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Encyclopedia > Roanoke College

Roanoke College

Motto "palmam qui meruit ferat" (let him who has deserved it bear the palm)
Established 1842
Type Private, liberal arts
President Michael C. Maxey
Faculty 117
Undergraduates 2,006
Location Salem, Virginia, USA
Campus Suburban
Endowment $108 million
Nickname Maroons
Website roanoke.edu

Roanoke College is an independent, four-year, private, coeducational, liberal-arts college affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The college is located in Salem, Virginia, a suburban independent city adjacent to Roanoke, Virginia. Established in 1842, Roanoke is the second oldest Lutheran-affiliated college in the United States. Image File history File links Logo of Roanoke College File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Salem is an independent city located in Virginia, bordered by the city of Roanoke and Roanoke County. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... The seven liberal arts – Picture from the Hortus deliciarum of Herrad von Landsberg (12th century) The term liberal arts refers to a particular type of educational curriculum broadly defined as a classical education. ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... Salem is an independent city located in Virginia, bordered by the city of Roanoke and Roanoke County. ... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... Nickname: Location in Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent city Government  - Mayor Nelson Harris Area  - City  43 sq mi (111. ...


Roanoke has approximately 2,000 students (55% female, 45% male) who represent approximately 40 states and 25 countries. The college offers 34 majors, 29 minors, 19 concentrations, and pre-professional programs in law, medicine, dentistry, engineering, and ministry. Roanoke awards bachelor's degrees in arts, science, and business administration and is one of 276 colleges with a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, the nation’s oldest and most prestigious honor society. The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ...


Roanoke is an NCAA Division III school competing in the Old Dominion Athletic Conference. The college fields varsity teams in nine men's and ten women's sports. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Old Dominion Athletic Conference is an NCAA Division III athletic conference. ...

Contents

History

Early years

Roanoke College was founded in 1842 as a boys' preparatory school by Lutheran pastors David F. Bittle and Christopher C. Baughmann. Originally located near Staunton, Virginia, the school was called the "Virginia Institute." In 1847, the institute moved to Salem which was developing into a center of commerce and transportation in the region; the institute moved all of its possessions in a single covered wagon. In 1853, the Virginia General Assembly granted a college charter and approved the name "Roanoke College", chosen in honor of the Roanoke Valley. Bittle then served as the college's first president. A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... West Beverley Street in downtown Staunton Staunton (IPA: or STAN-tehn or STANT-en) is an independent city within the confines of Augusta County in the commonwealth of Virginia. ... Salem is an independent city located in Virginia, bordered by the city of Roanoke and Roanoke County. ... A covered wagon was usually pulled by oxen, mules or horses in groups of two. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a U.S. state. ... Roanoke Valley in southwestern Virginia is an area adjacent to and including the Roanoke River. ...


Roanoke was one of the few Southern colleges that remained open throughout the American Civil War. The student body was organized into a corps of cadets and fought with Confederate forces at the Battle of Hanging Rock, which occurred a short distance from the college's campus. The students were outmatched and quickly forced to surrender, but the Union commander allowed them to return to the college in exchange for a promise to put down their arms and return to their studies. A monument honoring Salem's Confederate soldiers, erected by the local chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, is on the Roanoke campus (on the grounds of the former Roanoke County courthouse; now a college academic building). Historic Southern United States. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... The United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) is a sororal association dedicated to honoring the memory of those who served and died in service to the Confederate States of America (CSA). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


International students

Roanoke enrolled its first international students in the late 1800s; the first Mexican student in 1876 and the first Japanese student in 1888. The first Korean to graduate from an American college or university, Surh Beung Kiu, graduated in 1898.


Coeducation

Roanoke became coeducational in 1930 when women were admitted to counter a decline in male enrollment caused by the Great Depression. A small number of women (mostly students from Elizabeth College, a sister Lutheran women's college in Salem that burned in 1921; its students finished the 1921-1922 academic year at Roanoke) were previously offered limited admission, but not as degree seeking students. The first women's residence hall, Smith Hall, opened in 1941. Roanoke's student body is now more than fifty percent female. Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Elizabeth College was a private Lutheran womens college in Charlotte, North Carolina and Salem, Virginia that operated between 1896 and 1922. ... In higher education, particularly in the United States, a womens college is a college (that is, a primarily undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institution) whose students are exclusively women. ...


Roanoke adopted the alumnae of Marion College, a sister Lutheran women's college in Marion, Virginia, when it closed in 1967. Marion Hall, a large residence hall constructed in 1968, honors the college and its alumnae. Marion College was a Lutheran junior womens college that operated in Marion, Virginia from 1873 to 1967. ... In higher education, particularly in the United States, a womens college is a college (that is, a primarily undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institution) whose students are exclusively women. ... Marion is a town in Smyth County, Virginia, United States. ...


