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Encyclopedia > Ringworld
Ringworld

Cover of first edition (paperback)
Author Larry Niven
Country United States
Language English
Series Ringworld, Known Space
Genre(s) Science fiction novel
Publisher Ballantine Books
Publication date 1970
Media type Print (Hardcover & Paperback)
ISBN ISBN 0-345-02046-4
Followed by The Ringworld Engineers, 1980

Ringworld is a Hugo and Nebula award-winning 1970 science fiction novel by Larry Niven, set in his Known Space universe. The work is widely considered one of the classics of science fiction literature. It is followed by three sequels, and it ties in to numerous other books in the Known Space universe. Image File history File links Ringworld(1stEd). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Known Space is the fictional setting of several science fiction novels and short stories written by author Larry Niven. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... Ballantine Books, founded in 1952 by Ian Ballantine, is a major book publisher and is currently owned by Random House. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... “ISBN” redirects here. ... The Ringworld Engineers is a novel by Larry Niven first published in 1980. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... See also: 1969 in literature, other events of 1970, 1971 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Known Space is the fictional setting of several science fiction novels and short stories written by author Larry Niven. ... Known Space is the fictional setting of several science fiction novels and short stories written by author Larry Niven. ...

Contents

Plot summary

In the year 2855, four adventurers (two humans and two aliens) explore a mysterious "ringworld": an enormous, artificial, ring-shaped structure that surrounds a star. The story is set in an extremely technologically advanced universe, where instant teleportation and nigh-indestructible spacecraft hulls are commonplace. This article is about Extraterrestrial life. ... STAR is an acronym for: Organizations Society of Ticket Agents and Retailers], the self-regulatory body for the entertainment ticket industry in the UK. Society for Telescopy, Astronomy, and Radio, a non-profit New Jersey astronomy club. ... For other uses, see Universe (disambiguation). ... Teleportation is the movement of objects or elementary particles from one place to another, more or less instantaneously, without traveling through space. ... A hull is the body or frame of a ship or boat. ...


The character Nessus is a Pierson's Puppeteer, a species with the most advanced technology in Known Space. Being descended from herbivorous herd animals, their morality is more-or-less based on cowardice: the ruling class is known as they-who-lead-from-behind, and the supreme leader is called the Hindmost. Puppeteers who display any signs of bravery are considered insane by their peers, and in fact are insane; bravery is accompanied by other symptoms of ill mental health, such as manic-depressive cycles and paranoia. Nessus is a male character in Larry Nivens Known Space universe, of the species Piersons Puppeteer, a herbivorous species noted for two heads whose mouths act as capable hands. ... Piersons Puppeteers, often known just as Puppeteers, are a fictional alien race from Larry Nivens Known Space books. ... The hierarchy of scientific classification. ... In zoology, an herbivore is an animal that is adapted to eat primarily plants (rather than meat). ... For other uses, see Bipolar. ... For other senses of this word, see paranoia (disambiguation). ...


Essentially xenophobic, only a very small minority of Puppeteers interact with "potentially dangerous" alien species, usually only in cases where they need to hire mercenaries to handle risky situations which they themselves cannot. Only insane puppeteers are ever employed to arrange such matters; in fact sane puppeteers never leave their homeworld, being distrustful of space travel, among other things.


Nessus, being a "mad" Puppeteer, is given the task of assembling a team to explore the Ringworld, to see if it poses a threat to his species.

Cover sample of "Ringworld" Book 1 in the Series.

The main protagonist is Louis Wu, a periodic adventurer-genius in the midst of celebrating his 200th birthday. Despite his age, he is in perfect physical condition due to a combination of superior genetic makeup, advanced medical technology and boosterspice, a drug that extends human life. He extends his birthday by teleporting ahead of the terminator from party to party across Earth, but it so happens that he is bored with life and eager for new challenges, so Nessus has little difficulty recruiting him. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (633x1048, 915 KB) Scanned Book Cover This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned either by the artist who created the cover or the publisher of the book. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (633x1048, 915 KB) Scanned Book Cover This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned either by the artist who created the cover or the publisher of the book. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... Louis Gridley Wu is the main protagonist in the Ringworld series of books, written by Larry Niven. ... In Larry Nivens Known Space universe, boosterspice is a compound that increases the longevity and reverses aging of human beings. ... Life extension refers to an increase in maximum or average lifespan, especially in humans, by slowing down or reversing the processes of aging. ... World map with terminator (April) A composite image showing the terminator dividing night from day, running across Europe and Africa. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ...


