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Encyclopedia > Ridley Scott
Ridley Scott

on the set of Blade Runner (1981-2)
Born 1937
Flag of the United Kingdom South Shields, England, United Kingdom
Spouse(s) Felicity Heywood (1964-1975)
Sandy Watson (1979-1989)

Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. His films include Alien, Blade Runner, Thelma & Louise, Gladiator and American Gangster. Image File history File links Scott_ridley. ... This article is about the 1982 film. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... , South Shields is a coastal town in Tyne and Wear, England, on the south bank of the mouth of the River Tyne, with a population of about 90,000. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... Thelma & Louise is a road movie from 1991 conceived and written by Callie Khouri, co-produced and directed by Ridley Scott, and starring Geena Davis as Thelma, Susan Sarandon as Louise, and Harvey Keitel as a sympathetic detective trying to solve crimes that the two women find easier and easier... Gladiator is a 2000 historical action drama film. ... Black Hawk Down is a 2001 film by Ridley Scott, based on the book Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War by Mark Bowden. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... , South Shields is a coastal town in Tyne and Wear, England, on the south bank of the mouth of the River Tyne, with a population of about 90,000. ... South Tyneside is a metropolitan borough in Tyne and Wear in North East England. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ... This article is about the first film in a series. ... This article is about the 1982 film. ... Thelma & Louise is a road movie from 1991 conceived and written by Callie Khouri, co-produced and directed by Ridley Scott, and starring Geena Davis as Thelma, Susan Sarandon as Louise, and Harvey Keitel as a sympathetic detective trying to solve crimes that the two women find easier and easier... Gladiator is a 2000 historical action drama film. ... This article is about the feature film. ...

Contents

Career

Background

Scott grew up in an Army family, meaning that for most of his early life his father — an officer in the Royal Engineers — was absent. Ridley's older brother, Frank, joined the Merchant Navy when he was still young and the pair had little contact. During this time the family moved around, living in (amongst other areas) Cumbria, Wales and Germany. After the Second World War the Scott family moved back to their native north-east England, eventually settling in Teesside (whose industrial landscape would later inspire similar scenes in Blade Runner). Scott studied there, from 1954 to 1958, at the West Hartlepool College of Art, graduating with a Diploma in Design. He was to progress to an M.A. in graphic design at London's Royal College of Art from 1960 to 1962. There, he was to contribute to the college magazine, ARK, and help to establish its film department. For his final show he made a black and white short film, Boy and Bicycle, starring his younger brother, Tony Scott, and his father. The film's main visual elements would become features of Scott's later work; it was issued on the 'Extras' section of The Duellists DVD. After graduation in 1963 he secured a traineeship as a set designer with the BBC, leading him to work on the popular television police series Z-Cars and the science fiction series Out of the Unknown. He was also assigned to design the second Doctor Who serial, The Daleks, which would have entailed realising the famous alien creatures. However, shortly before he was due to start work a schedule conflict meant that he was replaced on the serial by Raymond Cusick.[1] At the BBC, Scott was placed into a directing training programme and, before he left the corporation, had directed episodes of Z-Cars, its spin-off, Softly, Softly, and adventure series Adam Adamant Lives!. The Corps of Royal Engineers (RE), commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. ... For the steam locomotives, see SR Merchant Navy Class. ... Cumbria (IPA: ), is a shire county in the extreme North West of England. ... This article is about the country. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Arms of the County Borough of Teesside Teesside is the name given to the conurbation in northern England based on Middlesbrough, Stockton-on-Tees and Redcar, along the banks of the River Tees with a resident population of over 388,000 in 2005. ... This article is about the 1982 film. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cleveland College of Art and Design is a further and higher education art and design college, based in the United Kingdom. ... Graphics are often utilitarian and anonymous,[1] as these pictographs from the US National Park Service illustrate. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Darwin Building at Kensington Gore The Royal College of Art (RCA) is a university in London, England. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Boy and Bicycle is the first film made by Ridley Scott. ... See also Tony Scott for the American clarinet jazz musician. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Z-Cars (sometimes written as Z Cars, and always pronounced zed, never zee) was a British television drama series centred around the work of regular beat police officers in the fictional town of Newtown, near Liverpool, in the north-west of England. ... For other uses, see Doctor Who (disambiguation). ... The Daleks (also known as The Mutants, among other titles, see below) is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast weekly from 21 December 1963 to 1 February 1964. ... Raymond Cusick, also known as Ray Cusick or Raymond P. Cusick, was a designer for the British Broadcasting Corporation. ... Softly, Softly was a British television drama series, produced by the BBC and screened on BBC One. ... Adam Adamant Lives! was a television series that ran from 1966 to 1967 on the BBC. The show was the BBCs attempt to emulate the success of ITVs The Avengers, with a comedy adventure theme that would take a satirical look at life in the 1960s through the...