National championships

Roanoke athletic teams have won two national championships; the 1972 NCAA Division II men's basketball championship and the 1978 Division II men's lacrosse championship. Roanoke's third national championship occurred in 2001; student Casey Smith won an individual championship in the Division III women's 10,000m track and field event. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division II (or DII) is an intermediate-level division of competition in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... This article is about the sport. ... Division II (or DII) is an intermediate-level division of competition in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... The Dive Shot. Lacrosse is a team sport that is played with ten players (mens field), six players (mens box), or twelve players (womens field), each of whom uses a netted stick (the crosse) in order to pass and catch a hard rubber ball with the aim... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ...


Recent years

Roanoke experienced exceptional growth in the 1980s and 1990s. Two strategic plans, the 1992 Sesquicentennial Campaign and the 2002 Plan (also known as "The Difference"), were successfully completed with well over $150 million raised; the campaigns financed the renovation and construction of numerous facilities including the library, the student center, and the arts and performance center as well as increases in the size and quality of the faculty and the student body.


Roanoke's tenth president (and first female president), Dr. Sabine O'Hara, took office in August 2004. O'Hara, an expert in sustainable economic development, was recruited to lead formulation of a new strategic plan, one that would advance the college into the next decade. In March 2006, Roanoke unveiled "The 2015 Plan", which calls for expanded academic offerings, an increase in enrollment from 1,900 to 2,100 students, renovation and construction of facilities to support increased enrollment, and growth in endowment resources to support financial aid for more students. Successful completion of the plan is ongoing; 2,006 students were enrolled for fall semester 2007, the most in college history; and four new residence halls have opened since 2005.


New leadership

On 16 March 2007, Dr. Sabine O'Hara, Roanoke's tenth president, announced her resignation effective 30 June. O'Hara told the college community that she had accomplished her primary objective at Roanoke by unveiling "The 2015 Plan", the college's current strategic plan, and that new leadership could better achieve the articulated goals. O'Hara's three-year tenure as president was short, but productive; four new residence halls were constructed, two academic buildings were renovated, a new sports stadium opened, records were set for applications and enrollment, and the tradition of balanced budgets was continued (Roanoke has had a balanced budget for 52 consecutive years).


Michael C. Maxey became Roanoke's eleventh president on 1 July 2007. Maxey previously served as Roanoke's vice president for college relations and dean of admissions and financial aid from 1992 until his selection as president. Roanoke received a record number of applications nine times during Maxey's tenure as vice president, and in May 2007, graduated 410 students, the largest class in college history. In lieu of naming an interim president while a national search was conducted to replace O'Hara, the board of trustees unanimously elected Maxey to become Roanoke's eleventh president.


Leaders

David F. Bittle, first Principal of Virginia Institute and first President of Roanoke College
David F. Bittle, first Principal of Virginia Institute and first President of Roanoke College

Image File history File links David_Bittle. ... Image File history File links David_Bittle. ...

Principals of Virginia Institute, 1842-1853

  • David F. Bittle, 1842-1845
  • Christopher C. Baughman, 1845-1853

Presidents of Roanoke College, 1853-present

  • David F. Bittle, 1853-1876
  • Thomas W. Dosh, 1877-1878
  • Julius D. Dreher, 1878-1903
  • John A. Morehead, 1903-1920
  • Charles J. Smith, 1920-1949
  • H. Sherman Oberly, 1949-1963
  • Perry F. Kendig, 1963-1975
  • Norman D. Fintel, 1975-1989
  • David M. Gring, 1989-2004
  • Sabine U. O'Hara, 2004-2007
  • Michael C. Maxey, 2007-

Lutheran heritage

Established in 1842, Roanoke is the second oldest (Gettysburg College is the oldest) Lutheran-affiliated college in the United States and is associated with three synods of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America; the Virginia Synod, the Metropolitan Washington, D.C. Synod, and the Western Maryland Synod. The Virginia Synod is headquartered on the Roanoke campus (in Bittle Hall; the college's first library now occupied by the Bishop of the Virginia Synod). Gettysburg College is a private national four-year liberal arts college founded in 1832, in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, adjacent to the famous battlefield. ... A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ...


Historically, the state of Virginia has had a small Lutheran population. As a result, Roanoke has admitted many students from other religious denominations. Approximately 20 religious groups are now represented in the student body with Roman Catholic the most prevalent; Lutherans total less than 20% of the student body. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ...


Roanoke has an active religious life program for students seeking that experience, however, religion is not prominent on the Roanoke campus; students are not required to attend religious services or to take classes in religion. Roanoke has an independent board of trustees and is not controlled by the church.


