FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Rimini" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Rimini
Comune di Rimini
Coat of arms of Comune di Rimini
Municipal coat of arms
Country Flag of Italy Italy
Region Emilia-Romagna
Province Rimini (RN)
Mayor Alberto Ravaioli
Elevation 6 m
Area 134,20 km²
Population
 - Total (as of July 31, 2006) 136,777
 - Density 1,019/km²
Time zone CET, UTC+1
Coordinates 44°03′N 12°34′E
Gentilic Riminesi
Dialing code 0541
Postal code 47900 Bellariva, Rimini, Rivabella, Rivazzurra, San Fortunato, San Giuliano a Mare, Santa Aquilina; 47811 Viserba, Viserbella; 47812 Torre Pedrera; 47831 Miramare di Rimini
Frazioni Bellariva, Corpolò, Marebello, Miramare di Rimini, Rivabella, Rivazzurra, San Fortunato, San Giuliano a Mare, Santa Aquilina, Torre Pedrera, Viserba, Viserbella
Patron St. Gaudentius
 - Day October 14

Location of Rimini in Italy
Website: www.comune.rimini.it

Rimini is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy and capital city of the Province of Rimini. Image File history File links Rimini-Stemma. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... Emilia-Romagna is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... In Italy, the province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of an intermediate level, between municipality (comune) and region (Regione). ... Rimini (It. ... July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with ethnonym. ... Here are a list of area codes in Italy. ... A frazione, in Italy, is the name given in administrative law to a type of territorial subdivision of a comune; for other subdivisions, see municipio, circoscrizione, quartiere. ... Saint Gaudentius was Bishop of Brescia from 387 until 410; he was the successor of the writer on heresies, Saint Philastrius. ... October 14 is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Italy_Regions_220px_(including_Pelagie_Islands). ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... Emilia-Romagna is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... Rimini (It. ...

Rimini's skyline.
Rimini's skyline.

It is located on the Adriatic Sea near the coast between the rivers Marecchia (the ancient Ariminus) and Ausa (Aprusa). Coast navigation and fishing are traditional industries and, together with Riccione, it is probably the most famous seaside resort on the Adriatic Riviera, among Italians. Download high resolution version (1700x1552, 493 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1700x1552, 493 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A satellite image of the Adriatic Sea. ... The Marecchia is a river in eastern Italy. ... The Auckland University Students Association (AUSA), founded in 1891, represents students at the University of Auckland. ... Template:Stub comuni Template:Comune2 Riccione is an Italian comune with 32,991 inhabitants in the Rimini province. ...

Contents

History

Ancient history

Up to 800,000 years ago, primitive man lived in the coastal area as far back as the hillside of Covignano.


In 268 BC at the mouth of the Ariminus river, in an area that had previously been inhabited by the Etruscans, the Umbrians, the Greeks and the Gauls, the Romans founded the colony of Ariminum, probably from the name of a nearby river, Ariminus (today, Marecchia). It was seen as a bastion against invading Gaul and also as a springboard for conquering the Padana plain. Rimini was a road junction connecting central Italy (Via Flaminia) and northern Italy (Via Aemilia that led to Piacenza and Via Popilia) and it also opened up trade by sea and river. Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC - 260s BC - 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC 273 BC 272 BC 271 BC 270 BC 269 BC 268 BC - 267 BC 266 BC 265... Map showing the extent of the Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ... The Umbri, also called Umbrians in English, were an ancient Italic tribe. ... Gallia (in English Gaul) is the Latin name for the region of western Europe occupied by present-day France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... See also Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ... Colonies in antiquity were city-states founded from a mother-city, not from a territory-at-large. ... The Marecchia is a river in eastern Italy. ... Gallia (in English Gaul) is the Latin name for the region of western Europe occupied by present-day France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... The Via Flaminia was a Roman road leading from Rome to Ariminum (Rimini), and was the most important route to the north. ... Via Aemilia (It. ... Piacenza (Placentia in Latin and old-fashioned English, Piasëinsa in the local dialect of Emiliano-Romagnolo) is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of northern Italy. ...


In the sixth century BC, it was taken by the Gauls; after their last defeat (283 BC), it returned to the Umbri and became in 263 BC a Latin colony, very helpful to the Romans during the late Gallic wars.


