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Encyclopedia > River Wye
River Wye and Lancat and Ban y Gore Nature Reserve
River Wye and Lancat and Ban y Gore Nature Reserve
The Wye at Hay-on-Wye
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The Wye at Hay-on-Wye
The Wye at Tintern
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The Wye at Tintern
This article is about the river that flows along the Anglo-Welsh border. See River Wye (disambiguation) for other rivers called Wye

The River Wye (Welsh: Afon Gŵy) is the sixth-longest river in the UK. Its source is in the Welsh mountains at Plynlimon at 741 metres above sea level. The total catchment area is 4,136 km². It flows through or past several towns and villages including Rhayader, Builth Wells, Hay-on-Wye, Hereford, Ross-on-Wye, Symonds Yat, Monmouth and Tintern. It finally meets the Severn estuary just below Chepstow. The Wye itself is a Site of Special Scientific Interest and one of the most important rivers in the UK for nature conservation. Much of the lower valley is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, and forms part of the border between England and Wales. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (9866x1689, 5498 KB) Beschreibung Description: River Wye and Lancaut and Ban y Gor Nature Reserve, Gloucestershire, UK. At this point, the River Wye is the border between England and Wales. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (9866x1689, 5498 KB) Beschreibung Description: River Wye and Lancaut and Ban y Gor Nature Reserve, Gloucestershire, UK. At this point, the River Wye is the border between England and Wales. ... Image File history File linksMetadata River_Wye_at_Hay-on-Wye. ... Image File history File linksMetadata River_Wye_at_Hay-on-Wye. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 304 KB) The village of Tintern in Monmouthshire, south-east Wales viewed from a disused railway bridge (now a footbridge) over the River Wye. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 304 KB) The village of Tintern in Monmouthshire, south-east Wales viewed from a disused railway bridge (now a footbridge) over the River Wye. ... The River Wye viewed from a former railway bridge with Tintern village in the background Tintern is a village on the River Wye in Monmouthshire, Wales, close to the border with England, at Grid reference SO530000. ... River Wye may refer to any one of three rivers in the United Kingdom: River Wye The major Welsh river rising on Plynlimon to the Severn River Wye, Derbyshire Flowing from Axe Edge Moor, Buxton to the Derbyshire Derwent River Wye, Buckinghamshire Flowing from the Chiltern Hills in Buckinghamshire down... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... This is a list of rivers of Great Britain. ... The source of a river, usually a lake or a spring, is the farthest point of a river from its estuary or confluence with another river. ... Motto: (Welsh for Wales for ever) Anthem: Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff Official language(s) English, Welsh Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Rhodri Morgan AM Unification    - by Gruffudd ap Llywelyn 1056  Area    - Total 20,779 km² (3rd... Mount McKinley (Denali) in Alaska (USA) has the highest visible base-to-summit elevation on Earth (approximately 5400 metres). ... Plynlimon (anglicised from Pumlumon in Welsh, meaning Five Peaks) is the highest point of the Cambrian Mountains in Wales. ... metre or meter, see meter (disambiguation) A metre or meter[1] (symbol: m) is a unit of length and the current base unit of length in the International System of Units (SI). ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Rhayader (Welsh: Rhaeadr Gwy) is a town in the traditional county of Radnorshire, Powys, mid Wales, lying on the River Wye. ... Builth Wells (Welsh: Llanfair ym Muallt) is a town in Powys, traditional county of Brecknockshire, mid Wales, lying on the River Wye. ... Second-hand bookshop at Hay-on-Wye Hay-on-Wye (Welsh: Y Gelli Gandryll or Y Gelli), often described as the town of books, is a market town in Brecknockshire, Wales, very close to the border with England, within the Brecon Beacons National Park. ... Hereford Cathedral Hereford (pronounced hÄ›r-É™-füd or hÄ›r-i-füd) Welsh: (pronounced Henforth) is a city in the west of England, close to the border with Wales and on the River Wye. ... Location within the British Isles. ... Symonds Yat is a village and popular tourist destination which straddles the River Wye in England. ... Monmouth (Welsh: Trefynwy) is a town in south Wales, county town of the traditional county of Monmouthshire. ... The River Wye viewed from a former railway bridge with Tintern village in the background Tintern is a village on the River Wye in Monmouthshire, Wales, close to the border with England, at Grid reference SO530000. ... The Severn is the name of a river in the United Kingdom. ... Estuaries and coastal waters are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth, providing numerous ecological, economic, cultural, and aesthetic benefits and services. ... Chepstow (Welsh language: Cas-gwent) is a border town straddling the Monmouthshire—Gloucestershire border, situated at the confluence of the River Wye and River Severn on the Severns west bank. ... A Site of Special Scientific Interest or SSSI is a conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom. ... Tintern Abbey in the Wye Valley, viewed from the Devils Pulpit near Tidenham The Wye Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) is an internationally important protected landscape area straddling the border between England and Wales. ... Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) is a United Kingdom. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi   - Water (%) Population...