The dominant aspect of Roanoke's Lutheran heritage is the college's commitment to academic freedom. Martin Luther encouraged freedom from oppression along with freedom for learning and freedom for service in the community. Roanoke aims to produce resourceful and responsible citizens who are well-educated in the Lutheran tradition of intellectual freedom. Academic freedom is the freedom of teachers, students, and academic institutions to pursue knowledge wherever it may lead, without undue or unreasonable interference. ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ...


Academics

Roanoke is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award bachelor's degrees in arts, science, and business administration. In addition, the business administration program is accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs; the chemistry program is accredited by the American Chemical Society; the teacher licensure program is accredited by the Virginia Department of Education; and the athletic training program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs. The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) is a regional accreditor for over 13,000 public and private educational institutions ranging from preschool to college level in the Southern United States. ... The Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs was founded in 1988 to create an organization and an accreditation process designed to fit the needs of business programs focused on teaching and learning. ... The American Chemical Society (ACS) is a learned society (professional association) based in the United States that supports scientific inquiry in the field of chemistry. ...


Roanoke offers 34 majors, 29 minors, and 19 concentrations. The college also offers dual degree programs with Virginia Tech and the University of Tennessee that lead to a Roanoke degree and an engineering degree from the other school. Each year, Roanoke invites approximately 40 incoming freshmen and first-term sophomores to become members of the Honors Program. These students complete the Honors Curriculum in lieu of the Roanoke College "Centers of Distinction" Curriculum. Honors students are offered numerous special learning experiences including plays, lectures, concerts, and service projects. This article or section should include material from Virginia Bioinformatics Institute. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ...


Roanoke is one of 276 colleges with a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, the nation’s oldest and most prestigious honor society. The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ...


Roanoke is one of the few colleges with two sets of school colors; blue and yellow are the academic colors; maroon and gray are the athletic colors. In the early days of the baseball program (first team fielded in 1870; exact date of the colors change is uncertain), the team needed new uniforms, but the supplier was sold-out of blue and yellow. Maroon and gray uniforms were purchased as a substitute. Roanoke's athletic department embraced the colors and adopted them as the college's official athletic colors; the college's athletic nickname became "Maroons" as well. Roanoke's traditional blue and yellow, however, remain as the college's academic colors although commencement is generally the only time they are used. School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ...


Statistics

Roanoke has approximately 2,000 students (55% female, 45% male) who represent approximately 40 states and 25 countries. Approximately 60% of the student body is from Virginia; the majority of out-of-state students are from Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania. In 2007, for the seventh consecutive year, Roanoke received a record number of freshman applications; over 3,200 for approximately 540 openings. This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... This article is about the U.S. State. ... “NJ” redirects here. ... This article is about the state. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ...


Roanoke has a tenure-track faculty of 117 (95% hold the highest degrees in their fields) plus a variety of adjunct professors selected from the business, political, and other communities for their subject matter expertise. Faculty members teach in 14 academic departments:

  • Biology
  • Business Administration and Economics
  • Chemistry
  • Education
  • English
  • Fine Arts
  • Foreign Language
  • Health and Human Performance
  • History
  • Math, Computer Science, and Physics
  • Public Affairs
  • Religion and Philosophy
  • Psychology
  • Sociology

Roanoke has an operating budget of more than $65 million supported by an endowment of more than $100 million. A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ...


Roanoke's Fintel Library, named after Dr. Norman Fintel, eighth president of the college, has a collection of over half a million items. Roanoke and nearby Hollins University have a reciprocal borrowing agreement expanding the size of the library collection by another 300,000 items. Hollins University is a four-year institution of higher education, a private university located on a 475-acre campus on the border of Roanoke County, Virginia and Botetourt County, Virginia. ...


Roanoke is respected for its Henry H. Fowler Public Affairs Lecture Series that brings world leaders to campus. Guest lecturers have included former presidents Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter, former Secretaries of State Henry Kissinger and Lawrence Eagleburger, former Polish president Lech Walesa, former German chancellor Helmut Schmidt, former Pakistan Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, and numerous other diplomats and public officials. }} Henry Hammill Fowler (September 5, 1908–January 3, 2000) was an American lawyer and politician. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Henry Alfred Kissinger (born Heinz Alfred Kissinger on May 27, 1923) is a German-born American diplomat, and 1973 Nobel Peace Prize laureate. ... Lawrence Sidney Eagleburger (born August 1, 1930), is an American statesman and diplomat who served as The United States Secretary of State under President George H. W. Bush. ... Lech Wałęsa (pronounced , born September 29, 1943, Popowo, Poland) was an Polish electrician, a trade union activist, a human rights activist and a politician. ... Helmut Heinrich Waldemar Schmidt (born December 23, 1918) is a German Social Democratic politician. ... Benazir Bhutto (Urdu: بینظیر بھٹو) (born 21 June 1953 in Karachi) is a Pakistani politician who became the first woman to lead a post-colonial Muslim state. ...