The city was involved in the civil wars but remained faithful to the popular party and to its leaders, firstly Marius and then Caesar. After crossing the Rubicon, the latter made his legendary appeal to the legions in the Forum of Rimini. Gaius Marius Gaius Marius (Latin: C·MARIVS·C·F·C·N)[1] (157 BC–January 13, 86 BC) was a Roman general and politician elected Consul an unprecedented seven times during his career. ... Gaius Julius Caesar [1] (Latin pronunciation ; English pronunciation ; July 12 or July 13, 100 BC – March 15, 44 BC), often simply referred to as Julius Caesar, was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in world history. ... Presumed course of the Rubicon For other uses, see Rubicon (disambiguation). ...


Rimini, which drew the attention of many emperors, Augustus who did much for the city and Hadrian in particular, was experiencing a great period in its history, embodied by the construction of prestigious monuments such as the Arch of Augustus, Tiberius' Bridge and the Amphitheatre and Galla Placida built the church of San Stefano. Augustus (Latin: IMP•CAESAR•DIVI•F•AVGVSTVS;[1] September 23, 63 BC–August 19, AD 14), known as Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus (English Octavian; Latin: C•IVLIVS•C•F•CAESAR•OCTAVIANVS) for the period of his life prior to 27 BC, was the first and among the most important of... Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus (January 24, 76 – July 10, 138), known as Hadrian in English, was a Stoic-Epicurean[] Roman emperor from 117 – 138, and a member of the gens Aelia. ... Portrait of Galla Placidia, from her mausoleum in Ravenna. ...


Crisis in the Roman world was marked by destruction caused by invasions and wars, but also by the testimony of the palaces of the Imperial officers and the first churches, the symbol of the spread of Christianity that held an important Council in Rimini in 359. See also Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ... // Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... The Council of Rimini (also called the Council of Ariminum) was a Christian church council that took place in Rimini (Latin name, Ariminum) in July 359, and was concerned with the problem of Arianism. ... Events Battle of Amida: Shapur II of Persia conquers Amida from the Romans. ...


Middle Ages

When the Goths conquered Rimini in 493, Odoacer, besieged in Ravenna, had to capitulate. During the Gothic War Rimini was taken and retaken many times. In its vicinity the Byzantine general Narses overthrew (553) the Alamanni. Under Byzantine dominion it belonged to the Pentapolis, part of the Exarchate of Ravenna. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Gothic War, 535–552, was the expression of Justinians decision in 535 to reverse the course of events of the past century in the West and win back for the Eastern Roman Empire the provinces of Italy that had been lost, first to Odoacer and then to the... Narses (478-573) was, along with Belisarius, one of the two great generals in the service of the Eastern Roman Emperor Justinian I. during the so-called Reconquest that took place during the Justinians reign. ... area settled by the Alamanni, and sites of Roman-Alamannic battles, 3rd to 6th century The Alamanni, Allemanni, or Alemanni were originally an alliance of Germanic tribes located around the upper Main, land that is today part of Germany. ... A Pentapolis, from the Greek words penta five and polis city(-state) is geographic and/or institutional grouping of five cities. ... The Exarchate of Ravenna was a center of Byzantine power in Italy, from the end of the 6th century to 751 A.D., when the last Exarch was put to death by the Emperors enemies in Italy, the Lombards. ...


In 728 it was taken with many other cities by the Lombard King Liutprand but returned to the Byzantines about 735. King Pepin gave it to the Holy See, but during the wars of the popes and the Italian cities against the emperors, Rimini sided with the latter. Liutprand was the king of the Lombards from 712 to 744 and is chiefly remembered for his Donation of Sutri, in 728, and his long reign which brought him into conflicts, mostly successful, with most of Italy at some time or other. ... Pippin the Younger Pippin the Younger or Pepin[1] (714 – September 24, 768), often known under the mistranslation Pippin the Short or the ordinal Pippin III, was the king of the Franks from 751 to 768 and is best known for being the father of Charlemagne, or Charles the Great. ...

Tiberius' Bridge (1st century).
Tiberius' Bridge (1st century).

In the thirteenth century it suffered from the discords of the Gambacari and Ansidei families. The city became a municipality in the fourteenth century and with the arrival of the religious orders, numerous convents and churches were built, providing work for many illustrious artists. In fact, Giotto inspired the fourteenth-century School of Rimini, which was the expression of original cultural ferment. Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 930 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 930 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The 1st century was that century which lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. ... Statue of Giotto di Bondone, close to the Uffizi. ...


