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Encyclopedia > Roald Dahl
Roald Dahl

Patricia Neal and Roald Dahl
Born 13 September 1916(1916-09-13)
Llandaff, Cardiff, Wales
Died 23 November 1990 (aged 74)
Great Missenden, Buckinghamshire, England
Occupation Novelist, short story writer
Genres Children's, adult's literature
Notable work(s) Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, James and the Giant Peach, others
Spouse(s) Patricia Neal (1953–1983; divorced; 5 children)
Felicity Ann d'Abreu Crosland (1983–1990; his death)

Roald Dahl (IPA: /ˌroʊld ˈdɑːl/[dubious ]) (13 September 191623 November 1990) was a Welsh novelist, short story writer and screenwriter, who rose to prominence in the 1940s with works for both children and adults, and became one of the world's bestselling authors. Patricia Neal and Roald Dahl, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, April 20, 1954 From the collection of the Library of Congress and in the public domain: http://memory. ... Patricia Neal (born January 20, 1926, Packard, Kentucky) is an Academy Award winning American actress. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Llandaff electoral ward of Cardiff Llandaff (Welsh Llandaf llan church + Taf) is a district in the city of Cardiff, Wales, having been incorporated into the city in 1922, and is also the name of a diocese of the Church in Wales, covering the most populous area of south Wales. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... This article is about the country. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Great Missenden is a village in the valley of the river Misbourne in the Chiltern Hills in Buckinghamshire between Amersham and Wendover. ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about work. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Childrens books redirects here. ... For the 2005 movie by Tim Burton, see Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (film). ... For the 1996 film adaptation, see James and the Giant Peach (film). ... Patricia Neal (born January 20, 1926, Packard, Kentucky) is an Academy Award winning American actress. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... This article is in need of attention. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Screenwriters, scenarists, or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... Childrens books redirects here. ...


His most popular books include The Twits, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, James and the Giant Peach, Matilda, The Witches and The BFG. The Twits is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake. ... For the 2005 movie by Tim Burton, see Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (film). ... For the 1996 film adaptation, see James and the Giant Peach (film). ... For other uses, see Matilda. ... The Witches is a book for children by Roald Dahl, first published in London in 1983 by Jonathan Cape. ... For other uses, see BFG. The BFG (which stands for Big Friendly Giant) is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake, first published in 1982. ...

Contents

Biography

Roald Dahl was born in Llandaff, Cardiff, Wales in 1916, to Norwegian parents, Harald Dahl and Sofie Magdalene Dahl née Hesselberg. Dahl's family had moved from Norway and settled in Cardiff in the 1880s. Roald was named after the polar explorer Roald Amundsen, a national hero in Norway at the time. He spoke Norwegian at home with his parents and sisters. Dahl and his sisters were christened at the Norwegian Church, Cardiff, where their parents worshipped. Llandaff electoral ward of Cardiff Llandaff (Welsh Llandaf llan church + Taf) is a district in the city of Cardiff, Wales, having been incorporated into the city in 1922, and is also the name of a diocese of the Church in Wales, covering the most populous area of south Wales. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... This article is about the country. ... . Roald Amundsen Piotr Fyodorovich Anjou Fabian von Bellingshausen Edward Bransfield Richard Evelyn Byrd Semion Chelyuskin Frederick A. Cook Francis Crozier Adrian de Gerlache Matthew A. Henson Henry Hudson Khariton Laptev Francis Leopold McClintock Nathaniel Palmer Robert Edwin Peary Ralph Plaisted James Clark Ross John Ross Yakov Sannikov Robert Falcon Scott... Roald Engelbregt Gravning Amundsen (July 16, 1872 – c. ... The Norwegian Church with Cardiff City Centre and Grangetown in the background. ...


In 1920, when Roald was four, his seven-year-old sister, Astri, died from appendicitis. About a month later, his father died of pneumonia at the age of 57, following grief from his daughter's death. Dahl's mother, however, decided not to return to Norway to live with her relatives, but to remain in Wales since it had been her husband's wish to have their children educated in British schools. Appendicitis (or epityphlitis) is a condition characterized by inflammation of the appendix. ... This article is about human pneumonia. ...


Dahl first attended The Cathedral School, Llandaff. At the age of eight, he and four of his friends were caned by the headmaster after putting a dead mouse in a jar of sweets at the local sweet shop, which was owned by a "mean and loathsome" old woman called Mrs. Pratchett (wife of blacksmith David Pratchett). This was known amongst the five boys as the "Great Mouse Plot of 1923". This was Roald's own idea. unknown The Cathedral School, Llandaff is a coeducational Welsh prep school. ... In the UK and elsewhere, a head teacher is the most senior teacher in a school. ... Image:BoyDahl. ...


Thereafter, he was sent to several boarding schools in England, including Saint Peter's in Weston-super-Mare. His parents had wanted Roald to be educated at a British public school and at the time, due to a then regular boat link across the Bristol Channel, this proved to be the nearest. His time at Saint Peter's was an unpleasant experience for him. He was very homesick and wrote to his mother almost every day, but never revealed to her his unhappiness. Only when she died did he find out that she had saved every single one of his letters, in small bundles held together with green tape. He later attended Repton School in Derbyshire, where, according to his novel Boy, a friend named Michael was viciously caned by Geoffrey Fisher, the man who later became the Archbishop of Canterbury. This caused Dahl to "have doubts about religion and even about God". A boarding school is a usually fee-charging school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Weston-super-Mare is an English seaside resort town in North Somerset, population 65,000 (1991 estimate). ... Repton School, founded in 1557, is one of the most famous co-educational public schools in the UK, located in the village of Repton, in Derbyshire, England. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... Geoffrey Francis Fisher, Baron Fisher of Lambeth GCVO, PC (May 5, 1887 – September 15, 1972) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1945 to 1961. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ...


Dahl was very tall, reaching 6'6" (1.98m) in adult life,[1] and he was good at sports, being made captain of the school Fives and Squash team, and also playing for the football team. This helped his popularity. He developed an interest in photography. During his years there, Cadbury, a chocolate company, would occasionally send boxes of new chocolates to the school to be tested by the pupils. Dahl himself apparently used to dream of inventing a new chocolate bar that would win the praise of Mr. Cadbury himself, and this proved the inspiration for him to write his third book for children, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Fives is a British sport believed to derive from the same origins as many racket sports. ... Squash racquet and ball Players in a glass-backed squash court International Squash Singles Court, as specified by the World Squash Federation Squash is an indoor racquet sport that was formerly called Squash racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball... Soccer redirects here. ... -1... Cadbury Schweppes plc is a confectionery and beverage company with its headquarters in Berkeley Square, London, England, UK. Cadbury Schweppes is currently the only major international confectionery manufacturer to produce Fairtrade or organic products, which it sells through its subsidiary company Green & Blacks. ... For the 2005 movie by Tim Burton, see Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (film). ...


