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Encyclopedia > Road Rovers
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Road Rovers

The Road Rovers, from left to right: Muzzle, Shag, Hunter, Colleen, Blitz, and Exile.
Genre Animated series
Created by Tom Ruegger
Starring Jess Harnell
Tress MacNeille
Jeff Bennett
Kevin Michael Richardson
Frank Welker
Joseph Campanella
Jim Cummings
Country of origin USA
No. of episodes 13
Production
Running time 30 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel Kids' WB
Original run September 2, 1996February 22, 1997

Road Rovers is an action adventure / comedy cartoon. written and produced by Tom Ruegger, that premiered on Kids' WB on September 2, 1996. It lasted only one season and ended on February 22, 1997. Re-runs of the show continued for a short time on Kids' WB and then on Cartoon Network until 1999. Much of the humor contained in the show was derived from popular culture of the mid 1990s. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Tom Ruegger is an American animation writer, producer and director. ... Jess Q. Harnell (born December 23, 1963 in Teaneck, New Jersey, USA), is an American voice actor, best known for portraying Wakko Warner and Walter Wolf on Animaniacs. ... Tress MacNeille (born June 20, 1951) is an American voice actress best known for providing various voices on the animated television shows The Simpsons and Futurama, and Animaniacs. ... Jeffrey Glenn Bennett (born October 2, 1962) is a well-known voice actor in cartoons, movies and games. ... Kevin Michael Richardson (born October 25, 1964 in The Bronx, New York) is an American voice actor and actor, one of the most prominent voice actors in the field. ... Franklin W. Welker (born March 12, 1946) is an American voice actor. ... Joseph Campanella (born November 21, 1933 in New York, New York) is an American actor who has appeared in over 200 TV and film roles since 1955, including a recurring role on the soap opera The Bold and the Beautiful from 1997 to 2003. ... James Jonah Jim Cummings (born November 3, 1952[1] in Youngstown, Ohio) is an American voice actor. ... Kids WB! is the Saturday morning cartoon portion of The CW Television Networks weekend programming. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... The word comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humor with an intent to provoke laughter in general). ... A cartoon is any of several forms of illustrations with varied meanings that evolved from its original meaning. ... Tom Ruegger is an American animation writer, producer and director. ... Kids WB! is the Saturday morning cartoon portion of The CW Television Networks weekend programming. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... Kids WB! is the Saturday morning cartoon portion of The CW Television Networks weekend programming. ... Cartoon Network (commonly referred to as CN) is a cable television network created by Turner Broadcasting which primarily shows animated programming. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... Popular culture, sometimes called pop culture, consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ...


The show follows the adventures of the Road Rovers, a team of five super-powered crime fighting anthropomorphic dogs, known as "cano-sapiens". The leader of the rovers is Hunter, a golden retriever mix from the United States. The Rovers' boss is a scientist known as "The Master" who oversees their operations and supplies them with equipment from their subterranean headquarters. Anthropomorphism, also referred to as personification or prosopopeia, is the attribution of human characteristics to inanimate objects, animals, forces of nature, and others. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog (Canis lupus familiaris) is a domestic subspecies of the wolf, a mammal of the Canidae family of the order Carnivora. ...

Contents

Plot

One year prior to the formation of the Road Rovers, Professor Shepherd is attacked by a man named General Parvo, who demands the professor's experimental transdogmafier (a play on the term transmogrifier) technology in exchange for his pet dog. Shepherd gives in but is tricked by Parvo, who gives him a bomb that destroys his laboratory. The next year, as normal dogs begin to mutate into monsters, Shepard realizes it is Parvo who is behind it and decides to stop him. Species Canine minute virus Canine parvovirus Chicken parvovirus Feline panleukopenia virus Feline parvovirus HB virus H-1 virus Kilham rat virus Lapine parvovirus LUIII virus Mice minute virus Mink enteritis virus Mouse parvovirus 1 Porcine parvovirus Raccoon parvovirus RT parvovirus Tumor virus X Parvovirus, commonly called parvo, is a genus... A transmogrifier is a fictional device used for transforming one object into another object. ...