The Malatesta family emerged from the struggles between municipal factions with Malatesta da Verucchio, who in 1239 was named podestà (feudal lord) of the city. Despite interruptions, his family held authority until 1528. In 1312 he was succeeded by Malatesta II, first signore (lord) of the city and Pandolfo I, the latter's brother, named by Louis the Bavarian imperial vicar in Romagna. Ferrantino, son of Malatesta II (1335), was opposed by his cousin Ramberto and by Cardinal Bertando del Poggetto (1331), legate of John XXII. Malatesta III, Guastafamiglia (1363), was also lord also of Pesaro. He was succeeded by Malatesta IV l'Ungaro (1373) and Galeotto, uncle of the former (1385), lord also of Fano (from 1340), Pesaro, and Cesena (1378). The House of Malatesta was an Italian family which ruled over Rimini from 1295 until 1500. ... Malatesta da Verucchio (1212 - 1312) was the founder of the powerful Malatesta family and a famous condottiere. ... The Palace of the Podestà in Florence, known as the Palazzo Vecchio or the Palazzo della Signoria Podestà is the name given to certain high officials in many Italian cities, since the later middle ages, mainly as Chief magistrate of a city state (like otherwise styled counterparts in other cities... Malatesta II Malatesta, best known as Guastafamiglia (Italian: the Ruiner of the Family, c. ... Pandolfo Malatesta is the name of four members of the Italian House of Malatesta: Pandolfo I Malatesta (c. ... Louis IV of Bavaria of the House of Wittelsbach, born 1282, was duke of Bavaria from 1294, duke of the Palatinate from 1329 and, after 1314, Holy Roman Emperor. ... Emilia-Romagna is an administrative region of Northern Italy comprising the two historic regions of Emilia and Romagna. ... Pope John XXII, né Jacques dEuse (1249 - December 4, 1334), was elected to the papacy in 1316 and reigned until his death in 1334. ... Pesaro is a town and comune in the Italian region of the Marche, capital of the Pesaro e Urbino province, on the Adriatic. ... Country Italy Region Marche Province Pesaro e Urbino (PU) Mayor Stefano Aguzzi (since June 2004) Elevation 12 m Area 121 km² Population  - Total (as of December 31, 2004) 61,675  - Density 512/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Fanesi Dialing code 0721 Postal code 61032 Frazioni Bellocchi, Camminate...


His son Carlo was one of the most respected condottieri of the time, enlarged the Riminese possessions to Lombardy and restored the port. Carlo died childless in 1429, and the lordship was divided into three parts, Rimini going to Galeotto Roberto, a Catholic zelot who turned totally unable to the role. The Pesarese line of the Malatestas tried in fact to take advantage of his weakness and to capture the city, but Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta, a nephew of Carlo who at the time was only 14, intervened to save it. Galeotto retired in convent and Sigismondo obtained the rule of Rimini. Carlo I Malatesta (June 1368 - 13 September 1429) was an Italian condottiero and lord of Rimini, Fano, Cesena and Pesaro. ... Condottieri (singular condottiere or condottiero) were mercenary leaders employed by Italian city-states from the late Middle Ages until the mid-sixteenth century. ... Lombardy (Italian: Lombardia, Lombard: Lumbardìa) is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... Portrait of Sigismondo Malatesta in a portrait by Piero della Francesca Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta (1417 – 1468) (the wolf of Rimini) was lord of Rimini, Fano, and Cesena from 1432. ...