Throughout his childhood and adolescent years, Dahl spent his summer holidays in his parents' native Norway, mostly enjoying the Fjords. His childhood is the subject of his autobiographical work, Boy: Tales of Childhood. Boy is the first autobiographical book by Roald Dahl. ...


After finishing his schooling, he spent three weeks hiking through Newfoundland with a group called the Public Schools' Exploring Society (now known as BSES Expeditions). In July 1934, he joined the Shell Petroleum Company. This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... BSES Expeditions is a youth development charity based in the United Kingdom. ... Royal Dutch Shell plc is a multinational oil company of British and Dutch origins. ...


Following two years of training in the UK, he was transferred to Dar-es-Salaam, Tanganyika (now Tanzania). Along with the only two other Shell employees in the entire territory, he lived in luxury in the Shell House outside Dar-es-Salaam, with a cook and personal servants. While on the job, supplying oil to customers across Tanganyika, he encountered green mambas (a type of snake), and lions, amongst other wildlife. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... For the region, see Dar es Salaam (region). ... Flag of Deutsch-Ostafrika (1885-1919) Flag of Tanganyika (1919-1961) Flag of the Republic of Tanganyika 1962–64 Tanganyika is the name of an East African territory lying between the largest of the African great lakes: Lake Victoria, Lake Malawi and Lake Tanganyika, after which it was named. ... A cook is a person that prepares food for consumption. ... A servant is a person who is hired to provide regular household or other duties, and receives compensation. ... Black Mamba is the codename of The Bride in the film Kill Bill. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


World War II

In August 1939, as World War II was imminent, plans were made to round up the hundreds of Germans in Dar-es-Salaam. Dahl was made an officer in the King's African Rifles, commanding a platoon of askaris. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For the region, see Dar es Salaam (region). ... The Kings African Rifles (KAR) was a British colonial regiment in East Africa from 1902 until the independence of the various colonies in the 1960s. ... For the Shia imam, see Hasan al-Askari. ...


In November 1939, Dahl joined the Royal Air Force. After a 600-mile (970 km) car journey from Dar-es-Salaam to Nairobi, he was accepted for flight training with 20 other men, 17 of whom would later die in air combat. With seven hours and 40 minutes experience in a De Havilland Tiger Moth, he flew solo; Dahl enjoyed watching the wildlife of Kenya during his flights. He continued on to advanced flying training in Iraq, at RAF Habbaniya, 50 miles (80 km) west of Baghdad. Following six months training on Hawker Harts, Dahl was made a Pilot Officer. RAF redirects here. ... Location of Nairobi Coordinates: , Country Province HQ City Hall Founded 1899 Constituencies of Nairobi List Makadara Kamukunji Starehe Langata Dagoretti Westlands Kasarani Embakasi Government  - Mayor Geoffrey Majiwa Area  - City 684 km² (264. ... The de Havilland DH 82 Tiger Moth was a 1930s biplane designed by de Havilland and operated by the Royal Air Force and others as a primary trainer. ... RAF Habbaniya was a Royal Air Force station about 100 miles west of Baghdad in modern day Iraq, near the town and lake of Habbaniya. ... Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... The Hawker Hart was a two-seater biplane light-bomber of the Royal Air Force (RAF), which had a prominent role during the RAFs inter-war period. ... A Pilot Officers sleeve/shoulder insignia Pilot Officer (Plt Off in the RAF; PLTOFF in the RAAF and RNZAF, P/O in the former RCAF) is the lowest substantive commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries, ranking only above Acting...


He was assigned to No. 80 Squadron RAF, flying obsolete Gloster Gladiators, the last biplane fighter plane used by the RAF. Dahl was surprised to find that he would not receive any specialised training in aerial combat, or in regard to flying Gladiators. On 19 September 1940, Dahl was ordered to fly his Gladiator from Abu Sueir in Egypt, on to Amiriya to refuel, and again to Fouka in Libya for a second refuelling. From there he would fly to 80 Squadron's forward airstrip 30 miles (48 km) south of Mersa Matruh. On the final leg, he could not find the airstrip and, running low on fuel and with night approaching, he was forced to attempt a landing in the desert. Unfortunately, the undercarriage hit a boulder and the plane crashed, fracturing his skull, smashing his nose in, and blinding him. He managed to drag himself away from the blazing wreckage and passed out. Later, he wrote about the crash for his first published work (see below). Gloster Gladiator photographed in England in 2002 The Gloster Gladiator was a biplane fighter, used by the Royal Air Force and the Royal Navy, as well as a number of other air forces, during World War II. The aircraft had a top speed of around 414 km/h. ... Reproduction of a Sopwith Camel biplane flown by Lt. ... A fighter aircraft is a military aircraft designed primarily for attacking other aircraft, as opposed to a bomber, which is designed to attack ground targets, primarily by dropping bombs. ... Combat has been fought in the air since 1911. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... An airstrip is a kind of airport that consists only of a runway with perhaps fueling equipment. ... Mersa Matruh is a seaport in Egypt, Africa. ... For other uses, see Fuel (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the visual condition. ...


Dahl was rescued and taken to a first-aid post in Mersa Matruh, where he regained consciousness, but not his sight, and was then taken by train to the Royal Navy hospital in Alexandria. There he fell in and out of love with a nurse, Mary Welland. Dahl had fallen in love with her voice while he was blind, but once he regained his sight, he decided that he no longer loved her. An RAF inquiry into the crash revealed that the location he had been told to fly to was completely wrong, and he had mistakenly been sent instead to the no man's land between the Allied and Italian forces. First aid is a series of simple, life-saving medical techniques that a non-doctor or layman can be trained to perform. ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ...


Doctors said he had no chance of flying again, but in February 1941, five months after he was admitted to the hospital, he was discharged and passed fully fit for flying duties.


