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Encyclopedia > Riga
Rīga
 
Riga old town silhouette at the horizon.
City rights 1225
Location of Rīga within Latvia
Location 56°58′N, 24°8′E
Other names Estonian: Riia; Finnish: Riika; Lithuanian: Ryga; Russian: Рига; Polish: Ryga
Mayor Jānis Birks
Area 307.17 km² (119 sq mi)
  Water 48.50 km² (19 sq mi)
Population 727,578
Metropolitan 1,148,003
Density 2,382 /km² (6,169 /sq mi)
Postal code LV-10(01-84)
Calling code +371 67
Time zone EET (UTC+2)
  Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3)
Homepage of Rīga


Riga (Latvian: Rīga, IPA[riːga], pronunciation ) the capital of Latvia, is situated on the Baltic Sea coast on the mouth of the river Daugava. Riga is the largest city in the Baltic states. The Historic Centre of Riga has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and the city is particularly notable for its extensive Art Nouveau (Jugendstil) architecture, which UNESCO considers to be unparalleled anywhere in the world [1] Riga is a city in Latvia. ... Image File history File links Coat_of_Arms_of_Riga. ... Image File history File links Riga_flag. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2962 × 1974 pixel, file size: 1. ... Town privileges was an important feature of European towns during most of the 2nd millenium. ... // The Teutonic Order is expelled from Transylvania. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Jānis Birks (born July 31, 1956) is a Latvian politician. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Postcodes are generally clearly visible outside Australia Post offices. ... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing daylight saving Eastern European Time (EET) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Eastern European Time Central Africa Time Israel Standard Time South Africa Standard Time Central European Summer Time West Africa Summer Time Category: ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern European Summer Time (EEST) is one of the names of UTC+3 time zone, 3 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Image File history File links Rigapronunc. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... For other uses, see Baltic (disambiguation). ... Daugava sunset in Riga. ... The three Baltic states: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania The terms Baltic countries, Baltic Sea countries, Baltic states, and Balticum refer to slightly different combinations of countries in the general area surrounding the Baltic Sea. ... Org type Specialized Agency Acronyms UNESCO Head Director General of UNESCO Koïchiro Matsuura Japan Status Active Established 1945 Website www. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Vitebsk Railway Station one of the finest examples of Art Nouveau architecture. ... Jugendstil is defined as a style of architecture or decorative art similar to Art Nouveau, popular in German-speaking areas of Europe during the late 19th and early 20th centuries [1]. Jugendstil was also popular in the Nordic countries, where it became integrated with the National Romantic Style. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Riga
The Rīga skyline in the mid-16th century, Cosmographia Universalis

Riga is located at the site of an ancient settlement of the Livonians, an ancient Finnic tribe, at the junction of the Daugava and the Riga River, at one point forming a natural harbor called the Riga Lake, neither of which exist today [2]. It is believed that the name of the river gave Riga its name. [3] Riga city in 1547 The history of Riga, the capital of Latvia, begins with the ancient settlement of the Livonians, an ancient Finnic tribe, at the junction of the Daugava and Ridzene (Latvian: ) rivers. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Livonians are the indigenous inhabitants of a large part of what is today the Republic of Latvia. ... Finnic peoples (Fennic, sometimes Baltic-Finnic) refers to a group of related ethnic groups and nations speaking Finnic languages (also known as Balto-Finnic languages). ... Daugava sunset in Riga. ...


The modern founding of Riga is regarded by historians to have begun with the arrival of German traders, mercenaries and religious crusaders in the second half of the 12th century, attracted by a sparsely populated region, potential new markets and by the missionary opportunities to convert the local population to Christianity. German merchants established an outpost for trading with the Balts near the Liv settlement at Riga in 1158. The Augustinian monk Meinhard built a monastery there ca. 1190. This article is about the medieval crusades. ... For other uses, see Missionary (disambiguation). ... Religious conversion is the adoption of a new religious identity, or a change from one religious identity to another. ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... http://www. ... The Livonians are the indigenous inhabitants of a large part of what is today the Republic of Latvia. ... Detail of St. ... The Latin word circa, literally meaning about, is often used to describe various dates (often birth and death dates) that are uncertain. ...


Bishop Albert was proclaimed Bishop of Livonia by his uncle Hartwig, Archbishop of Bremen and Hamburg in 1199. He landed in Riga in 1201 with 23 ships and more than 1500 armed crusaders, making Riga his bishopric. He established the Order of Livonian Brothers of the Sword (later a branch of the Teutonic Knights) and granted Riga city rights in that same year.[citation needed] The career of Albert of Buxhoeveden (ca 1165 - Riga, January 17, 1229) and his brother Hermann exemplify the double nature of power, ecclesiastical and secular, especially on the marches of Europe, where Roman Catholicism was pushing aggressively to the East. ... Baltic Tribes, ca 1200 CE This article is about the region in Europe. ... The Archbishopric of Bremen was an ecclesiastical state in the Holy Roman Empire. ... Map of the Livonian Confederation, showing the territories of the Order in 1260 Capital Fellin (Viljandi) Language(s) Low German Religion Roman Catholicism Government Principality Master of the Livonian Order  - 1204–09 Wenno von Rohrbach  - 1209–36 Volquin  - 1237–38 Hermann Balk¹  - 1559–61 Gotthard Kettler¹ Historical era Middle Ages... For the state, see Monastic state of the Teutonic Knights. ...


