FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "River" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > River
Blackwood River, Western Australia
Blackwood River, Western Australia
This bridge across the Danube River links Hungary with Slovakia.
This bridge across the Danube River links Hungary with Slovakia.

A river is a natural stream of water, usually freshwater, flowing toward the ocean, a lake, or another stream. In some cases a river flows into the ground or dries up completely before reaching another body of water. Usually larger streams are called rivers while smaller streams are called creeks, brooks, rivulets, rills, and many other terms, but there is no general rule that defines what can be called a river. Sometimes a river is said to be larger than a creek,[1] but this is not always the case.[2] ÁŘŤ♣ Look up river in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 426 KB)The Mária Valéria bridge, connecting Esztergom in Hungary with Štúrovo in Slovakia, constructed 2001. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 426 KB)The Mária Valéria bridge, connecting Esztergom in Hungary with Štúrovo in Slovakia, constructed 2001. ... Length 2,888 km Elevation of the source 1,078 m Average discharge 30 km before Passau: 580 m³/s Vienna: 1,900 m³/s Budapest: 2,350 m³/s just before Delta: 6,500 m³/s Area watershed 817,000 km² Origin Black Forest (Schwarzwald-Baar, Baden- Württemberg, Germany... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 2. ... The Woronora River (also known as The Wonnie) flows North from Helensburg into the Georges River at Como. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Butchers Creek, Omeo, Victoria A stream, brook, beck, burn or creek, is a body of water with a detectable current, confined within a bed and banks. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... Fresh water redirects here. ... Animated map exhibiting the worlds oceanic waters. ... For other uses, see Lake (disambiguation). ...


A river is a component of the water cycle. The water within a river is generally collected from precipitation through surface runoff, groundwater recharge (as seen at baseflow conditions / during periods of lack of precipitation) and release of stored water in natural reservoirs, such as a glacier. The movement of water around, over, and through the Earth is called the water cycle. ... Runoff flowing into a stormwater drain Surface runoff is water, from rain, snowmelt, or other sources, that flows over the land surface, and is a major component of the water cycle[1][2]. Runoff that occurs on surfaces before reaching a channel is also called overland flow. ... Groundwater is water located beneath the ground surface in soil pore spaces and in the fractures of lithologic formations. ... Perito Moreno Glacier Patagonia Argentina Aletsch Glacier, Switzerland Icebergs breaking off glaciers at Cape York, Greenland This article is about the geological formation. ...

Contents

Origins of river water

The youthful Tambo River flowing over a slight change in topography
The youthful Tambo River flowing over a slight change in topography
The beginning of a mountain river (Reichenbach in Grosse Scheidegg)
The beginning of a mountain river (Reichenbach in Grosse Scheidegg)

A river may have its source in a spring, lake, from damp, boggy landscapes where the soil is waterlogged, from glacial melt, or from surface runoff of precipitation. Almost all rivers are joined by other rivers and streams termed tributaries, the highest of which are known as headwaters. Water may also originate from groundwater sources. Throughout the course of the river, the total volume transported downstream will often be a combination of the free water flow together with a substantial contribution flowing through sub-surface rocks and gravels that underlie the river and its floodplain (called the hyporheic zone). For many rivers in large valleys, this unseen component of flow may greatly exceed the visible flow. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1067, 311 KB) Tambo River, East Gippsland, Victoria, Australia File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): River Wikipedia:Australian Wikipedians notice board User:Khat Wordsmith/images ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1067, 311 KB) Tambo River, East Gippsland, Victoria, Australia File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): River Wikipedia:Australian Wikipedians notice board User:Khat Wordsmith/images ... Tambo River The Tambo River is a River in Gippsland Victoria, Australia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3264x2448, 2959 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): River Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3264x2448, 2959 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): River Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... The beginning of the Reichenbach river Grosse Scheidegg (el. ... River Wey near its source at Farringdon, Hampshire Headstream is the origin of water flow that initiates the subject watercourse. ... A natural spring on Mackinac Island in Michigan. ... For other uses, see Lake (disambiguation). ... Lütt-Witt Moor, a bog in Henstedt-Ulzburg in northern Germany. ... Loess field in Germany Surface-water-gley developed in glacial till, Northern Ireland For the American hard rock band, see SOiL. For the System of a Down song, see Soil (song). ... Waterlogging is a verbal noun meaning the saturation of such as ground or the filling of such as a boat with water. ... Runoff flowing into a stormwater drain Surface runoff is water, from rain, snowmelt, or other sources, that flows over the land surface, and is a major component of the water cycle[1][2]. Runoff that occurs on surfaces before reaching a channel is also called overland flow. ... Look up tributary in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... River Wey near its source at Farringdon, Hampshire Headstream is the origin of water flow that initiates the subject watercourse. ... Groundwater is water located beneath the ground surface in soil pore spaces and in the fractures of lithologic formations. ... The hyporheic zone is a region beneath and lateral to a stream bed, where there is mixing of shallow groundwater and surface water. ...