Early work

Scott quit the BBC in 1968 and established a production company, Ridley Scott Associates, working with Sir Alan Parker, Hugh Hudson, Hugh Johnson and employing his younger brother, Tony. Having cut his teeth on UK television commercials in the 1970s — most notably the 1974 Hovis advert, "Bike Round" (New World Symphony), which was filmed in Shaftesbury, Dorset — he graduated to Hollywood, where he produced and directed a number of top box office films. His first feature, The Duellists, was produced in Europe and won a jury medal at the Cannes Film Festival but made limited impact in the US. Alan Parker on the set of Pink Floyd The Wall Sir Alan Parker (born February 14, 1944) is a British film director, producer, writer, and actor. ... Hugh Hudson (born 25 August 1936) is a British Academy award-nominated film director. ... Hugh Johnson is an Irish cinematographer and film director. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Hovis bread on the shelf Hovis is a UK brand of flour and bread, now owned by Premier Foods. ... New World Symphony redirects here; for the Miami-based orchestra, see New World Symphony Orchestra. ... For other uses, see Shaftesbury (disambiguation) Shaftesbury is a town in North Dorset, England, situated on the A30 road near the Wiltshire border 20 miles west of Salisbury. ... Dorset (pronounced DOR-sit or [dÉ”.sÉ™t], and sometimes in the past called Dorsetshire) is a county in the south-west of England, on the English Channel coast. ... ... The Duellists (1977) was Ridley Scotts first feature film, based on the Joseph Conrad short story The Duel. Set during the Napoleonic Wars, it features two French Hussar officers, DHubert and Feraud (played by Keith Carradine and Harvey Keitel). ... The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ...


Alien

Main article: Alien (film)

Scott's disappointment with The Duellists was compounded by the success being enjoyed by Alan Parker with American-backed films — Scott admitted he was "ill for a week" with envy. Scott had originally planned to next adapt an opera, Tristan und Isolde, but after seeing Star Wars, he became convinced of the potential of large scale, effects-driven films. He therefore accepted the job of directing Alien, the ground-breaking 1979 horror/science fiction film that would give him international recognition. While Ridley Scott would not direct the three Alien sequels, the female action hero Ellen Ripley (Sigourney Weaver), introduced in the first film, would become a cinematic icon. Scott was involved in the 2003 restoration and re-release of the film including media interviews for its promotion. At this time Scott indicated that he had been in discussions to make the fifth and final film in the Alien franchise. However, in a 2006 interview, the director remarked that he'd been unhappy about Alien: The Director's Cut, feeling that the original was "pretty flawless" and that the additions were merely a marketing tool.[2] This article is about the first film in a series. ... Tristan und Isolde (Tristan and Isolde) is an opera in three acts by Richard Wagner to a German libretto by the composer, based largely on the romance by Gottfried von Straßburg. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... This article is about the first film in a series. ... As a number of critics have suggested (including Dr. Susan Hopkins, a lecturer in The School of Journalism and Communication, The University of Queensland, in her book Girl Heroes), the form of Girl Power! advocated by the Spice Girls influenced representations of female figures in popular culture during the late... Sigourney Weaver as Ellen Ripley Ellen Ripley is a fictional character, the protagonist in the Alien movie series. ... Sigourney Weaver (born Susan Alexandra Weaver on October 8, 1949 in New York City) is an Oscar-nominated American actress. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Blade Runner

Main article: Blade Runner

After a year working on the film adaptation of Dune, Scott signed to direct the film version of Philip K. Dick's novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, (which would be retitled as Blade Runner), following the sudden death of his brother Frank. Starring Harrison Ford and featuring an acclaimed soundtrack by Vangelis, Blade Runner was a flop when released to theatres in 1982, and was pulled shortly thereafter. However, it would eventually achieve cult status through re-issue on television and through home video. Scott's notes were used by Warner Brothers to create a rushed director's cut in 1991 which removed the voiceovers and modified the ending. Today Blade Runner is often ranked by critics one of the most important science fiction films of the 20th century[3] and is usually discussed along with William Gibson's novel Neuromancer as initiating the cyberpunk genre. Scott personally supervised a digitally restored Blade Runner and approved the Final Cut, which is to be finally released theatrically in Los Angeles and New York on 5 October 2007, and as an elaborate DVD release on 18 December 2007, following the resolution of a number of rights issues between Warner Bros and the film's guarantors.[4] Scott regards Blade Runner as his "most complete and personal film."[5] This article is about the 1982 film. ... Dune is a science fiction novel written by Frank Herbert and published in 1965. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. ... Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a 1968 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... Evangelos Odysseas Papathanassiou (Greek: Ευάγγελος Οδυσσέας Παπαθανασίου IPA: ) is a world-renowned Greek composer of electronic, new age and classical music and musical performer, under the artist name Vangelis Papathanassiou (Βαγγέλης Παπαθανασίου) or just Vangelis (a diminutive of Evangelos) [IPA: or ]. He is best known for his Academy Award winning score for the film Chariots... A directors cut is a specially edited version of a film, and less often TV series, music video, commercials or video games, that is supposed to represent the directors own approved edit. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... For other persons named William Gibson, see William Gibson (disambiguation). ... For the 1988 video game, see Neuromancer (video game). ... Berlins Sony Center reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