The Wye is largely unpolluted and is therefore considered one of the best rivers for salmon fishing in the United Kingdom, outside of Scotland. It is also a popular river with canoeists due to the relatively slow flowing water, making it good for beginners and the rapids at Symonds Yat which are slightly more challenging. Walkers can enjoy the Wye Valley Walk which follows the route of the River Wye from Hay-on-Wye to Chepstow along a series of well maintained way-marked paths. Water pollution Pollution is the release of chemical, physical, biological or radioactive contaminants to the environment. ... The Chinook or King Salmon is the largest salmon in North America and can grow to 1. ... Motto: (Latin for No one provokes me with impunity)1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots2 Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I 843  Area    - Total 78... A canoe is a relatively small boat, typically human-powered, but also commonly sailed. ... Symonds Yat is a village and popular tourist destination which straddles the River Wye in England. ... Woman walking downstairs Walk redirects here. ... The Wye Valley Walk is a long distance footpath in Wales, from Chepstow in Monmouthshire to Rhayader in Powys, via Newtown, Presteigne and Builth Wells. ... Waymarking is a means by which people can catalog, mark, locate and log unique and interesting locations around the world. ...


The lower 16 miles of the river from Redbrook to Chepstow forms the border between England and Wales. A viewpoint near The Biblins on the Wye is known as 'Three counties view' as it is the meeting place of the counties of Herefordshire, Gloucestershire and Monmouthshire. Herefordshire is a traditional and ceremonial county and unitary district in the West Midlands region of England in the United Kingdom. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... Monmouthshire (Welsh: Sir Fynwy) is both a principal area and a traditional county in south-east Wales. ...

Contents


Tributaries

The Wyes tributaries include: the River Lugg, River Irfon, River Monnow, River Ithon, and River Llynfi. A tributary (or affluent or confluent) is a contributory stream, a river that does not reach the sea, but joins another major river (a parent river), to which it contributes its waters, swelling its discharge. ... The River Lugg rises near Presteigne, Wales (OS ref: 309649), then flows through Herefordshire, England, including the town of Leominster, to become a tributary of the River Wye, which it joins at Mordiford, 9 miles downstream of Hereford and 45 miles from its source. ... The River Monnow (Welsh: Afon Mynwÿ) flows through south-west Herefordshire, England and east Monmouthshire, Wales. ...

History

The river Wye has been navigable up to Monmouth at least since the early 14th century. It was improved from there to a short distance below Hereford by Sir William Sandys in the early 1660s with locks to enable vessels to pass weirs. According to Herefordshire Council Archaeology (http://www.smr.herefordshire.gov.uk/agriculture%20_industry/navigation_wye_twnfc.htm), these were flash locks, though there is disagreement over this. In any case, this work proved to be insufficiently substantial. In 1696, a further Act of Parliament authorised the County of Hereford to buy up and demolish the mills on the Wye and Lugg. All locks and weirs were removed, except that at New Weir Forge below Goodrich, which survived until about 1815. This was paid for by a tax on the County. Weirs removed all along the Wye in Herefordshire, making the river passable to the western boundary, and beyond it at least to Hay on Wye. A horse towing path was added in 1808, but only up to Hereford; previously as on the river Severn, barges were man-hauled. Money was spent several times improving the river Lugg from Leominster to its confluence with the Wye at Mordiford, but its navigation is likely to have been difficult. The Wye remained commercially navigable until the 1850s, when commercial traffic moved to railways. It is still used by pleasure craft. This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... William Sandys of Fladbury (1607 - 1669) was known as Waterworks Sandys to distinguish him from his cousin, the spendthrift Golden Sandys. His principal fame was as the waterworks engineer, who improved the River Avon, Warwickshire, England, and the River Wye, and who was involved in various ways in several other... Canal locks in England. ... Iron tapped from the blast furnace is pig iron, and contains significant amounts of carbon and silicon. ... Goodrich is the name of several places: In the United States: Goodrich, Michigan Goodrich, North Dakota Goodrich, Texas Goodrich, Wisconsin In the United Kingdom Goodrich, Herefordshire Goodrich may also refer to: The Goodrich Corporation - an American aerospace company, formerly known for tires and rubber Benjamin Goodrich - the founder of The... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Herefordshire is a traditional and ceremonial county and unitary district in the West Midlands region of England in the United Kingdom. ... Hay-on-Wye (Welsh: Y Gelli Gandryll or Y Gelli), often described as the town of books, is a market town in Brecknockshire, Wales. ... The Severn bridges crossing near the mouth of the River Severn The River Severn (Welsh: Afon Hafren) is the longest British river, at 354 kilometres (219 miles) long; it rises at an altitude of 610 metres on Plynlimon near Llanidloes, in the Cambrian Mountains, Mid Wales, and it passes through... Location within the British Isles For the town of Leominster, Massachusetts, see Leominster, Massachusetts. ... Mordiford is a village in Herefordshire on the B4224 Hereford to Mitcheldean road 4 miles east south east of the city of Hereford. ... // Events and Trends Technology Production of steel revolutionised by invention of the Bessemer process Benjamin Silliman fractionates petroleum by distillation for the first time First transatlantic telegraph cable laid First safety elevator installed by Elisha Otis Science Charles Darwin publishes The Origin of Species, putting forward the theory of evolution...