By this time, 80 Squadron had been transferred to the Battle of Greece Greek campaign and based at Eleusina, near Athens. The squadron was now equipped with Hawker Hurricanes. Dahl flew a replacement Hurricane across the Mediterranean Sea in April 1941, after seven hours flying Hurricanes. By this stage in the Greek campaign, the RAF had only 18 combat planes in Greece: 14 Hurricanes and four Bristol Blenheim light bombers. Dahl saw his first aerial combat on 15 April 1941, while flying alone over the city of Chalcis. He attacked six Junkers Ju-88s that were bombing ships. Dahl managed to shoot one down. On 16 April in another air battle, he shot down another Ju-88. Eleusis redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... The Hawker Hurricane was a British single-seat fighter aircraft designed and predominantly built by Hawker Aircraft Ltd. ... The Bristol Blenheim is also the name of the main model produced by Bristol Cars since 1994. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Coordinates 38°28′ N 23°36′ E Country Greece Periphery Central Greece Prefecture Euboea Population 53,584 source (2001) Area 30. ... The Junkers Ju 88 was a WW2 Luftwaffe twin-engine multi-role aircraft. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On 20 April 1941 Dahl took part in the "Battle of Athens", alongside the highest-scoring British Commonwealth ace of World War II, Pat Pattle and Dahl's friend David Coke. Twelve Hurricanes were sent in, and five Hurricanes were shot down and four of their pilots killed, including Pattle. Greek observers on the ground counted twenty-two German aircraft downed, but none of the pilots knew who they shot down due to the carnage of the aerial engagement. Roald Dahl described it as "an endless blur of enemy fighters whizzing towards me from every side." The wing returned back to Elevsis. Later on in the day, the aerodrome was ground-strafed by Bf 109s, but miraculously, none of them hit any of the Hawker Hurricanes. After that, the seven Hurricanes were evacuated to a small, secret airfield near Megara, a small village on 21 April 1941, where the pilots hid. Approximately 50 miles (80 km) north half of the Luftwaffe were searching for the remaining Hurricanes. By approximately 6 or 7 A.M., about thirty Bf-109s and Stuka dive-bombers flew over the seven pilots who were hiding. The Stukas dived bombed a tanker in the Bay of Athens, and sank it. Dahl and his comrades were only 500 yards (460 m) away from the incident. Surprisingly, none of the bombers nor the fighters were able to spot the Hurricanes parked in the nearby field. Somewhere in the afternoon, an Air Commodore arrived in a car to the airfield and asked if one of the seven could volunteer to fly and deliver a package to a man named Carter at Elevsis. Roald Dahl was the only one that volunteered to do it. The contents of the package were of vital importance, and Dahl was told that if he was shot down, or captured, he should burn the package immediately, so it would not fall into enemy hands, and once he had handed over the package, he was to fly to Argos, an airfield, with the rest of the seven pilots in the squadron. is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Squadron Leader Marmaduke Thomas St. ... David Coke was a WWII Flying ace. ... Eleusis redirects here. ... (Bf 109 was the official Reichsluftfahrtministerium designation, though some late_war aircraft actually carried the Me 109 designation stamped onto their aircraft type plates. ... Bold text For other uses, see Megara (disambiguation). ... Masouleh village, Gilan Province, Iran. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ...   (German IPA: ) is a generic German term for an air force. ... Junkers Ju 87 Dive-Bombers The Junkers Ju 87 or Stuka was the most famous Sturzkampfflugzeug (German dive bomber) in World War II, instantly recognisable by its inverted gull-wings and fixed undercarriage. ... Commercial crude oil supertanker AbQaiq. ... An Air Commodoress sleeve/shoulder insignia Air Commodore is the fourth most senior rank active in the Royal Air Force today, after the deactivation of Marshal of the Royal Air Force as a substantive rank in peacetime during defence cuts of the 1990s. ... Eleusis redirects here. ... This article is about the city in Greece. ...


For the rest of April, the situation was horrible for the RAF in Greece. If the Luftwaffe destroyed the remaining seven planes, they would then have complete control of the skies in Greece. They intended to wipe them out. If the squadron were to be found, it would mean the worst. According to Dahl's report, at about 4:30 P.M. an Bf 110 swooped over the airfield at Argos, and found them. The pilots discussed that it would take the 110 roughly half an hour to return to base, and then another half hour for the whole enemy squadron to get ready for take-off, and then another half hour for them to reach Argos. They had roughly an hour and thirty minutes until they would be ground-strafed by enemy aircraft. However, instead of having the remaining seven pilots airborne and intercepting the 110s an hour ahead, the CO ordered them to escort ships evacuating their army in Greece at 6:00. The seven planes got up into the air, but the formation was quickly disorganized as the radios were not working. Dahl and Coke found themselves separated from the rest of the wing. They could not communicate with the rest of the wing, so they continued on flying, looking for the ships to escort. Eventually they ran out of fuel and returned back to Argos, where they found the entire airfield in smoke and flames, with tents flamed, ammunition destroyed, etc.; however there were few casualties. What happened was that while Roald Dahl and David Coke took off, three other aircraft in the wing somehow managed to get away. The sixth pilot who was taking off was ground-strafed by the enemy and killed. The seventh pilot managed to bail out. Everybody else in the camp was hiding in the slit trenches. Immediately after Dahl and Coke figured out what was going on, the squadron was sent to Crete. A month later they were evacuated to Egypt. The Messerschmitt Bf110 (later Me110) was a twin-engine heavy fighter in the service of the Luftwaffe during World War II. History Based around the concept of the long-range Zerstörer or Destroyer Fighter the Bf110 enjoyed some success in the Polish and French campaigns. ...


As the Germans were pressing on Athens, Dahl was evacuated to Egypt. His squadron was reassembled in Haifa. From there, Dahl flew missions every day for a period of four weeks, downing a Vichy French Air Force Potez 63 on 8 June and another Ju-88 on 15 June, but he then began to get severe headaches that caused him to black out, and he was invalided home to Britain. At this time his rank was Flight Lieutenant. Hebrew Arabic حَيْفَا Government City District Haifa Population 266,300 (city) 1,039,000 (metropolitan area) Jurisdiction 63,666 dunams (63. ... The Vichy French Air Force (French: ) was the aerial branch of the armed forces of Vichy France. ... The Potez 630 and its derivatives were a family of multi-role twin-engined aircraft developed for the Armée de lAir in the late 1930s. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up Unconscious in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A Flight Lieutenants sleeve/shoulder insignia Flight Lieutenant (abbreviated as Flt Lt and pronounced as flight lef-tenant, see Lieutenant) is a junior commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many Commonwealth countries. ...


Dahl began writing in 1942, after he was transferred to Washington, D.C. as Assistant Air Attaché. His first published work, in the 1 August 1942 issue of the Saturday Evening Post was "Shot Down Over Libya", describing the crash of his Gloster Gladiator. C. S. Forester had asked Dahl to write down some RAF anecdotes so that he could shape them into a story. After Forester sat down to read what Dahl had given him, he decided to publish it exactly as it was. The original title of the article was A Piece of Cake — the title was changed to sound more dramatic, despite the fact that the he was not "shot down". For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... A military attaché is a military expert who is part of a diplomatic mission. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The cover of the 1974 paperback edition of one of Foresters non-fiction titles: Hunting The Bismarck Cecil Scott Forester was the pen name of Cecil Louis Troughton Smith (August 27, 1899 – April 2, 1966), an English novelist who rose to fame with tales of adventure with military themes. ...