Roanoke is also respected for its Copenhaver Artist-in-Residence Program that brings visiting artists to campus, including theatrical productions, and the Charles H. Fisher Lecture Series that brings distinguished scientists to campus.


Roanoke has over 100 student organizations that provide learning experiences outside the classroom. Students may choose from academic, religious, service, and social organizations including a campus newspaper, a student-operated radio station, a literary magazine, and eight Greek social organizations. Intramural sports are also offered.


Greek life

Roanoke has recognized chapters of eight social Greek organizations. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Fraternities: While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for...

Sororities: The Kappa Alpha Order (KA) is a secret collegiate Order of Knights. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... Pi Kappa Phi is a national social fraternity that was founded in the spirit of nu phi, meaning non-fraternity. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for...

Roanoke's Greek organizations reside in college-owned housing. Roanoke's fraternity row, however, constructed in the 1960s, no longer houses the college's fraternities (the buildings have been converted into residence halls; one building houses Honors students). The Greek organizations are now housed in various locations on the Roanoke campus. Kappa Alpha Order, Pi Kappa Alpha, Sigma Chi, and Alpha Sigma Alpha have houses. Delta Gamma, Chi Omega, Phi Mu, and Pi Kappa Phi occupy Chesapeake Hall, a new residence hall that opened in 2006; each organization has a floor in the four-story building. Alpha Sigma Alpha (ΑΣΑ) is a US national sorority founded on November 15, 1901 at Longwood College (now University) in Farmville, Virginia. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... Phi Mu (ΦΜ) is the second oldest secret organization for women in the United States. ...


Roanoke has a long history of Greek organizations. The Black Badge Society, established at Roanoke in 1859, was the second Southern Greek social organization (Sigma Alpha Epsilon was the first). The Black Badge Society did not survive the Civil War, but remains a part of Roanoke's Greek history. Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ...


Roanoke's Greek organizations have a prominent role on campus, but are not dominant; approximately 20% of the Roanoke student body participates in Greek life. Freshmen students must wait until spring semester to join a fraternity or sorority. Roanoke has over 100 student organizations that provide many extracurricular opportunities other than Greek life.


Campus

Quadrangles

Roanoke's Administration Building
Roanoke's Administration Building

Roanoke's campus is relatively self-contained with most academic buildings and residence halls built around two quads; the John R. Turbyfill Front Quad and the "Back" Quad. Newer residence halls and athletic facilities form a partial outer ring around the traditional quads. The campus is lined with brick sidewalks and has been recognized for its landscaping and views of the surrounding mountains. Image File history File links Roanoke_College_Administration. ... Image File history File links Roanoke_College_Administration. ... Quadrangle of University of Sydney In architecture, a quadrangle, or more colloquially, quad, is a space or courtyard, usually square or rectangular in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building. ...


Architecture

The campus architecture is a mix of traditional and modern styles. The Administration Building, constructed in 1848 with bricks made on-site, and several other buildings, Miller Hall, Trout Hall, Bittle Hall, Francis T. West Hall, and Monterey House, are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Fintel Library, the Colket Student Center, and several other recent buildings follow the traditional style of the older structures. Other newer buildings including Antrim Chapel, the science complex (Trexler Hall, Massengill Auditorium, and Life Science Building), the arts and performance center (F. W. Olin Hall), and the C. Homer Bast Physical Education and Recreational Center have a more modern look. A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


Residence halls

Approximately 65% of the student body resides on campus. Residence halls for freshman students include Bartlett Hall, Smith Hall, Crawford Hall, Marion Hall, Blue Ridge Hall, and Shenandoah Hall. Upperclass students reside in Bowman Hall, Chalmers Hall, Wells Hall, Yonce Hall, Fox Hall, Tabor Hall, Catawba Hall, Augusta Hall, Caldwell Hall, Allegheny Hall, Ritter Hall, Chesapeake Hall, and Elizabeth Hall.

Roanoke's Fintel Library
Roanoke's Fintel Library

Image File history File linksMetadata Roanoke_College_Fintel_Library. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Roanoke_College_Fintel_Library. ...

President's House

The President's House is in a residential district approximately one-half mile north of the Roanoke campus. The colonial revival mansion, one of the largest private homes in the area, was constructed in the late 1930s; was purchased in the mid-1950s by John P. Fishwick, president of the Norfolk and Western Railway and a Roanoke alumnus; and was acquired by the college in 1968. Presidents Kendig, Fintel, Gring, and O'Hara have lived in the house. The Norfolk and Western Railway (N&W) (AAR reporting marks NW), a US class I railroad, was formed by more than 200 railroad mergers between 1838 and 1982. ...