Riga served as a gateway to trade with the Baltic tribes and with Russia. In 1282 Riga became a member of the Hanseatic League. The Hansa was instrumental in giving Riga economic and political stability, thus providing the city with a strong foundation which endured the political conflagrations that were to come, down to modern times. Carta marina of the Baltic Sea region (1539). ...


As the influence of the Hansa waned, Riga became the object of foreign military, political, religious and economic aspirations. Riga accepted the Reformation in 1522, ending the power of the archbishops. In 1524, a venerated statue of the Virgin Mary in the Cathedral was denounced as a witch, and given a trial by water in the Daugava or Dvina River. The statue floated, so it was denounced as a witch and burnt at Kubsberg[4]. With the demise of the Teutonic Knights in 1561, Riga for twenty years had the status of a Free Imperial City, then in 1581, Riga came under the influence of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 1621 Riga and the outlying fortress of Daugavgriva came under the rule of Gustavus Adolphus, King of Sweden, who intervened in the Thirty Years' War not only for political and economic gain but also in favor of German Lutheran Protestantism. During the Russo-Swedish War, 1656-1658, Riga withstood a siege by Russians. Riga remained the largest city in Sweden until 1710 during a period in which the city retained a great deal of self-government autonomy. In that year, in the course of Great Northern War, Russia under Tsar Peter the Great invaded Riga. Sweden's northern dominance ended, and Russia's emergence as the strongest Northern power was formalized through the Treaty of Nystad in 1721. Riga was annexed by Russia and became an industrialized port city of the Russian empire, where it remained until World War I. By 1900, Riga was the third largest city in Russia after Moscow and Saint Petersburg in terms of numbers of industrial workers.[citation needed] The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... See Trial by drowning for the supposed medieval judicial process. ... Daugava sunset in Riga. ... For the state, see Monastic state of the Teutonic Knights. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Swedish army bombarding the fortress of Dünamünde. ... Gustav II Adolph Gustav II Adolph (December 9, 1594 - November 6, 1632) (also known as Gustav Adolph the Great, under the Latin name Gustavus Adolphus or the Swedish form Gustav II Adolf) was a King of Sweden. ... Combatants Sweden  Bohemia Denmark-Norway[1] Dutch Republic France Scotland England Saxony  Holy Roman Empire Catholic League Austria Bavaria Spain Commanders Frederick V Buckingham Leven Gustav II Adolf â€  Johan Baner Cardinal Richelieu Louis II de Bourbon Vicomte de Turenne Christian IV of Denmark Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar Johann Georg I... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... The Russo-Swedish War of 1656-1658 was fought by Russia and Sweden against the background of the simultaneous Northern Wars and the War for Ukraine. ... Combatants Sweden Ottoman Empire (1710–1714) Ukrainian Cossacks Russia Denmark-Norway Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth Saxony after 1718 Prussia Hanover Commanders Charles XII of Sweden Ahmed III Ivan Mazepa Peter the Great Frederick IV of Denmark Augustus II the Strong Strength 77,000 in the beginning of the war. ... Tsar (Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian цар, Russian  , in scientific transliteration respectively car and car ), occasionally spelled Czar or Tzar and sometimes Csar or Zar in English, is a Slavonic term designating certain monarchs. ... Peter the Great or Pyotr Alexeyevich Romanov (Russian: Пётр I Алексеевич Pyotr I Alekse`yevich, Пётр Великий Pyotr Veli`kiy) (9 June 1672 – 8 February 1725 [30 May 1672–28 January 1725 O.S.][1]) ruled Russia from 7 May (27 April O.S.) 1682 until his death, jointly ruling before 1696 with his... The Treaty of Nystad (1721), signed at the present-day Finnish town of Uusikaupunki (Swedish Nystad), ended the Great Northern War, in which Russia received the territories of Estonia, Livonia and Ingria, as well as much of Karelia and Tsar Peter I of Russia replaced King Frederick I of Sweden... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland...

Riga in 1650. The inscription reads: Prospect der Stadt Riga ums Jahr 1650 (View at the City of Riga in the year 1650). Drawing by Johann Christoph Brotze
Riga in 1650. The inscription reads: Prospect der Stadt Riga ums Jahr 1650 (View at the City of Riga in the year 1650). Drawing by Johann Christoph Brotze