During the war, Forester worked for the British Information Service and was writing propaganda for the Allied cause, mainly for American consumption.[2] This work introduced Dahl to espionage and the activities of the Canadian spymaster William Stephenson, known by the codename "Intrepid". During the war, Dahl supplied intelligence from Washington to Stephenson and his organization, which was known as British Security Coordination. Dahl was sent back to Britain, for supposed misconduct by British Embassy officials: "I got booted out by the big boys," he said. Stephenson sent him back to Washington — with a promotion.[3] After the war Dahl wrote some of the history of the secret organization and he and Stephenson remained friends for decades after the war.[4] For other persons named William Stephenson, see William Stephenson (disambiguation). ... The British Security Coordination was authorized by Winston Churchill in 1940 as a highly secret organization in New York to supervise the activities of the British intellignece service -- MI5, Special Operations Executive, the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6), & the Political Warfare Executive -- in the Western hemisphere. ...


He ended the war as a Wing Commander. His record of five aerial victories, qualifying him as a flying ace, has been confirmed by post-war research and cross-referenced in Axis records, although it is most likely that he scored more than that during 20 April 1941 where 22 German aircraft were downed.[5] A Wing Commanders sleeve/shoulder insignia A Wing Commanders command flag Wing Commander is a commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ... The Red Baron, Manfred von Richthofen, perhaps the most famous ace of all The first ace, Adolphe Pegoud being awarded the Croix de Guerre A flying ace or fighter ace is a military aviator credited with shooting down five or more enemy aircraft during aerial combat. ...


Postwar life

Family

Dahl married American actress (and future Oscar-winner) Patricia Neal on 2 July 1953 at Trinity Church in New York City. Their marriage lasted for 30 years and they had five children: Olivia (died of measles encephalitis, aged seven), Tessa, Theo, Ophelia, and Lucy. He dedicated The BFG to Olivia Dahl Patricia Neal (born January 20, 1926, Packard, Kentucky) is an Academy Award winning American actress. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Trinity Church Close-up of Trinity Church Trinity Church, at the corner of Broadway and Wall Street in New York City, viewed from the World Trade Center A glimpse of New York from Trinity Church steeple. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Chantal Sophia Tessa Dahl (born 11 April 1957) is a British author. ... Ophelia Magdalena Dahl (born May 12, 1964) is a social justice and health care advocate. ...


When he was four months old, Theo Dahl was severely injured when his baby carriage was hit by a taxi in New York City. For a time, he suffered from hydrocephalus, and as a result, his father became involved in the development of what became known as the "Wade-Dahl-Till" (or WDT) valve, a device to alleviate the condition.[6]


In 1965, Neal suffered three burst cerebral aneurysms while pregnant with their fifth child, Lucy. Dahl took control of her rehabilitation and she eventually relearned to talk and walk. They were divorced in 1983 following a very turbulent marriage, and he subsequently married Felicity ("Liccy") d'Abreu Crosland (born 12 December 1938), who was 22 years his junior. A cerebral aneurysm or brain aneurysm is a cerebrovascular disorder in which weakness in the wall of a cerebral artery or vein causes a localized dilation or ballooning of the blood vessel. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Ophelia Dahl is director and co-founder (with doctor Paul Farmer) of Partners in Health, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing health care to some of the most impoverished communities in the world. Lucy Dahl is a screenwriter in Los Angeles. Tessa's daughter Sophie Dahl (who was the inspiration for Sophie, the main character in her grandfather's book The BFG) is a model and author who remembers Roald Dahl as "a very difficult man – very strong, very dominant ... not unlike the father of the Mitford sisters sort of roaring round the house with these very loud opinions, banning certain types – foppish boys, you know – from coming round." Ophelia Magdalena Dahl (born May 12, 1964) is a social justice and health care advocate. ... Dr. Paul Farmer Paul Farmer (born October 26, 1959) is an American anthropologist and physician, currently the Presley Professor of Medical Anthropology at Harvard University and an attending physician at Brigham and Womens Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Partners in Health (PIH) or Zanmi Lasante in Haiti is a non-profit healthcare organization to give preferential care for the poor. Founded in the 1980s by Dr. Paul Farmer and Dr. Jim Kim, it strives to bring the best of western medicine to the poorest of the poor. ... Sophie Dahl (born September 15, 1977 in London) is an English fashion model and authoress. ... For other uses, see BFG. The BFG (which stands for Big Friendly Giant) is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake, first published in 1982. ... The Mitfords were an aristocratic British family noted for their accomplishments in writing and their notorious lives, particularly of the daughters of the family, known as the Mitford sisters. ...


Way Out

In 1961, Dahl hosted and wrote for a science fiction and horror television anthology series called Way Out, which preceded the similar but less dark and edgy Twilight Zone series on the CBS network Saturday nights for 14 episodes from March to July. Dahl's comedic monologues bookended the episodes, frequently explaining exactly how to murder one's spouse without getting caught. The show was the last dramatic network series filmed in New York City, and the entire series remains available for viewing at the Paley Center for Media in New York and Los Angeles. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Horror can mean several things: Horror (emotion) Horror fiction Horror film This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... ANThology is the first major label album by Alien Ant Farm released on March 6, 2001 in the USA and March 19, 2001 in the UK. // Their first single, Smooth Criminal, was a cover of Michael Jacksons song Smooth Criminal, which started to bring popularity to the band. ... Note, this page is about the television series and its two revivals. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The East Coast branch of The Museum of Television and Radio is located in the heart of Midtown Manhattan in New York City (USA). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ...


Anti-Semitic remarks

In the summer of 1983, he wrote a book review for the Literary Review of God Cried by Newsweek writer Tony Clifton, a picture book about the invasion of Lebanon by Israel. Dahl's review stated that the Israeli ordered-invasion of Lebanon in June 1982 was when "we all started hating Israel," and that the book would make readers "violently anti-Israeli". According to biographer Jeremy Treglown, Dahl had originally written "when we all started hating Jews" - but editor Gillian Greenwood of the Literary Review changed Dahl's terms from "Jews" and "Jewish" to "Israel" and "Israeli".[7] On the basis of the published version, Dahl would later claim, "I am not anti-Semitic. I am anti-Israel."[7] Literary Review was founded in 1979 for people who love reading. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Combatants Israel South Lebanon Army LF (nominally neutral) PLO Syria Amal (switched sides) LCP Commanders Menachem Begin (Prime Minister) Ariel Sharon, (Ministry of Defence) Rafael Eitan, (CoS) Yasser Arafat Strength Israel: 76,000 troops 800 tanks 1,500 APCs 634 aircraft Syria: 22,000 troops 352 tanks 300 APCs 450... Anti-Zionism is opposition to Zionism, an international political movement that supports a homeland for the Jewish people in Palestine[1][2] Anti-Zionism takes many forms, ranging from political or religious opposition to the idea of a Jewish state, to rejecting Israels right to exist and the legitimacy...