"1984" Apple Macintosh commercial

In 1984, Apple Computer launched the Macintosh. Its debut was announced by a single broadcast of the now famous $1.5 million commercial, based on George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four, and directed by Ridley Scott (due to his work on Blade Runner). The commercial was broadcast during the 1984 Super Bowl XVIII. Steve Jobs' intention with the ad was to equate Big Brother with the IBM PC and a nameless female action hero, portrayed by Anya Major, with the Macintosh. A screenshot from the commercial. ... Apple Inc. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... A screenshot from the commercial. ... Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 [1] [2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... This article is about the Orwell novel. ... This article is about the 1982 film. ... This article is about the year. ... Date January 22, 1984 Stadium Tampa Stadium City Tampa, Florida MVP Marcus Allen, Running back Favorite Redskins by 2 1/2 National anthem Barry Manilow Coin toss Bronko Nagurski Referee Gene Barth Halftime show Salute to Superstars of the Silver Screen with the University of Florida and Florida State University... Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple and was the CEO of Pixar until its acquisition by Disney. ... Big Brother as portrayed in the 1954 BBC Television adaptation of Nineteen Eighty-Four. ... IBM PC (IBM 5150) with keyboard and green screen monochrome monitor (IBM 5151), running MS-DOS 5. ... Anya Major in the 1984 commercial. ...


The commercial is frequently voted top in surveys of influential marketing campaigns. For example, Advertising Age named it the 1980s "Commercial of the Decade", and in 1999 the US TV Guide selected it as number one in their list of "50 Greatest Commercials of All Time". Advertising Age is a magazine, chronicling trends in advertisement. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... This article is about the year. ... TV Guide is the name of two North American weekly magazines about television programming, one in the United States and one in Canada. ...


The film resurfaced in the late 1990s when Apple made a QuickTime version of the commercial available for download from the Internet. It appeared numerous times on television commercial compilation specials, as well as on Nick-at-Nite during its "Retromercial" breaks. The making and presentation of this famous commercial formed the visual bookends for the docudrama Pirates of Silicon Valley. For the band, see 1990s (band). ... QuickTime is a multimedia framework developed by Apple Inc. ... Nick at Nite is the evening programming block broadcast over Nickelodeon Sunday – Thursdays from 9 PM – 6 AM and Friday – Saturdays from 10 PM – 6 AM Eastern and Pacific Standard Time. ... Pirates of Silicon Valley (1999) is an unauthorized made-for-television docudrama written and directed by Martyn Burke. ...


Legend

Main article: Legend (film)

In 1985, Scott directed Legend, a fantasy film produced by Arnon Milchan. Having not tackled the fairy tale genre, Scott decided to create a "once upon a time" film set in a world of fairies, princesses, and goblins. Scott cast Tom Cruise as the film's hero, Jack, Mia Sara as Princess Lily, and Tim Curry as the Satan-like Lord of Darkness. But a series of problems with both principal photography and post-production (including heavy editing and substitution of Jerry Goldsmith's original score) hampered the film's release and as a result Legend received scathing reviews. It has since become a cult classic thanks to a DVD release that restores Scott's original, intended vision. Legend is a 1985 fantasy film released by 20th Century Fox (in Europe) and Universal Pictures (in the U.S. and Canada), directed by Ridley Scott and starring Tom Cruise, Mia Sara, Tim Curry, Alice Playten, and Billy Barty. ... Legend is a 1985 fantasy film released by 20th Century Fox (in Europe) and Universal Pictures (in the U.S. and Canada), directed by Ridley Scott and starring Tom Cruise, Mia Sara, Tim Curry, Alice Playten, and Billy Barty. ... Arnon Milchan (1945-) is movie producer and businessman. ... Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV on July 3, 1962) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor and film producer. ... Mia Sara (born June 19, 1967) played Ferriss girlfriend Sloane in Ferris Buellers Day Off. ... Timothy James Curry (born April 19, 1946) is an English actor, singer and composer, perhaps best known for his role as mad scientist Dr. Frank-N-Furter in The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... Jerrald King Goldsmith (February 10, 1929 – July 21, 2004) was a famous American film score composer from Los Angeles, California. ... A cult film is a film that has acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans. ...


Someone to Watch Over Me and Black Rain

Hungry for a real box office hit and also for respect from the press who considered him as a commercial filmmaker devoted only to fantastic visuals without much substance, Scott decided to postpone further incursions into the science fiction and fantasy genre, in order to avoid being typecast, by focusing more in down to earth mature suspense thrillers.


Among them came Someone to Watch Over Me, a romantic police drama starring Tom Berenger, Lorraine Bracco and Mimi Rogers in 1987, and Black Rain, a 1989 cop drama starring Michael Douglas and Andy Garcia, shot partially in Tokyo and Osaka, Japan. Both met with mild success at the box office. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Tom Berenger (born May 31, 1949) is an Academy Award nominated and Golden Globe winning American actor known mainly for his roles in action films. ... Lorraine Bracco (born October 2, 1954[1]) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe and Emmy Award nominated and Screen Actors Guild winning American actress best known for her roles as Karen Hill in Goodfellas and Dr. Jennifer Melfi on the hit HBO TV series, The Sopranos. ... Mimi Rogers (born Miriam Spickler on January 27, 1956 in Coral Gables, Florida) is an American movie actress and competitive poker player. ... Black Rain is the title of several works of fiction. ... For other people bearing this name, see Michael Douglas (disambiguation) Michael Kirk Douglas (born September 25, 1944) is an American actor and producer, primarily in movies and television. ... Andy Garcia at the Incirlik hospital, Incirlik Air Base, December 7, 2001 Andy García (born April 12, 1956) is a Cuban-American actor. ...


Again, Scott was praised for their lavish visuals, but was still being criticised that his films were nothing more than an extended version of his glossy TV commercials, which he kept directing until that period, due to the more lucrative advertising business.


