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Encyclopedia > Rip Van Winkle
Joseph Jefferson as Rip van Winkle, 1896.
Joseph Jefferson as Rip van Winkle, 1896.

"Rip Van Winkle" is a short story by the American author Washington Irving published in 1819, as well as the name of the story's fictional protagonist. Written while Irving was living in Birmingham, England, it was part of a collection of stories entitled The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon. Rip Van Winkle is an operetta in three acts based on the stories The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving after the play by Dion Boucicault and Joseph Jefferson, composed by Robert Planquette with a libretto by Henry Brougham Farnie, Ludovic Meilhac and Phillipe Gille. ... Demographic Seinen Serialized in Young King OURs Original run 1997 – ongoing Volumes 9 volumes, with 90 total chapters (current) Hellsing ) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Kouta Hirano with an anime adaptation. ... First Lieutenant Rip van Winkle with her musket First Lieutenant/SS-Obersturmführer Rip van Winkle ) is a character in the manga Hellsing and a member of the Millennium forces. ... Download high resolution version (432x640, 27 KB)Actor Joseph Jefferson as Rip van Winkle, photographed by Napoleon Sarony in 1869. ... Download high resolution version (432x640, 27 KB)Actor Joseph Jefferson as Rip van Winkle, photographed by Napoleon Sarony in 1869. ... Washington Irving (April 3, 1783 – November 28, 1859) was an American author of the early 19th century. ... See also: 1818 in literature, other events of 1819, 1820 in literature, list of years in literature. ... This article is about the British city. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Headline text ...

Contents

Plot summary

The story of Rip Van Winkle is set in the years before and after the American Revolutionary War. Rip Van Winkle, a villager of Dutch descent, lives in a nice village at the foot of New York's Catskill Mountains. An amiable man whose home and farm suffer from his lazy neglect, he is loved by all but his wife. One autumn day he escapes his nagging wife by wandering up the mountains. After encountering strangely dressed men, rumored to be the ghosts of Henry Hudson's crew, who are playing nine-pins, and after drinking some of their liquor, he settles down under a shady tree and falls asleep. He wakes up twenty years later and returns to his village. He finds out that his wife is dead and his close friends have died in a war or gone somewhere else. He immediately gets into trouble when he hails himself a loyal subject of King George III, not knowing that in the meantime the American Revolution has taken place. An old local recognizes him, however, and Rip's now grown daughter eventually puts him up. As Rip resumes his habit of idleness in the village, and his tale is solemnly believed by the old Dutch settlers, certain hen-pecked husbands especially wish they shared Rip's luck. This article is about military actions only. ... Main areas in which Dutch-Americans can be found. ... This article is about the state. ... The Catskill Mountains (also known as simply the Catskills), a natural area in New York State northwest of New York City and southwest of Albany are a mature dissected plateau, an uplifted region that was subsequently eroded into sharp relief. ... No portrait of Hudson is known to be in existence. ... Pins and ball Large scale game Skittles is an old European target sport, a variety of bowling, from which Ten-pin bowling, Duckpin bowling, and Candlepin bowling in the United States, and Five-pin bowling in Canada are descended. ... Masouleh village, Gilan Province, Iran. ... George III redirects here. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen...


Characters

  • Rip Van Winkle - a henpecked husband who loathes 'profitable labour'.
  • Dame Van Winkle - Rip Van Winkle's cantankerous wife.
  • Rip - Rip Van Winkle's son.
  • Judith Gardenier - Rip Van Winkle's daughter.
  • Derrick Van Bummel - the local schoolmaster and later a member of Congress.
  • Nicholas Vedder - landlord of the local inn.
  • Mr Doolittle - a hotel owner.

Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political...

Literary origins

Statue of Rip Wan Winkle in Irvington, New York, not far from "Sunnyside", the home of Washington Irving.
Statue of Rip Wan Winkle in Irvington, New York, not far from "Sunnyside", the home of Washington Irving.

The story is a close adaptation of Peter Klaus the Goatherd by J.C.C. Nachtigal, which is a shorter story set in a German village. The choice of "Van Winkle" for the character's name may have been influenced by the fact that Irving's New York publisher was C. S. Van Winkle. Irvington is a village in Westchester County, New York, USA. The population was 6,631 at the 2000 census. ... Sunnyside, Tarrytown, New York. ... Washington Irving (April 3, 1783 – November 28, 1859) was an American author of the early 19th century. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


It is also close to Karl Katz, a German fairy tale by the Brothers Grimm. This story is almost identical. One difference is when he sees dwarfs playing a game of ninepins in a mountain meadow, he joins the game. The dwarfs give him a magic drink that makes him fall asleep for one hundred years.[1] It is implied that the dwarfs are teaching him a lesson about laziness. For other uses, see Brothers Grimm (disambiguation). ... This article is about the mythical creature. ...