He told a reporter in 1983 that: "there’s a trait in the Jewish character that does provoke animosity . . . I mean there is always a reason why anti-anything crops up anywhere; even a stinker like Hitler didn’t just pick on them for no reason."[7][8] Nonetheless, according to Treglown, Dahl maintained friendships with a handful of individual Jews.[7]


In later years, Dahl occasionally tried to bridge closer relations with the Jewish community. He included a sympathetic episode about German-Jewish refugees in his book Going Solo, and on another occasion he claimed that he was opposed to injustice, not Jews.[9] He maintained his strong political stance against Israel, and shortly before his death in 1990 he told the British newspaper The Independent, "I'm certainly anti-Israeli and I've become anti-Semitic in as much as that you get a Jewish person in another country like England strongly supporting Zionism," and he added that Jews "control the media."[10] Going Solo book cover Going Solo is an autobiography by Roald Dahl published in 1986. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... This article is about Zionism as a movement, not the History of Israel. ...


Death and legacy

Roald Dahl died in November 1990 at the age of 74 of a rare blood disease, myelodysplastic anaemia (sometimes called "pre-leukemia"), at his home, Gipsy House in Great Missenden, Buckinghamshire, and was buried in the cemetery at the parish church of Saints Peter and Paul. According to his granddaughter, the family gave him a "sort of Viking funeral". He was buried with his snooker cues, some very good burgundy, chocolates, HB pencils and a power saw. In his honour, the Roald Dahl Children's Gallery was opened at Buckinghamshire County Museum in nearby Aylesbury. The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS, formerly known as preleukemia) are a diverse collection of hematological conditions united by ineffective production of blood cells and varying risks of transformation to acute myelogenous leukemia. ... Great Missenden is a village in the valley of the river Misbourne in the Chiltern Hills in Buckinghamshire between Amersham and Wendover. ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... The Roald Dahl Childrens Gallery is in Church Street, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire. ... Ceely House, the main building now containing the museum The Old Aylesbury Grammar School building that now houses part of the museum The Buckinghamshire County Museum is a museum in the centre of Aylesbury, in Buckinghamshire, England. ... This page is about Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire, England. ...


In 2002, one of Cardiff's modern landmarks, the historic Oval Basin plaza, was re-christened "Roald Dahl Plass". "Plass" means plaza in Norwegian, a nod to the acclaimed late writer's Norwegian roots. There have also been calls from the public for a permanent statue of him to be erected in the city. This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... Roald Dahl Plass as the exterior of the Hub Roald Dahl Plass (Welsh: Plas Roald Dahl) is a public plaza in Cardiff Bay, part of Cardiff, Wales. ...


Dahl's charitable commitments in the fields of neurology, haematology and literacy have been continued by his widow since his death, through the Roald Dahl Foundation. In June 2005, the Roald Dahl Museum and Story Centre opened in Great Missenden to celebrate the work of Roald Dahl and advance his work in literacy. Neurology is a branch of medicine dealing with disorders of the nervous system. ... Hematology is the branch of medicine that is concerned with blood and its disorders. ... Children reading. ... The Roald Dahl Museum and Story Centre is in the village of Great Missenden in Buckinghamshire, England, which was the home of the childrens writer and short story writer Roald Dahl for many years until his death in 1990. ... Great Missenden is a village in the valley of the river Misbourne in the Chiltern Hills in Buckinghamshire between Amersham and Wendover. ... Children reading. ...


Roald Dahl Day

The anniversary of Dahl's birthday on 13 September has recently become widely celebrated as Roald Dahl Day.[11][12] is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Writing

Dahl's first published work, inspired by a meeting with C. S. Forester, was Shot Down Over Libya. Today the story is published as "A Piece of Cake". The story, about his wartime adventures, was bought by the Saturday Evening Post for $900, and propelled him into a career as a writer. Its title was inspired by a highly inaccurate and sensationalized article about the crash that blinded him, which claimed he had been shot down instead of simply having to land due to low fuel. The cover of the 1974 paperback edition of one of Foresters non-fiction titles: Hunting The Bismarck Cecil Scott Forester was the pen name of Cecil Louis Troughton Smith (August 27, 1899 – April 2, 1966), an English novelist who rose to fame with tales of adventure with military themes. ...


His first children's book was The Gremlins, about mischievous little creatures that were part of RAF folklore. The book was commissioned by Walt Disney for a film that was never made, and published in 1943. Dahl went on to create some of the best-loved children's stories of the 20th century, such as Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Matilda and James and the Giant Peach. Cover of an edition of The Gremlins The Gremlins is a childrens book, written by Roald Dahl, and published in 1943. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... For the 2005 movie by Tim Burton, see Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (film). ... For other uses, see Matilda. ... For the 1996 film adaptation, see James and the Giant Peach (film). ...


He also had a successful parallel career as the writer of macabre adult short stories, usually with a dark sense of humour and a surprise ending. Many were originally written for American magazines such as Ladies Home Journal, Harper's, Playboy and The New Yorker, then subsequently collected by Dahl into anthologies, gaining world-wide acclaim. Dahl wrote more than 60 short stories and they have appeared in numerous collections, some only being published in book form after his death. See List of Roald Dahl short stories. His stories also brought him three Edgar Awards: in 1954, for the collection Someone Like You; in 1959, for the story The Landlady; and in 1980, for the episode of Tales of the Unexpected based on "Skin". A cover of Ladies Home Journal from 1906 Ladies Home Journal is a magazine first published February 16, 1883 as a womens supplement to the Tribune and Farmer. ... Harpers redirects here. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see New Yorker. ... List of Roald Dahl short stories. ... The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (popularly called the Edgars), named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America. ... The Landlady is a short story by Roald Dahl, included in his 1960 collection Kiss Kiss. ... Tales Of The Unexpected is a British television series that originally aired between 1979 and 1988, made by Anglia Television for ITV. The series was an anthology of different tales, initially based on short stories by author Roald Dahl, that were sometimes sinister, sometimes wryly comedic and usually had a...