Elizabeth campus

Additional college facilities, mostly residence halls and athletic fields, are located on the site of the former Elizabeth College, a Lutheran women's college that closed in 1922. The area, approximately two miles east of the main campus, is now referred to as Roanoke's "Elizabeth campus". Houses for Kappa Alpha Order, Pi Kappa Alpha, and Alpha Sigma Alpha are on Elizabeth campus along with Elizabeth Hall, a large residence hall with apartments for non-freshman students. Elizabeth College was a private Lutheran womens college in Charlotte, North Carolina and Salem, Virginia that operated between 1896 and 1922. ... The Kappa Alpha Order (KA) is a secret collegiate Order of Knights. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... Alpha Sigma Alpha (ΑΣΑ) is a US national sorority founded on November 15, 1901 at Longwood College (now University) in Farmville, Virginia. ...

Roanoke's Back Quad with Alumni Gymnasium (left) and Colket Student Center (right)
Roanoke's Back Quad with Alumni Gymnasium (left) and Colket Student Center (right)

Image File history File linksMetadata Roanoke_College_Student_Center_and_Back_Quad. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Roanoke_College_Student_Center_and_Back_Quad. ...

New construction

With the opening of three new residence halls in 2005, Caldwell Hall, Allegheny Hall, and Ritter Hall, known collectively as "CAR", the Roanoke campus has more than 50 buildings. Chesapeake Hall, another new residence hall, opened in 2006.


Trout Hall and Miller Hall, two of Roanoke's oldest buildings, reopened in 2005 and 2006 after complete renovation and a new campus entrance, highlighted by a large colonnade, opened in 2005.


Donald J. Kerr Stadium, a 1,000 seat multi-sport artificial turf athletic complex, opened in 2007. The artificial surface complements the college's natural surface athletic fields. The field is used primarily as the home venue of the men's and women's lacrosse teams, but is also suitable for soccer and field hockey. The Dive Shot. Lacrosse is a team sport that is played with ten players (mens field), six players (mens box), or twelve players (womens field), each of whom uses a netted stick (the crosse) in order to pass and catch a hard rubber ball with the aim... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world. ...


Roanoke began construction on a new freshman housing complex in 2007; three existing residence halls, Blue Ridge Hall, Shenandoah Hall, and Tabor Hall, are being renovated and enlarged to form the complex. The first phase is scheduled to open in 2008 with the second phase set to open in 2009.


Roanoke in Germany

Roanoke offers numerous study abroad programs including the "Roanoke College in Wittenberg" spring semester in Germany. The program is a link to Roanoke's heritage as the second oldest Lutheran-affiliated college in the United States; Martin Luther's Protestant Reformation originated in Wittenberg where he posted the 95 theses to the door of the Castle Church. Roanoke professors provide the instruction; courses in German language and literature, history, humanities, religion, and other topics are offered. Various off-site opportunities are also offered including excursions to historic sites in Berlin, Leipzig, and other nearby cities. Statue of Martin Luther in the main square Wittenberg, officially [Die] Lutherstadt Wittenberg, is a town in Germany, in the Bundesland Saxony-Anhalt, at 12° 59 E, 51° 51 N, on the Elbe river. ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... “Reformation” redirects here. ... The 95 Theses. ... Wittenberg, officially Lutherstadt Wittenberg, is a town in Germany, in the Bundesland Saxony-Anhalt, at 12°59 east, 51°51 north. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Leipzig ( ; Sorbian/Lusatian: Lipsk from the Sorbian word for Tilia) is, with a population of over 506,000, the largest city in the federal state of Saxony, Germany. ...


Athletics

Roanoke is an NCAA Division III school competing in the Old Dominion Athletic Conference. The college fields varsity teams (known as "Maroons"; the college's athletic colors are maroon and gray) in nine men's and ten women's sports. Roanoke is particularly noted for the strength of its men's lacrosse program. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Old Dominion Athletic Conference is an NCAA Division III athletic conference. ... The Dive Shot. Lacrosse is a team sport that is played with ten players (mens field), six players (mens box), or twelve players (womens field), each of whom uses a netted stick (the crosse) in order to pass and catch a hard rubber ball with the aim...


History

Roanoke athletics began in 1870 when the college fielded its first baseball team. The men's basketball program, added in 1911, received national recognition in 1939 when the team finished third in the National Invitational Tournament, the premiere postseason tournament of that era; and with more than 1,200 wins (almost 2,000 games played; better than 60% winning percentage over more than 90 years) is among the most successful in the nation. Frankie Allen, arguably the greatest men's basketball player in Virginia college history (2,780 points and 1,758 rebounds), graduated from Roanoke in 1971. This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... The National Invitation Tournament (NIT) is a mens college basketball tournament operated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... Frankie Allen, born in Charlottesville, Virginia in 1949, is arguably the greatest mens basketball player in Virginia college history. ...


Roanoke teams have won two national championships: the 1972 NCAA Division II men's basketball championship and the 1978 Division II men's lacrosse championship. In 2001, Roanoke student Casey Smith won an individual national championship in the Division III women's 10,000m track and field event. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division II (or DII) is an intermediate-level division of competition in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... Division II (or DII) is an intermediate-level division of competition in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ...