During these many centuries of war and changes of power in the Baltic, the Baltic Germans in Riga remained in their dominant position despite demographic changes. Riga employed German as its official language of administration until the imposition of Russian language in 1891 as the official language in the Baltic provinces. Latvians began to supplant Germans as the largest ethnic group in the city in the mid-19th century. The rise of a Latvian bourgeoisie made Riga a center of the Latvian National Awakening with the founding of the Riga Latvian Association in 1868 and the organization of the first national song festival in 1873. The nationalist movement of the Young Latvians was followed by the socialist New Current during the city's rapid industrialization, culminating in the 1905 Revolution led by the Latvian Social Democratic Workers' Party. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Johann Christoph Brotze (1742-1823) (or Johans Kristofs Broce in Latvian) is a famous German pedagogue and ethnographer, born in Gerlitz. ... The Baltic Germans (German: , or Baltendeutsche) were mostly ethnically German inhabitants of the eastern shore of the Baltic Sea, which today form the countries of Estonia and Latvia. ... Russification is an adoption of the Russian language or some other Russian attribute (whether voluntarily or not) by non-Russian communities. ... Russian ( , transliteration: , Russian pronunciation: ) is the most geographically widespread language of Eurasia, the most widely spoken of the Slavic languages, and the largest native language in Europe. ... Bourgeois redirects here. ... The Latvian National Awakening (in Latvian: latvieÅ¡u [or latvju] tautas atmoda) refers to three distinct but ideologically related nationalist movements: the First Awakening refers to the national revival led by the Young Latvians from the 1850s to the 1880s, the Second Awakening to the movement that led to the... The Young Latvians (in Latvian: jaunlatvieÅ¡i) is the term most often applied to the intellectuals of the first Latvian National Awakening (in Latvian: tautas atmoda), active from the 1850s to the 1880s. ... In the history of Latvia, the New Current (in Latvian, Jaunā strāva; participants in the movement are called jaunstrāvnieki) was a broad leftist social and political movement that followed the First Latvian National Awakening (led by the Young Latvians from the 1850s to the 1880s) and culminated in... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... The Latvian Social Democratic Workers Party (Latvian: Latvijas Sociāldemokrātiskā Strādnieku Partija, abbreviated as LSDSP) is a political party in Latvia. ...


The 20th century brought World War I and the impact of the Russian Revolution of 1917 to Riga. The German army marched into Riga in 1917. In 1918 the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk was signed giving the Baltic countries to Germany. Because of the Armistice with Germany of November 11, 1918, Germany had to renounce that treaty, as did Russia, leaving Latvia and the other Baltic States in a position to claim independence. Latvia, with Riga as its capital city, thus declared its independence on November 18, 1918. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Russian Revolution of 1917 was a series of political and social upheavals in Russia, involving first the overthrow of the tsarist autocracy, and then the overthrow of the liberal and moderate-socialist Provisional Government, resulting in the establishment of Soviet power under the control of the Bolshevik party. ... The first two pages of the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk, in (left to right) German, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Ottoman Turkish and Russian The Treaty of Brest-Litovsk was a peace treaty signed on March 3, 1918, at Brest-Litovsk (now Brest, Belarus) between the Russian SFSR and the Central Powers, marking... The three Baltic states: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania The terms Baltic countries, Baltic Sea countries, Baltic states, and Balticum refer to slightly different combinations of countries in the general area surrounding the Baltic Sea. ... Front page of the New York Times on Armistice Day, 11 November 1918 The armistice treaty between the Allies and Germany was signed in a railway carriage in Compiègne Forest on November 11, 1918, and marked the end of the First World War on the Western Front. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

A view of Riga on a postcard. circa 1900.
A view of Riga on a postcard. circa 1900.

Between World War I and World War II (1918–1940), Riga and Latvia shifted their focus from Russia to the countries of Western Europe. The United Kingdom and Germany replaced Russia as Latvia's major trade partners. Download high resolution version (1024x762, 191 KB)The view of Riga. ... Download high resolution version (1024x762, 191 KB)The view of Riga. ... A current understanding of Western Europe. ...


During the World War II, Latvia was occupied first by the Soviet Union in 1941 and then by the Nazi Germany in 1941-1944. The Baltic Germans were forcibly repatriated to Germany. The city's Jewish community was forced into a ghetto in the Maskavas neighbourhood, and concentration camps were constructed in Kaiserwald and at the Salaspils city. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Occupation of Latvia by Nazi Germany. ... The Baltic Germans (German: , or Baltendeutsche) were mostly ethnically German inhabitants of the eastern shore of the Baltic Sea, which today form the countries of Estonia and Latvia. ... Kaiserwald was a Nazi concentration camp near a village outside Riga. ... Salaspils (population 21,106 in the census of 2000, known as Kirchholm until 1917), is a town 18 km south-east of Riga in Latvia, on the western bank of Daugava river. ...


In 1945 Latvia was once again occupied by the Red Army. As a result of the war Latvia lost approximately one-third of its population.[citation needed] Forced industrialization and planned[citation needed] large-scale immigration of large numbers of non-Latvians from other Soviet republics into Riga, particularly Russians, changed the demographic composition of Riga.


The policy of economic reform, introduced in 1986 as Perestroika, led to disolution of the Soviet Union and restoration of independent Latvia in 1991. Latvia formally joined the United Nations as an independent country on September 17, 1991. In 2004 Latvia joined both NATO and the European Union. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... UN redirects here. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... This article is about the military alliance. ...


In 2004, the arrival of low-cost airlines resulted in cheaper flights from other European cities such as London and Berlin and consequently a substantial increase in numbers of tourists. [5] A Ryanair Boeing 737-800 A low-cost carrier or low-cost airline (also known as a no-frills or discount carrier / airline) is an airline that offers generally low fares in exchange for eliminating many traditional passenger services. ...


Geography

Historic Centre of Riga*
UNESCO World Heritage Site

The Old Town of Riga
Type Cultural
Criteria i, ii
Reference 852
Region** Europe and North America
Inscription history
Inscription 1997  (21st Session)
* Name as inscribed on World Heritage List.
** Region as classified by UNESCO.

