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Encyclopedia > River Teme
River Teme (Tefaidd)
The River Teme at Ludlow, Shropshire
Countries Wales, England
Regions Powys &, Shropshire, Worcestershire
Major cities Beguildy, Knighton, Powys, Ludlow, Tenbury Wells, Worcester
Length 130 km (81 mi)
Source Dolfor
 - location Kerry Hills, Radnorshire, Powys, Wales
 - coordinates 52°28′18″N, 3°19′28″W
 - elevation 506 m (1,660 ft)
Mouth Confluence with River Severn
 - location Powick, Worcestershire, England
 - coordinates 52°09′48″N, 2°14′44″W
 - elevation 14 m (46 ft)

The River Teme rises in mid-Wales south of Newtown, Powys and flows through Ludlow in Shropshire, then between Tenbury Wells, Worcestershire and Burford, Shropshire on its way to join the River Severn south of Worcester. The whole of the River Teme was designated as an SSSI, by English Nature, in 1996. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1053x700, 528 KB) Summary Taken by myself in 2005. ... Feathers Hotel, Ludlow A view of Ludlow market, which is situated in Castle Square, taken from the tower of St Laurences Church. ... Shropshire (alternatively Salop or abbreviated Shrops) is an English county in the West Midlands region of the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the country. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... Shropshire (alternatively Salop or abbreviated Shrops) is an English county in the West Midlands region of the United Kingdom. ... Worcestershire (pronounced ; abbreviated Worcs) is a county located in the West Midlands region of central England. ... Beguildy is a village in mid Wales. ... For other places with the same name, see Knighton (disambiguation). ... Feathers Hotel, Ludlow A view of Ludlow market, which is situated in Castle Square, taken from the tower of St Laurences Church. ... The Pump Rooms Tenbury Wells is a small scenic market town in Worcestershire, England, lying on the south bank of the River Teme. ... Worcester (pronounced ) is a city in the Midlands of England, and the county town of Worcestershire. ... km redirects here. ... A mile is a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including Imperial units, United States customary units and Norwegian/Swedish mil. ... Kerry is a small village in Powys, mid-Wales. ... Radnorshire (Welsh: Sir Faesyfed) is an inland traditional county of Wales, bounded to the north by Montgomeryshire and Shropshire, to the east by Herefordshire, to the south by Brecknockshire and to the west by Cardiganshire. ... Powys is a local government principal area and a preserved county in Wales. ... This article is about the country. ... The or meter (see spelling differences) is a measure of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... “Severn” redirects here. ... Powick is a village in Worcestershire, England close to the River Teme. ... Worcestershire (pronounced ; abbreviated Worcs) is a county located in the West Midlands region of central England. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... The or meter (see spelling differences) is a measure of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the country. ... Newtown town centre Newtown (Welsh: ) is a town with a population of 10,541 (1993) lying on the River Severn in Mid Wales. ... Feathers Hotel, Ludlow A view of Ludlow market, which is situated in Castle Square, taken from the tower of St Laurences Church. ... Shropshire (alternatively Salop or abbreviated Shrops) is an English county in the West Midlands region of the United Kingdom. ... The Pump Rooms Tenbury Wells is a small scenic market town in Worcestershire, England, lying on the south bank of the River Teme. ... Worcestershire (pronounced ; abbreviated Worcs) is a county located in the West Midlands region of central England. ... Shropshire (alternatively Salop or abbreviated Shrops) is an English county in the West Midlands region of the United Kingdom. ... “Severn” redirects here. ... The city of Worcester (pronounced Wuh-ster) is the county town of Worcestershire in England; the river Severn runs through the middle, with the citys large Worcester Cathedral overlooking the river. ... A Site of Special Scientific Interest or SSSI is a conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom. ... English Nature is the United Kingdom government agency that promotes the conservation of wildlife, geology and wild places throughout England. ...