Roanoke teams have won 84 conference championships (as of May 2007; 41 in men's sports, 43 in women's sports) since the college joined the ODAC as a founding member in 1976. Roanoke has won more conference championships than any other ODAC school in men's lacrosse (15), women's basketball (13), women's lacrosse (9) and softball (7). Roanoke and Hampden-Sydney College are tied for the most conference championships in men's basketball (10). Hampden-Sydney College is a liberal arts college for men located in Hampden-Sydney, Virginia. ...


Recent achievements

Roanoke completed the 2006-2007 academic year having won three ODAC championships; women's indoor track and field, women's outdoor track and field, and men's lacrosse. Roanoke finished second in men's basketball, men's tennis, women's lacrosse, and women's cross country. In individual action, freshman Billy McDonald won the Virginia Division III golf tournament; freshman Mallory McClaine won the Virginia Division II/III women's cross country championship; and senior Eric Johnson won the ODAC men's cross country championship.


The men's and women's lacrosse teams advanced to the 2007 NCAA Division III tournament quarter-finals; both were defeated by the number #1 teams in the country. The men's team, after winning it fifteenth ODAC championship, ended the season with 15 wins, which for the third straight year, tied the college record for wins in a season. The women's team, after finishing second in the ODAC, ended its season with 15 wins as well, the second most in team history.


The women's outdoor track and field team finished second in the 4x100 relay event at the 2007 NCAA Division III tournament; the team set a new college and ODAC record with their NCAA second-place time.


Teams

Roanoke teams compete in the following sports:

This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... US Armed Forces cross country meet Cross-country running is a sport in which teams of runners compete to complete a course over open or rough terrain before other teams. ... US Armed Forces cross country meet Cross-country running is a sport in which teams of runners compete to complete a course over open or rough terrain before other teams. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Dive Shot. Lacrosse is a team sport that is played with ten players (mens field), six players (mens box), or twelve players (womens field), each of whom uses a netted stick (the crosse) in order to pass and catch a hard rubber ball with the aim... The Dive Shot. Lacrosse is a team sport that is played with ten players (mens field), six players (mens box), or twelve players (womens field), each of whom uses a netted stick (the crosse) in order to pass and catch a hard rubber ball with the aim... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport, in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (or rarely, 16 inches) (28 to 30. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ...

Football

Roanoke does not compete in football; discontinued during World War II, the program was not revived. The final game was a 42-0 loss to Catawba College on 13 November 1942. In 1985, the Salem city government constructed an 8,000 seat stadium adjacent to Roanoke's "Elizabeth campus", two miles from the main campus, location of athletic fields and residence halls. Constructed for Salem's public high school, many hoped the college would revive its football program and that the team would play in the stadium, but the college declined. Interestingly, the stadium hosts the annual NCAA Division III football championship even though Roanoke does not compete in the sport. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Catawba College official seal Catawba College, founded in 1851, is a private, coeducational liberal arts college in Salisbury, North Carolina, USA. It is the sixth oldest college in North Carolina, and is affiliated with the United Church of Christ. ... Salem is an independent city located in Virginia, bordered by the city of Roanoke and Roanoke County. ... As part of education in the United States, secondary education usually covers grades 5, 6, or 7 through twelve. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ...


Rivalries

Roanoke does not have an archrival in athletics primarily because the college does not compete in football. Washington and Lee University, Hampden-Sydney College, and Randolph-Macon College draw the most attention in men's sports. Hollins University draws attention in women's sports. All are members of the Old Dominion Athletic Conference. Washington and Lee University is a private liberal arts college in Lexington, Virginia. ... Hampden-Sydney College is a liberal arts college for men located in Hampden-Sydney, Virginia. ... For the former womens college, see Randolph College. ... Hollins University is a four-year institution of higher education, a private university located on a 475-acre campus on the border of Roanoke County, Virginia and Botetourt County, Virginia. ... The Old Dominion Athletic Conference is an NCAA Division III athletic conference. ...


Roanoke and Virginia Tech were rivals in the late 1800s and early 1900s when Virginia Tech was a small college. In 1877, the schools competed in Virginia Tech's first intercollegiate baseball game (Virginia Tech won 53-13; an amazing score); and in 1896, Virginia Tech first wore its current athletic colors -- maroon and burnt orange -- in a football game against Roanoke. In 1895, Roanoke and Virginia Tech were charter members of the now defunct Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic Association along with Randolph-Macon College, the University of Richmond, and the College of William and Mary; and in 1926, Roanoke and Virginia Tech played the inaugural football game at Virginia Tech's Miles Stadium. This article or section should include material from Virginia Bioinformatics Institute. ... For the former womens college, see Randolph College. ... The University of Richmond is a private, nonsectarian, liberal arts university located on the border of the city of Richmond and Henrico County, Virginia. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... Miles Stadium was a stadium in Blacksburg, Virginia. ...