One of his more famous adult stories, "The Smoker" (also known as "Man From the South"), was filmed twice as both 1960 and 1985 episodes of Alfred Hitchcock Presents, and also adapted into Quentin Tarantino's segment of the 1995 film Four Rooms. This bizarre, oft-anthologized suspense classic concerns a man residing in Jamaica who wagers with visitors in an attempt to claim the fingers from their hands; the 1960 Hitchcock version stars Steve McQueen and Peter Lorre. Man from the South is a short story by Roald Dahl. ... Alfred Hitchcock Presents was an anthology television series hosted by Alfred Hitchcock. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an Academy Award- and Palme dOr-winning American film director, screenwriter and actor. ... Four Rooms is a 1995 anthology film telling four stories set in a Los Angeles hotel on New Years Eve. ... For other uses, see Steve McQueen (disambiguation). ... Peter Lorre (June 26, 1904 – March 23, 1964), born László Löwenstein, was an Hungarian[1] - Austrian - American actor frequently typecast as a sinister foreigner. ...


His short story collection Tales of the Unexpected was adapted to a successful TV series of the same name, beginning with "Man From the South." When the stock of Dahl's own original stories was exhausted, the series continued by adapting stories by authors that were written in Dahl's style, including the American writers John Collier and Stanley Ellin. Tales Of The Unexpected is a British television series that originally aired between 1979 and 1988, made by Anglia Television for ITV. The series was an anthology of different tales, initially based on short stories by author Roald Dahl, that were sometimes sinister, sometimes wryly comedic and usually had a... Man from the South is a short story by Roald Dahl. ... John Collier (May 3, 1901-April 6, 1980) was a British-born author and screenplay writer best known for his short stories, many of which appeared in The New Yorker during the 1930s, 40s, and 50s. ... Stanley Bernard Ellin (October 6, 1916 - July 31, 1986) was an American mystery writer. ...


A number of his short stories are supposed to be extracts from the diary of his (fictional) Uncle Oswald, a rich gentleman whose sexual exploits form the subject of these stories.


For a brief, relatively unsuccessful period in the 1960s, Dahl wrote screenplays. Two of his screenplays – the James Bond film You Only Live Twice and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang – were adaptations of novels by Ian Fleming. Dahl also wrote an initial draft adapting his own novel Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, which was heavily rewritten by David Seltzer, and produced as the film Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971). Dahl later disowned the film. This article is about the spy series. ... For the Ian Fleming novel, see You Only Live Twice. ... Chitty Chitty Bang Bang is a 1968 feature film with a script by Roald Dahl and Ken Hughes, and songs by the Sherman Brothers, based on Ian Flemings book Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: The Magical Car. ... This article is about the author. ... David Seltzer (born in 1940 in Highland Park, Illinois) is an American screenwriter, producer, and director who is perhaps best known for having written The Omen. ... For other uses, see Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (disambiguation). ...


Memories with Food at Gipsy House, written with his wife Felicity and published posthumously in 1991, was a mixture of recipes, family reminiscences and Dahl's musings on favourite subjects such as chocolate, onions, and claret.


Dahl ranks amongst the world's bestselling fiction authors, with sales estimated at 100 million.[13][14]


Children's fiction

Dahl's children's works are usually told from the point of view of a child. They typically involve adult villainesses who hate and mistreat children, and feature at least one "good" adult to counteract the villain(s). These stock characters are possibly a reference to the abuse that Dahl stated that he experienced in the boarding schools he attended. They usually contain a lot of black humour and grotesque scenarios, including gruesome violence. The Witches, George's Marvelous Medicine and Matilda are examples of this formula. The BFG follows it in a more analogous way with the good giant (the BFG or "Big Friendly Giant") representing the "good adult" archetype and the other giants being the "bad adults". This formula is also somewhat evident in Dahl's film script for Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. Class-conscious themes – ranging from the thinly veiled to the blatant – also surface in works such as Fantastic Mr. Fox and Danny, the Champion of the World. A typical cartoon villain. ... A boarding school is a usually fee-charging school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... This article is about the tone of comedy. ... The Witches is a book for children by Roald Dahl, first published in London in 1983 by Jonathan Cape. ... Georges Marvelous Medicine (or Marvellous in the English spelling published in the UK print-runs) is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake. ... For other uses, see Matilda. ... For other uses, see BFG. The BFG (which stands for Big Friendly Giant) is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake, first published in 1982. ... Chitty Chitty Bang Bang is a 1968 feature film with a script by Roald Dahl and Ken Hughes, and songs by the Sherman Brothers, based on Ian Flemings book Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: The Magical Car. ... Fantastic Mr Fox book cover by Quentin Blake book cover by Tony Ross. ... Danny, the Champion of the World is a 1975 childrens book by Roald Dahl. ...


Dahl also features in his books characters that are very fat, usually children. Augustus Gloop, Bruce Bogtrotter, and Bruno Jenkins are a few of these characters, although an enormous woman named Aunt Sponge is featured in James and The Giant Peach. All of these characters (with the possible exception of Bruce Bogtrotter) are either villains or simply unpleasant gluttons. They are usually punished for this: Augustus Gloop drinks from Willy Wonka's chocolate river, disregarding the adults who tell him not to, and falls in, getting sucked up a pipe and nearly being turned into fudge. Bruce Bogtrotter steals cake from the evil headmistress, Miss Trunchbull, and is forced to eat a gigantic chocolate cake in front of the school. Bruno Jenkins is turned into a mouse by witches and, it is speculated, possibly disowned or even killed by his parents because of this. Aunt Sponge is flattened by a giant peach. Augustus Gloop is the glutton of the five main child characters in Roald Dahls Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. ...


Dahl's mother used to tell him and his sisters tales about trolls and other mythical Norwegian creatures and some of his children's books contain references or elements inspired by these stories, such as the giants in The BFG. Many of his children's books are illustrated by Quentin Blake. Professor Quentin Saxby Blake, CBE (born December 16, 1932) is a British cartoonist and author. ...


List of works

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Roald Dahl

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ...