Shepherd selects five dogs from around the world to combat this new threat. Once they arrive at his new, secret underground lab, he uses his new transdogmifier on the five, turning them into cano-sapiens. Cano-sapiens look like normal clothed humans except that they have retained all the trademark aspects of the dogs they came from, such as a tail, fur, distinctive ears, etc. Their personality before the transformation also remains intact. They can also speak English and possess super abilities that normal humans do not. (The lone exception to this was Shag, a large sheepdog who did not speak intelligibly for the most part, although sometimes his speech was partially understandable, and who appears to have had no true super powers beyond seeingly being able to pull virtually anything out of his fur. He was, however, the tallest Road Rover and may have had strength proportionate to his size. The character was excessively cowardly, however, and so was only rarely seen engaged in close quarters combat, in which case he was usually fleeing his opponents.) The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Human beings are defined variously in biological, spiritual, and cultural terms, or in combinations thereof. ...


Professor Shepherd (or "The Master" as the new Road Rovers would call him) briefs them on their situation, and agrees to turn them back into their normal forms if they succeed in their mission. After hearing of the dangers inherent in their first mission, the Road Rovers are hesitant to help Shepherd, but he reassures them and gains their trust by offering them meals and weekly baths.


Their first assignment is to stop General Parvo from obtaining a Molecular Stabilizer that will allow him to make the effects of his cano-mutator permanent. The Rovers nearly succeed in their task but are forced to hand over the stabilizer to Parvo in exchange for one of their own. As Parvo delights in his victory he realizes the stabilizer has been exchanged for a bomb. The bomb destroys Parvo's ship but he vows to continue fighting.


Back at Road Rover headquarters, the Master keeps his end of the bargain. He returns the five back to their normal canine forms and places them in the homes of the leaders of their country of origin; Hunter goes to the President of the United States, Colleen to the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Blitz to the Chancellor of Germany, Exile to the President of Russia, and Shag to the President of the Swiss Confederation. The presidential seal is a well-known symbol of the presidency. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... The head of government of Germany is called Chancellor (German: Kanzler). ... The President of Russia (ru: Президент России is the highest position within the Government of Russia. ... The President of the Confederation (Italian: , French: , German: ) is the presiding member of the Swiss Federal Council, Switzerlands seven-member executive. ...


It is later discovered that many of the events in the past were caused by Parvo's time machine. These include Parvo's appearance in the past (as a cat named Boots), Parvo's failed attempt at construcing a transdogrifier causing Scout to become Muzzle, Boots becoming Parvo with Groomer's help, Muzzle meeting Hunter, and Shag saving Shepherd's life by informing him of the bomb that will blow up his lab. This is, perhaps, a jab at the Back to the Future movies, or other shows where timetravel has proven to cause the events of the present. Either way, the paradoxes have become part of the storyline. Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... This article is about the first film in the Back to the Future trilogy. ... Look up paradox in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Russian Name Song Controversy

Regardless of its short run on television, Road Rovers did have one notable controversial incident. During the episode A Day in the Life, Exile reveals his full Russian name. This launches the Rovers into a song, which explains how Russian names work. The source of the controversy doesn't appear until the last three lines, in which they demonstrate middle names and their paternal source. Using the name “Sonov” as an example, they add “-ovich”, creating “Sonovovich”, a homonymic pun on the phrase “son of a bitch”. Look up homonym in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A pun (also known as paronomasia) is a figure of speech, or word play which consists of a deliberate confusion of similar words within a phrase or phrases for rhetorical effect, whether humorous or serious. ... The term son of a bitch or son-of-a-bitch (often pronounced sumbitch in the Southern United States, and frequently euphemised to s. ...


The Russian Name Song only appeared in its initial airing, and was subsequently removed following the objections of concerned parents[citation needed].


