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Encyclopedia > Ring of Barahir

Ring of Barahir is a fictional ring from J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium.


The ring was given to Barahir by the Elven Lord Finrod Felagund, in reward for saving his life in Dagor Bragollach. It was a sign of eternal friendship between Finrod and the House of Barahir. Barahir's hand and ring were taken by the orcs that killed him, but were retrieved by his son Beren when he avenged his father. Beren laid the hand to rest with the rest of his father's body, but kept and wore the ring.

“'Death you can give me earned or unearned, but names I will not take from you of baseborn, nor spy, nor thrall. By the ring of Felagund, that he gave to Barahir my father on the battlefield of the North, my house has not earned such names from any Elf, be he king or no.'”


Thus spoke Beren Erchamion in the halls of mighty Thingol as he held aloft the ring, “and the green jewels gleamed there that the Noldor had devised in Valinor. For this ring was like to twin serpents, whose eyes were emeralds, and their heads met beneath a crown of golden flowers, that the one upheld and the other devoured; that was the badge of Finarfin and his house.” (Silmarillion, Chapter 19: Of Beren and Lúthien)


Beren later used it as a token when he sought Finrod's help in the quest for the Silmaril.


The ring was passed from Beren in direct line to Dior, then his daughter Elwing and her son Elros, who brought it to Númenor during the Second Age. It was an heirloom of the kings of Númenor until Tar-Elendil gave the ring to his eldest daughter Silmariën, who was not allowed to succeed him on the throne. She in turn gave the ring to her son Valandil, first Lord of Andúnië. It was handed down to succeeding Lords of Andúnië to the last one, Elendil.


In the Third Age ring was again passed in direct line from Elendil to Isildur to the Kings of Arnor, and then Kings of Arthedain. The last King of Arthedain, Arvedui, gave the ring to the Lossoth of Forochel, thankful for the help he received from them. It was later ransomed from the Snowmen by the Dúnedain of the North, and it was kept safe at Rivendell.


Eventually, it was given by Elrond to Aragorn son of Arathorn, when he was told of his true name and lineage, together with the shards of Narsil. In the year 2980 of the Third Age, in Lórien Aragorn gave the ring to Arwen Undómiel, and thus they were betrothed.


Nothing is said of the fate of the ring in the Fourth Age, but it was most likely either again passed to the Kings of Gondor and Arnor, descendants of Aragorn and Arwen, or it went with Arwen to her grave in Cerin Amroth.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ring of Barahir - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (524 words)
The Ring of Barahir is a fictional ring from J.
Barahir's hand and ring were taken by the orcs that killed him, but were retrieved by his son Beren when he avenged his father.
Nothing is said of the fate of the ring in the Fourth Age, but it was most likely either again passed to the Kings of Gondor and Arnor, descendants of Aragorn and Arwen, or it went with Arwen to her grave in Cerin Amroth.
Aragorn - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2814 words)
He gave her the heirloom of his House, the Ring of Barahir, and Arwen pledged her hand to him in marriage, renouncing her Elvish lineage and accepting the Gift of Men: death.
In 3009, Gandalf grew suspicious of the ring of the Hobbit Bilbo Baggins, which later turned out to be the One Ring, the source of Power of the Dark Lord Sauron.
In the earliest unpublished versions of The Lord of the Rings (see: The History of The Lord of the Rings), the character that later became Aragorn was a hobbit, and was called Trotter instead of Strider — though he was still called a Ranger (which were not yet identified as Dúnedain of the North).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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