From their source, rivers flow downhill, typically terminating in a sea or in a lake, through a confluence. In arid areas rivers sometimes end by losing water to evaporation. River water may also infiltrate into the soil or pervious rock, where it becomes groundwater. Excessive abstraction of water for use in industry, irrigation, etc., can also cause a river to dry before reaching its natural terminus. This article is about the body of water. ... Confluence of Rhine and Mosel at Koblenz In geography, a confluence describes the point where two rivers meet and become one, usually when a tributary joins a more major river. ... In general terms, the climate of a locale or region is said to be arid when it is characterized by a severe lack of available water, to the extent of hindering or even preventing the growth and development of plant and animal life. ... Vaporization redirects here. ... Infiltration is the process by which water on the ground surface enters the soil. ... pervious in geography is where a rock allows water to pass through via its joints rather than porous which is where water is allowed to pass through pores an example of this is carboniferous limestone, which is pervious and thus water seeps through the joints giving rise to sink and... Groundwater is water located beneath the ground surface in soil pore spaces and in the fractures of lithologic formations. ... Water abstraction is the process of taking water from the environment for irrigation or treatment to produce drinking water. ...


The mouth, or lower end, of a river is known as its base level. The area drained by a river and its canals is called catchment, catchment basin, drainage basin or watershed. The term "watershed" is also used to mean a boundary between catchments, which is also called a water divide, or in some cases, continental divide. The base level of a river or stream is the lowest point to which it can flow, often referred to as the mouth of the river. ... A drainage basin is the area within the drainage basin divide (blue outline), and drains the surface runoff and river discharge (green lines) of a contiguous area. ... Main European water divides (red lines) separating catchments (gray regions). ... A continental divide is a line of elevated terrain which forms a border between two watersheds such that water falling on one side of the line eventually travels to one ocean or body of water, and water on the other side travels to another, generally on the opposite side of...


Topography

The water in a river is usually confined to a channel, made up of a stream bed between banks. In larger rivers there is also a wider flood-plain shaped by flood-waters over-topping the channel. Flood plains may be very wide in relation to the size of the river channel. This distinction between river channel and flood-plain can be blurred especially in urban areas where the flood-plain of a river channel can become greatly developed by housing and industry. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (992x653, 1435 KB) satellite image of mouths of amazon river in brazil File links The following pages link to this file: Amazon River ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (992x653, 1435 KB) satellite image of mouths of amazon river in brazil File links The following pages link to this file: Amazon River ... This article is about the river. ... In physical geography, a channel is the physical confine of a river, slough or ocean strait consisting of a bed and banks. ... The bed of this stream is made up of rocks, some very rounded (having had a longer life in the stream) and some not. ... The bed of this stream is made up of rocks, some very rounded (having had a longer life in the stream) and some not. ...