Cancellation

In February of 1997, WB canceled the show, citing its low performance. Fans were upset that the show had gone off the air, and some claimed to have access to inside information about the ratings, and subsequently claimed that they were near or equivalent to Superman: The Animated Series, but did not give a solid answer on why Superman had been picked up, while Road Rovers was left alone. Superman: The Animated Series is the unofficial title given to Warner Bros. ...


The show's cancellation took on enhanced criticism in September of the same year, when Kids' WB did not air additional scenes of the "A Day in the Life" episode for the show's final airing, which they had assented to, or a Christmas special they showed a promo for. [1]


Some have suggested that the show was cancelled in part due to complaints about various factors (Blitz has been suggested to be a leading cause). If this is the case, it is unclear why Warner Brothers did not mention it.


Characters

  • Hunter (Jess Harnell) – A Golden Retriever mix from the United States; Hunter is the leader of the Road Rovers. His naivete and literal thinking aside, he is a confident and serious leader who finds time to add humor to a situation. His primary superpower is super speed, though he also lists such abilities as super generosity, super forgiveness, and super super luck. In addition, at the end of "Reigning Cats and Dogs," Hunter (in canine form) displays the ablity to spit a tennis ball with the force of one of their blasters. His two main catch phrases are, “I would not have predicted this,” and, “Yet another unexpected twist,” which he uses during plot clichés. He seems to understand both Shag and Muzzle.
  • Colleen (Tress MacNeille) – A rough collie from the United Kingdom, and the only female in the group; Colleen’s skill of the martial arts is unparalleled whether in humanoid or canine form. She, like Hunter, throws in quips during a fight. Colleen has also displayed keen medical abilities. There are hints of a relationsip between her and Hunter while at the same time she receives endless confessions of love from Blitz, whose name and even existence she seems to be constantly forgetting. This is later revealed to be done for the pure sake of annoying Blitz, as she does call him by his proper name in the series finale A Day in the Life. Also during A Day In The Life Colleen confesses to having failed paper training.
  • Blitz (Jeff Bennett) – A Doberman from Germany; Blitz is the most combative member of the team. His super sharp teeth and claws can cut through anything, but his courage (or lack thereof) often causes problems for them all. He screams like a girl. Blitz is quite vain and has an uninhibited fondness for Colleen, whom he believes he can impress despite all indications. During one mission, the team is nearly killed and he confesses his love to her. (Unfortunately, he did not look at the person to whom he was speaking and the message is instead directed at Exile, whose response is, “Please get therapy!”) He also has an obsession with peppermint milkshakes and “biting tooshies.”
  • Exile (Kevin Michael Richardson) – A Siberian husky from Siberia; Exile is the master of fixing and unfixing things. His superpowers are heat, freeze and night vision, along with super-strength (though not as much as Shag). He does, however, have a tendency to completely butcher everyday American expressions, often three or four at a time. He frequently tells Blitz, “Don't be weird boy.”
  • Shag (Frank Welker) – A sheepdog from Switzerland; Shag is a kind of fluke as far as the transdogmafier process goes. Instead of becoming a complete cano-sapien, he is stuck at someplace in between. Shag cannot speak English clearly and is only vaguely humanoid. He has super-strength and stores equipment (among other things, including weapons, lunch, furniture, and on at least two occasions even fellow Road Rovers) in his copious fur, but is also a complete coward. He has an unfortunate tendency to hold his rocket launcher backwards, leading Hunter to remark at one point, “This is precisely the reason they don't normally give bazookas to dogs.”
  • Muzzle (Frank Welker) – Formally Professor Shepherd’s pet Rottweiler, Scout, a failed experiment with the transdogmafier turned him into the mad and foaming mess he is today. He is always restrained in a strait jacket and mask, and is only let out as a last resort (with the catch-phrase “Let's Muzzle 'em!”). While his fighting always takes place off-screen with implications of extreme violence, the result is usually beneficial to the Rovers at the same time making them disgusted. He was rescued from animal control officers by Hunter, who was also in the pound. The two have since been friends. In addition, he seems to have a good understanding with Shag as he would hang with him beside Hunter; as well a converse with each other. He holds a degree of respect for Exile and Colleen and flat out hates Blitz, one instance when Blitz was calling Muzzle names and refusing to take him on a mission, Muzzle tried to bite him making him scream like a girl.
  • Professor William F. Shepherd (Joseph Campanella)– The geneticist behind the transdogmafier and the Road Rovers. He is the team’s boss and supplier for all their gear. He is known as “the Master” to the Rovers. He always appears before them as a figure with glowing eyes, something he attributes to “Special effects”. In "Reigning Cats and Dogs," his past self refers to his kids, revealing the fact that he had a family. Why they are never mentioned elsewhere in the series is a mystery (most likely, General Parvo elliminated them out of spite after trying to kill the Professor).