Thelma & Louise

Thelma & Louise was released in 1991 and stars Geena Davis as Thelma, Susan Sarandon as Louise, and Harvey Keitel as a sympathetic detective trying to solve crimes that the two women find easier and easier to commit. The movie proved to be a success and revived Scott's reputation as a film maker, earning his first Oscar nomination. Scott's next project was the independent movie 1492: Conquest of Paradise, a visually striking take on the story of Christopher Columbus, yet usually considered to be his most slowly paced movie. Thelma & Louise is a road movie from 1991 conceived and written by Callie Khouri, co-produced and directed by Ridley Scott, and starring Geena Davis as Thelma, Susan Sarandon as Louise, and Harvey Keitel as a sympathetic detective trying to solve crimes that the two women find easier and easier... Virginia Elizabeth Geena Davis (born January 21, 1956) is an Academy Award- and Golden Globe-winning and Emmy-nominated American actress and former fashion model. ... Susan Sarandon (born October 4, 1946) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Harvey Keitel (born May 13, 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor from New York City. ... 1492: Conquest of Paradise is a 1992 American/Spanish adventure/drama film. ...


Production company

In 1995 Scott, together with his brother Tony, formed the film and television production company Scott Free Productions in Los Angeles. All of his subsequent feature films, starting with White Squall and G.I. Jane, a female tabloid version of Full Metal Jacket starring Demi Moore and Viggo Mortensen, have been produced under the Scott Free banner. Also in 1995, the two brothers purchased a controlling interest in Shepperton Studios that was later merged with Pinewood Studios. Scott and his brother are currently producing (since 2005) the CBS series Numb3rs. It is a crime drama focused on a mathematician who helps the FBI solve crimes using his genius ability in mathematics. Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... White Squall is a 1996 movie directed by Ridley Scott, starring Jeff Bridges and John Savage. ... G.I. Jane is an 1997 action movie that tells the story of the first woman to undergo S.E.R.E. training. ... For the type of ammunition, see Full metal jacket bullet. ... Shepperton Studios, located in Shepperton, Middlesex, England is a film studio with a long history of film making. ... The gatehouse at Pinewood Studios Pinewood Studios is a major British film studio situated in Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire. ... Numb3rs (also capitalized as NUMB3RS and pronounced as Numbers) is an American television show produced by brothers Ridley Scott and Tony Scott. ...


Gladiator and beyond

The huge success of Scott's film Gladiator (2000) has been credited with the revival of the nearly defunct genre of the "sword and sandal" historical epic.[citation needed] Scott then turned to Hannibal, the sequel to Jonathan Demme's The Silence of the Lambs. 2001 also saw the release of Scott's war film Black Hawk Down (2001), which further established Scott's position as both a critically and financially successful film maker and went on to earn two Oscars. Gladiator is a 2000 historical action drama film. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... D. W. Griffith set out to depict the splendor of ancient Babylon in Intolerance. ... Hannibal is a 2001 film directed by Ridley Scott, adapted from the Thomas Harris novel of the same name. ... Jonathan Demme (born February 22, 1944, in Baldwin, New York) is an American film director, producer and writer. ... The Silence of the Lambs is a 1991 Academy Award-winning film directed by Jonathan Demme and starring Jodie Foster and Anthony Hopkins. ... Black Hawk Down is a 2001 film by Ridley Scott, based on the book Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War by Mark Bowden. ...


In 2003, Scott directed Matchstick Men, adapted from the novel by Eric Garcia, and starring Nicolas Cage, Sam Rockwell and Alison Lohman. It received mostly positive reviews and performed moderately at the box office. Matchstick Men is a 2003 film starring Nicolas Cage, Sam Rockwell and Alison Lohman. ... Eric Garcia is the author of several humorous books including Matchstick Men which was made into a movie directed by Ridley Scott and starring Nicolas Cage, and the Anonymous Rex series which is being used as the basis for a new TV show on the SciFi Channel. ... Nicolas Cage (born January 7, 1964) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Sam Rockwell as Zaphod Beeblebrox in The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. ... Alison Marion Lohman (born September 18, 1979) is an American actress. ...


In 2005, the director made the internationally successful Kingdom of Heaven, a movie about the Crusades that consciously sought to connect history to current events. While on location in Morocco during filming, Scott reportedly received threats from extremists. The Moroccan government also sent the Moroccan cavalry as extras in the epic battle scenes. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... There is another article about the theological concept of the Kingdom of Heaven. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ...


Unhappy with the theatrical version of the film (which he blamed on paying too much attention to the opinions of preview audiences), Scott supervised a director's cut of Kingdom of Heaven, which was released on DVD in 2006.[6] In an interview to promote the latter, when asked if he was against previewing in general, Scott had this to say on the subject: DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...

"It depends who's in the driving seat. If you've got a lunatic doing my job, then you need to preview. But a good director should be experienced enough to judge what he thinks is the correct version to go out into the cinema."[7]

A Good Year, American Gangster and other future projects

Scott teamed up again with actor Russell Crowe, directing the movie A Good Year, which is based on the best-selling book. The film was released on 10 November 2006, with a score by Marc Stretenfield. Rupert Murdoch, chairman of News Corp and Subsidiary studio 20th Century Fox (who backed the film) dismissed A Good Year as "a flop" at a shareholders' meeting only a few days after the film was released.[8] Russell Ira Crowe (born April 7, 1964) is a New Zealand-Australian[1] actor. ... A Good Year is a 2006 romantic comedy film set in Provence, in southeastern France. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ...