Sigismondo Pandolfo was the most famous lord of Rimini. In 1433 Emperor Sigismund soujourned in the city and for a while he was the commander-in-chief of the Papal armies. A skilled general, he often acted as condottiero for other states to gain money to embellish it (he was also a dilectant poet). He had the famous Tempio Malatestiano rebuilt by Leon Battista Alberti. However, after the rise of Pope Pius II he had to fight constantly for the independence of the city. In 1463 he was forced to submit to Pius II, who left him only Rimini and little more; Roberto Malatesta, his son (1482), under pope Paul II nearly lost his state but under Sixtus IV became the commanding officer of the pontifical army against Alfonso of Naples, by whom he was defeated in the battle of Campomorto (1482). Pandolfo IV, his son (1500), lost Rimini to Cesare Borgia, after whose overthrow it fell to Venice (1503-1509), but later was retaken by pope Julius II and incorporated in the Papal States. After the death of pope Leo X, Pandolfo returned for several months, and with his son Sigismondo held a rule which looked tyrannous even for the time. Pope Adrian VI expelled him again and gave Rimini to the Duke of Urbino, the pope's vicar in Romagna. In 1527 Sigismondo managed to regain the city, but the following year the Malatesta dominion passed away forever. Sigismund (February 14/15, 1368 - December 9, 1437) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1433 to 1437. ... The main entrance. ... Leone Battista Alberti (February 1404 - 25th April 1472), Italian painter, poet, linguist, philosopher, cryptographer, musician, architect, and general Renaissance polymath . ... Pope Pius II. Pius II, né Enea Silvio Piccolomini, in Latin Aeneas Sylvius (October 18, 1405 - August 14, 1464) was pope from 1458 to 1464. ... Pope Pius II. Pius II, né Enea Silvio Piccolomini, in Latin Aeneas Sylvius (October 18, 1405 - August 14, 1464) was pope from 1458 to 1464. ... Roberto Malatesta (c. ... Pope Paul II (February 23, 1417 – July 26, 1471), born Pietro Barbo, was Pope from 1464 until his death. ... Sixtus IV, born Francesco della Rovere (July 21, 1414 - August 12, 1484) was Pope from 1471 to 1484, essentially a Renaissance prince, the Sixtus of the Sistine Chapel where the team of artists he brought together introduced the Early Renaissance to Rome with a masterpiece. ... Portrait of Alfonso V of Aragon, attributed to Mino da Fiesole. ... The Battle of Campomorto is a battle fought near Frosinone, in the Lazio (Italy) on August 21, 1482. ... Pandolfo IV Malatesta, nicknamed Pandolfaccio (Bad Pandulph) (July 1475 – June 1534) was an Italian condottiero and lord of Rimini and other cities in Romagna. ... Cesare Borgia. ... Pope Julius II (December 5, 1443 – February 21, 1513), born Giuliano della Rovere, was Pope from 1503 to 1513. ... Map of the Papal States. ... Pope Leo X, born Giovanni di Lorenzo de Medici (11 December 1475 – 1 December 1521) was Pope from 1513 to his death. ... Sigismondo Malatesta (November 1498 - December 1553) was an Italian condottiero. ... The house where Adrian VI was born Adrian VI (also known as Hadrian VI or Adriano VI), born Adrian dEdel (March 2, 1459 - September 14, 1523), pope from 1522 to 1523, was born in Utrecht, the Netherlands, and studied under the Brethren of the Common Life either at Zwolle... The Duchy of Urbino is a former soverign state of northern Italy. ...

Sigismondo Malatesta, painted c. 1450 by Piero della Francesca, Louvre.
Sigismondo Malatesta, painted c. 1450 by Piero della Francesca, Louvre.

Sigismondo Malatesta, lord of Rimini, by Piero della Francesca (Louvre) Source: http://www. ... Sigismondo Malatesta, lord of Rimini, by Piero della Francesca (Louvre) Source: http://www. ... The Baptism of Christ, 1442 (National Gallery, London) Piero della Francesca (c. ... The main courtyard of the Louvre. ...

Modern history

At the beginning of the 16th century, Rimini, now a secondary town of the Papal States, had a local government under an Apostolic Legate (temporal governor in a province of the Papal States). Towards the end of the 16th century, the municipal square (Piazza Cavour), which had been closed off on a site where the Poletti Theatre was subsequently built, was redesigned. The statue of Pope Paul V has stood in the centre of the square next to the fountain since 1614. Map of the Papal States. ... A Papal Nuncio (also known as an Apostolic Nuncio) is a permanent diplomatic representative (head of mission) of the Holy See to a state, having ambassadorial rank. ... Paul V, né Camillo Borghese (Rome, September 17, 1552 – January 28, 1621) was Pope from May 16, 1605 until his death. ... Events April 5 - In Virginia, Native American Pocahontas marries English colonist John Rolfe. ...