Contents

Geography

The river source is on Cilfaesty Hill in the Kerry Hills near Dolfor and south of Newtown. Two other rivers - the River Ithon and the River Mule - rise within 500 metres. It flows across the border into England close to Knighton. From there to its confluence with the River Severn, at Worcester (about 60 miles/100 km downstream) it flows through Herefordshire, Shropshire and Worcestershire. The upper reaches of the river are usually steep with fast flowing but relatively shallow waters. There are some mills, and a number of weirs, including several at Ludlow. Below Tenbury the river is more tranquil but still quite shallow, with strong cross currents. Water levels in the Teme are highly variable, something which has been made worse in recent years through increases in water extraction for agriculture use.[1] Kerry is a small village in Powys, mid-Wales. ... Newtown town centre Newtown (Welsh: ) is a town with a population of 10,541 (1993) lying on the River Severn in Mid Wales. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Herefordshire is a historic and ceremonial county and unitary district (known as County of Herefordshire) in the West Midlands region of England. ... Shropshire (alternatively Salop or abbreviated Shrops) is an English county in the West Midlands region of the United Kingdom. ... Worcestershire (pronounced ; abbreviated Worcs) is a county located in the West Midlands region of central England. ...


During its journey the river flows over Upper Ludlow shales and Devonian sandstones. Shale Shale is a fine-grained sedimentary rock whose original constituents were clays or muds. ... Artists illustration of a Devonian scene. ... Red Sandstone in Wyoming Layered sandstone Sandstone is an arenaceous sedimentary rock composed mainly of feldspar and quartz and varies in colour (in a similar way to sand), through grey, yellow, red, and white. ...


The River Clun flows into the Teme at Leintwardine, Herefordshire. The Ledwyche Brook flows into the Teme at Burford, Shropshire. The Kyre Brook flows into the Teme at Tenbury Wells. The River Rea flows into the Teme at Newnham Bridge, Worcestershire, a few miles south of Cleobury Mortimer, Shropshire, and the River Corve flows into the Teme just outside Ludlow.
The river falls nearly 500 metres during its length from a height of 506 metres above sea level at its source to just 14 metres above sea-level at its confluence with the river Severn. The River Clun is a river in South Shropshire which runs through the small town of Clun, as well as Newcastle upon Clun and other villages in this very rural area. ... Location within the British Isles. ... Herefordshire is a historic and ceremonial county and unitary district (known as County of Herefordshire) in the West Midlands region of England. ... Burford is a village and civil parish in the South Shropshire district of Shropshire, England. ... The Pump Rooms Tenbury Wells is a small scenic market town in Worcestershire, England, lying on the south bank of the River Teme. ... The River Rea is a small river that flows through South Shropshire, England and passes through the town of Cleobury Mortimer, before entering the River Teme in Worcestershire. ... Worcestershire (pronounced ; abbreviated Worcs) is a county located in the West Midlands region of central England. ... Cleobury Mortimer Cleobury Mortimer (pronounced Clib-bury Mort-imer) is a small rural market town in Shropshire, England. ... Shropshire (alternatively Salop or abbreviated Shrops) is an English county in the West Midlands region of the United Kingdom. ... Feathers Hotel, Ludlow A view of Ludlow market, which is situated in Castle Square, taken from the tower of St Laurences Church. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ...


Nature

otters
otters

The Teme is a clean river and after many years of decline the population of otters is recovering[2] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Binomial name Lutra lutra (Linnaeus, 1758) The European Otter, Lutra lutra, is a European member of the Mustelidae or weasel family, and is typical of freshwater otters. ...


Obstructions keep salmon numbers at a low or negigible level[3]. Illustration of a male Coho Salmon The Chinook or King Salmon is the largest salmon in North America and can grow to 1. ...


Recreational use

Canoeing

A Countryside Agency report in September 2003 entitled Improving access for canoeing on inland waterways: A study of the feasibility of access agreements stated: The Countryside Agency in England is a statutory body with the task of improving the quality of the rural environment and the lives of those living in it. ...

