section cites its sources but does not provide page references. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, writer and producer and founder of the World Cinema Foundation. ... Map of Mulholland Drive (orange) and Mulholland Highway (brown) in Los Angeles County. ...


Martin Scorsese

Martin Scorsese was hired to direct The Last Waltz based on his use of music in Mean Streets. The two lived together during the editing of Waltz and became friends. Scorsese had later admitted that during the editing process, the two of them were under heavy drug use. Scorsese hired Robertson to compose the musical score for his 1980 film Raging Bull. Robertson would later work on Scorsese's movies The King of Comedy, The Color of Money, Casino and The Departed, and act as executive music director for Gangs of New York. Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, writer and producer and founder of the World Cinema Foundation. ... The Last Waltz was a concert by the Canadian-American rock group, The Band, held on Thanksgiving Day, November 25, 1976, at Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco. ... Mean Streets (1973) is an early Martin Scorsese film starring Harvey Keitel and Robert De Niro. ... Sheet music is written represenation of music. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the 1980 film. ... The King of Comedy is a feature film made in 1981. ... The Color of Money was a 1984 novel by American writer Walter Tevis, continuing the story of Fast Eddie Felson from The Hustler (1959). ... Casino is a 1995 movie directed by Martin Scorsese, based on the book of the same name by Nicholas Pileggi and Larry Shandling. ... The Departed is an Academy Award-winning 2006 film directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon and Jack Nicholson. ... Gangs of New York is a 2002 film set in the middle 19th century in the Five Points district of New York City. ...


Discography

Albums with The Band

Music From Big Pink is the 1968 debut album by folk-rock band The Band. ... The Band is the eponymous second album by The Band, released on September 22, 1969 (see 1969 in music). ... Stage Fright was the third long player by Canadian-American rockers The Band. ... Cahoots was the fourth LP by Canadian-American rock group The Band, and their last all-original studio album for four years. ... Rock of Ages is The Bands fifth album. ... Moondog Matinee was the sixth long player by Canadian-American rockers The Band, and an oddity in their catalogue, to say the least. ... Northern Lights - Southern Cross was the seventh album by Canadian-American rockers The Band, the first album to be recorded at their new California studio, Shangri-La, and the first album of all-new material since 1971s Cahoots. ... The Basement Tapes are a series of recordings by North American folk-rockers Bob Dylan and The Band, recorded in mid-1967. ... The Last Waltz was a concert by the Canadian-American rock group, The Band, held on Thanksgiving Day, November 25, 1976, at Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco. ...

Solo recordings

Robertson has released four solo albums:

Robbie Robertson is the self-titled solo debut by Robbie Robertson, released in 1987. ... U2 (IPA: /ju. ... Storyville is Robbie Robertsons second solo album. ... Music for The Native Americans is a 1994 album by Robbie Robertson, compiling music written by Robertson and other colleagues (billed as the Red Road Ensemble) for the television documentary film The Native Americans. ... Contact from the Underworld of Redboy is an album by Robbie Robertson, published in 1998 by Capitol Records. ...

Film Credits

Robertson is credited in the following films:

The Last Waltz was a concert by the Canadian-American rock group, The Band, held on Thanksgiving Day, November 25, 1976, at Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the 1980 film. ... The King of Comedy is a feature film made in 1981. ... The Color of Money was a 1984 novel by American writer Walter Tevis, continuing the story of Fast Eddie Felson from The Hustler (1959). ... Released on Wednesday, March 30, 1994, Jimmy Hollywood is the American comedy film starting Joe Pesci and Christian Slater. ... Casino is a 1995 movie directed by Martin Scorsese, based on the book of the same name by Nicholas Pileggi and Larry Shandling. ... The Crossing Guard is a 1995 independent film directed and written by American actor Sean Penn. ... Phenomenon is a 1996 drama, romance, and fantasy film written by Gerald Di Pego, directed by Jon Turteltaub, and starring John Travolta, Kyra Sedgwick, Forest Whitaker, and Robert Duvall. ... This page has been deleted, and should not be re-created without a good reason. ... Any Given Sunday is a 1999 film directed by Oliver Stone starring Al Pacino, Cameron Diaz, Dennis Quaid, Jamie Foxx, James Woods, LL Cool J, Matthew Modine, John C. McGinley, Charlton Heston, Ann-Margret, Lauren Holly, Bill Bellamy, Lela Rochon, Aaron Eckhart, Elizabeth Berkley and Marty Wright. ... Gangs of New York is a 2002 film set in the middle 19th century in the Five Points district of New York City. ... Ladder 49 is a 2004 drama movie about firefighters. ... The Departed is an Academy Award-winning 2006 film directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon and Jack Nicholson. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Robbie Robertson - definition of Robbie Robertson in Encyclopedia (397 words)
Jaime Robbie Robertson (born July 5, 1943 in Toronto, Ontario Canada) is a songwriter, guitarist and singer, probably best known for his membership in The Band.
Robertson was born to a Jewish father and a Mohawk mother.
Robertson sang only a few songs with The Band, but was the group's primary songwriter, and was often seen as the de facto bandleader.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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