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Encyclopedia > River Clyde
Coordinates: 55°40′N 5°′W / <span class="geo-dec geo" title="Maps, aerial photos, and other data for 55.667 Expression error: Unexpected < operator">55.667, Expression error: Unexpected < operator
River Clyde (Gaelic: Abhainn Chluaidh)
River
The River Clyde, looking eastwards upstream, as it passes beneath the Kingston Bridge in Central Glasgow.
Country Scotland
Counties South Lanarkshire, Argyll, Ayrshire
Cities Lanark, Glasgow, Bothwell, Greenock
Landmarks Falls of Clyde, Bothwell Castle, Firth of Clyde
Source Lowther Hills in South Lanarkshire
 - coordinates 55°24′4″N 3°39′10″W / 55.40111, -3.65278
Mouth Firth of Clyde
 - coordinates 55°40′N 5°′W / <span class="geo-dec geo" title="Maps, aerial photos, and other data for 55.667 Expression error: Unexpected < operator">55.667, Expression error: Unexpected < operator
Length 176 km (109 mi)
Basin 4,000 km² (1,544 sq mi)

The River Clyde (Gaelic: Abhainn Chluaidh, pronounced [avɪɲˈxɫ̪uəj]) is a major river in Scotland. It is the eighth longest river in the United Kingdom, and the third longest in Scotland. Flowing through the major city of Glasgow, it was an important river for shipbuilding and trade in the British Empire. Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 710 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: River Clyde Kingston Bridge, Glasgow ... Kingston Bridge, looking eastward up the River Clyde The Kingston Bridge is a road bridge crossing the River Clyde in Glasgow, Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ... South Lanarkshire (Siorrachd Lannraig a Deas in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, covering the southern part of the traditional county of Lanarkshire. ... Argyll, archaically Argyle (Airthir-Ghaidheal in Gaelic, translated as [the] East Gael, or [the] East Irish), sometimes called Argyllshire, is a traditional county of Scotland. ... Ayrshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Àir in Scottish Gaelic) is a region of south-west Scotland, located on the shores of the Firth of Clyde. ... This article describes the town in Scotland. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Bothwell is a small town in South Lanarkshire, Scotland, that lies on the right bank of the River Clyde, adjacent to Hamilton and nine miles east-south-east of Glasgow. ... For other uses, see Greenock (disambiguation). ... Falls of Clyde is the only surviving iron-hulled, four-masted full rigged ship, and the only surviving sail-driven oil tanker, in the world. ... The Donjon seen from the Great Hall Bothwell Castle is a large medieval castle sited on a high steep bank above a bend in the River Clyde between Uddingston and the small town of Bothwell in Lanarkshire, Scotland, about 10 miles (16 km) south of Glasgow. ... Map of the Firth of Clyde and area The Seamill beach looks south down the outer firth towards southern Arran and Ailsa Craig. ... South Lanarkshire (Siorrachd Lannraig a Deas in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, covering the southern part of the traditional county of Lanarkshire. ... Map of the Firth of Clyde and area The Seamill beach looks south down the outer firth towards southern Arran and Ailsa Craig. ... “km” redirects here. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ... For other uses, see River (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Men from Francisco de Orellanas expedition building a small brigantine, the San Pedro, to be used in the search for food Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ... It has been suggested that Commerce be merged into this article or section. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ...

Contents

Course

The Clyde is formed by the confluence of two streams, the Daer Water (the headwaters of which are dammed to form the Daer Reservoir) and the Potrail Water. The Southern Upland Way crosses both streams before they meet at Watermeetings (grid reference NS953131) to form the River Clyde proper. At this point the Clyde is only six miles (10 km) from Tweed's Well, the source of the River Tweed and eight miles from the Devil's Beef Tub, the source of the River Annan. Opened in 1984, the Southern Upland Way is a 212 mile (340 km) coast to coast walk in Scotland between Portpatrick in the west and Cockburnspath in the east. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... There are other rivers with this name: see Tweed River The River Tweed at Abbotsford, near Melrose The River Tweed at Coldstream The River Tweed (156 kilometres or 97 miles long) flows primarily through the Borders region of Scotland. ... The Devils Beef Tub and the monument to John Hunter The Devils Beef Tub is a deep, dramatic hollow in the hills north of the Scottish town of Moffat. ... The River Annan flows from Moffat, in South West Scotland, past the town of Lockerbie, and to the sea in the fishing town of Annan. ...