There are no formal access agreements for canoeing on the Teme. However, unlawful canoeing does occur and there are many claims about the resulting conflict. As a result of its character, the demand for canoeing is seasonal, when there is enough water in the river, and is more in the upper reaches where the faster water can be found. However, this part of the river is also the most valuable for fishing, with riparian owners keen to protect their interests and prevent canoeing, on the grounds that the Teme is not suited to canoeing under any circumstances. While there is probably less conflict below Tenbury, there is also less interest in canoeing, and probably less opportunity, given the water levels.[1]

Information on canoeing on the Teme in the Ludlow area is available at http://www.ukriversguidebook.co.uk/teme.htm - information on the Tenbury Wells to Broadwas area is available at http://www.ukriversguidebook.co.uk/temetenbury.htm


Fishing

Fishing is popular on many stretches of the Teme, with its barbel fishing being particularly noted. Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ... The barbel[1] (Barbus barbus)[2] is a species of freshwater fish in the Cyprinidae family (minnows and carps) of the order Cypriniformes (Carps). ...


Coracles

Leintwardine held its 11th annual coracle regatta in June 2005. For 2006 the event moved to Mortimer's Cross. An account of the 2005 event, with pictures, is available at http://www.coracle-fishing.net/leintwardine-2005/index.htm Location within the British Isles. ... Coracle: Ku-Dru or Kowa of Tibet—Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago A coracle is a primitive type of boat. ... Combatants House of York House of Lancaster Commanders Edward, Earl of March Owen Tudor†, Jasper Tudor Strength Unknown Unknown Casualties Unknown Unknown The Battle of Mortimers Cross was fought on February 2, 1461 near Wigmore, Herefordshire (between Hereford and Leominster, by the River Lugg). ...


Boating

Rowing boats are available for hire from The Linney Park, Ludlow - see http://www.visitsouthshropshire.co.uk/ludlow.htm - which includes a picture of boating on the Teme. Feathers Hotel, Ludlow A view of Ludlow market, which is situated in Castle Square, taken from the tower of St Laurences Church. ...


Navigability

See navigability for definition. A body of water, such as a river, canal or lake, is navigable if it is deep and wide enough for a vessel to pass and there are no obstructions, like rocks, trees and low bridges. ...

River Teme at Ludlow
River Teme at Ludlow

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 613 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): River Teme Metadata... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 613 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): River Teme Metadata... Feathers Hotel, Ludlow A view of Ludlow market, which is situated in Castle Square, taken from the tower of St Laurences Church. ...

Leisure boating

Undoubtedly, small boats have long been used on the river. For example:

  • Old maps show a few boat houses along the river in Worcestershire.[2]
  • Billings Directory 1855 mentions Boat House, evidently a farmhouse, at Eastham (five miles downstream of Tenbury Wells). [3] Boat House Farm still exists at Eastham [4]
  • The boathouse at Newnham Bridge (three miles downstream of Tenbury Wells) was large enough, and substantial enough, to be converted into a house. [4]
  • At Tenbury Wells in 1886, people were rescued during floods using a boat that had broken loose from its mooring so there must have been at least one boat on the river at that time.[5]
  • Down Along Temeside includes an account of travelling by boat from Ludford Mill to Orleton (a couple of miles upstream of Stanford Bridge) in the early 20th century.[6]
  • Tenbury Wells and the Teme Valley includes a photograph taken at Little Hereford described as 'Boating on the Teme in 1905'. The author mentions two gentlemen from Oxford who in 1894 travelled up the Teme from Worcester to Ludlow in 17.5 hours, and returned (downstream) in 9 hours.[7]

Commercial navigation

There is no doubt that the final 1.5 miles from Powick Mill to its confluence with the river Severn that the Teme is navigable. There was a coal wharf near Powick Bridge, belonging with the mill, whose owner had the right to use a towing path to the river Severn. In the 18th century, pig iron was brought up the river to Powick forge (as the mill then was).[8] Powick is a village in Worcestershire, England close to the River Teme. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... Metung Wharf on Bancroft Bay, Gippsland Lakes, Victoria, Australia A wharf is a fixed platform, commonly on pilings, roughly parallel to and alongside navigable water, where ships are loaded and unloaded. ... Pig iron is raw iron, the immediate product of smelting iron ore with coke and limestone in a blast furnace. ... Iron tapped from the blast furnace is pig iron, and contains significant amounts of carbon and silicon. ...