Villains on the show include: This article is considered orphaned, since there are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Jess Q. Harnell (born December 23, 1963 in Teaneck, New Jersey, USA), is an American voice actor, best known for portraying Wakko Warner and Walter Wolf on Animaniacs. ... The Golden Retriever is a popular breed of dog, originally developed to retrieve downed fowl during hunting. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Colleen (voiced by Tress MacNeille) is a fictional anthropomorphic dog from the action/comedy cartoon Road Rovers that premiered in September 1996 on Kids WB. She is a rough collie from the United Kingdom(as is evidenced by her cockney accent) and the only female in the group. ... Tress MacNeille (born June 20, 1951) is an American voice actress best known for providing various voices on the animated television shows The Simpsons and Futurama, and Animaniacs. ... The Rough Collie is a breed of dog developed originally for herding in Scotland. ... Blitz is a fictional anthropomorphic dog from the action/comedy cartoon Road Rovers that premiered in September 1996. ... Jeffrey Glenn Bennett (born October 2, 1962) is a well-known voice actor in cartoons, movies and games. ... Country of origin Germany Common nicknames Dobie Classification Breed standards (external links) FCI, AKC, ANKC, CKC KC(UK), NZKC, UKC The Dobermann or Doberman Pinscher (also, more colloquially, Dobie) is a breed of domestic dog. ... Exile is a fictional anthropomorphic dog from the action/comedy cartoon Road Rovers that premiered in September 1996. ... Kevin Michael Richardson (born October 25, 1964 in The Bronx, New York) is an American voice actor and actor, one of the most prominent voice actors in the field. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Western Siberia be merged into this article or section. ... Night-vision is seeing in the dark. ... Franklin W. Welker (born March 12, 1946) is an American voice actor. ... The Polish Lowland Sheepdog (Polish: Polski Owczarek Nizinny), also just PON, is a medium sized, shaggy-coated, sheep dog breed native to Poland. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Franklin W. Welker (born March 12, 1946) is an American voice actor. ... A Rottweiler is a large, robust and powerful dog breed originating in Germany. ... Joseph Campanella (born November 21, 1933 in New York, New York) is an American actor who has appeared in over 200 TV and film roles since 1955, including a recurring role on the soap opera The Bold and the Beautiful from 1997 to 2003. ... A geneticist is a scientist who studies genetics, the science of heredity and variation of organisms. ... Special effects (abbreviated SPFX or SFX) are used in the film, television, and entertainment industry to create effects that cannot be achieved by normal means, such as depicting travel to other star systems. ...