Scott is currently in post-production on American Gangster, working for the first time with Denzel Washington and again with Russell Crowe. He is the third director to attempt the project after Antoine Fuqua's attempt (under the working title Tru Blu) was shut down by the studio due to an escalating budget. Washington had been cast in that incarnation of the project (reuniting him with Fuqua who had directed him in his Best Actor Oscar-winning performance in Training Day) as well as Benicio del Toro, who were both paid salaries of $20m and $15m respectively without doing any production on the film. The project was then handed to the director of Hotel Rwanda, Terry George, who was rumoured to be working on a less harsh version of the script with Don Cheadle attached to Washington's role. Eventually George and Cheadle dropped out and Scott took over the project in early 2006. This article is about the feature film. ... Denzel Hayes Washington, Jr. ... Antoine Fuqua (born January 19, 1966 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is an African-American film director of such films as The Replacement Killers with Chow Yun Fat, Bait with Jamie Foxx, Training Day with Denzel Washington, Tears of the Sun with Bruce Willis and King Arthur with Clive Owen. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Training Day is an Academy Award-winning 2001 film starring Denzel Washington as Alonzo Harris, a corrupt Los Angeles police officer, and Ethan Hawke as Jake Hoyt, his new green recruit looking to become a part of Harris elite narcotics unit. ... Benicio Monserrat Rafael Del Toro Sanchez (born February 19, 1967, in San Germán, Puerto Rico) is an Academy Award winning Puerto Rican actor. ... Hotel Rwanda is a historical drama film that shows the quiet heroism of one man, Paul Rusesabagina (Don Cheadle), during the Rwandan Genocide. ... Terry George (born 1952) is a Belfast-born screenwriter and director. ... Don Cheadle (born November 29, 1964) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor. ...


Scott is to direct an adaptation of Robin Hood called Nottingham. Russell Crowe will portray the Sheriff of Nottingham.[9] For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ... The Sheriff of Nottingham was historically the office responsible for enforcing law and order in Nottingham and bringing criminals to justice. ...


Rumoured future projects include Shadow Divers (though currently unattached) and The Invisible World (production notes unknown). He also has a historical epic called Tripoli planned, with Russell Crowe and Ben Kingsley attached, and a western in development, Blood Meridian, based on the book by Cormac McCarthy. In 2000, he was attached to do an adaptation of Ben Elton's novel Popcorn. He and brother Tony are also looking at remaking the 1979 film The Warriors, with Tony set to direct as his next film after Déjà Vu. Shadow Divers is a non-fictional recounting of the discovery of a World War 2 German U-Boat sixty miles off the coast of New Jersey in 1991. ... Sir Ben Kingsley, CBE, (born December 31, 1943) is a British actor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the musician, see Cormac McCarthy (musician). ... Benjamin Charles Elton (born 3 May 1959) is an English comedian, writer and director. ... Popcorn is a 1996 novel and play by the British writer Ben Elton. ... The Warriors is a 1979 film directed by Walter Hill and based on the 1965 novel by Sol Yurick. ... Déjà Vu is a science fiction crime thriller directed by Tony Scott, produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, and starring Denzel Washington. ...


Recently it has been announced that his next project will be Body of Lies, the adaptation of the non-fiction bestseller of the same name, with Leonardo DiCaprio and Russell Crowe once more attached to star. Previously the project was named Penetration. On 19 June 2007 it was announced that Ridley Scott would helm a film version of the game Monopoly.[10] Body of Lies, formerly titled Penetration, is an upcoming feature film adaptation of the novel Body of Lies by David Ignatius about a CIA operative who goes to Jordan to track a high-ranking terrorist. ... Leonardo Wilhelm DiCaprio (born November 11 1974[1]) is a three-time Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor who garnered world wide fame for his role as Jack Dawson in Titanic. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Monopoly is the best-selling commercial board game in the world. ...


Currently five members of the Scott family are directors, all working for RSA. Brother Tony has been a successful film director for more than two decades; sons, Jake (40) and Luke (37), are both acclaimed commercials directors as is his daughter, Jordan (27). Jake and Jordan both work from Los Angeles and Luke is based in London.


Style

His striking visual style, incorporating a detailed approach to production design and innovative, atmospheric lighting, has been tremendously influential on an entire subsequent generation of filmmakers — many of whom have simply imitated him outright. Scott commonly uses very slow pacing until an action sequence, which is characterised by many rapid edits. Prime examples of this technique are Alien and Blade Runner. The critic Sheila Benson went so far as to call the latter "Blade Crawler" in the LA Times, "because it's so damn slow." Another trademark is his use of sound or music to build tension, as seen in Alien with hissing steam, beeping computers and the noise of the machinery in the space ship.


Awards

Scott has been nominated for three Academy Awards for Directing: for Thelma & Louise, Gladiator and Black Hawk Down.[11] He was knighted in the 2003 New Year honours.[12] The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to directors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. ... The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement, or service to the United Kingdom. ...