The river channel itself typically contains a single stream of water but some rivers flow as several interconnecting streams of water, producing a braided river. Extensive braided rivers are found in only a few regions worldwide, such as the South Island of New Zealand. They also occur on peneplains and some of the larger river deltas. Anastamosing rivers are similar to braided rivers. They have multiple sinuous channels carrying large volumes of sediment. Due to the dynamics of this type of system, they are also quite rare. The speedy deletion of this page is contested. ... Canisteo River Valley from Pinnacle State Park The distant peaks at the same elevation represent the remnants of a peneplain that was uplifted to form the Allegheny Plateau, which is a dissected plateau in southwestern NY. In this area, the sharp relief that is seen on some of the Allegheny...


A river flowing in its channel is a source of energy which acts on the river channel to change its shape and form. In mountainous torrential zones this can be seen as erosion channels through hard rocks and the creation of sands and gravels from the destruction of larger rocks. In U shaped glaciated valleys, the subsequent river valley can often easily be identified by the V shaped channel that it has carved. In the middle reaches where the river may flow over flatter land, loops (meanders) may form through eroding of the river banks and deposition on the inside of bends. Sometimes the river will cut off a loop, shortening the channel and forming an oxbow lake or billabong. Rivers that carry large amounts of sediment may develop conspicuous deltas at their mouths, if conditions permit. Rivers, whose mouths are in saline tidal waters, may form estuaries. Although the following classes are a useful way to visualize rivers, there are many other factors at work. Gradient is controlled largely by tectonics, but discharge is controlled largely by climate and sediment load is controlled by various factors including climate, geology in the headwaters, and the stream gradient. For other uses, see Meander (disambiguation). ... For morphological image processing operations, see Erosion (morphology). ... Songhua River, northeast China. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Nile River delta, as seen from Earth orbit. ... This article is about tides in the Earths oceans. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Río de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ...

Leisure activities on the River Avon at Avon Valley Country Park, Keynsham, Bristol, England. A boat giving trips to the public passes a moored private boat.
Leisure activities on the River Avon at Avon Valley Country Park, Keynsham, Bristol, England. A boat giving trips to the public passes a moored private boat.

The straight-line distance from the beginning to the end of most rivers is about one third their actual length.[3][4] The Avon Gorge and Clifton Suspension Bridge The River Avon is a river in the south west of England. ... Keynsham (pronounced CANE-shm), is a town between Bristol and Bath in south west England. ... This article is about the English city. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Brazos River, originally called, the Rio Brazos de Dios which can be translated as The River of Gods Arms. is the 11th longest river in the United States at 2060 km (1280 miles) from its source of Blackwater Draw, Curry County, New Mexico[1] to its mouth at... The Trinity River is the longest tributary of the Klamath River, approximately 130 mi (209 km) long, in northwestern California in the United States. ... This article is about the Spanish river. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Length 2,888 km Elevation of the source 1,078 m Average discharge 30 km before Passau: 580 m³/s Vienna: 1,900 m³/s Budapest: 2,350 m³/s just before Delta: 6,500 m³/s Area watershed 817,000 km² Origin Black Forest (Schwarzwald-Baar, Baden- Württemberg, Germany... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... This article is about the River Thames in southern England. ... For other Yellow Rivers, see Yellow River (disambiguation). ... This article is about the river. ... The Tigris is the eastern member of the pair of great rivers that define Mesopotamia, along with the Euphrates, which flows from the mountains of Anatolia through Iraq. ... The Euphrates (the traditional Greek name for the river, which is in Old Persian Ufrat, Aramaic Prâth/Frot, in Arabic الفرات, in Turkish Fırat and in ancient Assyrian language Pu-rat-tu) is the westernmost of the two great rivers that define Mesopotamia (Bethnahrin in Aramaic), the other being the... ‹ The template below (Citations missing) is being considered for deletion. ... There is also Nile, a death metal band from South Carolina, USA. The Nile in Egypt Length 6 695 km Elevation of the source 1 134 m Average discharge 2 830 m³/s Area watershed 3 400 000 km² Origin Africa Mouth the Mediterranean Basin countries Uganda - Sudan - Egypt The... ...