New Lanark Mill Hotel and Waterhouses by River Clyde
New Lanark Mill Hotel and Waterhouses by River Clyde

From there it snakes northeastward before turning to the west, its flood plain used for many major roads in the area, until it reaches the town of Lanark. On the banks of the Clyde, Victorian industrialists David Dale and Robert Owen built their mills and the model settlement of New Lanark. The mills harness the power of the Falls of Clyde, the most spectacular of which is Cora Linn. A hydroelectric power station still generates electricity here, although the mills are now a museum and World Heritage Site. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 104 KB) Summary New Lanark World Heritage village in Scotland. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 104 KB) Summary New Lanark World Heritage village in Scotland. ... New Lanark is a village on the River Clyde, approximately two kilometres from the Royal Burgh of Lanark, in South Lanarkshire, Scotland. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Floodplain. ... For other uses, see Road (disambiguation). ... This article describes the town in Scotland. ... David Dale, (1739 - 1806) is a remarkable example of the fluidity of Scottish society in the 18th century. ... For other uses, see Robert Owen (disambiguation). ... New Lanark is a village on the River Clyde, approximately two kilometres from the Royal Burgh of Lanark, in South Lanarkshire, Scotland. ... Corra Linn in full spate For the only surviving iron-hulled, full rigged ship, and the only surviving sail-driven oil-tanker in the world, see Falls of Clyde. ... Hydroelectric dam diagram The waters of Llyn Stwlan, the upper reservoir of the Ffestiniog Pumped-Storage Scheme in north Wales, can just be glimpsed on the right. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...

The River Clyde opening out at Newark Castle, Port Glasgow past Clydeport Ocean Terminal, Greenock, to the Firth of Clyde on the left, and to the right past Ardmore Point to the Gare Loch.
The River Clyde opening out at Newark Castle, Port Glasgow past Clydeport Ocean Terminal, Greenock, to the Firth of Clyde on the left, and to the right past Ardmore Point to the Gare Loch.

From New Lanark, the river turns northwest, before it is joined by the River Avon and flows into the West of Scotland conurbation. Between the towns of Motherwell and Hamilton the course of the river has been altered to create the artificial loch within Strathclyde Park. Part of the original course can still be seen, and lies between the island and the east shore of the loch. The river then flows through Blantyre and Bothwell, where the ruined Bothwell Castle stands on a defensible promontory. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 522 pixelsFull resolution (2154 × 1406 pixel, file size: 176 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 522 pixelsFull resolution (2154 × 1406 pixel, file size: 176 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Renaissance mansion of Newark Castle as seen from the west is linked to the original 15th century tower house to the left . ... For other uses, see Greenock (disambiguation). ... Map of the Firth of Clyde and area The Seamill beach looks south down the outer firth towards southern Arran and Ailsa Craig. ... The Gare Loch should not be confused with the Loch Gairloch or the village of Gairloch. ... A conurbation is an urban area comprising a number of cities, towns and villages which, through population growth and expansion, have physically merged to form one continuous built up area. ... , For the former parliamentary constituency, see Motherwell (UK Parliament constituency). ... , The county town of Lanarkshire, Hamilton is situated in west central Scotland and serves as the main administrative centre of the South Lanarkshire council area. ... Strathclyde Loch, looking north Strathclyde Country Park is a country park located in Hamilton, South Lanarkshire and Motherwell, Scotland. ... This article is about the location in Scotland. ... Bothwell is a small town in South Lanarkshire, Scotland, that lies on the right bank of the River Clyde, adjacent to Hamilton and nine miles east-south-east of Glasgow. ... The Donjon seen from the Great Hall Bothwell Castle is a large medieval castle sited on a high steep bank above a bend in the River Clyde between Uddingston and the small town of Bothwell in Lanarkshire, Scotland, about 10 miles (16 km) south of Glasgow. ...