Speaker-to-Animals is a Kzin, a ferocious felinoid predator species which has, in the recent past, fought a series of wars with humanity, losing every time because of a tendency to attack before being quite ready. He is recruited as the mission's security chief. Speaker-to-Animals (or later Chmee) is a fictional character in the Ringworld series of books, written by Larry Niven. ... The Kzinti (singular Kzin) are a fictional, very warlike and bloodthirsty race of felinoid aliens in Larry Nivens Known Space series. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Kzinti (singular Kzin) are a fictional, very warlike and bloodthirsty race of felinoid aliens in Larry Nivens Known Space series. ...


Finally, Teela Brown is a young human female whose role in the mission is not immediately clear. But Puppeteers do not do anything without a very good reason, and her significance is revealed as the plot unfolds. Teela Brown is the result of selective breeding for luck, which generally helps her and her descendants, but not necessarily her companions. Teela Brown is a fictional character created by Larry Niven in the Ringworld novels. ...


When their ship crash lands on the Ringworld, after being hit by the powerful meteor defense system and then striking one of the near-invisible shadow-square wires, the adventurers must set out to find a way to get back into space. They cross vast distances, witness strangely evolved ecosystems, and interact with some of the Ringworld's varied primitive civilizations. They attempt to discover what caused the Ringworld's inhabitants to lose their technology, and puzzle over who created the Ringworld and why. A coral reef near the Hawaiian islands is an example of a complex marine ecosystem. ... Central New York City. ...


Concepts

A depiction of Larry Niven's Ringworld as seen from space.
A depiction of Larry Niven's Ringworld as seen from space.

In addition to the two aliens, Niven includes a number of concepts from his other Known Space stories: Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 751 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1502 × 1200 pixel, file size: 219 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 751 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1502 × 1200 pixel, file size: 219 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

  • the Puppeteer's General Products hulls, which are impervious to any known force except visible light and gravity, and cannot be destroyed by anything except antimatter.
  • the Slaver stasis field, which causes time in an area to stand still; since time has for all intents and purposes ceased for an object in stasis, no harm can come to anything in its field.
  • the idea that luck is a genetic trait that can be favored by selective breeding.
  • the tasp, a device that induces a state of extreme pleasure in the pleasure center of the brain at the push of a button; it is used as a non-harmful method of debilitating its target and is extremely addictive. If the subject cannot, for whatever reason, get access to the device, intense depression can result, often to the point of madness or suicide.
  • boosterspice, a drug that extends human life to near immortality.
  • Impact armor, a flexible form of clothing that hardens instantly into a rigid form stronger than steel when rapidly deformed (for example, by the impact of a projectile such as a bullet).
  • Hyperdrives allow for faster-than-light travel, but at a rate slow enough (1 light year per 3 days, ~125c) to keep the galaxy vast and unknown; the new Quantum II Hyperdrive, developed by the Puppeteers but not yet released to humans, can cross a light year in just 1.25 minutes (~425,000c).
  • Near instant point-to-point teleportation is possible with transfer booths (on Earth) and stepping disks (on the Puppeteer homeworld); on Earth, people's sense of place and global position has been lost due to instantaneous travel; cities and cultures have blended together.