The way which a river's characteristics vary between the upper course and lower course of a river is summarized by the Bradshaw model. The Bradshaw Model is a geographical model which describes how a rivers characteristics vary between the upper course and lower course of a river. ...


Other types of rivers

Most rivers flow on the surface, however subterranean rivers flow underground in caves or caverns. Such rivers can be found in remote regions with limestone geologic formations. A subterranean river is a river that runs beneath the ground surface. ... For other uses, see Cave (disambiguation). ... Look up Remote in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A remote may mean: A remote control A remote broadcast As an adjective, anything which is distant or desolate. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... A geologic formation is a formally named rock stratum or geological unit. ...


An intermittent river (or ephemeral river) only flows occasionally and can be dry for several years at a time. These rivers are found in regions with limited or highly variable rainfall, or can occur due to geologic conditions such as having a highly permeable river bed. For the kind of film, see ephemeral film. ...


Use of rivers

Rivers have been used as a source of water, for food, for transport, as a defensive barrier, as a source of power to drive machinery, and as a means of disposing of waste.


For thousands of years rivers have been used for navigation (The earliest evidence of navigation is found in the Indus Valley Civilization, which existed in north-western India around 3300 BC). Riverine navigation provides the cheapest means of transport and is still used extensively on major rivers of the world like the Ganges, the Nile, the Mississippi, and the Indus. Excavated ruins of Mohenjo-daro. ... This article is about the river. ... For other uses, see Nile (disambiguation). ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Indus (sometimes considered a misnomer) is the English name for the Sengge Chu which flows from Tibet into Ladakh and Baltistan, finally arriving into Pakistan. ...


In some highly-forested regions like Scandinavia and Canada, lumberjacks use the river to float felled trees downstream to lumber camps for further processing, saving much effort and cost by transporting the huge heavy logs by natural means. For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... Lumberjacks in Oregon, c. ...


Rivers have been a source of food since pre-history. Apart from being a rich source of fish, rivers indirectly aid cultivation by supplying water for the crops. Rivers sustain their own food chain. They are a major source of fresh water, hence, it is no surprise to find most of the major cities of the world situated on the banks of rivers. Rivers also provide an easy means of disposing of waste. For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Food chains, food webs and/or food networks describe the feeding relationships between species to another within an ecosystem. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ...

Most riverbanks in Japan are used as places for playing, recreation and parties
Most riverbanks in Japan are used as places for playing, recreation and parties

The rocks and gravel generated and moved by rivers are used in construction. The beauty of rivers and their surroundings contributes to tourist income. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 536 pixelsFull resolution (2240 × 1500 pixel, file size: 732 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) ( ) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 536 pixelsFull resolution (2240 × 1500 pixel, file size: 732 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) ( ) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


In upland rivers, rapids with whitewater or even waterfalls occur. Rapids are often used for recreational purposes (see whitewater kayaking). Fast flowing rivers and waterfalls are harnessed as sources of energy, via watermills and hydroelectric plants. For other uses, see Rapid (disambiguation). ... Whitewater is formed in a rapid, when a rivers gradient drops enough to form a bubbly, or aerated and unstable current; the frothy water appears white. ... For other uses, see Waterfall (disambiguation). ... Whitewater kayaking is the sport of paddling a kayak on a moving body of water, typically a river. ... Watermill of Braine-le-Château, Belgium (12th century) A watermill is a structure that uses a water wheel or turbine to drive a mechanical process such as flour or lumber production, or metal shaping (rolling, grinding or wire drawing). ... Hydroelectric dam diagram The waters of Llyn Stwlan, the upper reservoir of the Ffestiniog Pumped-Storage Scheme in north Wales, can just be glimpsed on the right. ...

Rivers become polluted by human activities. Seen here a rubbish-laden river in the Indian Himalayas.
Rivers become polluted by human activities. Seen here a rubbish-laden river in the Indian Himalayas.

