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Encyclopedia > Roadside memorial
Flowers marking the site of a fatal crash
Flowers marking the site of a fatal crash

Roadside memorials are sometimes erected at the site of a fatal road crash. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (511x682, 75 KB)Roadside memorial La Perouse Street, Canberra. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (511x682, 75 KB)Roadside memorial La Perouse Street, Canberra. ... The result of excessive speed, this cement truck rolls over into the front garden of a house. ...


The memorials, which often consist at first of just a few flowers or wreaths, are sometimes followed by a more permanent marker such as a cross or a plaque. These are occasionally made more personal, with names and mementos. An intending cross is a cross, which was built as memorial to remember at a special event. ...


There have been roadside memorials for more than a thousand years. Eleanor crosses in England, for example, were erected in 1290 along the route of the Queen's funeral procession, though these, of course, were not intended to mark a death place. The Eleanor Cross at Charing Cross The Eleanor crosses are lavishly decorated stone monuments in the shape of a cross that Edward I of England erected in memory of his wife Eleanor of Castile. ... For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ...

A more permanent marker
A more permanent marker

The first automobile fatality may have been Mary Ward's accident with a steam car in 1869. Prior to this, roadside memorials would have been placed for deaths unrelated to motor vehicles. Image File history File links HndmrshDrvMmrl. ... Image File history File links HndmrshDrvMmrl. ... Scientist Mary Ward Mary Ward (b. ...


In the 1940s and '50s the Arizona State Highway Patrol began using white crosses to mark the site of fatal car accidents. This practice was continued by families of road-crash victims after it had been abandoned by the police. The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... // Recovering from World War II and its aftermath, the economic miracle emerged in West Germany and Italy. ... Official language(s) English Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Area  Ranked 6th  - Total 113,998 sq mi (295,254 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... A highway patrol is either a police agency created primarily for the purpose of overseeing and enforcing traffic safety compliance on roads and highways, such as the California Highway Patrol, or a detail within an existing local or regional police agency that is primarily concerned with such duties, such as...


The number of memorials erected in Australia since 1990 has increased considerably. In 2003 it was estimated that one in five road deaths were memorialised at the site of the crash. 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


It has been suggested that the urge to erect roadside memorials is related to a growing reluctance to seek spiritual solace in organised religion, and it is interesting to note that although religious symbols are often still used at roadside memorials, these seem merely to mark the place of a violent death and are probably not intended to carry any particular religious significance. It may be that roadside memorials mean more to families than do cemeteries. At the very least, there is an immediate reminder of the person in the site of his death. These 'sacred places' however, unlike cemeteries, usually serve only as a place for immediate grieving and tend not to be maintained.


The phenomenon of roadside memorials may perhaps be associated with another growing trend: public outpouring of grief for celebrities. The death of Diana, Princess of Wales, for example, precipitated an avalanche of flowers and wreaths at the Paris site of her death and at Kensington Place. While car-crash victims are rarely so well-known, something of the same sort of impulse to make a public display of emotion at the site of a tragedy may be partly responsible for the growing popularity of roadside memorials. Diana, Princess of Wales (Diana Frances Mountbatten-Windsor; née Spencer; 1 July 1961 – 31 August 1997) was the first wife of Charles, the Prince of Wales, eldest son and heir apparent of Elizabeth II. Her two sons, Princes William and Harry, are second and third, respectively, in line to...


Another aspect of these memorials is that they serve as a warning to other road users, both as a general reminder of the dangers of driving, and to mark a place where a fatal accident took place.


Controversy

In the United Kingdom, the practice of erecting roadside memorials has recently sparked a media debate about the danger these may pose to other road users and to people erecting the memorials in unsafe places. This debate has been sparked by accounts of dangerous actions, such as an adult dangerously crossing a main road with a young child to place a tribute.


Some jurisdictions already enforce local regulations, and police officials and local councillors have suggested that uniform rules be introduced across the country. For example, according to the BBC, in Merthyr Tydfil, memorials will only be allowed where it is deemed safe and appropriate, and they will be removed after three months. [1] The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is one of the largest broadcasting corporations in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the UK alone and with a budget of more than £4 billion. ... Merthyr Tydfil (Welsh: ) is a town and county borough in Wales, with a population of about 55,000. ...


In the United States, the legal situation varies from state to state. In California, residents must pay a state fee of $1,000. The states of Colorado, Massachusetts, and Wisconsin ban such memorials. Other states impose specific requirements.[2][3] Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42°30N to 47°3N  - Longitude 86°49W to 92°54W Population  Ranked...


External links

  • Australian Broadcasting Commission transcript of White lines, White Crosses, broadcast 7 December 2003
  • Further information and pictures accompanying the story White Lines, White Crosses
  • Descansos.org :: Project to create awareness for victims of vehicular fatalities. Painting the story of victims to create love, peace and public awareness

  Results from FactBites:
 
Roadside memorial - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (420 words)
The memorials, which often consist at first of just a few flowers or wreaths, are sometimes followed by a more permanent marker such as a cross or a plaque.
The phenomenon of roadside memorials may perhaps be associated with another growing trend: public outpouring of grief for celebrities.
Another aspect of these memorials is that they serve as a warning to other road users, both as a general reminder of the dangers of driving, and to mark a place where an fatal accident took place.
Descansos - Roadside Memorials on the American Highway: a photographic exploration - Photography by Dave Nance - (4531 words)
Roadside memorials are distributed more or less randomly along the highways -- no one chooses the place where they will meet death in an accident on the highway -- and the memorials erected at these sites therefore tend to present the photographer with a wide range of situations in terms of light and surroundings.
Roadside memorials are so effective at this, because they confront us with the reality of death as an actual event that arrives for a particular person, at a particular place, at a particular time.
Roadside memorials represent a very private experience, and part of me felt that it was an invasion of sorts to focus on the expression which grew out of that experience and to record it in photographs to be viewed by unknown strangers.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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