There are two opposing views as to whether the river Teme was navigable by boats carrying cargo above Powick Mill for more than short distances. Undoubtedly, navigation would have been very convenient for the ironmasters at Bringewood Ironworks, but the proponents of navigation have not been able to bring forward any unequivocal documentary or archaeological evidence of its use. They allege that there were flashlocks to to enable vessels to pass mill weirs, as on the river Thames, but adduce no evidence of any, or of actual voyages. Early locks were designed with a single gate, known as a flash lock. ... A watermill is a machine constructed by connecting a water wheel to a pair of millstones. ... The bridge and weir mechanism at Sturminster Newton on the River Stour, Dorset. ... The Thames (pronounced //) is a river flowing through southern England, and one of the major waterways in England. ...


In 1999 Colin Green claimed that traffic on the Teme began in Roman times and 'continued in Norman times, when it is known the stone for the mill at Ashford Carbonel was brought from Caen in the 14th century, using water transport all the way'.[9] However no earlier published source for this claim has been provided.


William Sandys (who improved the Avon) was at the same time also authorised to improve the Teme, but there is no evidence that he did so, having used up all his resources on the Avon. Having failed to recover the Avon after the Restoration, Sir William Sandys and his son undertook work on the Wye and Lugg.[10] William Sandys of Fladbury (1607 - 1669) was known as Waterworks Sandys to distinguish him from his cousin, the spendthrift Golden Sandys. His principal fame was as the waterworks engineer, who improved the River Avon, Warwickshire, England, and the River Wye, and who was involved in various ways in several other... The River Avon or Avon is a river in or adjoining the counties of Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, Warwickshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire in the midlands of England. ...


The only indication of any commercial use of vessels above Powick is a single newspaper advertisement in 1750 that the miller at Stanford on Teme had a boat for sale, capable of carrying 10 tons.[11] Unless locks had been installed, this could not have operated over any great distance, as a boat of this size would have been unable to pass mill weirs. Evidence that has been offered in support of navigability at Ludlow consists of certain paintings (thought to date from c.1830) which show a river with boats.[12] It is not clear if these paintings show Ludlow as it actually was, or if they were at least partly derived from the artist's imagination.


In an article published in March 2006 in the Journal of Railway and Canal Historical Society, Pat Jones, reviewing the evidence, asserts that the Teme was navigable above Powick.[13] However in an article published in the same journal in July 2006 Peter King refutes this and writes that evidence of substantial commercial use of the river as a navigable waterway above Powick is minimal.[14]


Cultural influences

In valleys of springs of rivers
By Ony and Teme and Clun
The country for easy livers
The quietest under the sun – A. E. Housman

Alfred Edward Housman (March 26, 1859 – April 30, 1936), usually known as A.E. Housman, was an English poet and classical scholar, now best known for his cycle of poems A Shropshire Lad. ...