Rivers have been important in determining political boundaries and defending countries. For example, the Danube was a longstanding border of the Roman Empire, and today forms most of the border between Bulgaria and Romania. The Mississippi in North America, and the Rhine in Europe, are major east-west boundaries in those continents. The Orange and Limpopo Rivers in Southern Africa form the boundaries between provinces and countries along their routes. This article is about the Danube River. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The Orange River (Afrikaans/Dutch: Oranjerivier), Gariep River or Senqu River is the longest river in South Africa. ... Course and Watershed of the Limpopo River The Limpopo River rises in the interior of Africa, and flows generally eastwards towards the Indian Ocean. ...


Rivers help to determine the urban form of cities and neighbourhoods and their corridors often present opportunities for urban renewal through the development of foreshoreways such as Riverwalks. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Urban Renewal redirects here. ... Milwaukee Riverwalk The Milwaukee Riverwalk is a continuous pedestrian walkway along the Milwaukee River in downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ...


The noted Greek historian Megasthenes (350BC-290BC) mentions about River Ganga several times in his work Indika: "India, again, possesses many rivers both large and navigable, which, having their sources in the mountains which stretch along the northern frontier, traverse the level country, and not a few of these, after uniting with each other, fall into the river called the Ganges. Now this river, which at its source is 30 stadia broad, flows from north to south, and empties its waters into the ocean forming the eastern boundary of the Gangaridai, a nation which possesses a vast force of the largest-sized elephants." (Diodorus II.37.) Megasthenes (c. ... This article is about the river. ...


Biology

Main article: Aquatic ecosystem

The flora and fauna of rivers use the aquatic habitats available, from torrential waterfalls through to lowland mires. Although many organisms are restricted to the fresh-water in rivers, some, such as Salmon and Hilsa have adapted to be able to survive both in rivers and in the sea. An estuary mouth and coastal waters, part of an aquatic ecosystem. ... Simplified schematic of an islands flora - all its plant species, highlighted in boxes. ... Fauna is a collective term for animal life of any particular region or time. ... Tower Fall in Yellowstone National Park A waterfall is usually a geological formation resulting from water, often in the form of a stream, flowing over an erosion-resistant rock formation that forms a sudden break in elevation. ... Freshwater redirects here. ... For other uses, see Salmon (disambiguation). ... Hilsa, also pronounced Ilish (Bangla: ইলিশ) is the national fish of Bangladesh and also relished in Indias Bengali and Oriya speaking populace. ...


Flooding

Main article: Flood

Flooding is a natural part of a river's cycle. The majority of the erosion of river channels and the erosion and deposition on the associated floodplains occur during flood stage. Human activity, however, has upset the natural way flooding occurs by walling off rivers, straightening their courses and by draining of natural wetlands. Flooding near Key West, Florida, United States from Hurricane Wilmas storm surge in October 2005 For other uses, see Flood (disambiguation). ... Flooding near Key West, Florida, United States from Hurricane Wilmas storm surge in October 2005 For other uses, see Flood (disambiguation). ... This picture shows the flood plain following a 1 in 10 year flood on the Isle of Wight. ... A subtropical wetland in Florida, USA, with an endangered American Crocodile. ...


Direction of flow

Some people think that most rivers flow from north to south.[5][6] Rivers in fact flow downhill regardless of direction, often in a complex meandering path involving all directions of the compass.[7][8][9] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Meander (disambiguation). ...


Few major rivers in the continental US flow north, as most of the country is located in the watershed of the Pacific or Atlantic oceans or the Gulf of Mexico, with very few rivers flowing northward toward the Arctic Ocean, Great Lakes, or Hudson Bay. However, thousands of north-flowing rivers exist elsewhere, including such major watercourses as the Nile, Mackenzie, Rhine, Yenisei, Nelson, and Lena. Four of the ten longest river systems of the world flow mainly north. For other uses, see Nile (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mackenzie River (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rhine (disambiguation). ... Енисей Length 5,550 (4,102) km Elevation of the source m Average discharge 19,600 m³/s Area watershed 2,580,000 km² Origin  ? Mouth Arctic Ocean Basin countries Russia The Yenisei basin, Lake Baikal, and the cities of Dikson, Dudinka, Turukhansk, Krasnoyarsk, Irkutsk Yenisei (Енисе́й) is a river... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lena redirects here. ... View of the Nile River, from a cruiseboat, between Luxor and Aswan in Egypt. ...