The story is also similar to the ancient Jewish story about Honi the Circle-Maker who falls asleep after asking a man why he is planting a carob tree which traditionally takes 70 years to mature, making it virtually impossible to ever benefit from the tree's fruit. After this exchange, he falls aleep on the ground and is miraculously covered by a rock and remains out of sight for 70 years. When he awakens, he finds a fully mature tree and that he has a grandson. When nobody believes that he is Honi, he prays to God and God takes him from this world. Note also that the family name of Honi is also a term of geometry ('M'agel' is Hebrew for 'circle maker'), as well as the family name of Rip ('Winkel' is German for 'angle'). Honi HaMagel (Khoni, or Choni, HaMagel, Hebrew for Honi the Circle-drawer) (First century BCE) was a Jewish scholar prior to the age of the Tannaim, the scholars from whose teachings the Mishnah (the first part of the Talmud) was derived. ... Carob trees near Mehmetcik, Northern Cyprus Carob tree (Ceratonia siliqua) is a species native to the Mediterranean region, cultivated for its edible seed pods. ... For other uses, see Geometry (disambiguation). ... The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ...


The story is also similar to a 3rd century AD Chinese tale of Ranka, as retold in Lionel Giles in A Gallery of Chinese Immortals. Ranka or Lankeshan ji, or Rotten Battle Axe in English, is a Chinese legend similar to that of Rip Van Winkle, although it predates it by at least a 1000 years. ... Translated the 1910 edition of Sun Tzus Art of War. ...


In Orkney there is a similar and ancient folklore tale linked to the Burial mound of Salt Knowe adjacent to the Ring of Brodgar. A drunken fiddler on his way home hears music from the mound. He finds a way in and finds the trowes (Trolls) having a party. He stays and plays for 2 hours then makes his way home to Stenness, where he discovers 50 years have passed. The Orkney Rangers believe this may be one source for Washington Irving's tale, because his father was an Orcadian from the island of Shapinsay, and would almost certainly have often told his son the tale.


The original story was by Diogenes Laertius, an Epicurean philosopher c. early half third century, in his book On the Lives, Opinions, and Sayings of Famous Philosophers. The story is in Chapter ten in his section on the Seven Sages, who were the precursors to the first philosophers. The sage was Epimenides. Apparently Epimenides went to sleep in a cave for fifty-seven years. But unfortunately, 'he became old in as many days as he had slept years'. Although according to the different sources that Diogenes relates, Epimenides lived to be one hundred and fifty-seven years, two hundred and ninety-nine years, or one hundred and fifty-four years.[2] Diogenes Laërtius, the biographer of the Greek philosophers, is supposed by some to have received his surname from the town of Laerte in Cilicia, and by others from the Roman family of the Laërtii. ... Epicureanism is a system of philosophy based upon the teachings of Epicurus (c340-c270 BC), founded around 307 BC. Epicurus was an atomic materialist, following in the steps of Democritus. ... Epimenides of Knossos Epimenides of Knossos (Crete) (Greek: Επιμενίδης) was a semi-mythical 6th century BC Greek seer and philosopher-poet, who is said to have fallen asleep for fifty-seven years in a Cretian cave sacred to Zeus, after which he reportedly awoke with the gift of prophecy. ...


A similar story is told of the Seven Sleepers of Ephesus, Christian saints who fall asleep in a cave while avoiding Roman persecution, and awake more than a century later to find that Christianity has become the religion of the Empire. In Christian mythology, the Seven Sleepers of Ephesus is a folktale concerning a number of fictional people who for a time were venerated as saints. ...


Adaptations

The story has been adapted for other media for the last two centuries, from stage plays to an operetta to cartoons to films. Actor Joseph Jefferson was most associated with the character on the 19th century stage and made a series of short films in 1896 recreating scenes from his stage adaptation, and which are collectively in the US National Film Registry. Jefferson's son Thomas followed in his father's footsteps and also played the character in a number of early 20th century films. The story was also adapted for the show "Twilight Zone" in the 1961 episode "The Rip Van Winkle Caper" starring Oscar Beregi. Rip Van Winkle is an operetta in three acts based on the stories The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving after the play by Dion Boucicault and Joseph Jefferson, composed by Robert Planquette with a libretto by Henry Brougham Farnie, Ludovic Meilhac and Phillipe Gille. ... Jefferson as Rip van Winkle, 1869 Joseph Jefferson (February 20, 1829 - April 23, 1905) was an American actor. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...


Allusions

David Bromberg's song "Kaatskill Serenade" tells the story of Rip Van Winkle from the first-person perspective.[3] The chorus is:

Where are the men that I used to sport with?
What has become of my beautiful town?
Wolf, my old friend, you don't even know me.
This must be the end; my house has tumbled down.