A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Image File history File linksMetadata Riga_dom. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This is a list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...

Cityscape

  • The Dom Cathedral, the largest church in the Baltic states. Built in the 13th century, it was modified several times in its history. It has a magnificent organ that dates from 1844.
  • Riga Castle (Rīgas Pils), which houses the Museum of Latvian History and the Museum of Foreign Art.
  • Saint Peter's Church, Riga, with its 123 m (404 ft) high tower.
  • St. John's Church, a small 13th-century chapel, behind Saint Peter's Church.
  • The Powder Tower (Pulvertornis), the only tower that remains from the original city walls. The Latvian Museum of War is located inside.
  • Wooden architecture.
  • Ethnographic Open-Air Museum (Brīvdabas Muzejs), houses, farm buildings, and church representing rural life going back hundreds of years. Situated along Jugla Lake (Juglas Ezers).
  • The Occupation Museum of Latvia, which documents the seizure and occupation of Latvia by different forces from 1940 to 1991.
  • Art Nouveau architecture on Central Riga streets such as Alberta and Elizabetes Iela.
  • Riga Radio and TV Tower - the third highest tower in Europe.
  • Motor Museum (Motormuzejs) - collection of retro motorcycles and automobiles, including some of the first motorcycles and remants of the Soviet era, for example, Brezhnev's and Stalin's armored limousines with waxworks of these political figures. Located in Mežciems.
  • Riga Zoo and Mežaparks (Forest Park) with a Ferris wheel.
  • Domina Shopping Centre - the largest shopping centre in the Baltic states (located in the North-West side of Purvciems).
  • Riga Circus - the only permanently situatated circus in the Baltic States.
  • "Lido" Atputas Centers (Recreation Centre) - restaurant, beer garden, amusement park and gift shop about 10 minutes from the city center.

The cathedral with Riga Castle and Daugava river in the background Riga Cathedral (Latvian: ) is the Protestant Cathedral in Riga, Latvia. ... The three Baltic states: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. ... Old Pipe organ in Église Saint-Thomas, Strasbourg, France. ... Riga Castle Riga Castle (Rīgas pils in Latvian) is a 13th century castle on the banks of River Daugava in Riga, the capital of Latvia. ... Spire of church on right St. ... The Radio and TV Tower from below The Riga Radio and TV Tower (Rīgas radio un televīzijas tornis) is the tallest structure in Riga, Latvia and Baltic states. ... (Latvian: Mežciems) A neighbourhood of Riga, Latvia. ... Riga Zoo is a city-owned zoo in Riga, Latvia. ... Mežaparks is a neighbourhood in North Central Riga, Latvia. ... A neighbourhood of Riga, Latvia. ...

Neighbourhoods

The Powder Tower of Riga
The Powder Tower of Riga
Left-bank Riga is distinguished by its green streets and large parks.
Left-bank Riga is distinguished by its green streets and large parks.

The city of Riga consists of six administrative regions, four of which are named after regions of Latvia - Kurzeme district, Latgale suburb, Vidzeme suburb, Zemgale suburb. There is also a Central District and a Northern district. Residents, however, divide Riga into residential neighbourhoods called micro regions. Unlike the city centre, they are mostly residential although they are equipped with commercial sectors. These neighbourhoods include: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 1079 KB) Summary self taken pcture of the Riga Powder Tower (Pulvertornis). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 1079 KB) Summary self taken pcture of the Riga Powder Tower (Pulvertornis). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1224x1632, 537 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Riga Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1224x1632, 537 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Riga Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Courland, Kurland, Couronia, or Curonia, a former Baltic province of the Teutonic Order state in Livonia (ca. ... Latgale or Latgalia (Latvian: , Latgale dialect: Latgola) is one of the four cultural regions of Latvia recognised in the Constitution of the Latvian Republic. ... Livonia (Latvian: Livonija; Estonian: Liivimaa; German: Livland; Polish: Inflanty; Russian: Лифляндия or Liflandiya) once was the land of the Finnic Livonians, but came in the Middle Ages to designate a much broader territory controlled by the Livonian Order on the eastern coasts of the Baltic Sea in present-day Latvia and... Zemgale (also historically known as Semigallia or Semigalia) forms an historical region of Latvia, sometimes also including a part of Lithuania. ...