A theme well-covered in the novel is that of cultures suffering technological breakdowns who then proceed to revert to belief-systems along fundamentalist and/or religious lines. Most societies have forgotten they live on an artificial structure, and now attribute the phenomena of their world to divine power. Piersons Puppeteers, often known just as Puppeteers, are a fictional alien race from Larry Nivens Known Space books. ... The optical spectrum (light or visible spectrum) is the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that is visible to the human eye. ... Gravity is a force of attraction that acts between bodies that have mass. ... For the physics of antimatter, see the article on antiparticles; for other senses of this term, see antimatter (disambiguation). ... The Slaver stasis field is a fictional technology from Larry Nivens Known Space series. ... The term stasis has several meanings: A state of stabilty, in which all forces are equal and opposing, therefore they cancel out each other. ... This article is about fortune. ... This article is about the general scientific term. ... Selective breeding in domesticated animals is the process of developing a cultivated breed over time. ... A tasp is a fictional device appearing in Larry Nivens Known Space novels. ... The limbic system is a group of brain structures that are involved in various emotions such as aggression, fear, pleasure and also in the formation of memory. ... In animals, the brain or encephalon (Greek for in the head), is the control center of the central nervous system, responsible for behaviour. ... In Larry Nivens Known Space universe, boosterspice is a compound that increases the longevity and reverses aging of human beings. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Hyperdrive is a name given to certain methods of traveling faster than light (FTL) in science fiction. ... a transfer booth is akin to a phone booth, but when you dial a number you are transferred via some form of matter transmission (or transported as in Star Trek) to the number dialed instead of merely voice contact. ... Stepping Disks are a fictional teleportation technology from the Known Space universe created by Larry Niven. ... Look up fundamentalism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual...


Ringworld engineering

Ringworld parameters
Radius 0.95×108 miles (~1.5×108 km) (~1 AU)
Circumference 6×108 miles (~9.7×108 km)
Width 997,000 miles (1,600,000 km)
Height of rim walls 1,000 miles (1,600 km)
Mass 2×1027 kg (1.8×1024 short tons) (1,250,000 kg/m², e.g. 250 m thick, 5,000 kg/m³)
Surface area 6×1014 sq mi (1.6×1015 km²); 3 million times the surface area of Earth.
Surface gravity 0.992 gee (~9.69 m/s²)
Spin velocity 770 miles/second (~1,200,000 m/s)
Sun's spectral class G3 verging on G2; "barely smaller and cooler than Sol".
Day length 30 hours
Rotational time 7.5 Ringworld days (225 hours, 9.375 Earth days)
On Ringworld, time longer than a day is measured in falans, with 1 falan being 10 turns or 75 Ringworld days (93.75 Earth days), so 4 falans is slightly longer than 1 Earth year.

The "Ringworld" is an artificial ring about one million miles wide and approximately the diameter of Earth's orbit (which makes it about 600 million miles in circumference), encircling a Sol-type star. It rotates, providing an artificial gravity that is 99.2% as strong as Earth's gravity through the action of centripetal force. Ringworld has a habitable flat inner surface equivalent in area to approximately three million Earth-sized planets. Walls 1000 miles tall along the edges retain the atmosphere. The Ringworld could be regarded as a thin, rotating slice of a Dyson sphere, with which it shares a number of characteristics. Niven himself thinks of the Ringworld as "an intermediate step between Dyson spheres and planets." Remote Authentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS) is an AAA (authentication, authorization and accounting) protocol for applications such as network access or IP mobility. ... Scientific notation, also known as standard form, is a notation for writing numbers that is often used by scientists and mathematicians to make it easier to write large and small numbers. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... The astronomical unit (AU or au or a. ... The circumference is the distance around a closed curve. ... In general English usage, length (symbol: l) is but one particular instance of distance – an objects length is how long the object is – but in the physical sciences and engineering, the word length is in some contexts used synonymously with distance. Height is vertical distance; width (or... Height is the measurement of distance between a specified point and a corresponding plane of reference. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... “Kg” redirects here. ... The short ton is a unit of mass equal to 907. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... Gravity is a force of attraction that acts between bodies that have mass. ... The term g force or gee force refers to the symbol g, the force of acceleration due to gravity at the earths surface. ... Meters per second squared is the SI derived unit of acceleration, defined by distance or displacement in metres divided by time in seconds and again divided by time in seconds. ... In physics, velocity is defined as the rate of change of displacement or the rate of displacement. ... In astronomy, stellar classification is a classification of stars based initially on photospheric temperature and its associated spectral characteristics, and subsequently refined in terms of other characteristics. ... Sol redirects here. ... Look up day in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The hour (symbol: h) is a unit of time. ... A sphere rotating around its axis. ... A year (from Old English gÄ“r) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... The circumference is the distance around a closed curve. ... Artificial gravity is a simulation of gravity in outer space or free-fall. ... The centripetal force is the external force required to make a body follow a circular path at constant speed. ... A cut-away diagram of an idealized Dyson shell—a variant on Dysons original concept—1 AU in radius. ...