Criticism

Although some of his films have been highly praised, others have been less successful with audiences and critics. White Squall and Hannibal are the two major works most often attacked by critics, while 1492: Conquest of Paradise was a major commercial failure. Legend (1985) was, like Blade Runner three years before, an initial box-office disaster, but it too has since found cult status thanks to Jerry Goldsmith's critically acclaimed (but rarely heard) score, featured on a 2002 director's cut that is closer to Scott's original vision. White Squall is a 1996 movie directed by Ridley Scott, starring Jeff Bridges and John Savage. ... Hannibal is a 2001 film, directed by Ridley Scott about Hannibal Lecters time in Italy following his escape from imprisonment. ... 1492: Conquest of Paradise is a 1992 American/Spanish adventure/drama film. ... Legend is a 1985 fantasy film released by 20th Century Fox (in Europe) and Universal Pictures (in the U.S. and Canada), directed by Ridley Scott and starring Tom Cruise, Mia Sara, Tim Curry, and Billy Barty. ... Jerrald King Goldsmith (February 10, 1929 – July 21, 2004) was a famous American film score composer from Los Angeles, California. ...


Actors who have worked with Scott often consider that he puts more emphasis on the sets or lining up shots than on them. Such criticisms have come from Harrison Ford, who complained that his relationship with Scott left a lot to be desired. Paul M. Sammon, in his book Future Noir: The Making of Blade Runner, commented about this in an interview with Brmovie.com, stating that Scott's relationship with his actors has improved considerably over the years.[13]


Trademarks

Although Scott is often known for his painterly directorial style, other trademarks include:

  • Storyboarding his films extensively. These illustrations are often referred to as "Ridleygrams".
  • Strong female characters.[14][15]
  • Military and officer classes as characters reflecting his father's career, such as in G.I. Jane and Black Hawk Down.
  • Extensive use of the two camera "V" set-up, allowing actors to perform more fluidly.
  • Casts Giannina Facio, his partner in life, in all his movies since White Squall.
  • Gets involved personally in the casting and prefers a more streamlined approach (just him and the casting director).
  • Likes to work with actors who have a strong theatre background and/or drama school graduates.
  • An admirer of Stanley Kubrick from early in his development. For his entry for the BBC traineeship Scott remade Paths of Glory as a short film.
  • Like Stanley Kubrick, Scott is known for repeating the takes by the double digits. This was more evident on Blade Runner: the crew nicknamed the movie "Blood Runner" because of this.
  • Often makes notable use of classical music (the Hovis advertisements, Someone to Watch Over Me). Worked intermittently on the project of a film adaptation of the opera Tristan und Isolde beginning in 1976.
  • Extensive use of fans and fanlike objects (in Blade Runner and Black Rain). Fans are also used in Hannibal, but for the purposes of symbolism.
  • Extensive use of smoke (in Alien, Blade Runner and Black Rain), for visual aesthetic purposes: Scott sometimes takes hours to set up one scene.
  • Consistency in his choice of composers, using Jerry Goldsmith (Alien and Legend), Vangelis (Blade Runner and 1492: Conquest of Paradise) or Hans Zimmer (Black Rain, Thelma & Louise, Gladiator, Hannibal, Black Hawk Down and Matchstick Men). Scott has also twice used songs by Sting during the film credits ("Valparaiso" for White Squall and "Someone to Watch Over Me" for the movie of the same title).
  • He is usually considered the "father" of the director's cut. Scott was one of the first to use the description for the 1992 re-release of Blade Runner (other such films existed, but were either small fan-oriented versions that carried the name "Special Edition" or were forcefully edited by the studio). The positive result of the Blade Runner DC has encouraged Scott to re-cut several of his movies that were flops at the time of their release (such as Legend and Kingdom of Heaven) with the same positive results. Today the practice is commonplace within the movie industry.
  • In some of his movies there is a strong conflict between father and son that usually ends with the latter killing the former intentionally (Blade Runner, Gladiator) or accidentally (Black Hawk Down), or witnessing the event (Kingdom of Heaven). The Lord of Darkness in Legend also mentions his "father" on a few occasions. As part of the conflict between father and son there are some repetitive scenes: in Gladiator, the son hugs the father seemingly as an expression of love but this embrace turns into the suffocation and death of the father. There is a similar sequence in Blade Runner.
  • In Gladiator, Blade Runner and Kingdom of Heaven, a son gets to know his father when he is grown up. Other common elements are that the mother is not seen, and that the son or father is seen performing his last actions. For example, Roy Batty is dying when he saves Deckard, Maximus dies after killing Commodus and Godfrey of Ibelin kills some enemies after he has been mortally wounded by an arrow. In addition, the hero is saved from death before attaining his greatest deeds: Deckard is saved by Rachel, Maximus is saved by a slave and Balian is saved by a Muslim enemy. Similar situations can be seen in Tony Scott's Man on Fire.