In the 16th century, the 'grand square' (now the Piazza Tre Martiri in honor of three civilians hanged by the retreating Nazis at the end of World War II), which was where markets and tournaments were held, underwent various changes. For example, a small temple dedicated to Saint Anthony of Padua and the Clock Tower block were built, giving the square its present shape and size. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... ...


Until the 18th century, raiding armies, earthquakes, famines, floods and pirate attacks ravaged the city. In this gloomy situation and due to a weakened local economy, fishing took on great importance, a fact testified by the construction of functional structures such as the fish market and the lighthouse.


In 1797, Rimini, along with the rest of Romagna, was influenced by the passage of the French troops and became part of the Cisalpine Republic. The Napoleonic government suppressed the monastic orders, confiscating their property and thus dispersing a substantial heritage, and demolished many churches including the ancient cathedral of Santa Colomba. On 30 March 1815, Joachim Murat launched his proclamation to the Italian people from Rimini, inciting them to unity and independence. In 1845 a band of adventurers commanded by Ribbotti entered the city and proclaimed a constitution which was soon abolished. In 1860 Rimini and the Romagna were incorporated with the Kingdom of Italy. 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Emilia-Romagna is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... The French Revolution (1789-1799) was a period of major political and social change in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based... The flag of the Cisalpine Republic was the Transpadane Republic vertical Italian tricolour, with the square shape of the Cispadane Republic The Cisalpine Republic (Italian: Repubblica Cisalpina) was a French client republic in Northern Italy that lasted from 1797 to 1802. ... Napoleon I Bonaparte, Emperor of the French, King of Italy, Mediator of the Swiss Confederation and Protector of the Confederation of the Rhine (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... March 30 is the 89th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (90th in a leap year). ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Joachim Murat, King of Naples, Marshal of France Murat portrait, by François Pascal Simon, Baron Gérard, c. ...


An idea of what the city was like in the 19th century is provided by the palaces built along Corso Augusto and in particular by the theatre, which was designed by Luigi Poletti and succeeded in translating into Neoclassical form the ambitions of the ruling classes. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


However, the biggest revolutionary element for the city was the foundation in 1843 of the first bathing establishment and the Kursaal, constructed to host sumptuous social events, became the symbol of tourist Rimini. In just a few years, the marina underwent considerable building work making Rimini 'the city of small villas'. At the beginning of the twentieth century, The Grand Hotel, the city’s first important accommodation facility, was built near the coast and soon became the emblem of a new kind of tourism.


During World War II, the city was torn apart by heavy bombardments and by the passage of the front along the Gothic Line but after liberation on September 21, 1944, impressive reconstruction work began, culminating in the explosive development of the tourist economy that created a new urban reality. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... German defensive positions in Northern Italy 1944 370th Infantry Regiment walking toward the mountains at north of Prato - april 1945 The Gothic Line, also known as Linea Gotica, formed Field Marshal Albert Kesselrings last line of defence along the summits of the Apennines during the fighting retreat of Nazi... September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years). ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