Past Uddingston and into the southeast of Glasgow the river begins to widen, meandering a course through Rutherglen and Dalmarnock. Flowing past Glasgow Green, the river is artificially straightened and widened through the centre, and although a footbridge now hinders access to the traditional Broomielaw, seagoing ships can still come upriver as far as Finnieston where the PS Waverley docks. From there, it flows past the shipbuilding heartlands, through Govan, Partick, Whiteinch, Scotstoun and Clydebank, all of which housed major shipyards, of which only two remain. The river flows out west of Glasgow, past Renfrew, and under the Erskine Bridge past Dumbarton on the north shore to the sandbank at Ardmore Point between Cardross and Helensburgh. Oppposite, on the south shore, the river continues past the last Lower Clyde shipyard at Port Glasgow to Greenock where it reaches the Tail of the Bank as the river merges into the Firth of Clyde. Uddingston is a village in South Lanarkshire, Scotland, on the north side of the River Clyde, approximately seven miles to the south-east of Glasgow. ... Rutherglen (An Ruadh Ghleann in Scottish Gaelic) is a town bordering on the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Dalmarnock is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... McLennan Arch at the north-west entrance to Glasgow Green Glasgow Green situated in the east end of the city on the north bank of the River Clyde, is the oldest park in Glasgow dating back to the 15th century. ... Finnieston is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... PS Waverley steaming down the Firth of Clyde - additional views at Image:PS Waverley off Brodick castle 1989. ... Govan (Baile a Ghobhainn in Gaelic) is a district and former burgh in the southwestern part of the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Bilingual sign in Gaelic and English at Partick railway station, Glasgow. ... Whiteinch is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Scotstoun is a district of Glasgow, Scotland, west of Glasgow City Centre. ... Clydebank (Bruach Chluaidh in Gaelic) is a town in West Dunbartonshire, Scotland, lying on the north bank of the river Clyde. ... Small shipyard in Klaksvík (Faroe Islands), reparing fishing vessels Fish ladder and shipyard in Grave, the Netherlands Construction hall of Schichau Seebeck Shipyard, Bremerhaven Gdynia Shipyard Shipyards and dockyards are places which repair and build ships. ... Renfrew (Rinn Friù in Scottish Gaelic) is a small town, located six miles west of Glasgow on the west coast of Scotland. ... The Erskine Bridge is a box girder bridge spanning the River Clyde in west central Scotland, connecting West Dunbartonshire with Renfrewshire. ... Dumbarton (Dùn Breatainn in Scottish Gaelic) is a burgh in Scotland, lying on the north bank of the River Clyde where the River Leven flows into the Clyde estuary. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... For the suburb of Wollongong in Australia, see Helensburgh, New South Wales. ... Port Glasgow is a burgh in Inverclyde, Scotland on the River Clyde. ... For other uses, see Greenock (disambiguation). ... Looking north from Greenock over the Tail of the Bank today, the cranes of the container terminal can be seen to the right, while on the other side of the Firth of Clyde the waters of the Gare Loch are just visible beyond the tail of the Rosneath peninsula. ... Map of the Firth of Clyde and area The Seamill beach looks south down the outer firth towards southern Arran and Ailsa Craig. ...


Industrial growth

The Clyde flowing through Glasgow. The Finnieston Crane on the left is seen as a lasting symbol of the industrial heritage of the Clyde.
The Clyde flowing through Glasgow. The Finnieston Crane on the left is seen as a lasting symbol of the industrial heritage of the Clyde.

The success of the Clyde at the beginning of the Industrial Revolution was driven by the location of Glasgow, being a port facing the Americas. Tobacco and cotton trade began the drive in the early 18th century. However, the shallow Clyde was not navigable for the largest ocean-going ships and cargo had to be transferred at Greenock or Port Glasgow to smaller ships to sail into Glasgow itself. The River Clyde flowing through central Glasgow in Scotland. ... The River Clyde flowing through central Glasgow in Scotland. ... The Finnieston Crane is a crane and landmark in Glasgow, Scotland. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... For other uses, see Port (disambiguation). ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America[1] and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... This article is about transported goods. ...