Source of material

To this end, one must understand that in the context of the books the Ringworld was described to have an approximate mass equal to the sum of all the planets in our solar system, and that the adventurers surmised that when the Ringworld was built that it was made literally using all the planets in that system as their source of material down to the last asteroid and/or moon as the Ringworld star has no other bodies in orbit. In Ringworld's Children it is additionally explained that it took the reaction mass of roughly 20 Jupiter masses to spin up the ring; thus the combined mass of the planets of the original system was that much larger than our solar system's. Working mass is a mass against which a system operates in order to produce acceleration. ...


Variations

"Ringworld", or more formally, "Niven ring", has become a generic term for such a structure, which is an example of what science fiction fans call a "Big Dumb Object", or more formally a megastructure. Other science fiction authors have devised their own variants of Niven's Ringworld, notably Iain M. Banks' Culture Orbitals, best described as miniature Ringworlds, and the ring-shaped Halo structure of the video game series of the same name. A term probably coined by reviewer Roz Kaveney[1] and used in discussing science fiction, a Big Dumb Object (BDO) is a mysterious artifact (usually of extraterrestrial or otherwise unknown origin) in a story which generates an intense sense of wonder just by being there; to a certain extent, the... A megastructure, in science fiction and speculative (or exploratory) engineering, is an enormous self-supporting artificial construct. ... Iain Menzies Banks (born on February 16, 1954 in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland) writes mainstream novels as Iain Banks and science fiction as Iain M. Banks. ... Illustration of an orbital created by Giuseppe Gerbino. ... Halos are fictional megastructures in the Halo video game series. ... Halo is video game series created by Bungie Studios. ...


Imperfections

Speculative

The construction of a ringworld remains firmly in the area of speculation. If such a structure were built it could indeed provide a huge habitable inner surface, but the energy required to construct it and set it rotating is so significant (several centuries' worth of the total energy output from the Sun) that without as-yet unimagined energy sources becoming available, it is hard to see how this construction could ever be possible in a time frame acceptable to humans.


Tension on material

Furthermore, the tensile strength of the material required would be on the same order as the strong nuclear force, according to Niven — since the artificial gravity is the same as normal gravity, the structure is comparable with a bridge with an extremely long span; nothing even remotely strong enough is known to exist in nature. In Niven's Ringworld novels, the material—which he calls scrith—is said to have been artificially produced through the transmutation of matter into the required substance. (This merely gives a name to the sufficiently advanced technology that would have to be used.) In later novels the "transmutation" idea is simply discarded and the construction method of scrith left open. The strong nuclear force or strong interaction (also called color force or colour force) is a fundamental force of nature which affects only quarks and antiquarks, and is mediated by gluons in a similar fashion to how the electromagnetic force is mediated by photons. ... Scrith, usually written italicized as scrith, is a fictional substance conceived by Larry Niven. ... // Transmutation is the conversion of one object into another. ... Arthur C. Clarke formulated the following three laws of prediction: When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. ...


Instability

Additionally, a ringworld design requires active stabilization, because it is not in inertial orbit. Though the ring itself is rotating at 1200 km/s (to approximate Earth gravity), the center of mass is stationary — in fact, it is at an unstable equilibrium, roughly comparable to a small sphere balanced on top of a larger one. This article is about inertia as it applies to local motion. ... Two bodies with a slight difference in mass orbiting around a common barycenter. ...


Thus, large thrusters must be incorporated into the design to keep it centered about its star. This point gave Niven some difficulty after he published his first Ringworld novel; he was deluged with letters pointing out that "the Ringworld isn't stable" and dedicated the first sequel to a resolution of this problem. He notes in the dedication of Ringworld Engineers that at the 1971 World Science Fiction Covention MIT students crowded the hotel hallways chanting "The Ringworld is Unstable!" In this first sequel, he also tackled how to prevent all the soil from ending up in the oceans. In the fourth book in the series, Ringworld's Children, he creates backplot explanations for several of the imperfections in his original design of the Ringworld — and wholly glosses over others, such as that Louis Wu is worried about his dietary intake of salt since only the Great Oceans are described as being saline. Cover sample of The Ringworld Engineers Book 2 in the Series. ... For other uses, see Salt (disambiguation). ... Saline may refer to: Salinity Saline (medicine) Saline, Michigan Saline, Scotland - a village in the burgh of Fife, Scotland. ...