“Kubrick” redirects here. ... Paths of Glory (1957) is a debatedly anti-war black and white film by Stanley Kubrick based on the novel of the same name by Humphrey Cobb. ... Jerrald King Goldsmith (February 10, 1929 – July 21, 2004) was a famous American film score composer from Los Angeles, California. ... Evangelos Odysseas Papathanassiou (Greek: Ευάγγελος Οδυσσέας Παπαθανασίου IPA: ) is a world-renowned Greek composer of electronic, new age and classical music and musical performer, under the artist name Vangelis Papathanassiou (Βαγγέλης Παπαθανασίου) or just Vangelis (a diminutive of Evangelos) [IPA: or ]. He is best known for his Academy Award winning score for the film Chariots... Hans Florian Zimmer (born September 12, 1957) is an Academy Award, Grammy, and Golden Globe award-winning film score composer from Germany. ... A directors cut is a specially edited version of a film, and less often TV series, music video, commercials or video games, that is supposed to represent the directors own approved edit. ... This article is about the 2004 film. ...

DVD

Scott is known for his enthusiasm for the DVD format, providing audio commentaries and interviews for all his films wherever possible. In the July 2006 issue of Total Film magazine, he stated: A major selling point of DVD video is that its storage capacity allows for a wide variety of extra features in addition to the feature film itself. ... Total Film, published by Future Publishing, is the United Kingdoms second best-selling film magazine, after the longer-established Empire from Emap. ...

"After all the work we go through, to have it run in the cinema and then disappear forever is a great pity. To give the film added life is really cool for both those who missed it and those who really loved it."[7]

The special edition DVDs of Scott's films are often regarded for their high quality picture and sound, as well as comprehensive documentaries and commentaries, produced by his longtime DVD producer, Charles de Lauzirika. His enthusiasm for the highest quality in picture and sound has also made him a fan of the Blu-ray high-definition format, and he described the Blu-ray version of "Kingdom of Heaven" as the closest he had seen to the film. Blu-ray discs Blu-ray Disc is a next-generation optical disc format jointly developed by a group of leading consumer electronics and PC companies called the Blu_ray Disc Association (BDA), which succeeds the Blu_ray Disc Founders (BDF). ...


Trivia

  • Among Scott's favourite films are Lawrence of Arabia, Citizen Kane and Seven Samurai.[16]
  • Russell Crowe nicknamed Scott "The Admiral of the Fleet" during production of Gladiator. He still sometimes refers to the director as "The Admiral".
  • Scott revealed in a 1997 documentary that he was depressed in his early career as his first film was mauled by audiences and critics. It was not until Star Wars was released in 1977 that it changed his perspective 180 degrees. He said, "I went back to my hotel apartment and had a long think to feel what I ought to be doing, and interestingly the next film I did was Alien."[citation needed]
  • In contrast, he was nicknamed "Guvnor" in the famous t-shirt fight of the Blade Runner production. Several crew members started to wear protest t-shirts with slogans such as "Yes Guvnor, my ass" and "Will Rogers never met Ridley Scott" (in reference to Will Rogers' most famous quotation, "I never met a man I didn't like").[17] This was mainly in response to the way that Scott directed his first American crew, which was considered too harsh by their standards.
  • Scott is often very receptive of ideas from the cast during the shooting of movies. Examples of this including Susan Sarandon's suggestions of Louise packing shoes in plastic bags in one scene, also where her character exchanges jewellery for a hat, etc. in Thelma & Louise, as well as Tim Robbins' collaboration with Scott and Susan Sarandon to rework the final scene with a more upbeat ending.
  • He co-directed the video to the Roxy Music single "Avalon".

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Lawrence of Arabia is an award-winning 1962 film based on the life of T. E. Lawrence. ... Citizen Kane is a 1941 mystery/drama film released by RKO Pictures and directed by Orson Welles, his first feature film. ... For other uses, see Seven Samurai (disambiguation). ... This article is about the series. ... This article is about the first film in a series. ... William Penn Adair Rogers (November 4, 1879 – August 15, 1935) was a Cherokee-American cowboy, comedian, humorist, social commentator, vaudeville performer, and actor. ... Roxy Music are an English art rock group founded in the early 1970s by art school graduate Bryan Ferry (vocals and keyboards). ... Avalon, released in June 1982, was Roxy Musics eighth studio album; it is generally regarded as the culmination of the smoother, more adult-oriented sound of the bands later work. ...

Filmography

Upcoming films

  • Nottingham (TBA)
  • Blood Meridian (2009)
  • Child 44 (2009)
  • Body of Lies (2008)

Body of Lies, formerly titled Penetration, is an upcoming feature film adaptation of the novel Body of Lies by David Ignatius about a CIA operative who goes to Jordan to track a high-ranking terrorist. ...