In 1768 John Golborne advised the narrowing of the river and the increasing of the scour by the construction of rubble jetties and the dredging of sandbanks and shoals. A particular problem was the division of the river into two shallow channels by the Dumbuck shoal near Dumbarton. After James Watt's report on this in 1769, a jetty was constructed at Longhaugh Point to block off the southern channel; this being insufficient, a training wall called the Lang Dyke was built in 1773 on the Dumbuck shoal to stop water flowing over into the southern channel. In the late 18th and early 19th centuries hundreds of jetties were built out from the banks between Dumbuck and the Broomielaw quay in Glasgow itself. In some cases this resulted in an immediate deepening as the constrained water flow washed away the river bottom, in others dredging was required.[1][2][3] Dumbarton (Dùn Breatainn in Scottish Gaelic) is a burgh in Scotland, lying on the north bank of the River Clyde where the River Leven flows into the Clyde estuary. ... For other persons named James Watt, see James Watt (disambiguation). ...


In the mid-19th century engineers took on a much greater dredging of the Clyde, removing millions of cubic metres of silt to deepen and widen the channel. The major stumbling block in the project was a massive volcanic plug known as Elderslie Rock. It would be the 1880s before work was finally complete. The completion of the dredging was well-timed, as steelworking grew in the city, the channel finally became navigable all the way up to Glasgow. Shipbuilding replaced trade as the major activity on the river and shipbuilding companies were establishing themselves on the river at an exponential rate. Soon, the Clyde gained a reputation for being the best location for shipbuilding in the British Empire, and grew to become the worlds pre-eminent shipbuilding centre. Clydebuilt became an industry benchmark of quality, and the river’s shipyards were given contracts for prestigious ocean-going liners as well as warships, including the Queen Mary and the Queen Elizabeth 2 in later years, all built in the town of Clydebank. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Silt (disambiguation). ... // Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Queen Mary 1936 RMS Queen Mary is an ocean liner that sailed the North Atlantic Ocean from 1936 to 1967 for Cunard Line (then Cunard White Star Line). ... RMS Queen Elizabeth 2 (QE2) is a Cunard Line ocean liner named after the earlier Cunard liner RMS Queen Elizabeth. ... Clydebank (Bruach Chluaidh in Gaelic) is a town in West Dunbartonshire, Scotland, lying on the north bank of the river Clyde. ...


Shipbuilding decline

Although diminished from its early 20th century heights, shipbuilding remains an important industry on Clydeside.

The downfall of the Clyde as a major industrial centre came during and post-World War II. Clydebank in particular was targeted by the Luftwaffe and sustained heavy damage. The immediate post war period saw a severe reduction in warship orders which was balanced by a prolonged boom in merchant shipbuilding. By the end of the 1950s, however, the rise of other shipbuilding nations, recapitalised and highly productive, made many European yards uncompetitive. Many Clydeside yards booked a series of loss-making contracts in the hope of weathering the storm. However by the mid-1960s, shipbuilding on the Clyde was becoming increasingly uneconomic and potentially faced collapse. This culminated in the closure of Harland and Wolff's Linthouse yard and a bankruptcy crisis facing Fairfields of Govan. The Government responded by creating the Upper Clyde Shipbuilders consortium. After the consortium's controversial collapse in 1971, the Labour government of James Callaghan later passed the Aircraft and Shipbuilding Industries Act which nationalised most of the Clyde's shipyards and grouped them with other major British shipyards as British Shipbuilders. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (850 × 567 pixel, file size: 193 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (850 × 567 pixel, file size: 193 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Deutsche Luftwaffe or   (German: air force, IPA: ) is the commonly used term for the German air force. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Harland and Wolff Heavy Industries began as a shipyard located in Belfast. ... Upper Clyde Shipbuilders was a group which amalgamated the major shipbuilders of the River Clyde, Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Aircraft and Shipbuilding Industries Act 1977 nationalised large parts of the UK aerospace and shipbuilding industries and established two corporations, British Aerospace and British Shipbuilders. ... Small shipyard in Klaksvík (Faroe Islands), reparing fishing vessels Dockyards and shipyards are places which repair and build ships. ... British Shipbuilders was a public corporation that owned and managed the UK shipbuilding industry from 1977 to 1986. ...