Lionel Richie's "Hello" makes reference to Rip Van Winkle in the opening scene of the video when Laura, a blind subject of Ritchie's affection and student of his, acts out a scene in which she describes the character Tony Billy Boy as "a regular Rip Van Winkle". Billy Boy, just out of prison, had suggested taking Laura on a date to the Brooklyn Paramount, not knowing that in the meantime it had closed, just as Eisenhower was no longer President. He was also mentioned in the Alabama song "Mountain Music" in 1982. Lionel Brockman Richie, Jr. ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890–March 28, 1969), American soldier and politician, was the 34th President of the United States (1953–1961) and supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II, with the rank of General of the Army. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The Belle & Sebastian song "I Could Be Dreaming" features band member Isobel Campbell reading a passage from Rip Van Winkle towards the end of the song. This article is about the band. ... Isobel Campbell (born on April 27, 1976 in Glasgow, Scotland) is a Scottish singer, cellist and composer in the indie and folk genres. ...


Richard Dawkins' book Unweaving_the_Rainbow has a short reference to Rip Van Winkle: Clinton Richard Dawkins, FRS (born March 26, 1941) is a British ethologist, evolutionary biologist and popular science writer who holds the Charles Simonyi Chair for the Public Understanding of Science at the University of Oxford. ... Unweaving the Rainbow (subtitled Science, Delusion and the Appetite for Wonder) is a book by Richard Dawkins, published in 1998 discussing the relationship between science and arts from the perspective of a scientist. ...

The passengers, Rip van Winkles, wake stumbling into the light. After a million years of sleep, here is a whole new fertile globe, a lush planet of warm pastures, sparkling streams and waterfalls, a world bountiful with creatures, darting through alien green felicity. Our travellers walk entranced, stupefied, unable to believe their unaccustomed senses or their luck.

[4]

See also

Rip Van Winkle is an operetta in three acts based on the stories The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving after the play by Dion Boucicault and Joseph Jefferson, composed by Robert Planquette with a libretto by Henry Brougham Farnie, Ludovic Meilhac and Phillipe Gille. ... Rip Van Wink was a comic strip in the UK comic The Beano. ... This March 2007 does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... First Lieutenant Rip van Winkle with her musket First Lieutenant/SS-Obersturmführer Rip van Winkle ) is a character in the manga Hellsing and a member of the Millennium forces. ... This article is about the manga and anime franchise. ...

References

  1. ^ North American Bigfoot Legends. Retrieved on 2007-11-16.
  2. ^ Laertius, Diogenes: Lives of Eminent Philosophers: Books I-V, RD Hicks, trans., Cambridge: Harvard, 1972. p. 115
  3. ^ Kaatskill Serenade
  4. ^ Richard Dawkins. Unweaving_the_Rainbow, Chapter 1.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Clinton Richard Dawkins, FRS (born March 26, 1941) is a British ethologist, evolutionary biologist and popular science writer who holds the Charles Simonyi Chair for the Public Understanding of Science at the University of Oxford. ... Unweaving the Rainbow (subtitled Science, Delusion and the Appetite for Wonder) is a book by Richard Dawkins, published in 1998 discussing the relationship between science and arts from the perspective of a scientist. ...

External links

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Rip Van Winkle

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ...

Sources

Newell Convers Wyeth (October 22, 1882 – October 19, 1945), known as N.C. Wyeth, was an American artist and illustrator. ... An illustration from Alices Adventures in Wonderland Arthur Rackham (September 19, 1867 – September 6, 1939) was a prolific English book illustrator. ...

Other


  Results from FactBites:
 
Rip Van Winkle, a Posthumous Writing of Diedrich Knickerbocker. Irving, Washington. 1917. Rip Van Winkle & The ... (5649 words)
Rip Van Winkle, however, was one of those happy mortals, of foolish, well-oiled dispositions, who take the world easy, eat white bread or brown, whichever can be got with least thought or trouble, and would rather starve on a penny than work for a pound.
Rip’s sole domestic adherent was his dog Wolf, who was as much hen-pecked as his master; for Dame Van Winkle regarded them as companions in idleness, and even looked upon Wolf with an evil eye, as the cause of his master’s going so often astray.
Rip’s daughter took him home to live with her; she had a snug, well-furnished house, and a stout cheery farmer for a husband, whom Rip recollected for one of the urchins that used to climb upon his back.
Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving (1140 words)
Poor Rip was at last reduced almost to despair; and his only alternative, to escape from the labor of the farm and clamor of his wife, was to take gun in hand and stroll away into the woods.
Rip now felt a vague apprehension stealing over him; he looked anxiously in the same direction, and perceived a strange figure slowly toiling up the rocks, and bending under the weight of something he carried on his back.
During the whole time Rip and his companion had labored on in silence; for though the former marvelled greatly what could be the object of carrying a keg of liquor up this wild mountain, yet there was something strange and incomprehensible about the unknown, that inspired awe and checked familiarity.
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