Further reading

I. Cohen, 'The non-tidal Wye and its navigation' Trans. Woolhope Nat. Fld. Club 34 (1955), 83-101; V. Stockinger, The Rivers Wye and Lugg Navigation: a documentary history 1555-1951 (Logaston Press 1996); P. King, 'The river Teme and other Midlands River Navigations' Journal of Railway and Canal Historical Society 35(50 (July 2006), 350-1.


Cultural References

The Romantic poet William Wordsworth includes an apostrophe to the Wye in his famous poem "Lines Written a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey" published 1798 in Lyrical Ballads William Wordsworth, English poet William Wordsworth (April 7, 1770 – April 23, 1850) was a major English romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped launch the Romantic Age in English literature with their 1798 joint publication, Lyrical Ballads. ... Apostrophe is a figure of speech consisting of speech directed in an abstract direction, to a person not present, or to a thing. ... Lyrical Ballads, 1798, was the flame that lit the English Romantic movement, its spark being that of the somewhat earlier William Blake. ...


O sylvan Wye! thou wanderer thro' the woods, / How often has my spirit turned to thee!


See also


This is a list of rivers of Great Britain. ...

River Severn, UK edit
Counties: Powys | Shropshire | Worcestershire | Gloucestershire | Flows into: Bristol Channel

Towns: Llanidloes | Newtown | Welshpool | Shrewsbury | Telford | Bridgnorth | Bewdley
Stourport | Worcester | Tewkesbury | Gloucester | Berkeley | Chepstow | Bristol
The Severn bridges crossing near the mouth of the River Severn The River Severn (Welsh: Afon Hafren) is the longest British river, at 354 kilometres (219 miles) long; it rises at an altitude of 610 metres on Plynlimon near Llanidloes, in the Cambrian Mountains, Mid Wales, and it passes through... Powys is a local government principal area and a preserved county in Wales. ... Shropshire (abbreviated Salop or Shrops) is a traditional, ceremonial and administrative county in the West Midlands region of England. ... Worcestershire (pronounced ; abbreviated Worcs) is a county located in the West Midlands region of central England. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... The location of the Bristol Channel The Severn Bridge and Bristol Channel, looking northwestward from England towards Wales The Bristol Channel coast at Ilfracombe, North Devon, looking west towards Lee Bay The Bristol Channel is a major inlet in the island of Great Britain, separating South Wales from South West... {{|Population= 2314 |Place= Llanidloes |Council= Powys |Traditional= Montgomeryshire |Ceremonial= Powys |Constituency= Montgomeryshire |PostalTown= LLANIDLOES |PostCode= SY18 |DiallingCode= +44-1686 (4) |GridReference= SN954844 |OldMapsYear= 1891 |OldMapsEasting= 295500 |OldMapsNorthing= 284500 |OldMapsCounty= 10montg511 |Police= Dyfed-Powys Police }} Llanidloes is a town in Powys, traditional county of Montgomeryshire, mid Wales. ... Newtown (Welsh: Y Drenewydd) is a town with a population of 10,542 (1993) lying on the River Severn in mid Wales. ... Welshpool (Welsh: Y Trallwng) is a town in eastern-mid Wales, only 4 miles (6 km) from the border with England. ... Shrewsbury (pronounced either /ˈʃɹuːzbɹiː/ or /ˈʃɹəʊzbɹiː/) is a town of 70,059 [1] in Shropshire, England. ... This article is about the British town. ... Map sources for Bridgnorth at grid reference SO7193 High Town from the River Severn Bridgnorth is a town in Shropshire, England, at grid reference SO717929. ... Location within the British Isles Load Street, Bewdley Bewdley is a small town in Worcestershire, England. ... Stourport-on-Severn, often shortened to Stourport, is a town in Worcestershire, England, with a population of 19,713 (2001 Census). ... The city of Worcester (pronounced ) is a city and the county town of Worcestershire in England. ... Location within the British Isles The Tewkesbury War Memorial, locally known as the Cross Tewkesbury is a historic town in Gloucestershire, England. ... Gloucester (pronounced ) is a city and district in south-west England, close to the Welsh border. ... Location within the British Isles. ... Chepstow (Welsh language: Cas-gwent) is a border town straddling the Monmouthshire—Gloucestershire border, situated at the confluence of the River Wye and River Severn on the Severns west bank. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Greater Bristol. ...