  • General Parvo (Jim Cummings) – The Road Rover’s main antagonist who is out to destroy Professor Shepherd and conquer the world. He was once a cat, and often requests lozenges from the Groomer for hairballs. Parvo actually coughed one up during the course of the series. Parvo and his assistent the Groomer (see below) set in motion the events that caused the formation of the Road Rovers. They also became part of a time paradox in which Parvo after revealing himself to be part cat to the Groomer, is transformed back into his feline self, and transported back in time during an attempt to prevent the Rovers from being created, where he soon lost his original memories, was taken in by Professor Shepard, catnapped by Shepard's assistant, and became Parvo all over again when exposed to a prototype of the transdogmafier. The Groomer followed Parvo back in time and they again set into motion the events which occur in the first episode. (no explanation however, is given for Parvo's apparently cybernetic hand and leg, or why he would have had the need to reveal to Groomer that he was part cat if she was already aware of it due to the time paradox.) It remains unknown where the original cat that first became Parvo before being caught in the time paradox came from. There are hints of a possible romance between Parvo and Groomer throughout the series, though it is not quite as one sided as it appears to be with Hunter and Colleen, whose relationship (if any) appeared to have been kept kept off-screen.
  • The Groomer (Sheena Easton) – The Groomer is the equally nasty assistant to General Parvo. She's generally armed with a portable hair clipper, though she uses other equipment when appropriate. Groomer is, with only one brief exception, completely loyal to Parvo, though she is not above telling him to lighten up in one episode when he is barking orders at her. Groomer at one point proposed the idea of using the transdogmafier on cats, to which Parvo vehemently obejected. She split off from him in an attempt to start on her own quest for world conquest. Parvo later revealed to her that he was part cat (a fact which surprised the Groomer, despite the fact that she is the one who named Parvo during the events of the time paradox which set the events of the series into motion.), and followed him back in time when Parvo was accidentally returned to feline form and flung into the past.
  • Zachary Storm (Larry Drake) – A former soldier that was discharged from the army and wants revenge on the United States.
  • Gustav Havoc (George Dzundza) – An arms dealer that brought two neighboring countries to the brink of war just so he could make some money.
  • Donovan Bell – A heartless business man who steals and sells dogs for money, he supplied General Parvo with dogs so they could be mutated.

James Jonah Jim Cummings (born November 3, 1952[1] in Youngstown, Ohio) is an American voice actor. ... An ... Sheena Easton (born Sheena Shirley Orr on April 27, 1959, Bellshill, North Lanarkshire, Scotland) is a Scottish-American Grammy Award-winning pop singer and theatre & television actress. ... Larry Drake. ... George Dzundza (born July 19, 1945) is an actor who is best known for his role as Sgt. ...

Episodes

  1. Let's Hit The Road (7 September 1996) - The Road Rovers meet for the first time. (series premiere)
  2. Storm From The Pacific (14 September, 1996) - Disgraced Captain Zachary Storm seeks revenge on the United States for his court-martial.
  3. A Hair Of The Dog That Bit You (21 September, 1996) - Packs of werewolves take over London, and Exile seems to have gotten bitten (or scratched), which puts him under watch. Ultimately it turns out Colleen was the one who turned into a werewolf.
  4. Where Rovers Dare (12 October, 1996) - Eisneria and Katzenstok are preparing to go to war over an ancient scepter. This episode featured a reference to Disney at the end of the episode, complete with the silhouette of the head of Mickey Mouse.
  5. Let Sleeping Dogs Lie (26 October, 1996) - The Road Rovers must protect ancient artifacts from unknown ninjas (belonging to Parvo).
  6. Hunter's Heroes (2 November, 1996) - Parvo and his cano-mutants are at it again. This time, it's a high-tech, heavliy-armed concentration camp to keep thousands of dogs in captivity. This is for shipping armies of cano-mutants out to the major cities of the world so Parvo can take over militarily. The episode's title is likely a play on the old tv show Hogan's Heroes, which centered on American POWs held somewhyere in Nazi Germany.
  7. The Dog Who Knew Too Much (9 November, 1996) - One dog has the answers to a rash of human and canine kidnappings, and becomes a temporary Road Rover so he can testify. This episode's title is a play on the title "The Man Who Knew Too Much."
  8. Dawn Of The Groomer (16 November, 1996) - The Groomer gets delusions of grandeur involving taking over the world with cats, otherwise known as Felo-Mutants.
  9. Still A Few Bugs In The System (23 November, 1996) - Dr. Eugene Atwater does some research on the survival of bugs over the years of their survival. However, General Parvo turns his bugs for research into life-size giants using an attachment from his Cano-Mutator. Some of the bugs have their own plans for a nuclear winter.
  10. Reigning Cats and Dogs (1 February 1997) - General Parvo builds a successful time machine so that he could stop Prof. Shepherd from creating the Road Rovers. An accident reverts him back to his original form of an alley cat, but the Rovers still have to follow him back to ensure their creation. As with Hunter's Heroes and The Dog Who Knew Too Much, this episode's title featured a play on words, this time a reference to the old phrase 'raining cats and dogs'.
  11. Gold and Retrievers (8 February, 1997) - Gold begins to flood the world's markets at an alarming rate. The source is traced to South America, where a blind boy named Luca leads them to an ancient golden pyramid. The episode's title is a partial pun on Hunter's breed of dog, the golden retriever.
  12. Take Me To Your Leader (15 February, 1997) - Zachary Storm is back again, and some aliens are intent on making trouble.
  13. A Day In The Life (22 February, 1997) - A pretty ordinary day for the Road Rovers (doesn't look like it, though). (Series finale)