Today, two major shipyards remain in operation on the Upper Clyde; they are owned by the Global defence contractor, BAE Systems Naval Ships, who focus principally upon the design and construction of technologically advanced warships for the Royal Navy and other navies around the world. These are the former Yarrow yard at Scotstoun and Fairfields / Govan Shipbuilders at Govan. There is also the King George V Dock, operated by the Clyde Port Authority. On the Lower Clyde, the privately owned Ferguson Shipbuilders at Port Glasgow is the last survivor of the many shipyards that once dominated Port Glasgow and Greenock - its mainstay being the construction of car ferries. Launch of HMS Daring from BAEs Scotstoun Shipyard. ... Yarrow Shipbuilders Limited (YSL) was a major British shipyard, now part of BAE Systems Marine which also includes the nearby Govan shipyard and the former VSEL yard in Barrow. ... Scotstoun is a district of Glasgow, Scotland, west of Glasgow City Centre. ... The Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Limited was a British shipbuilding company in the famous Govan area on the Clyde in Scotland. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... King George V Dock is a dock for ocean-going vessels located near Braehead in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Ferguson Shipbuilders Limited is a shipyard located in Port Glasgow on the River Clyde in Scotland. ... Port Glasgow is a burgh in Inverclyde, Scotland on the River Clyde. ... For other uses, see Greenock (disambiguation). ... A train ferry is a ship designed to carry railway vehicles. ...


Development of tourism

However, Clydeside has gained new draws to replace the once dominant shipbuilding industry. Market gardens and garden centres have grown up on the fertile plains of the Clyde Valley. Tourism has also brought many back to the riverside, especially in Glasgow where former docklands have given way to housing and amenities on the banks in the city, for instance, the Glasgow Harbour project, the Glasgow Science Centre, and the creation of the Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre. With the migration of the commercial Port of Glasgow downstream to the deeper waters of the Firth of Clyde, the river has been extensively cleaned up, once having a very poor reputation for pollution and sewage, in order to make it suitable for recreational use. In agriculture, market gardening is the relatively small-scale production of fruits, vegetables and flowers as cash crops, frequently sold directly to consumers and restaurants. ... A garden centre is a retail firm that sells plants and products related to gardens as its primary business. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Floodplain. ... The River Clyde, looking eastwards upstream, as it passes beneath the Kingston Bridge. ... Tourist redirects here. ... Glasgow Harbour is an urban regeneration scheme at Partick in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Glasgow Science Centre and the Glasgow Tower The Glasgow Science Centre is a major science and technology museum located in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The front of the SECC The Clyde Auditorium with the main SECC building behind it The Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre (SECC), located on the north bank of the River Clyde in Glasgow, is Scotlands national venue for public events. ... Map of the Firth of Clyde and area The Seamill beach looks south down the outer firth towards southern Arran and Ailsa Craig. ... Sewage is the mainly liquid waste containing some solids produced by humans which typically consists of washing water, faeces, urine, laundry waste and other material which goes down drains and toilets from households and industry. ...

Ferguson Shipbuilders Limited is a shipyard located in Port Glasgow on the River Clyde in Scotland. ... Lithgows, Limited, was a British shipbuilding company based in Kingston, Port Glasgow, on the River Clyde in Scotland. ... Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Company Limited, often referred to simply as Scotts, were a British shipbuilding company based in Greenock, Scotland, on the River Clyde. ... Alexander Stephen and Sons Limited, often referred to simply as Alex Stephens or just Stephens, was a Scottish shipbuilding company based in Linthouse, Govan in Glasgow, on the River Clyde. ... The Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Limited was a British shipbuilding company in the famous Govan area on the Clyde in Scotland. ... Harland and Wolff Heavy Industries began as a shipyard located in Belfast. ... Yarrow Shipbuilders Limited (YSL) was a major British shipyard, now part of BAE Systems Marine which also includes the nearby Govan shipyard and the former VSEL yard in Barrow. ... Seawind Barclay Curle is a British shipbuilding company. ... Charles Connell and Company was a British shipbuilding company based in Scotstoun, Govan in Glasgow on the River Clyde. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... William Denny and Brothers Limited, often referred to simply as Denny, were a British shipbuilding company based in Dumbarton, Scotland, on the River Clyde. ... HMS Indefatigable being launched at Clydebank. ... Lobnitz Marine Holdings is a British shipbuilding company located at Renfrew in Scotland. ... William Beardmore and Company was a Scottish Engineering and Shipbuilding company based in Glasgow. ...