In the press

Roanoke is listed favorably in many national publications. U.S. News and World Report ranks Roanoke as a national liberal arts college; the Princeton Review lists Roanoke among the "Best in the Southeast"; and the Templeton Guide names Roanoke as a college that encourages character development. Roanoke is also listed as a College of Distinction; and in 2006, Men's Fitness magazine named Roanoke the 19th "fittest campus" in the United States based on the college's fitness facilities and healthy food options made available for students. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... Mens Fitness is a monthly mens magazine that focuses on fitness. ...


In 2005, George Keller, a noted American expert on higher education, authored Prologue to Prominence, A Half Century at Roanoke College. Published by Lutheran University Press, the book documents the college's academic and financial success over the past half century. Other books about Roanoke College include The First Hundred Years, Roanoke College 1842-1942 by William E. Eisenberg and Dear Ole Roanoke, a Sesquicentennial Portrait, 1842-1992 by Dr. Mark F. Miller. These books were written as a part of the college's centennial and sesquicentennial celebrations.


Alumni

Roanoke alumni live in all 50 states and in more than 35 countries. Notable alumni include:


Business

Landmark Communications is a privately-held media company specializing in cable television, broadcast television, print publishing, and internet publishing. ... The Virginian-Pilot is a daily newspaper based in Norfolk, Virginia and serving southeastern Virginia, Virginias Eastern Shore, and northeastern North Carolina. ... Wachovia Corporation NYSE: WB, based in Charlotte, North Carolina is one of the largest banking chains in the United States. ... The Norfolk and Western Railway (N&W) (AAR reporting marks NW), a US class I railroad, was formed by more than 200 railroad mergers between 1838 and 1982. ... The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ... Coca-Cola Bottling Co. ... John McAfee (born September, 1945) is a software engineer and founder of McAfee. ... McAfee, Inc. ... John A. Mulheren, Jr. ... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... A single blue Puma shoe. ... David C. Robinson is an American film producer. ... In the entertainment industry, a producer is generally in charge of, or helps to coordinate, the financial, legal, administrative, technological, and artistic aspects of a production. ... Morgan Creek Productions, founded in 1988 by its Chairman, CEO and Producer/Presenter, James G. Robinson, is a film studio most notable for such blockbuster hits as Young Guns and In a varied 17-year history that has seen the Santa Monica, California-based company shift domestic distribution bases from... Stuart Thomas Saunders (1909-1987) was an American railroad executive. ... The Penn Central Transportation Company, normally called Penn Central, was an American railroad company, headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and formed by the merger on February 1, 1968 of the Pennsylvania Railroad and the New York Central Railroad; the New Haven was added to the merger at the insistence of the... Norfolk Southern Corporation (NYSE: NSC) is a US publicly-traded stock corporation based in Norfolk, Virginia. ... Norfolk Southern Corporation (NYSE: NSC) is a US publicly-traded stock corporation based in Norfolk, Virginia. ...