Main sights

Fontana della Pigna, in Cavour Square.
Fontana della Pigna, in Cavour Square.
The Arch of Augustus.
The Arch of Augustus.
  • The 13th century Cathedral (San Francesco, best known as Tempio Malatestiano) was originally in Gothic style, but was transformed by order of Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta according to the designs of Leon Battista Alberti and never completed. In the cathedral are the tombs of Sigismondo and his wife Isotta.
  • The Arch of Augustus. Built in 27 BC, it has a single gate 9.92  high and 8.45 wide. The merlons were added in the Middle Ages.
  • the church of San Giuliano Martire (1553-1575), housing the great picture of Paul Veronese (1588) representing the martyrdom of that saint. It includes also pictures of Bittino da Faenza (1357) dealing with some episodes of the saint's life (1409).
  • The Tiberius Bridge As the inscription on the internal parapets recalls, the bridge over the Marecchia River, then known as Ariminus, began under the Emperor Augustus in 14 and was completed under Tiberius in 21. The bridge still connects the city centre to Borgo San Giuliano and leads to the consular roads Via Emilia and Via Popilia that lead north. Built in Istria stone, the bridge consists of five arches that rest on massive pillars with breakwater spurs set at an oblique angle with respect to the bridge’s axis in order to follow the current. The bridge’s structure on the other hand, rests on a practical system of wooden poles.
  • The amphitheater (2nd century). It was erected alongside the ancient coast line, and had a two orders of porticoes with 60 arcades. It had elliptical shape, with axes of 117,7 x 88 meters. The arena measured 73 x 44 meters, not far from the greatest Roman amphitheatres: the edifice could house up to 15,000 spectators.
  • The Castel Sismondo or Rocca Malatestiana of Sigismondo Pandolfo was later used as a prison.
  • Palazzo dell'Arengo e del Podestà (1204), seat of the judiciary and civil administrations. On the short side in the 14th century the podestà residence was added. It was modified at the end of the 16th century.
  • The church of St. John the Evangelist (also known as St. Augustine)
  • The church of San Giovanni Battista, erected in the 12th century. It has a single nave with rich stucco decoration from the 18th century.
  • The town hall has a small but valuable gallery (Perin del Vaga, Ghirlandajo, Bellini, Benedetto Coda, Tintoretto, Agostino di Duccio); the Gambalunga Library (1677) has valuable manuscripts.
  • Church of San Fortunato (1418). It houses the Adoration of the Magi (1547) by Giorgio Vasari.
  • The bell tower of the former Cathedral of Santa Colomba.
  • Archeological museum .
  • Bronze statue of Paul V.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 1883 KB) Summary Fontana della Pigna, is a fountain in the city of Rimini. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 1883 KB) Summary Fontana della Pigna, is a fountain in the city of Rimini. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1114x1120, 739 KB)Giulio Carlo Argan, Storia dellArte, Sansoni, 1981 Images of uncertain copyright status ^ 17 U.S.C. §104A File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1114x1120, 739 KB)Giulio Carlo Argan, Storia dellArte, Sansoni, 1981 Images of uncertain copyright status ^ 17 U.S.C. §104A File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The main entrance. ... Königsberg Cathedral Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... Leone Battista Alberti (February 1404 - 25th April 1472), Italian painter, poet, linguist, philosopher, cryptographer, musician, architect, and general Renaissance polymath . ... The Battle of Lepanto by Paolo Veronese Veronese is the name usually used to refer to painter Paolo Veronese; alternatively it means someone or something from Verona, Italy. ... The name amphitheatre (alternatively amphitheater) is given to a public building of the Classical period (being particularly associated with ancient Rome) which was used for spectator sports, games and displays. ... The 2nd century is the period from 101 - 200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Castel Sismondo is a castle in Rimini, Romagna, northern Italy. ... // Events February - Byzantine emperor Alexius IV is overthrown in a revolution, and Alexius V is proclaimed emperor. ... Giorgio Vasaris selfportrait Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Giorgio Vasari Giorgio Vasari (Arezzo, Tuscany July 3, 1511 - Florence, June 27, 1574) was an Italian painter and architect, mainly known for his famous biographies of Italian artists. ... Painting of Pope Paul V by Caravaggio Paul V, né Camillo Borghese (Rome, September 17, 1550 - January 28, 1621) was Pope from May 16, 1605 until his death. ...

Night life

Rimini is famous for its nightlife, and is known as the "Ibiza of the Adriatic". The city itself does not have any clubs, but many of its bars have dance floors that are frequently packed. Riccione, the next township, is the place to go for the big clubs. Template:Stub comuni Template:Comune2 Riccione is an Italian comune with 32,991 inhabitants in the Rimini province. ...


The city is notable in disco music history for its Cosmic Club who's DJ Daniele Baldelli played records from a moving elevator to the young experimental audience. Baldelli's important contribution to the world of DJing is perhaps overshadowed by his American counterparts, Frankie Knuckles and Ron Hardy. Frankie Knuckles (born January 18, 1955, in New York City) is a DJ, producer and remix artist. ... Ron Hardy was the DJ of Chicago club The Music Box, which opened in 1983. ...


Transportation

Rimini is provided with six railway stations (Rimini, Rimini Fiera, Rimini Miramare, Rimini Rivazzurra, Rimini Viserba and Rimini Torre Pedrera).


It is served by the Federico Fellini International Airport, airport of Rimini and San Marino. Federico Fellini International Airport (IATA: RMI, ICAO: LIPR) is an airport located at Miramare, 8 kilometres (5 miles) away from the city of Rimini, Italy and 16 kilometres (10 miles) away City of San Marino, San Marino. ...