Children's writing

Children's stories

Cover of an edition of The Gremlins The Gremlins is a childrens book, written by Roald Dahl, and published in 1943. ... For the 1996 film adaptation, see James and the Giant Peach (film). ... James and the Giant Peach is a movie, based on the Roald Dahl book of the same name. ... For the 2005 movie by Tim Burton, see Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (film). ... For other uses, see Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with the 1971 film Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory. ... The Magic Finger is a childrens story written by Roald Dahl, different editions being illustrated by Tony Ross and Quentin Blake Spoiler warning: Synopsis Living next door to the Greggs, a family that hunts for fun, is an eight-year-old girl possessing a very special gift - a magic... Fantastic Mr Fox is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl, and illustrated by Tony Ross. ... Fantastic Mr. ... Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator is a childrens book by British author Roald Dahl. ... Danny, the Champion of the World is a 1975 childrens book by Roald Dahl. ... Danny, Champion of the World cover by Quentin Blake // Danny, the Champion of the World For the 1989 film, see Danny, the champion of the world (movie) Danny, the Champion of the World is a book for children by British author Roald Dahl about a boy called Danny Smith. ... Enormous Crocodile book cover The Enormous Crocodile is a short story about a mean spirited crocodile by Roald Dahl with large colour illustrations by Quentin Blake. ... The Twits is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake. ... Georges Marvelous Medicine (or Marvellous in the English spelling published in the UK print-runs) is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake. ... For other uses, see BFG. The BFG (which stands for Big Friendly Giant) is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake, first published in 1982. ... The BFG is a animated movie based on the book by Roald Dahl Cast Category: ... The Witches is a book for children by Roald Dahl, first published in London in 1983 by Jonathan Cape. ... The Witches is a 1990 film based on the book of the same name by British author, Roald Dahl. ... The Giraffe and the Pelly and Me The Giraffe and the Pelly and Me is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake. ... For other uses, see Matilda. ... For other uses, see Matilda. ... Cover of Esio Trot Esio Trot is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake. ...

Children's poetry

Revolting Rhymes book cover Revolting Rhymes is a collection of Roald Dahl poems that re-interpret popular fairy tales. ... Dirty Beasts is a collection of Roald Dahl poems about unsuspecting animals. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...

Adult fiction

Novels

My Uncle Oswald is an adult novel written by Roald Dahl. ...

Short story collections

See the alphabetical List of Roald Dahl short stories. See also Roald Dahl: Collected Stories for a complete, chronological listing. Someone Like You bookcover Someone Like You is a collection of short stories by Roald Dahl. ... Lamb to the Slaughter is a short story by Roald Dahl, first published in Harpers in 1953. ... Penguin edition of Kiss Kiss Kiss Kiss is a collection of short stories by Roald Dahl, first published in 1960 by Jonathan Cape in London and Alfred Knopf in the USA. Most of the constituent stories had been previously published elsewhere. ... The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar and Six More is a collection of seven stories written by Roald Dahl. ... Roald Dahls Tales of the Unexpected is a collection of sixteen short stories written by Dahl and first published in 1948. ... Switch Bitch is a 1974 book for adults by Roald Dahl. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Penguin edition of Two Fables Two Fables is a collection of two short stories by Roald Dahl, first published in 1986 by Penguin in London and Farrar, Straus, & Giroux in the USA. It contains the following two stories: Princess and the Poacher Princess Mammalia This short story-related article is... The Umbrella Man redirects here. ... List of Roald Dahl short stories. ...


Non-fiction

The Mildenhall Treasure is a non-fiction work by Roald Dahl. ... Image:BoyDahl. ... Going Solo book cover Going Solo is an autobiography by Roald Dahl published in 1986. ... Royal Dutch Shell plc is a multinational oil company of British and Dutch origins. ... In general, allies are people or groups that have joined an alliance and are working together to achieve some common purpose. ... This article, image, template or category should belong in one or more categories. ... Roald Dahls Guide to Railway Safety Book Cover Roald Dahls Guide to Railway Safety was published in 1991 by the British Railways Board. ... My Year is a book by Roald Dahl and was published in 1993. ...

Plays

  • The Honeys (1955) Produced at the Longacre Theater on Broadway.

The Honeys is a play written by Roald Dahl. ...

Film scripts

ISN show hosted by Cynthia Torqueman which spends 36 hours on location investigating a subject. ... For the Ian Fleming novel, see You Only Live Twice. ... Chitty Chitty Bang Bang is a 1968 feature film with a script by Roald Dahl and Ken Hughes, and songs by the Sherman Brothers, based on Ian Flemings book Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: The Magical Car. ... We dont have an article called The Night Digger Start this article Search for The Night Digger in. ... For other uses, see Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (disambiguation). ...

Television

David Susskind (December 19, 1920, New York City - February 22, 1987, New York City, heart attack) was best known as a pioneer TV talk show host. ... Alfred Hitchcock Presents was an anthology television series hosted by Alfred Hitchcock. ... Lamb to the Slaughter is a short story by Roald Dahl, first published in Harpers in 1953. ... Dip in the Pool is a short story by Roald Dahl that appeared in the 1953 collection Someone Like You. ... Man from the South is a short story by Roald Dahl. ... For other uses, see Steve McQueen (disambiguation). ... Peter Lorre (June 26, 1904 – March 23, 1964), born László Löwenstein, was an Hungarian[1] - Austrian - American actor frequently typecast as a sinister foreigner. ... Mrs. ... The Landlady is a short story by Roald Dahl, included in his 1960 collection Kiss Kiss. ... Tales Of The Unexpected is a British television series that originally aired between 1979 and 1988, made by Anglia Television for ITV. The series was an anthology of different tales, initially based on short stories by author Roald Dahl, that were sometimes sinister, sometimes wryly comedic and usually had a...

Sources

  • Philip Howard, "Dahl, Roald (1916–1990)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2006 http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/39827 accessed 24 May 2006

References

  1. ^ Roald Dahl - Penguin UK Authors - Penguin UK
  2. ^ Cambridge Guide to Literature (Cambridge University Press, 1989) ISBN 0-521-26751-X.
  3. ^ Bill Macdonald - The True Intrepid p249 (Raincoast 2001)ISBN 1-55192-418-8 Dahl also speaks about his espionage work in the documentary The True Intrepid
  4. ^ Macdonald - The True Intrepid p243 ISBN 1-55192-418-8.
  5. ^ Christopher Shores and Clive Williams – Aces High: A Tribute to the Most Notable Fighter Pilots of the British and Commonwealth Air Forces in WWII (Grub Street Publishing, 1994) ISBN 1-898697-00-0.
  6. ^ Water on the Brain. MedGadget: Internet Journal of Emerging Medical Technologies (2005-07-15). Retrieved on 2006-05-11.
  7. ^ a b c d Roald Dahl An Autobiography, Jeremy Treglown (Farrar, Straus, Giroux, 1994), pp. 255-256.
  8. ^ Philip Howard, ‘Dahl, Roald (1916–1990)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2006 accessed 16 Sept 2007
  9. ^ Treglown, p. 258
  10. ^ Brian Appleyard. "Interview: Roald and the promiscuous girl." The Independent (London), March. 21, 1990, p. 15.
  11. ^ Roald Dahl Day celebrations, Roald Dahl Museum and Story Centre (accessed 20 Sept 2007)
  12. ^ Roald Dahl's 90th Birthday!, Random House UK (accessed 20 Sept 2007)
  13. ^ The International Herald Tribune on Roald Dahl: "Dahl's books, many of them darkly comic and featuring villainous adult enemies of the child characters, have sold over 100 million copies." (13 September 2006)
  14. ^ BBC on Roald Dahl: "Exhibitions and children's reading campaigns are being held to commemorate the life of Dahl, who died in 1990 and has sold more than 100 million books." (13 September 2006)
  15. ^ Source: written for a leaflet published in 1986 by Sandwell Health Authority (now Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust). Reproduced at http://www.blacktriangle.org/blog/?p=715.

Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust is one of the largest teaching Trusts in the UK and comprises of Sandwell General Hospital in West Bromwich, Birmingham City Hospital and Rowley Regis Hospital. ...

External links

  • Official website
  • Roald Dahl Day
  • The Roald Dahl Collection
  • Roald Dahl Foundation website
  • Roald Dahl Museum
  • Roald Dahl, from Cardiff, Wales
  • Roald Dahl at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database
  • Roald Dahl at the Internet Movie Database
  • Find-A-Grave profile for Roald Dahl
  • Radio interview with Dahl in Norwegian by NRK (1975)
Persondata
NAME Dahl, Roald
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION British novelist, short story writer
DATE OF BIRTH 13 September 1916
PLACE OF BIRTH Llandaff, Cardiff, Wales
DATE OF DEATH 23 November 1990
PLACE OF DEATH Great Missenden, Buckinghamshire, England
The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... Cover of an edition of The Gremlins The Gremlins is a childrens book, written by Roald Dahl, and published in 1943. ... For the 1996 film adaptation, see James and the Giant Peach (film). ... For the 2005 movie by Tim Burton, see Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (film). ... The Magic Finger is a childrens story written by Roald Dahl, different editions being illustrated by Tony Ross and Quentin Blake Spoiler warning: Synopsis Living next door to the Greggs, a family that hunts for fun, is an eight-year-old girl possessing a very special gift - a magic... Fantastic Mr Fox is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl, and illustrated by Tony Ross. ... Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator is a childrens book by British author Roald Dahl. ... Danny, the Champion of the World is a 1975 childrens book by Roald Dahl. ... The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar and Six More is a collection of seven stories written by Roald Dahl. ... Enormous Crocodile book cover The Enormous Crocodile is a short story about a mean spirited crocodile by Roald Dahl with large colour illustrations by Quentin Blake. ... The Twits is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake. ... Georges Marvellous Medicine (or Marvelous in the US print-runs) is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake. ... For other uses, see BFG. The BFG (which stands for Big Friendly Giant) is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake, first published in 1982. ... The Witches is a book for children by Roald Dahl, first published in London in 1983 by Jonathan Cape. ... The Giraffe and the Pelly and Me The Giraffe and the Pelly and Me is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake. ... For other uses, see Matilda. ... Cover of Esio Trot Esio Trot is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake. ... The Minpins book cover The Minpins is a book by Roald Dahl with illustrations by Patrick Benson. ... Vicar of Nibbleswicke book cover The Vicar of Nibbleswicke is a childrens story written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake. ... Revolting Rhymes book cover Revolting Rhymes is a collection of Roald Dahl poems that re-interpret popular fairy tales. ... Dirty Beasts is a collection of Roald Dahl poems about unsuspecting animals. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... My Uncle Oswald is an adult novel written by Roald Dahl. ... Someone Like You bookcover Someone Like You is a collection of short stories by Roald Dahl. ... Penguin edition of Kiss Kiss Kiss Kiss is a collection of short stories by Roald Dahl, first published in 1960 by Jonathan Cape in London and Alfred Knopf in the USA. Most of the constituent stories had been previously published elsewhere. ... Roald Dahls Tales of the Unexpected is a collection of sixteen short stories written by Dahl and first published in 1948. ... Switch Bitch is a 1974 book for adults by Roald Dahl. ... The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar and Six More is a collection of seven stories written by Roald Dahl. ... Penguin edition of Two Fables Two Fables is a collection of two short stories by Roald Dahl, first published in 1986 by Penguin in London and Farrar, Straus, & Giroux in the USA. It contains the following two stories: Princess and the Poacher Princess Mammalia This short story-related article is... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The Mildenhall Treasure is a non-fiction work by Roald Dahl. ... Image:BoyDahl. ... Going Solo book cover Going Solo is an autobiography by Roald Dahl published in 1986. ... This article, image, template or category should belong in one or more categories. ... Roald Dahls Guide to Railway Safety Book Cover Roald Dahls Guide to Railway Safety was published in 1991 by the British Railways Board. ... My Year is a book by Roald Dahl and was published in 1993. ... The Honeys is a play written by Roald Dahl. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Llandaff electoral ward of Cardiff Llandaff (Welsh Llandaf llan church + Taf) is a district in the city of Cardiff, Wales, having been incorporated into the city in 1922, and is also the name of a diocese of the Church in Wales, covering the most populous area of south Wales. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... This article is about the country. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Great Missenden is a village in the valley of the river Misbourne in the Chiltern Hills in Buckinghamshire between Amersham and Wendover. ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

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The Roald Dahl Foundation - RDF Nurses (586 words)
The Roald Dahl Foundation is proud of its strong record in funding crucial nursing posts in the areas of epilepsy, acquired brain injury, and haematology throughout the UK.
Roald Dahl nurses are often lifelines to their young patients, and their families.
A Roald Dahl Haemoglobinopathy Nurse Specialist was funded at St Mary's Hospital in London in 2003 and there are plans to fund further Haemoglobinopathy nurse specialist posts in the near future.
Roald Dahl - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2791 words)
Roald Dahl was born at Villa Marie, Fairwater Road, Llandaff, Cardiff, Wales on 13 September 1916, to Norwegian parents, Harald Dahl and Sofie Magdalene Dahl (née Hesselberg).
Roald Dahl died of leukemia on 23 November 1990, at his home, Gipsy House, in Great Missenden, Buckinghamshire, at the age of 74, and is buried in the cemetery at the parish church of St. Peter and St. Paul.
Dahl's works for children are usually told from the point of view of a child, typically involve adult villainesses, who hate and mistreat children, and feature at least one "good" adult to counteract the villain(s) (perhaps a reference to the abuse that Dahl himself experienced in the boarding schools he attended).
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