Released films

Boy and Bicycle is the first film made by Ridley Scott. ... The Duellists (1977) was Ridley Scotts first feature film, based on the Joseph Conrad short story The Duel. Set during the Napoleonic Wars, it features two French Hussar officers, DHubert and Feraud (played by Keith Carradine and Harvey Keitel). ... This article is about the first film in a series. ... This article is about the 1982 film. ... Legend is a 1985 fantasy film released by 20th Century Fox (in Europe) and Universal Pictures (in the U.S. and Canada), directed by Ridley Scott and starring Tom Cruise, Mia Sara, Tim Curry, Alice Playten, and Billy Barty. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the Shohei Imamura film of the same name, see Black Rain (Japanese film). ... Thelma & Louise is a road movie from 1991 conceived and written by Callie Khouri, co-produced and directed by Ridley Scott, and starring Geena Davis as Thelma, Susan Sarandon as Louise, and Harvey Keitel as a sympathetic detective trying to solve crimes that the two women find easier and easier... 1492: Conquest of Paradise is a 1992 American/Spanish adventure/drama film. ... White Squall is a 1996 movie directed by Ridley Scott, starring Jeff Bridges and John Savage. ... G.I. Jane is an 1997 action movie that tells the story of the first woman to undergo S.E.R.E. training. ... Gladiator is a 2000 movie directed by Ridley Scott, and starring Russell Crowe and Joaquin Phoenix. ... Hannibal is a 2001 film directed by Ridley Scott, adapted from the Thomas Harris novel of the same name. ... Black Hawk Down is a 2001 film by Ridley Scott, based on the book Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War by Mark Bowden. ... Matchstick Men is a 2003 film starring Nicolas Cage, Sam Rockwell and Alison Lohman. ... Kingdom of Heaven is a 2005 epic film, directed and produced by Ridley Scott, and written by William Monahan. ... All the Invisible Children is a collection of short films which premiered at the 2005 Venice Film Festival. ... A Good Year is a 2006 romantic comedy film set in Provence, in southeastern France. ... This article is about the feature film. ...

Music video

Roxy Music are an English art rock group founded in the early 1970s by art school graduate Bryan Ferry (vocals and keyboards). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ...

Commercials

Hovis bread on the shelf Hovis is a UK brand of flour and bread, now owned by Premier Foods. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Not to be confused with Channel. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... A screenshot from the commercial. ... Apple Computer, Inc. ... This article is about the year. ... Pepsi Cola is a non-alcoholic carbonated beverage produced and manufactured by PepsiCo. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Donald Wayne Don Johnson (born December 15, 1949) is an American actor well known for his fame in film and television. ... Glenn Lewis Frey (born November 6, 1948 in Detroit, Michigan[1]) is an American musician, singer, songwriter, and actor, best known as one of the founding members of rock band Eagles. ...

TV shows

  • NUMB3RS (2005–present) (producer, with Tony Scott)

Numb3rs (also capitalized as NUMB3RS and pronounced as Numbers) is an American television show produced by brothers Ridley Scott and Tony Scott. ...

External links

  • They Shoot Pictures, Don't They?
  • Ridley Scott at the Internet Movie Database
  • Video interview with STV's Grant Lauchlan, discussing Kingdom of Heaven and Blade Runner
  • Times Interview with Ridley Scott October 5, 2006
  • Total Film: Interview with Ridley Scott, 15 July 2007

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

References

  1. ^ Howe, David J.; Mark Stammers, Stephen James Walker (1994). The Handbook: The First Doctor - The William Hartnell Years 1963-1966. Virgin Books, p. 61. ISBN 0-426-20430-1. 
  2. ^ BBC News: A good year ahead for Ridley
  3. ^ The Guardian: Top 10 sci-fi films
  4. ^ "Blade Runner Final Cut Due," SciFi Wire, May 26, 2006
  5. ^ Barber, Lynn (2002-01-02). "Scott's Corner". The Observer. Retrieved on 2007-02-22. 
  6. ^ Kingdom of Heaven: Director's Cut DVD official website
  7. ^ a b Total Film magazine, July 2006: 'Three hours, eight minutes. It's beautiful.' (Interview to promote Kingdom of Heaven: The Director's Cut)
  8. ^ "A Good Year is a 'flop', Murdoch admits", Guardian Unlimited, 2006-11-16. Retrieved on 2007-02-24. 
  9. ^ "Ridley Scott to Direct Nottingham", Cinema Fusion, 2007-4-30. Retrieved on 2007-4-30. 
  10. ^ WorstPreviews.com: Ridley Scott's "Monopoly" film confirmed
  11. ^ IMDb: Ridley Scott — awards
  12. ^ BBC News: Bates and Scott lead showbiz honours
  13. ^ BRmovie.com: Paul M. Sammon interview
  14. ^ Yahoo! Movies: Ridley Scott
  15. ^ AmericanCinemateque.com: Press release
  16. ^ BBC Movies: Calling the Shots
  17. ^ Answers.com: I never met a man I didn't like
Persondata
NAME Scott, Ridley
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Scott, Sir Ridley
SHORT DESCRIPTION English film director, and producer
DATE OF BIRTH November 30, 1937
PLACE OF BIRTH South Shields, England
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
SPLICEDwire | Ridley Scott, Jerry Bruckheimer interview for "Black Hawk Down" (2001) (897 words)
The day I interviewed Jerry Bruckheimer and Ridley Scott, the producer and director of "Black Hawk Down" had seen their schedule upended by fog at San Francisco International Airport that delayed the landing of their chartered jet by several hours.
Scott -- the extremely atmospheric director of "Alien," "Blade Runner," "Thema and Louise" and "Gladiator" -- lit his own cigar, taken from a leather case in his pants pocket, and nodded.
While Scott employs spectacular cinematography and symbolic color filters to artistically ratchet up the imposing ambiance of battle commotion, capturing the chaos that engulfed the soldiers that day was Scott's primary aim in making the film.
Ridley Scott - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3028 words)
Scott was involved in the 2003 restoration and re-release of the film including media interviews for its promotion.
Scott's notes were used by Warner Brothers to create a rushed director's cut in 1991 which removed the voiceovers and modified the ending.
Scott is known for his enthusiasm for the DVD format, providing audio commentaries and interviews for all his films wherever possible.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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