  • Āgenskalns - Left bank, old neighbourhood, mainly built in late 19th - early 20th century.
  • Andrejsala - An emerging art, culture and entertainment district, located within former territory of the industrial port.
  • Beberbeķi - A neighbourhood consisting mainly of private houses, it lies on the western edge of the city. Swampy forest Mukupurvs and Riga Airport noise area divides it from the rest of the city.
  • Bolderāja - Left bank, Northernmost neighbourhood. 18th century fort bilt by Peter the Great is one of the oldest buildings in this part of the city.
  • Čiekurkalns - Right bank, old neighbourhood.
  • Dārzciems - Right bank, mainly consists of one- or two-story private houses.
  • Dreiliņi - A newly built neighbourhood in the eastern part of the city.
  • Dzirciems - Left bank, South of Iļģuciems.
  • Iļģuciems - Left bank, North of Āgenskalns.
  • Imanta - Left bank, newly-built neighbourhood.
  • Jugla - Right bank, large neighbourhood, lies just West of lake Juglas.
  • Ķengarags - Right bank, South-East of city center. One of the most inhabited neighbourhoods in town.
  • Ķīpsala - island located just West of the Old Town. Home to The Press Office and Exhibition Hall.
  • Maskavas Forštate - located South of the city centre.
  • Mežaparks - Right bank, consists largely of private houses. Notable for its large forest-like park and the city zoo.
  • Mežciems - Right bank, just East of large Biķernieku forest.
  • Pārdaugava - Not really a neighbourhood by itself, but the name is frequently used when talking about Left bank, particularly Āgenskalns and Torņakalns.
  • Pleskodāle - A neighbourhood consisting mostly of private houses on the west side of the city. It borders Zolitūde and Šampēteris neighbourhoods.
  • Pļavnieki - Right bank, one of the town's most inhabited neighbourhoods.
  • Purvciems - Right bank.
  • Sarkandaugava - Right bank, East of the small river with the same name.
  • Šampēteris - An old neighbourhood on the best bank of Daugava, with many houses built in the first part of 20th century still surviving.
  • Šmerlis - Right bank, more of a forest than a neighbourhood, it is home to Riga's Cinema Studio.
  • Torņakalns - Left bank, old neighbourhood known for the Māras pond.
  • Vecmīlgrāvis - Right bank, cut off the mainland by a small river, Mīlgrāvis.
  • Vecrīga - Old Town.
  • Ziepniekkalns - Left bank, consists both of old and new buildings.
  • Zolitūde - Left bank, another newly-built neighbourhood, just South of Imanta.

Some common factors in these place names are "vec" meaning old [vecs], "kalns" meaning hill, "ciems" meaning village, "sala" meaning island and "mež" meaning forest [mežs]. Ä€genskalns — district in Riga, located at the left bank of Daugava, old neighbourhood, mainly built in late 19th - early 20th century. ... Andrejsala is a special district of Riga, Latvia, located within former territory of industrial port next to the city center. ... A neighbourhood consisting mainly of private houses, it lies on the western edge of the city. ... RÄ«ga International Airport (IATA: RIX, ICAO: EVRA) was built in Skulte in 1973. ... Bolderāja is a district to the north-west of Riga, the capital of Latvia. ... Peter I Emperor and Autocrat of All Russia Peter I (Pyotr Alekseyvich) (9 June 1672–8 February 1725 [30 May 1672–28 January 1725 O.S.1]) ruled Russia from 7 May (27 April O.S.) 1682 until his death. ... Right bank, old neighbourhood. ... Right bank, mainly consists of one- or two-story private houses. ... Dreiliņi prior reconstruction in 2003 Reconstruction in 2004 Dreiliņi is a newly built neighbourhood on the eastern edge of Riga. ... Built in 60`s. ... Left bank, North of Ä€genskalns. ... A neighbourhood of Riga, Latvia. ... A neighbourhood of Riga, Latvia. ... Ķengarags is a neighborhood in the city of Riga, Latvia. ... Ķīpsala is an island in the left bank of Daugava. ... located South of the city centre. ... Mežaparks is a neighbourhood in North Central Riga, Latvia. ... (Latvian: Mežciems) A neighbourhood of Riga, Latvia. ... A neighbourhood of Riga, Latvia. ... A neighbourhood consisting mostly of private houses on the west side of the city. ... (Latvian: Pļavnieki) A neighbourhood of Riga, Latvia. ... A neighbourhood of Riga, Latvia. ... A neighbourhood of Riga, Latvia. ... An old neighbourhood on the best bank of Daugava, with many houses built in the first part of 20th century still surviving. ... Å merlis is a neighborhood in Riga, Latvia. ... Torņakalns is a neighbourhood of Riga, Latvia. ... Vecmilgravis is an area of Riga, capital of Latvia located in the northern part of the city. ... VecrÄ«ga (Old Riga) is the historical center of Riga, located on the left side of Daugava river. ... A neighbourhood of Riga, Latvia. ... Aleksandra Bieziņa street ZolitÅ«de train station ZolitÅ«de is a neighbourhood of Riga, the capital of Latvia, located on the citys western edge. ...

Panorama over Riga from Latvian Academy of Sciences
Panorama over Riga from Latvian Academy of Sciences

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 84 pixelsFull resolution (16150 × 1693 pixel, file size: 3. ... Latvian Academy of Sciences The Academy of Sciences is the official science academy of Latvia and is an association of the countrys foremost scientists. ...

Climate

The climate of Riga is maritime and temperate, but the winters can be extreme due to the northern location. The coldest months are January and February, when the average temperature is -6°C but can frequently drop as low as -25°C. Due to the proximity of the sea autumn rains and fogs are frequent. Continuous snow cover may last eighty days. The summers in Riga are very warm and humid, with an average temperature of 18°C, the peak often goes as high as 36°C.