Education

Frankie Allen, born in Charlottesville, Virginia in 1949, is arguably the greatest mens basketball player in Virginia college history. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article or section should include material from Virginia Bioinformatics Institute. ... Tennessee State University (TSU) is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational land-grant university founded in 1912. ... Howard University is a university located in Washington, D.C., USA. An historically black university, Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named for Oliver O. Howard. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The University of the South The University of the South is located in Sewanee, Tennessee, and is a private, coeducational liberal arts college. ... Capital University is a university of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America located in Bexley, Ohio, founded in 1830, that offers five schools of study: College of Arts and Sciences; the Conservatory of Music; Capital University Law School; School of Management; and School of Nursing. ... The University of Arizona (UA or U of A) is a land-grant and space-grant public institution of higher education and research located in Tucson, Arizona, United States. ... Image A: A normal chest X-ray. ... Marion College was a Lutheran junior womens college that operated in Marion, Virginia from 1873 to 1967. ... R. H. W. Dillard (born 1937) is an American poet, author, critic, and translator. ... Hollins University is a four-year institution of higher education, a private university located on a 475-acre campus on the border of Roanoke County, Virginia and Botetourt County, Virginia. ... For other uses, see Patent (disambiguation). ... Organic chemistry is a specific discipline within chemistry which involves the scientific study of the structure, properties, composition, reactions, and preparation (by synthesis or by other means) of chemical compounds consisting primarily of carbon and hydrogen, which may contain any number of other elements, including nitrogen, oxygen, halogens as well... Polymer chemistry or macromolecular chemistry is a multidisciplinary science that deals with the chemical synthesis and chemical properties of polymers or macromolecules. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Lynchburg College is a private college in Lynchburg, Virginia, USA, related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) with approximately 2,400 undergraduate and graduate students. ... Tusculum College is a private four-year college affiliated with the Presbyterian Church located in Tusculum, Tennessee, a suburb of Greeneville, Tennessee. ... New Mexico State University, or NMSU, is a land-grant university that has its main campus in Las Cruces, New Mexico. ... Elizabeth College was a private Lutheran womens college in Charlotte, North Carolina and Salem, Virginia that operated between 1896 and 1922. ... Statues of Buddha such as this, the Tian Tan Buddha statue in Hong Kong, remind followers to practice right living. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... The University of the West (Ch. ... Vernon B. Mountcastle (born July 15, 1918 in Shelbyville, Kentucky) is a retired neuroscientist from the Johns Hopkins University. ... Neuroscience is a field of study which deals with the structure, function, development, genetics, biochemistry, physiology, pharmacology and pathology of the nervous system. ... A cortical column is a group of neurons in the brain cortex which can be successively penetrated by a probe inserted perpendicularly to the cortical surface, and which have nearly identical receptive fields. ... Location of the cerebral cortex Slice of the cerebral cortex, ca. ... Radford University is a public, state-funded, comprehensive university, located in the City of Radford, in Southwestern Virginia. ... Hartwick College is a nationally ranked, non-denominational, private, four-year liberal arts and sciences college located in Oneonta, New York, in the United States. ... Pacific University is a private university located in Forest Grove, Oregon, United States about 40 minutes west of Portland. ... Newberry College is a liberal-arts college of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America located on an ninety acre (324,000 m²) campus in Newberry, South Carolina. ... The California Institute of Technology (commonly referred to as Caltech)[1] is a private, coeducational research university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... The California Institute of Technology (commonly referred to as Caltech)[1] is a private, coeducational research university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... The American College of Physicians (ACP) is a national organization of doctors of internal medicine (internists) -- physicians who specialize in the prevention, detection and treatment of illnesses in adults. ...

Government

Rick Boucher Frederick Carlyle Rick Boucher (born August 1, 1946) is a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives representing Virginias 9th Congressional District (map). ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... }} Henry Hammill Fowler (September 5, 1908–January 3, 2000) was an American lawyer and politician. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the finance minister of the Federal Government of the United States. ... “DHS” redirects here. ... Kim Kyu-shik, also spelled Kim Gyu-sik (January 29, 1881 - December 10, 1950), was a leader in the Korean independence movement and the early history of South Korea. ... E.J. Pipkin is a Republican member of the Maryland State Senate, first elected in 2002. ... The Maryland State Senate is the upper house of the General Assembly, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Maryland. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... The Kitchen Debate was an impromptu debate (through interpreters) between Vice President Richard Nixon and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev at the opening of the American National Exhibition in Moscow, on July 24, 1959. ... The Massachusetts House of Representatives is the lower house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ...

Other

“Everest” redirects here. ... The Guinness Book of Records (or in recent editions Guinness World Records, and in previous US editions Guinness Book of World Records) is a book published annually, containing an internationally recognized collection of superlatives: both in terms of human achievement and the extrema of the natural world. ... For other uses, see Kilimanjaro (disambiguation). ... Surgeon may refer to: a practitioner of surgery the moniker of British electronic music producer and DJ, Anthony Child; see Surgeon (musician) This is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Reverend Dr. W. A. R. Goodwin (1869-1939), was the rector of Bruton Parish Church who began the 20th century effort which resulted in the preservation and restoration of Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia The Reverend Dr. William Archer Rutherfoord Goodwin (1869-1939) (or W.A.R. Goodwin as he preferred... Bruton Parish Church is located in the restored area of Colonial Williamsburg in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... John D. Rockefeller Jr. ... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... Theodore F. Schneider is the second and current bishop of the Metropolitan Washington, D.C. Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Roanoke College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2901 words)
Roanoke College was founded in 1842 as a boys' preparatory school by Lutheran pastors David F. Bittle and Christopher C. Baughmann.
Established in 1842, Roanoke is the second oldest (Gettysburg College is the oldest) Lutheran-affiliated college in the United States and is associated with three synods of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America; the Virginia Synod, the Metropolitan Washington, D.C. Synod, and the Western Maryland Synod.
Roanoke is one of the few colleges with two sets of school colors; blue and yellow are the academic colors; maroon and gray are the athletic colors.
Roanoke, Virginia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4688 words)
Roanoke and the immediate area are represented by three members of the Virginia House of Delegates and two members of the Virginia Senate.
Roanoke Regional Airport is located in the northern part of the city and is the primary airport for Southwest Virginia.
Roanoke's best known museum is the Virginia Museum of Transportation which houses many locomotives which were built in Roanoke, most prominently the Norfolk and Western J class #611 and A class #1218 steam engines, and other locomotives and rolling stock.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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