Find more information on Rimini by searching Wikipedia's sister projects
 Dictionary definitions from Wiktionary
 Textbooks from Wikibooks
 Quotations from Wikiquote
 Source texts from Wikisource
 Images and media from Commons
 News stories from Wikinews
 Learning resources from Wikiversity

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ...

Famous residents

Pietro Aron (also Pietro Aaron), c. ... Federico Fellini Federico Fellini (January 20, 1920 – October 31, 1993) was one of the most influential and widely revered Italian film-makers of the 20th century and is considered to be one of the finest film directors of all time. ... Gianciotto Discovers Paolo and Francesca by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres Francesca da Rimini or Francesca da Polenta (died 1285) was the beautiful daughter of Guido da Polenta of Ravenna. ... Hugo Pratt (June 15, 1927, Rimini, Italy – August 20, 1995, Grandvaux, near Lausanne, Switzerland,) was an Italian comic book creator who combined his strong storytelling talent with extensive historical research on Corto Maltese and his other series. ... Guido Cagnacci ( 1601-1663) was a late Baroque painter of the Bolognese School. ... Giuseppe Garampi (Rimini, 29th October, 1725 - 4th May, 1792) was nominated Cardinal of the Catholic Church by pope Pius VI. He was born in Rimini on 29th October, 1725. ... Portrait of Sigismondo Malatesta in a portrait by Piero della Francesca Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta (1417 – 1468) (the wolf of Rimini) was lord of Rimini, Fano, and Cesena from 1432. ... Renzo Pasolini (18 July 1938 - 20 May 1973), nicknamed Paso, was a popular Italian Grand Prix motorcycle road racer in the 1960s. ... Carlo Tessarini (1690; – 1766), was an Italian composer and violinist in the late Baroque era. ...

Sister Cities

Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... Seraing is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Liège. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_France. ... Saint-Maur-des-Fossés is a commune in the southeastern suburbs of Paris, France. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia_(bordered). ... Soci may refer to several villages in Romania: Soci, a village in PănceÅŸti Commune, Bacău County Soci, a village in MirosloveÅŸti Commune, IaÅŸi County Soci, a village in Borca Commune, NeamÅ£ County Soci, a village in Åžtefan cel Mare Commune, NeamÅ£ County Soci, a village... Image File history File links Flag_of_Senegal. ... Ziguinchor (from Portuguese Cheguei e choram, I came and they Cry) is the capital of the Casamance region of Senegal, lying on the Casamance River. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... Nickname: Nickname: Venice of America Coordinates: Country United States State Florida County Broward Established 27 March 1911 Government Type Commission-Manager  - Mayor Jim Naugle Area  - City  36. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Yangzhou (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; former spellings: Yang-chou, Yangchow; literally Rising Prefecture) is a prefecture-level city in central Jiangsu province, Peoples Republic of China. ...

See also

The Bishopric of Rimini is an ecclestiastical territory in Emilia Romagna, Italy. ... Rimini Calcio F.C. is an Italian football club based in Rimini, Emilia-Romagna. ...

Sources and external links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Hotel Rimini Alberghi Rimini Hotel Riccione (280 words)
Hotel a Rimini sulla spiaggia, alberghi fronte mare, soluzioni ideali per le vacanze per famiglie, alberghi Rimini per bambini, hotel che possono ospitare animali, hotel con parcheggio e hotel con piscina, tutte le offerte per una bella vacanza sulla Riviera Romagnola
Fiere Rimini: elenco delle fiere di Rimini con offerte di soggiorno degli Hotel vicino la Fiera.
Se cerchi la soluzione ideale per organizzare una vacanza sulla Riviera Romagnola in questo sito potrai trovare un elenco di ottimi hotel a Rimini, Alberghi per famiglie, per sportivi ma per scoprire le occasioni più interessanti per una vacanza last minute ti invitiamo a guardare le proposte Last Minute Hotel Rimini.
Rimini - definition of Rimini in Encyclopedia (842 words)
Rimini is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy, population 128,656 (2001).
Rimini, which drew the attention of many emperors, Augustus and Hadrian in particular, was experiencing a great period in its history, embodied by the construction of prestigious monuments such as the Arch of Augustus, Tiberius' Bridge and the Amphitheatre.
In 1797, Rimini along with the rest of Romagna was influenced by the passage of the Jacobin troops and became part of the Cisalpine Republic.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m