External links

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b Wendy Thompson Improving access for canoeing on inland waterways: A study of the feasibility of access agreements for the Countryside Agency September 2003
  2. ^ Ordnance Survey, six-inch maps (1st edition), various: accessible on [1].
  3. ^ Billings Directory lists "Eckley Vincent, farmer, Boat House" at Eastham in 1855.
  4. ^ http://www.malvernhills.gov.uk/documents/pdf/A%20-%20Mins%20061004.pdf
  5. ^ F. Wayland Joyce, Tenbury - Some Record of its History (1931)
  6. ^ Richard Holding, Down Along Temeside (1963).
  7. ^ Howard Miller, Tenbury Wells and the Teme Valley (1996).
  8. ^ H. Lloyd, The Quaker Lloyds in the Industrial Revolution (1975), 148-50.
  9. ^ Colin Green. Severn Traders, Black Dwarf Publications (1999), ISBN 0953302822. p.33.
  10. ^ I. Cohen 'The non-tidal Wye and its navigation' Transactions of the Woolhope Naturalists Field Club 34 (1955), 83-101; P. King, 'The River Teme and Other Midlands Navigations' Journal of Railway and Canal Historical Society 35(5) (July 2006), 350-1.
  11. ^ C. Hadfield, Canals of the West Midlands (1969), 58-9.
  12. ^ A painting allegedly of Dinham Bridge, Ludlow.
  13. ^ Pat Jones 'Navigation on the river Teme' Journal of Railway and Canal Historical Society 35(4) (Mar. 2006), 293-300.
  14. ^ Peter King 'The River Teme and Other Midland Navigations' Journal of Railway and Canal Historical Society 35(5) (July 2006), 348-55. Correspondence about this also appears in the two subsequent issues.


The Countryside Agency in England is a statutory body with the task of improving the quality of the rural environment and the lives of those living in it. ...

River Severn, UK edit
Counties: Montgomeryshire | Shropshire | Worcestershire | Gloucestershire | Monmouthshire | Bristol | Somerset | Flows into: Bristol Channel

Towns: Llanidloes | Newtown | Welshpool | Shrewsbury | Ironbridge | Bridgnorth | Bewdley
Stourport | Worcester | Tewkesbury | Gloucester | Berkeley | Chepstow | Bristol
“Severn” redirects here. ... Montgomeryshire (Welsh: Sir Drefaldwyn) is an inland traditional county of Wales. ... Shropshire (alternatively Salop or abbreviated Shrops) is an English county in the West Midlands region of the United Kingdom. ... Worcestershire (pronounced ; abbreviated Worcs) is a county located in the West Midlands region of central England. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... Monmouthshire (Welsh: ) is both a historic county and principal area in south-east Wales. ... View from Cumberland Basin of the Clifton Suspension Bridge and the Avon Gorge Bristol (IPA: ) is a city, unitary authority and ceremonial county in South West England, 115 miles (185 km) west of London. ... Somerset is a county in the south-west of England. ... The location of the Bristol Channel The Severn Bridge and Bristol Channel, looking northwestward from England towards Wales The Bristol Channel coast at Ilfracombe, North Devon, looking west towards Lee Bay The Bristol Channel is a major inlet in the island of Great Britain, separating South Wales from South West... {{|Population= 2314 |Place= Llanidloes |Council= Powys |Traditional= Montgomeryshire |Ceremonial= Powys |Constituency= Montgomeryshire |PostalTown= LLANIDLOES |PostCode= SY18 |DiallingCode= +44-1686 (4) |GridReference= SN954844 |OldMapsYear= 1891 |OldMapsEasting= 295500 |OldMapsNorthing= 284500 |OldMapsCounty= 10montg511 |Police= Dyfed-Powys Police }} Llanidloes is a town in Powys, traditional county of Montgomeryshire, mid Wales. ... Newtown town centre Newtown (Welsh: ) is a town with a population of 10,541 (1993) lying on the River Severn in Mid Wales. ... Welshpool Town Hall Welshpool (Welsh: ) is a town in Powys, Wales, only 4 miles (6 km) from the border with England. ... Shrewsbury (pronounced either or ) is a town of 70,560 inhabitants [1] in Shropshire, England. ... The village, seen from the bridge Ironbridge is a settlement beside the River Severn, at the heart of the Ironbridge Gorge in Shropshire, England. ... High Town from the River Severn Bridgnorth is a town in Shropshire, England, at grid reference SO717929, along the Severn Valley. ... Bewdley ( pronunciation) is a small town in Worcestershire, England, along the Severn Valley a few miles to the west of Kidderminster. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Worcester (pronounced ) is a city in the Midlands of England, and the county town of Worcestershire. ... Location within the British Isles The Tewkesbury War Memorial, locally known as the Cross Tewkesbury is a historic town in Gloucestershire, England. ... Gloucester (pronounced ) is a city and district in the English county of Gloucestershire, close to the Welsh border. ... Berkeley (pronounced ) is a town between the south bank of the River Severn and the M5 motorway in Gloucestershire, England, at grid reference ST685992. ... Chepstow or the ham sandwch is my teacher Mr. ... View from Cumberland Basin of the Clifton Suspension Bridge and the Avon Gorge Bristol (IPA: ) is a city, unitary authority and ceremonial county in South West England, 115 miles (185 km) west of London. ...