Weather averages for Riga
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 10.2 (50) 13.5 (56) 20.5 (69) 27.9 (82) 30.1 (86) 32.5 (91) 36.1 (97) 33.6 (92) 29.3 (85) 23.4 (74) 17.2 (63) 11.5 (53) 36.1 (97)
Average high °C (°F) -1.9 (29) -1.5 (29) 2.8 (37) 9.8 (50) 16.3 (61) 21.2 (70) 23.7 (75) 21.0 (70) 17.4 (63) 10.5 (51) 4.1 (39) 0.4 (33) 10.0 (50)
Average low °C (°F) -7.3 (19) -7.3 (19) -4.3 (24) 1.1 (34) 6.0 (43) 10.1 (50) 12.3 (54) 11.9 (53) 8.1 (47) 4.1 (39) -0.3 (31) -4.3 (24) 2.5 (37)
Record low °C (°F) -33.7 (-29) -34.9 (-31) -23.3 (-10) -11.4 (11) -5.3 (22) -1.2 (30) 4.0 (39) 0.0 (32) -4.1 (25) -8.7 (16) -19.0 (-2) -31.9 (-25) -34.9 (-31)
Precipitation mm (inches) 33 (1.3) 25 (1) 31 (1.2) 39 (1.5) 43 (1.7) 61 (2.4) 79 (3.1) 79 (3.1) 76 (3) 60 (2.4) 61 (2.4) 49 (1.9) 636 (25)
Source: Pogoda.ru.net[6] 8.09.2007

Economy

Business and leisure travel to Riga has increased significantly in recent years due to improved infrastructure. Most tourists travel to Riga by air via Riga International Airport, the largest airport in the Baltic states, which was renovated and modernized in 2001 on the occasion of Riga's 800th anniversary. In the near future, the face of Riga will undergo notable changes. The construction of a new landmark — the Latvian National Library building — is beginning in the autumn of 2007 and is due to be built by 2010.[7] Currently discussions are underway in Riga council about the development of the central areas on the left bank of the Daugava. The major dispute surrounds plans to build skyscrapers in Ķīpsala.[citation needed] The construction of 3 buildings in Ķīpsala has already started — the Da Vinci complex (25 floors) and two high-rises called Z-Towers (30 floors).[8][9] Almost all important Latvian financial institutions are located in Riga, including the Bank of Latvia, which is Latvia's central bank. Foreign commercial trade through Riga has been on the increase in recent years and received new impetus on May 1, 2004 when Latvia became a member of the European Union. Riga accounts for about half of the total industrial output of Latvia, focusing on the financial sector, public utilities, food and beverages, pharmaceuticals, wood processing, printing and publishing, textiles and furniture, and communications equipment manufacturing. More than 50% of Latvian companies are registered in Riga region.[10] The port of Riga is an important cargo shipping center. It is the main all-weather port in the Baltic and is expected to grow in the next few years due to increased trade with other ex-Soviet states and China. [11] RÄ«ga International Airport (IATA: RIX, ICAO: EVRA) was built in 1973 as an alternative to Spilve, which had become outdated. ... The three Baltic states: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. ... High-rise is a 1975 novel by J. G. Ballard. ... The Bank of Latvia (Latvijas Banka) is the central bank of Latvia. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Infrastructure

Riga has one airport, Riga International Airport, that serves commercial airlines. Air traffic at the airport has doubled between 1993 and 2004. Baltic sea ferries connect Riga to Stockholm, Kiel and Lübeck. Riga was also home to two air bases during the Cold War: Rumbula and Spilve. [12] Riga as a city-port is a major transportation hub and is the center of the local road and railway system. In 2008, the first stage of the new Southern Bridge route across the Daugava will be completed.[13] The Southern Bridge is currently the biggest construction project in Baltic States in 20 years, and will help to reduce traffic jams and the amount of traffic in the city centre.[14] Another big construction project is the planned Riga Northern Transport Corridor,[15] which is scheduled to start in 2010. RÄ«ga International Airport (IATA: RIX, ICAO: EVRA) was built in 1973 as an alternative to Spilve, which had become outdated. ... For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ... , For the city in the United States, see Kiel, Wisconsin. ... The title of this article contains the character ü. Where it is unavailable or not desired, the name may be represented as Luebeck. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Rumbula is an air base in Latvia located 11 km southeast of Riga. ... Spilves lidosta (Spilve airport, also given as RÄ«gas Centrālā Lidosta - RÄ«ga Central airport) is a former civilian and military airport in Latvia located 5 km north of the RÄ«ga city centre, from which aircraft took off as soon as the First World War. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ...


Public transportation in the city is provided by Rīgas Satiksme which operates a large fleet of trams, buses and trolleybuses on an extensive network of routes across the city. In addition, many private owners operate minibus services. Riga is connected to the rest of Latvia by trains operated by the national railway company Pasažieru Vilciens, whose headquarters are in Riga. There are also international rail links to Russia and Estonia (Valga). RÄ«gas Satiksme is a publicly owned body which operates public transport and vehicle hire in the Latvian capital Riga and its surrounding areas. ... A modern tram in the Töölö district of Helsinki, Finland A tram (or tramway, trolley, streetcar, tramcar, Straßenbahn) is a railborne vehicle (lighter than a train) for transport of passengers (or, occasionally, freight). ... This article is about the form of transport. ... A trolleybus in Arnhem An electric trolleybus (also known as trolley bus or trackless trolley or simply trolley) is a bus powered by two overhead electric wires, from which the bus draws electricity using two trolley poles. ... Volkswagen minibus A minibus is a motor vehicle that is designed to carry fewer people than a full-size bus. ... Electric train Pasažieru Vilciens (PV)(eng: Passenger Train) is the only passenger-carrying railway company in Latvia, operating both electric and diesel trains on various lines throughout the country. ... County Valga County Mayor Margus Lepik Area 16. ...