Imperfect shadow squares

To provide an approximation of the day–night cycle common to planets, Niven's Ringworld was also provided with a separate ring of "shadow squares" linked together (by "shadow square wires") in a ring close to the star, rotating at slightly faster than the Ringworld's spin, providing a lot of twilight, as well as a day-night cycle. This is not the perfect match for a planet however, as there is no sunrise or sunset in Ringworld, and when not covered by a shadow square, the sun is always at high noon. These absorb a huge amount of sunlight energy, which is beamed to the Ringworld as its primary source of power. They are also not in inertial orbit, and must be actively stabilized as well. The shadow squares provide another of the imperfections "clarified" in Ringworld's Children, as five shadow squares of greater length, orbiting retrograde would provide a better day-night cycle, with less twilight. As revealed in Ringworld Engineers, the "shadow squares" also provide a shielding to the inner surface of the Ringworld when someone in the control room uses a magnetic field embedded in the Ringworld to fire the meteor defense system. Twilight in Denmark, just after sunset Twilight in the midwestern US featuring Venus as a brilliant evening star and the crescent moon Finland - Lapland at midnight in July Twilight in Acapulco with Long time Exposure Early twilight in California, before sunset Twilight is the time before sunrise or after sunset... Prograde motion is the motion of a planetary body in a direction similar to that of other bodies within its system, and is sometimes called direct motion, especially in astrology. ...


Trivia

  • In the first edition of Ringworld, Louis Wu tries to extend his birthday by traveling (through instantaneous transfer booths) eastbound around the earth. This would have shortened his birthday, not prolonged it. In later editions, he travels westbound.
  • Impact armor was tested during the 2006 Winter Olympics, composed of a synthetic material called d3o (see here).
  • Many references are made by Louis to Finagle's Law. He also mentions Occam's Razor.

see also: The First Edition, a musical group fronted by Kenny Rogers. ... a transfer booth is akin to a phone booth, but when you dial a number you are transferred via some form of matter transmission (or transported as in Star Trek) to the number dialed instead of merely voice contact. ... Neve and Gliz, the 2006 Olympics mascots, on display in Turin The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... d3o (dee-three-oh) is a dilatant material developed by the British company d3o Lab. ... The adage Finagles Law of Dynamic Negatives is a version of Murphys law, and usually rendered: One variant (known as OTooles Corollary of Finagles Law) favored among hackers is (but see also Hanlons Razor). ... For the House episode, see Occams Razor (House episode) Occams razor (sometimes spelled Ockhams razor) is a principle attributed to the 14th-century English logician and Franciscan friar William of Ockham. ...

Sequels, adaptations, other ringworlds in fiction

Cover sample of "The Ringworld Engineers" Book 2 in the Series.

The novel Ringworld has been followed by three sequels, The Ringworld Engineers (1980), The Ringworld Throne (1996), and Ringworld's Children (2004). Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (616x1038, 839 KB) Scanned Book Cover This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned either by the artist who created the cover or the publisher of the book. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (616x1038, 839 KB) Scanned Book Cover This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned either by the artist who created the cover or the publisher of the book. ... The Ringworld Engineers is a novel by Larry Niven first published in 1980. ... See also: 1979 in literature, other events of 1980, 1981 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Ringworld Throne is a novel by Larry Niven first published in 1996. ... See also: 1995 in literature, other events of 1996, 1997 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Ringworlds Children is a 2004 science fiction novel by Larry Niven, the fourth in the Ringworld series set in the Known Space universe. ... // Canada Reads selects Guy Vanderhaeghes The Last Crossing to be read across the nation. ...