Major tributaries: Rea Brook | River Perry | River Tern | River Vyrnwy | River Stour | River Teme | Upper Avon | Lower Avon | River Wye The Rea Brook is a minor river that begins at Marton Pool, near the Shropshire/Wales border and runs north, past the villages of Minsterley and Pontesbury, to Shrewsbury, where it joins the much larger River Severn. ... The River Perry is a river in Shropshire, England. ... The River Tern is a river in Shropshire, England. ... The River Vyrnwy is a river in the United Kingdom. ... The Stour is a river in Worcestershire, Staffordshire and West Midlands, England. ... The River Avon or Avon is a river in or adjoining the counties of Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, Warwickshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire in the midlands of England. ... The Avon Gorge and Clifton Suspension Bridge The River Avon is a river in the south west of England. ... River Wye and Lancat and Ban y Gore Nature Reserve The Wye at Hay-on-Wye The Wye at Tintern This article is about the river that flows along the Anglo-Welsh border. ...


Linked canals: Staffordshire and Worcestershire | Worcester and Birmingham | Droitwich
Herefordshire and Gloucestershire | Thames and Severn | Coalport | Gloucester and Sharpness
The Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal is a canal in the Midlands of England, passing through Staffordshire and Worcestershire. ... The Birmingham and Worcester Canal is a canal linking Birmingham and Worcester in England. ... The Droitwich Canal is a synthesis of two canals; the Droitwich Barge Canal and the Droitwich Junction Canal, in England. ... The Herefordshire and Gloucestershire Canal (sometimes known as the Hereford and Gloucester Canal) is a canal in the south west of England, passing through Herefordshire and Gloucestershire. ... The Thames and Severn Canal is a canal in the south of England, linking the River Thames to the River Severn, via Cricklade and Stroudwater. ... The Coalport Canal is a historic canal built to link several coalport industries with the River Severn. ... The Gloucester and Sharpness Canal is a canal in the south west of England, between Gloucester and Sharpness. ...


Major crossings: Welsh Bridge | English Bridge | The Iron Bridge | Severn Bridge | Severn Tunnel | Second Severn Crossing | Aust Severn Powerline Crossing | (All crossings) The Welsh Bridge is a bridge in Shrewsbury which crosses the River Severn. ... The English Bridge is a bridge which crosses the River Severn in Shrewsbury, Shropshire. ... The Iron Bridge The Iron Bridge The Iron Bridge The Iron Bridge crosses the River Severn at the Ironbridge Gorge, by the village of Ironbridge, in Shropshire, England. ... For the Ontario community, see Severn Bridge, Ontario. ... The approach to the tunnel. ... The Severn Bridge (Welsh: Pont Hafren) and the Second Severn Crossing (Welsh: Ail Groesfan Hafren) are two large bridges crossing the River Severn between England and Wales. ... The pylon on the English side of the river, photographed from the Severn Bridge Aust Severn Powerline Crossing is the longest powerline span in the UK with a span width of 1618 metres. ... This is a lists some of the crossings of the River Severn in Great Britain, in order from source to mouth. ...

Longest UK rivers: 1. Severn 2. Thames 3. Trent 4. Great Ouse 5. Wye 6. Tay 7. Spey 8. Nene 9. Clyde 10. Tweed 11. Eden 12. Dee

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