Gallery

See also

There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Clyde Walkway is a 40 mile [65 kilometre] foot and cycle path which runs from the centre of Glasgow, Scotland to the UNESCO World Heritage village of New Lanark. ... This is a list of rivers of Great Britain. ... Red Clydeside is a term used to describe the era of political radicalism that characterised the city of Glasgow in Scotland, United Kingdom, and urban areas around the city on the banks of the River Clyde. ... Corra Linn in full spate For the only surviving iron-hulled, full rigged ship, and the only surviving sail-driven oil-tanker in the world, see Falls of Clyde. ... Map of the Firth of Clyde and area The Seamill beach looks south down the outer firth towards southern Arran and Ailsa Craig. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Clydesdale may mean or refer to: Clydesdale, the former local government district of the Strathclyde region of Scotland Clydesdale, the former constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom Clydesdale, the constituency of the Scottish Parliament The Clydesdale Bank The Clydesdale breed of horse Clydesdale... Location of Faslane and RNAD Coulport Faslane Naval Base, HMNB Clyde Her Majestys Naval Base (HMNB) Clyde (HMS Neptune), is one of three operating bases for the Royal Navy (the others being HMNB Devonport and HMNB Portsmouth). ... For other uses, see Paisley (disambiguation). ...

References

  1. ^ "Glasgow". Encyclopedia Britannica 12. (1911). 84. Retrieved on 2007-05-10. 
  2. ^ Riddell, John F [1999]. "Improving the Clyde: the eighteenth century phase", in Goodman, David (ed): The European Cities and Technology Reader. London: Routledge in association with the Open University, 57-63. ISBN 0415200822. 
  3. ^ Making the Clyde. Best Laid Schemes. Retrieved on 2007-05-10.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • River Clyde waterfront regeneration
  • Gallery of pictures of the River Clyde from the Erskine Bridge
  • Glasgow Digital Library: Glimpses of old Glasgow
  • In Glasgow Photo Gallery of pictures of the River Clyde
  • Clydebank Restoration Trust - Pictures and history
  • Clyde Bridges Heritage Trail
South Lanarkshire (Siorrachd Lannraig a Deas in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, covering the southern part of the traditional county of Lanarkshire. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 19th  - Total 470 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Motherwell ISO 3166-2 GB-NLK ONS code 00QZ Demographics Population Ranked 4th  - Total (2006) 323,800  - Density 689 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics North Lanarkshire Council http://www. ... The City of Glasgow Council (Mòr-bhaile Ghlaschu in Gaelic) is one of the 32 Scottish unitary authorities, formerly Glasgow District Council and Glasgow Corporation in Glasgow, Scotland. ... West Dunbartonshire (Siorrachd Dhùn Bhreatainn an Iar in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority areas in Scotland. ... Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority regions in Scotland. ... For other uses, see Inverclyde (disambiguation). ... Location Geography Area Ranked 2nd  - Total 6,909 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Lochgilphead ISO 3166-2 GB-AGB ONS code 00QD Demographics Population Ranked 23rd  - Total (2005) 90,870  - Density 13 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Argyll & Bute Council http://www. ... Map of the Firth of Clyde and area The Seamill beach looks south down the outer firth towards southern Arran and Ailsa Craig. ... The North Channel is the stretch of water which separates Ireland from Scotland. ... Abington is a town in the Scottish council region of South Lanarkshire close to the M74 motorway, marking the point where it changes name to the A74(M). ... New Lanark is a village on the River Clyde, approximately two kilometres from the Royal Burgh of Lanark, in South Lanarkshire, Scotland. ... This article describes the town in Scotland. ... , For the village in England, see Wishaw, Warwickshire Wishaw (Scots Wishae) is a large town and former burgh in North Lanarkshire, Scotland. ... , For the former parliamentary constituency, see Motherwell (UK Parliament constituency). ... , The county town of Lanarkshire, Hamilton is situated in west central Scotland and serves as the main administrative centre of the South Lanarkshire council area. ... Bothwell is a small town in South Lanarkshire, Scotland, that lies on the right bank of the River Clyde, adjacent to Hamilton and nine miles east-south-east of Glasgow. ... Uddingston is a village in South Lanarkshire, Scotland, on the north side of the River Clyde, approximately seven miles to the south-east of Glasgow. ... Rutherglen (said: Rhu-ther-glehn) comes from the Gaelic An Ruadh Ghleann - the red valley. Rutherglen is a town located within the south-eastern suburbs of the city of Glasgow, Scotland near the town of Cambuslang. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Renfrew (Rinn Friù in Scottish Gaelic) is a small town and former royal burgh in the Renfrewshire region of Scotland (see main article on the town of Renfrew, Scotland). ... Clydebank (Bruach Chluaidh in Gaelic) is a town in West Dunbartonshire, Scotland, lying on the north bank of the river Clyde. ... Bearsden (pronounced Bears den []) is a suburb located in the northwestern outskirts of the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Dumbarton (Dùn Breatainn in Scottish Gaelic) is a burgh in Scotland, lying on the north bank of the River Clyde where the River Leven flows into the Clyde estuary. ... Port Glasgow is a burgh in Inverclyde, Scotland on the River Clyde. ... For other uses, see Greenock (disambiguation). ... For the suburb of Wollongong in Australia, see Helensburgh, New South Wales. ... Gourock (Guireag in Scottish Gaelic which means pimple shaped or rounded hill in reference to the many hills surrounding the area,) is a burgh in Inverclyde, Scotland. ... Dunoon, looking North from the Castle hill with the old Victorian pier to the right and The Queens Hall on the left The Holy Loch seen across the Firth of Clyde with Dunoon on the left The PS Waverley leaves Dunoon Pier, to sail up the Firth of Clyde. ... Confluence of Rhine and Mosel at Koblenz In geography, a confluence describes the point where two rivers meet and become one, usually when a tributary joins a more major river. ... Douglas Water is a small village in Lanarkshire, Scotland. ... The River Avon Water is a river in Scotland and a tributary of the River Clyde. ... The South Calder Water is a river in Scotland. ... The North Calder Water is a river in North Lanarkshire, Scotland. ... The River Cart is a tributary of the River Clyde, Scotland, which it joins from the west roughly midway between Erskine and Renfrew. ... The Kelvin is Glasgows second river after the River Clyde. ... The River Leven is a stretch of water in West Dunbartonshire, Scotland, flowing from Loch Lomond in the North to the River Clyde in the South. ... Kingston Bridge, looking eastward up the River Clyde The Kingston Bridge is a road bridge crossing the River Clyde in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Clyde Arc is a road bridge spanning the River Clyde in west central Scotland, connecting Finnieston, near the Clyde Auditorium and SECC with Pacific Quay and Glasgow Science Centre in Govan. ... The Erskine Bridge is a box girder bridge spanning the River Clyde in west central Scotland, connecting West Dunbartonshire with Renfrewshire. ... This is a list of rivers of Great Britain. ... “Severn” redirects here. ... This article is about the River Thames in southern England. ... For other uses see Trent River. ... For other Rivers named Ouse, see Ouse The River Great Ouse is a river in the east of England. ... River Wye and Lancat and Ban y Gore Nature Reserve The Wye at Hay-on-Wye The Wye at Tintern This article is about the river that flows along the Anglo-Welsh border. ... The River Tay looking eastwards from Perth The River Tay, in terms of flow (193 kilometres or 120 miles), is the longest river in Scotland. ... The River Spey is a river in Scotland that runs 107 miles (172 km) to the Moray Firth at Spey Bay, making it the second longest river in Scotland. ... There are other rivers with this name: see Tweed River The River Tweed at Abbotsford, near Melrose The River Tweed at Coldstream The River Tweed (156 kilometres or 97 miles long) flows primarily through the Borders region of Scotland. ... The River Nene is a river in the east of England. ...

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River Clyde - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1084 words)
The River Clyde (Cluaidh in Scottish Gaelic) is a major river in Scotland.
The Clyde rises in the Lowther Hills in South Lanarkshire.
The success of the Clyde at the beginning of the Industrial Revolution was driven by the location of Glasgow, being a port facing the Americas.
River Clyde - definition of River Clyde in Encyclopedia (164 words)
The River Clyde flows from its source in the "Lead Hills" area of lowland Scotland to its mouth near Glasgow at the Firth of Clyde, where it flows into the North channel of the Irish Sea.
The Clyde Valley near New Lanark is particularly fertile, and home to many tomato greenhouses and garden centres, as well as being a magnet for tourists.
The Clyde is also well-known for its shipbuilding which has declined in recent years, but saw the launch of such well-known ocean liners as the Queen Mary and the Queen Elizabeth 2.
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