Studying the flows of rivers is one aspect of hydrology.[10] Water covers 70% of the Earths surface. ...


Rate of water flow

Volumetric flow rate, also called volume flow rate and rate of water flow, is the volume of water which passes through a given volume per unit time, measured in cubic meters per second (1 m³/s = 35.51 ft³/s) or cubic feet per second, sometimes gallons per second. In fluid dynamics, the volumetric flow rate, also volume flow rate and rate of fluid flow, is the volume of fluid which passes through a given volume per unit time (for example gallons per minute or squeaks per parsec). ... A cubic metre per second (m3·s−1, m3/s, cumecs or cubic meter per second in American English) is a derived SI unit of flow rate equal to that of a cube with sides of one metre (1000 mm) (39. ... A cubic foot per second (also cfs, cusec and ft3/s) is an Imperial unit / U.S. customary unit of flow rate equal to a cube with sides each 12 inches (1 foot or 472. ... The gallon (abbreviation: gal) is a unit of volume. ...


Management

Main article: River engineering

Rivers are often managed or controlled to make them more useful, or less disruptive, to human activity. The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...

  • Dams (see above) or weirs may be built to control the flow, store water, or extract energy.
  • Levees, known as dikes in Europe, may be built to prevent river water from flowing on floodplains or floodways.
  • Canals connect rivers to one another for water transfer or navigation.
  • River courses may be modified to improve navigation, or straightened to increase the flow rate.

River management is a continuous activity as rivers tend to 'undo' the modifications made by people. Dredged channels silt up, sluice mechanisms deteriorate with age, levees and dams may suffer seepage or catastrophic failure. The benefits sought through managing rivers may often be offset by the social and economic costs of mitigating the bad effects of such management. As an example, in parts of the developed world, rivers have been confined within channels to free up flat flood-plain land for development. Floods can inundate such development at high financial cost and often with loss of life. The bridge and weir mechanism at Sturminster Newton on the River Stour, Dorset. ... A levee, levée (from the feminine past participle of the French verb lever, to raise), floodbank or stopbank is a natural or artificial slope or wall, usually earthen and often parallels the course of a river. ... For other uses, see Canal (disambiguation). ... ... This article is about determination of position and direction on or above the surface of the earth. ...


River lists

View of the Nile River, from a cruiseboat, between Luxor and Aswan in Egypt. ... This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... This is a list of rivers of Africa. ... This list of rivers of the Americas includes all the major rivers of the Americas. ... These are the major rivers of Asia. ... These are the main rivers of Europe (ecologically, the extreme west of the Palearctic ecozone - which includes Russia in the east). ... This is a list of rivers of Oceania. ... The List of waterways is a link page for any river, canal, estuary or firth. ... This page lists the various etymologies (origins) of the names of rivers around the world. ...

Rating systems

  • International Scale of River Difficulty – The scale is used to rate the challenges of navigation—particularly those with rapids. Class I is the easiest and Class VI is the hardest.
  • Strahler Stream Order – The Strahler Stream Order ranks rivers based on the connectivity and hierarchy of contributing tributaries. Headwaters are first order while Amazon River is twelfth order. Approximately 80 percent of the rivers and streams in the world are of the first and second order.