In the 1980s a role-playing game based on this setting was produced by Chaosium named The Ringworld Roleplaying Game. The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... Chaosium is one of the longer lived publishers of role_playing games still in existence. ... The Ringworld science fiction role-playing game was published by Chaosium in 1984, using the Basic Role-Playing system for its rules and Larry Nivens Ringworld novels as a setting. ...


Tsunami Games released two adventure games based on Ringworld, Ringworld: Revenge of the Patriarch in 1992 and Return to Ringworld in 1994. This is an article about the computer and video game genre. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ...


In 2004, the Sci Fi Channel reported that it was developing a Ringworld miniseries [1]. Larry Niven reported in 2001 that a movie deal had been signed and was in the early planning stages. There have also been many abortive attempts to adapt the novel to the screen. SCI FI (originally Sci-Fi Channel, sometimes rendered SCI FI Channel when part of a longer phrase) is an American cable television channel, launched on September 24, 1992, specializing in science fiction, fantasy, horror, and paranormal programming. ...


In Iain M. Banks' novel Consider Phlebas (1987), Vavatch Orbital is a Ringworld-like structure which is ultimately destroyed by The Culture. Iain Menzies Banks (born on February 16, 1954 in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland) writes mainstream novels as Iain Banks and science fiction as Iain M. Banks. ... Consider Phlebas is a science fiction novel by Scottish writer Iain M. Banks, first published in 1987. ... See also: 1986 in literature, other events of 1987, 1988 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Culture is a fictional anarchic, socialistic and utopian society created by the Scottish writer Iain Banks and described by him in several of his novels and shorter fictions. ...


The plot of the first-person shooter Halo for the Microsoft Xbox also takes place on an artificial ring structure. Given its dimensions (10,000 kilometers in diameter) it is more like Banks' Culture Orbitals than Niven's behemoth. This article is about video games. ... Halo: Combat Evolved, or simply Halo, is a video game in the first-person shooter (FPS) genre, created by the Microsoft-owned Bungie Studios. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... Illustration of an orbital created by Giuseppe Gerbino. ...


There is a Ringworld system tile created for the boardgame Twilight Imperium on BoardGameGeek [2]. A board game is any game played with a premarked surface, with counters or pieces that are moved across the board. ... Box Art for Twilight Imperium 3rd Edition Twilight Imperium is a strategy board game produced by Fantasy Flight Games. ... Screenshot of the BoardGameGeek entry for Settlers of Catan. ...


There is a Ringworld-like structure in the Tre'illica system in the video game Escape Velocity Nova; also, in the game, Earth has a ring structure built around its equator. Escape Velocity Nova (EV Nova or EVN) is a computer game by Ambrosia Software, in collaboration with ATMOS. It is the third game in the Escape Velocity series. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ...


In the lengthy series of "WebErotica" by Elf Mathieu Sternberg, many races of Anthromophs (Centaurs, etc.) inhabit a ringworld called Pendor created by a human though the use of time travel, to a far point in the past. [3]


See also

Illustration of an orbital created by Giuseppe Gerbino. ... Planets in science fiction are fictional planets that appear in various media, especially those of the science fiction genre, as story-settings or depicted locations. ... Known Space is the fictional setting of several science fiction novels and short stories written by author Larry Niven. ... A megastructure, in science fiction and speculative (or exploratory) engineering, is an enormous self-supporting artificial construct. ... A cut-away diagram of an idealized Dyson shell—a variant on Dysons original concept—1 AU in radius. ... Halos are fictional megastructures in the Halo video game series. ...

External links

Preceded by
The Left Hand of Darkness
by Ursula K. Le Guin
Nebula Award for Best Novel
1970
Succeeded by
A Time of Changes
by Robert Silverberg

  Results from FactBites:
 
Science Fiction Timeline Site . . . Marc Carlson's KNOWN SPACE Chronology . . . (8087 words)
Before the Ringworld is completed, 11 Protectors rebelled, and were imprisoned on the Maps of Pak in the Isolation Zone in the farther Greater Sea
According to "Ringworld", it is about this time that the Fertility Laws are revised to allow more Birthrights.
Louis Wu is kidnapped by a Puppeteer to return to the Ringworld (It's been "22 years" since he's seen a Puppeteer; however, the date is given specifically in "Ringworld Throne").
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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