Major tributaries: Rea Brook | River Perry | River Tern | River Vyrnwy | River Stour | River Teme | Upper Avon | Lower Avon | River Wye The Rea Brook is a minor river that begins at Marton Pool, near the Shropshire/Wales border and runs north, past the villages of Minsterley and Pontesbury, to Shrewsbury, where it joins the much larger River Severn. ... The River Perry is a river in Shropshire, England. ... The River Tern is a river in Shropshire, England. ... The River Vyrnwy is a river in the United Kingdom. ... The Stour is a river in Worcestershire. ... The River Teme rises in mid-Wales south of Newtown, Powys and flows through Ludlow in Shropshire, then between Tenbury Wells, Worcestershire and Burford, Shropshire on its way to join the River Severn south of Worcester. ... The River Avon or Avon is a river in or adjoining the counties of Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, Warwickshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire in the midlands of England. ... The Avon Gorge and Clifton Suspension Bridge The River Avon is a river in the south west of England. ...


Linked canals: Staffordshire and Worcestershire | Birmingham and Worcester | Droitwich
Herefordshire and Gloucestershire | Thames and Severn | Coalport | Gloucester and Sharpness
The Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal is a canal in the Midlands of England, passing through Staffordshire and Worcestershire. ... The Worcester and Birmingham Canal is a canal linking Birmingham and Worcester in England. ... The Droitwich Canal is a synthesis of two canals; the Droitwich Barge Canal and the Droitwich Junction Canal, in England. ... The Herefordshire and Gloucestershire Canal (sometimes known as the Hereford and Gloucester Canal) is a canal in the south west of England, passing through Herefordshire and Gloucestershire. ... The Thames and Severn Canal is a canal in the south of England, linking the River Thames to the River Severn, via Cricklade and Stroudwater. ... The Coalport Canal is a historic canal built to link several coalport industries with the River Severn. ... The Gloucester and Sharpness Canal is a canal in the south west of England, between Gloucester and Sharpness. ...


Major crossings: Welsh Bridge | English Bridge | Ironbridge | Severn Tunnel | Severn crossing (Severn Bridge) The Welsh Bridge is a bridge in Shrewsbury which crosses the River Severn. ... The English Bridge is a bridge which crosses the River Severn in Shrewsbury, Shropshire. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Ironbridge. ... The approach to the tunnel. ... The Severn crossing is generally used to refer to two river crossings over the River Severn between England and Wales. ... For the Ontario community, see Severn Bridge, Ontario. ...

Longest UK rivers: 1. Severn 2. Thames 3. Trent 4. Aire 5. Great Ouse 6. Wye 7. Tay 8. Spey 9. Nene 10. Clyde 11. Tweed 12. Eden

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Aspen Wye River Conference Centers - Marriot Conference Centers (323 words)
The site, sections of which were once known as the Wye Plantation, was donated to the Aspen Institute by Mr.
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At Aspen Wye River, ideas have been known to flow as easily as the river.
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The river that defined the 'cult of the picturesque', the Wye carves its way through stunning borderland scenery attracting canoeists, sight-seers and walkers in equal measure.
The River Wye is born on the slopes of Plynlimon and carves its way through mid-Wales and the Marches until it reaches the River Severn 153 miles later.
Wye trows (similar to the types of boats found on the River Severn), group-pulled boats, fishing boats, coracles and even a steam tug have come down this river.
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