is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Jeffrey Katzenberg (born December 21, 1950 in New York City) is an American film producer and Chief Executive Officer of DreamWorks Animation SKG. He is perhaps most famous for his period as studio chairman at The Walt Disney Company, and for producing the movie Shrek (2001). ... Mickey Mouse is an Academy Award-winning comic animal cartoon character who has become an icon for The Walt Disney Company. ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hogans Heroes was an American television situation comedy that ran from September 17, 1965 to July 4, 1971 on the CBS network for 168 episodes. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Man Who Knew Too Much DVD cover The Man Who Knew Too Much is the name of two suspense films, one released in 1934 and the other in 1956, and both directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... Cats may refer to: Felines, members of the animal family Felidae The domesticated animal, cat The musical, yeah right, I bet that this was really dumb. ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... Nuclear winter is a hypothetical global climate condition that is predicted to be a possible outcome of a large-scale nuclear war. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... General Name, Symbol, Number gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 6, d Appearance metallic yellow Standard atomic weight 196. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... The Golden Retriever is a popular breed of dog, originally developed to retrieve downed fowl during hunting. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Trivia

  • The opening scenes of “A Hair of the Dog That Bit You” featured Prince Charles and Princess Diana finalizing their divorce before being attacked by werewolves. This was edited out of syndication following Diana’s death on 31 August 1997.
  • Two episodes featured a modified opening theme song that contained slightly different lyrics. Instead of commenting on their descriptions between lines, the Road Rovers get ready to sing in harmony.
  • In "The Dog That Knew Too Much", Hunter complains that Colleen's terms of affection could be considered as insubordination and could "demoralize the troops," possibly explaining why their alleged relationship was never confirmed or explored to any great length. However, this is conflicted by the fact that after she talked to him in "baby talk" he says, "That's better." Toward the end of the episode, he also seems to show some affection toward her after she gets on his hovercycle. Thus, viewers who insist that Hunter is not oblivious to Colleen's feelings for him and that the "relationship" is not one-sided are quick to point to this episode as an example of their point of view. However this argument appears to be both countered and supported by the events of the series finale A Day in the Life.
  • In A Day in the Life, the season and series finale, Blitz refers to Hunter having a new girlfriend after Colleen had been expressing a great deal of sadness and semi-jealousy over Hunter's quest to find his mother, suggesting that the two may have paired up as a romantic couple off camera. This leads some to ask, however, if Colleen would not have voiced her objections to the situation rather than suffering in silence when she, along with the other Rovers, believed that Hunter was looking for another girl. Of note, Blitz refers to Colleen thinking Hunter had a 'new' girlfriend, and says this directly to Hunter when he explains that the dog he'd been looking for was his mother, and that Colleen thought he was dumping her, indicating they were indeed involved. There was even a promo for a Christmas special in 1996 (which never aired)in which Hunter and Colleen declaired their love for one another and ended with Hunter proposing marriage. Unfortunately this epsiode, and the subsequesnt season two in which the wedding would have taken place, never aired.
  • Since this show has almost the same creators (and voice actors), they had Brain from Pinky and The Brain do a cameo appearance. In the end of "Take Me To Your Leader", an argument in a sanitarium erupted between Capt. Storm and Dr. Atwater about who would take over the world, and Brain (not shown), cries "No, it is I who should rule the world. YES!"
  • When "Let's Hit The Road" first aired the opening titles were actually played at the end of the show, right before the end titles. During the end credits different music was played, a sort of fusion-jazz version of the Road Rover theme.
  • The show was distributed internationally and was translated from English into German, Spanish, Arabic and Portuguese.
  • Fetch, Loud Kiddington's dog on Histeria!, bears a striking resemblance to Hunter. Fans accredit this to the fact that the show was worked on by Ruegger, and fans speculated that the Rovers as a unit, were intended to be guest-hosts for the show. This never happened, however.
  • The 12" action figure toy line K9 Corps bears a very strong resemblance to Road Rovers, story-wise.
  • Although they are a multi-national team and individually support their respective owners as seen in "Take Me To Your Leader," it is mentioned that they are listed as US operatives and backed by the United States Military in "Where Rovers Dare." The latter of these two seemingly contradictory facts may explain how all their equiptment is financed.