See also

See also: geography, water cycle, and drainage basin
Look up River in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

The movement of water around, over, and through the Earth is called the water cycle. ... A drainage basin is the area within the drainage basin divide (blue outline), and drains the surface runoff and river discharge (green lines) of a contiguous area. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... For other uses, see Aqueduct (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Canal (disambiguation). ... Fields outside Benambra, Victoria, Australia suffering from drought conditions A drought is an extended period of months or years when a region notes a deficiency in its water supply. ... This page lists the various etymologies (origins) of the names of rivers around the world. ... A mainstem is defined as the principal river within a given drainage basin, in the case where a number of tributaries discharge into a larger watercourse. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Water disputes are some of the worlds oldest forms of disputes. ... Baers law, named after Karl Ernst von Baer, says that in the northern hemisphere, erosion occurs mostly on the right banks of rivers, and in the southern hemisphere on the left banks. ... A Rock-cut basin is the term used for the depression in which a free standing rounded boulder sits within a water filled natural cavity or rock basin in a stream or river; such plucked-bedrock pits are created by Kolks, which are powerful vortices within the water currents. ...

Crossings

This article is about the structure. ... The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, circa 1945. ... A ford, with pedestrian footbridge, on a minor road near Weimar bei Kassel in Germany The ford at Brockenhurst, leading into the village centre, following heavy rain. ... A disused railway tunnel now converted to pedestrian and bicycle use, near Houyet, Belgium A tunnel is an underground passage. ...

Transport

Self propelled barge carrying bulk crushed stone A barge is a flat-bottomed boat, built mainly for river and canal transport of heavy goods. ... A riverboat is a specialized watercraft (vessel) designed for operating on inland waterways. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... A towpath on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal A towpath is a road or track that runs alongside the banks of a river, canal or other inland waterway. ...

References

  1. ^ River, Wordnet
  2. ^ USGS GNIS FAQ, #17 What is the difference between “mountain,” “hill,” and “peak”; “lake” and “pond”; or “river” and “creek”?
  3. ^ Hans-Henrik Stølum: "River Meandering as a Self-Organization Process", Science 271 (5256), 1710
  4. ^ Fermat's last theorem, Simon Singh, 1997
  5. ^ Children's Misconceptions about Science. Operation Physics, American Institute of Physics (September 1998).
  6. ^ William C. Philips (February 1991). Earth Science Misconceptions.
  7. ^ Matt Rosenberg (2006-06-08). Do All Rivers Flow South?.
  8. ^ Matt Rosenberg. Rivers Flowing North: Rivers Only Flow Downhill; Rivers Do Not Prefer to Flow South.
  9. ^ Nezette Rydell (1997-03-16). Re: What determines the direction of river flow? Elevation, Topography, Gravity??. Earth Sciences.
  10. ^ Cristi Cave. How a River Flows. Stream Biology and Ecology.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Beyond the Bridges Life on American Rivers told by Riverlorian, Jerry Hay. [1]for more information
  • Luna B. Leopold (1994). A View of the River. Harvard University Press. ISBN.  — a non-technical primer on the geomorphology and hydraulics of water
  • Jeffrey W. Jacobs "Rivers, Major World". Water Encyclopaedia.  

Luna Bergere Leopold (b. ... Surface of the Earth Geomorphology is the study of landforms, including their origin and evolution, and the processes that shape them. ... Table of Hydraulics and Hydrostatics, from the 1728 Cyclopaedia. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Buffalo National River (U.S. National Park Service) (417 words)
One of the few remaining rivers in the lower 48 states without dams, the Buffalo cuts its way through massive limestone bluffs traveling eastward through the Arkansas Ozarks and into the White River.
Explore the river by canoe or take the back roads into the pioneer history of the Buffalo River region or enjoy a hike in one of the three designated wilderness areas.
The climate for Buffalo National River is typical of the Ozark region and the Mid-South.
River Network (495 words)
River Network and Watershed Support Network are pleased to accept applications for the Training for Trainers workshop to be held December 5-8 in Seabeck, Washington.
River Network participates in the federal employee Combined Federal Campaign (CFC# 10407) and is a proud member of Earth Share of Oregon, Conservation and Preservation Charities of America and Independent Charities of America.
River Network is now accepting workshop proposals for River Rally 2008, to be held May 2-5 at Sawmill Creek Resort in Huron, OH.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m