Demographics

Year Population
1767 19,500
1800 29,500
1840 60,000
1867 102,600
1881 169,300
1897 282,200
1913 517,500
1920 ¹185,100
1930 377,900
1940 353,800
Year Population
1941 335,200
1945 ²228,200
1950 482,300
1955 566,900
1959 580,400
1965 665,200
1970 731,800
1975 795,600
1979 835,500
1987 900,300
Year Population
1990 909,135
1991 900,455
1992 889,741
1993 863,657
1994 843,552
1995 824,988
1996 810,172
1997 797,947
1998 786,612
1999 776,008
Year Population
2000 764,329
2001 756,627
2002 747,157
2003 739,232
2004 735,241
2005 731,762
2006 727,578
2007 722,485

With 722,485 inhabitants in 2007, Riga is the largest city in the Baltic States, though its population has decreased since 1991. [16] Notable causes include out-migration and low fertility rates. Some have estimated that the population may fall by as much as 50% by 2050.[17] According to the 2007 data, native Latvians make up 42.3% of the population of Riga, with the percentage of Russians at 42.1%, Belarusians at 4.4%, Ukrainians at 3.9%, Poles at 2.0%, and others at 4.3%.[18] By comparison, 59% of Latvia's inhabitants are native Latvians, 28.5% are Russians, 3.8% are Belarusians, 2.5% are Ukrainians, 2.4% are Polish, 1.4% are Lithuanians and the remaining 2.4% are accounted for by other nationalities (2006).[18] Upon restoration of Latvian independence in 1991, Soviet-era migrants (and any of their offspring born before 1991) were not automatically granted Latvian citizenship. Some have emigrated; this partially accounts for the recent decline in Riga's population. As a result of this repatriation of some Soviet-era migrants, the proportion of Latvians in Riga has increased from 36.5% in 1989 to 42.3% in 2007. In contrast the percentage of Russians has fallen from 47.3% to 42.1% in the same time period. Latvians overtook Russians as the largest ethnic group in 2006. [19] The three Baltic states: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. ... Latvians or Letts (Latvian: latvieši), the indigenous Baltic people of Latvia, occasionally refer to themselves by the ancient name of Latvji, which may have originated from the word Latve which is a name of the river that presumably flowed through what is now eastern Latvia. ... Lithuanians are the Baltic ethnic group native to Lithuania, where they number a little over 3 million [8]. Another million or more make up the Lithuanian diaspora, largely found in countries such as the United States, Brazil, Canada and Russia. ...


Sister cities

The clock presented to Riga by its sister city Kobe. It shows time in both cities
The clock presented to Riga by its sister city Kobe. It shows time in both cities

Riga maintains sister city relationships with the following cities:[20] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,112 × 2,816 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,112 × 2,816 pixels, file size: 1. ... This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ...

Flag of Denmark Aalborg, Denmark Flag of Kazakhstan Almati, Kazakhstan Flag of the Netherlands Amsterdam, The Netherlands Flag of Kazakhstan Astana, Kazakhstan
Flag of the People's Republic of China Beijing, China Flag of France Bordeaux, France Flag of Germany Bremen, Germany Flag of Australia Cairns, Australia
Flag of France Calais, France Flag of the United States Dallas, USA Flag of Italy Florence, Italy Flag of Ukraine Kiev, Ukraine
Flag of Japan Kobe, Japan Flag of Belarus Minsk, Belarus Flag of Russia Moscow, Russia Flag of Sweden Norrköping, Sweden
Flag of Finland Pori, Finland Flag of the United States Providence, USA[21] Flag of Germany Rostock, Germany Flag of Russia Saint Petersburg, Russia
Flag of Chile Santiago, Chile Flag of the United Kingdom Slough, UK[22] Flag of Sweden Stockholm, Sweden Flag of the People's Republic of China Suzhou, China
Flag of the Republic of China Taipei, Taiwan Flag of Estonia Tallinn, Estonia Flag of Lithuania Vilnius, Lithuania Flag of Poland Warsaw, Poland

Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... View of Aalborg railroad station from J.F. Kennedys Square, 2004 Aalborg (help· info) is a municipality (Danish, kommune) in North Jutland County on the Jutland peninsula in northern Denmark. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kazakhstan. ... Almaty (Алматы; formerly known as Alma-Ata, also Verny, Vyernyi (Верный) in Imperial Russia) is a city in Kazakhstan, with a population of 1,168,000. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... For other uses, see Amsterdam (disambiguation). ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kazakhstan. ... Coordinates: Government  - Mayor Askar Mamin Population (estimated)  - City 600,000 Time zone BTT (UTC+6) This article is about the capital of Kazakhstan; for the article on the palace in Sarawak, see Astana (Sarawak); for the professional road-cycling team see Astana Team; for the Iranian city, see Astaneh-e... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Peking redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Bordeaux (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... This article is about the city in Germany. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Cairns redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Calais (Kales in Dutch) is a town in northern France, located at 50°57N 1°52E. It is in the département of Pas-de-Calais, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Dallas (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... Map of Ukraine with Kiev highlighted Coordinates: , Country Ukraine Oblast Kiev City Municipality Raion Municipality Government  - Mayor Leonid Chernovetskyi Elevation 179 m (587 ft) Population (2006)  - City 4,450,968  - Density 3,299/km² (8,544. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... This article is about the Japanese city. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belarus. ... Location of Minsk, shown within the Minsk Voblast Coordinates: Country Subdivision Belarus Minsk Founded 1067 Government  - Mayor Mikhail Pavlov Area  - City 305. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... Nickname: Area  - City 34. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Finland. ... Court House of Pori The Juselius Mausoleum, designed by Josef Stenbäck For other uses, see Pori (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Providence redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Motto: Within your walls be concordance and public welfare Rostock (pronounced // from Polabian Roz toc, literally to flow apart) is the largest city in the north German state Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... Image File history File links Flag_of_Chile. ... Motto: Location of Santiago commune in Greater Santiago Location of Santiago commune in Greater Santiago Coordinates: , Region Province Foundation February 12, 1541 Government  - Mayor Raúl Alcaíno Lihn Area 1  - City 22. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Slough (pronounced ) is a town and unitary authority (Borough of Slough) in England. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... This article is about the city in Jiangsu. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... This article is about the city. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Estonia. ... County Area 159. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... Not to be confused with Vilnius city municipality. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... For other uses, see Warsaw (disambiguation) and Warszawa (disambiguation). ...

See also

RÄ«gas Satiksme is a publicly owned body which operates public transport and vehicle hire in the Latvian capital Riga and its surrounding areas. ... Riga Town Hall (Rātsnams) rebuilt from a scratch (Photo: Toms Grīnbergs) Riga City Council is the the government of the Riga City, the capital of Latvia. ... The Archbishops of Riga (1202) 1255-1561 were the secular rulers of Riga, the capital of Livonia (now known as Latvia). ...

References

  1. ^ [1] Unesco evaluation Page 67
  2. ^ "Teritorija un administratīvās robežas vēsturiskā skatījumā" (in Latvian). Cities Environmental Reports on the Internet. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  3. ^ Riga municipality portal
  4. ^ MacCulloch, Diarmaid (2003). The Reformation: A History. Penguin. ISBN 0-670-03296-4. 
  5. ^ Charles, Jonathan (2005-06-30). "Latvia prepares for a tourist invasion", BBC News. Retrieved on 2007-08-02. 
  6. ^ "Pogoda.ru.net" (in Russian). Retrieved on September 8, 2007.
  7. ^ "About the construction of the Castle of Light". Latvian National Library. Retrieved on 2007-08-21.
  8. ^ "Da Vinci project info". Emporis Buildings. Retrieved on 2007-08-21.
  9. ^ "Z-Towers project description". Vertikala Pasaule. Retrieved on 2007-08-21.
  10. ^ "Lursoft IT statistics on dynamics of registering of companies in regions of Latvia". Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  11. ^ Report on the Free Port of Riga
  12. ^ www.russianairfields.com/doc/russianairfields.pdf
  13. ^ "About the South Bridge". Riga City Council. Retrieved on 2007-08-21.
  14. ^ "Southern Bridge project homepage". Retrieved on 2007-08-21.
  15. ^ "About the Northern Corridor". Retrieved on 2007-08-21.
  16. ^ "RESIDENT POPULATION BY REGION, CITY AND DISTRICT AT THE BEGINNING OF THE YEAR".
  17. ^ Heleniak, Timothy (February 2006). "Latvia Looks West, But Legacy of Soviets Remains". University of Maryland. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  18. ^ a b "Riga in Figures". Riga City Council. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  19. ^ "RESIDENT POPULATION BY ETHNICITY AT THE BEGINNING OF THE YEAR".
  20. ^ "Rīgas sadraudzības pilsētas". Riga city council. Retrieved on 2008-04-29.
  21. ^ "Mayor Announces Sister City - Meeting (7/30/2003)". Providence, RI, Office of the Mayor. Retrieved on 2007-01-17.
  22. ^ British Latvian Trade – the magazine of the British Chamber of Commerce in Latvia
    Autumn / Winter 2007 – page 10, column 2 (accessed 11 February 2008)

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Diarmaid MacCulloch is Professor of the History of the Church in the University of Oxford (at St Cross College, Oxford. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Riga Town Hall (Rātsnams) rebuilt from a scratch (Photo: Toms Grīnbergs) Riga City Council is the the government of the Riga City, the capital of Latvia. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  • Sights of Riga on the portal Other Riga
  • Virtual tour of old Riga
  • Riga Municipality portal
  • Riga travel guide from Wikitravel
  • Map of Greater Riga
  • Riga Daily Photo
  • Riga—entry (article and engraving) from The National Encyclopedia: A Dictionary of Universal Knowledge, circa 1900
  • "Riga/Рига" photo album, circa 1910
  • "Foreign Corn Ports-Riga"—The Illustrated London News, news article with engraved illustrations, published 1847
  • Images from Riga


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