Prince Charles may refer to: Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, current heir-apparent to the British throne Any of the previous British royals named Charles, Prince of Wales The former Belgian regent, Prince Charles of Belgium This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... Diana, Princess of Wales (Diana Frances Mountbatten-Windsor, née Spencer) (1 July 1961–31 August 1997), commonly, but incorrectly, known as Princess Diana, was for fifteen years the wife of HRH The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales. ... Diana, Princess of Wales (Diana Frances Mountbatten-Windsor, née Spencer) (1 July 1961–31 August 1997), commonly, but incorrectly, known as Princess Diana, was for fifteen years the wife of HRH The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... Pinky and the Brain (sometimes abbreviated PatB or P&tB) are cartoon characters who have starred in the American animated television series Steven Spielberg Presents Animaniacs, Steven Spielberg Presents Pinky and the Brain, and Steven Spielberg Presents Pinky, Elmyra & the Brain. ... Loud Kiddington is a fictional character featured on the Warner Bros. ... Histeria! was an animated television series of the late-1990s, created by Tom Ruegger (who also created Tiny Toon Adventures, Animaniacs, and Pinky and the Brain) at Warner Bros. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ...

Goofs

Many drawing and computer errors occurred in this show. For example:

  • In "....Knew Too Much", when the bikers are after Sport (and the Rovers), Blitz, Colleen, Hunter & the volunteer Sport are in the Street Rover, Hunter is driving and Blitz is sitting in the back seat. In a quick scene, whle Colleen is talking to Sport, a Hunter-colored Blitz appears while Hunter (driving), is out of sight.
  • In Where Rovers Dare when the Rovers were riding the Sled Rovers, Hunter appears with Colleen's markings for a few frames.
  • In Where Rovers Dare the wolf that the Rovers helped is shown wearing a collar near the end of the episode.
  • In Let's Hit The Road when Blitz is in his normal canine form, a close up shows him wearing his armour.

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Road Rovers
  • Road Rovers at the Internet Movie Database.
  • Road Rovers at the Big Cartoon Database.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Road Rovers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2419 words)
The leader of the rovers is Hunter, a golden retriever mix from the United States.
The Rovers' boss is a scientist known as "The Master" who oversees their operations and supplies them with equipment from their subterranean headquarters.
One year prior to the formation of the Road Rovers, Professor Shepherd is attacked by a man named General Parvo, who demands the professor's experimental transdogmafier (a play on the term transmogrifier) technology in exchange for his pet dog.
CBUB Fights: Swatkats vs. Road Rovers (3223 words)
All that and one of the Road Rovers is British!
IIRC, Road Rovers was on the lower end of the shows that came out on the WB that were really good, but canceled way too quickly.
Granted, the Road Rovers have a support network while all the Swat Kats have is Commander Ferral saying "The Enforcers will handle this!" That aside, this battle is a bit of a cake walk for T-Bone and Razor.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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