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Encyclopedia > Ridgefield, Connecticut
Ridgefield, Connecticut
Location in Connecticut
Location in Connecticut
Coordinates: 41°18′19″N 73°30′05″W / 41.30528, -73.50139
NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford
Region Housatonic Valley
Incorporated 1709
Government
 - Type Selectman-town meeting
 - First selectman Rudolph P. Marconi
Area
 - City 90.6 km²  (35.0 sq mi)
Population (2005)
 - City 24,210
 - Density 272/km² (704/sq mi)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 06877
Website: http://www.ridgefieldct.org/

Ridgefield is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. Situated in the foothills of the Berkshire Mountains, the 300-year-old community has a population of 23,643,[1] spread across 34 square miles. I made this. ... A New England City and Town Area or NECTA is a geographic entity in the New England region of the United States. ... The Board of Selectmen is commonly the executive arm of town government in New England. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... The system of local government in use in New England is very different from that found throughout the rest of the United States. ... Fairfield County is located in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ...

Contents

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 90.6 km² (35.0 mi²). 89.2 km² (34.4 mi²) of it is land and 1.4 km² (0.5 mi²) of it (1.52%) is water. The town is bordered by the towns of Southeast and Lewisboro in Westchester County, New York to the west, Danbury, Connecticut to the north, Wilton, Connecticut to the south and Redding, Connecticut to the east. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Westchester County is a primarily suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Nickname: Located in Fairfield County, Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated (town) 1702 Incorporated (city) 1889 Consolidated 1965 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Mark D. Boughton (R) Area  - City 114. ... Wilton is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, in the United States. ... Redding is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ...


The town has a Metro North railroad station called "Branchville." Branchville is a business and residential community in the southeast corner of the town. Metro-North (officially MTA Metro-North Railroad) is a suburban commuter railroad running service from New York City to the northern suburbs in New York State and Connecticut. ... Branchville (ca. ...


Other locales within the town include Titicus, on Route 116 just north of the village; Ridgebury, in the northern section of town; Scotland, which is south of Ridgebury; Farmingville, northeast and east of the village; Limestone, northeast of the village; Flat Rock, south of the village; and Florida, just north of Branchville. Branchville (ca. ...


Geology

The Town of Ridgefield consists of hilly, rocky terrain, ranging from 1,060 feet above sea level (at Pine Mountain) to 342 feet at Branchville. Its village is between 800 and 720 feet above sea level, and is said to be the loftiest town center between Boston and Washington. The landscape is strewn with countless rocks deposited by glaciers and among the town's bodies of water is Round Pond, formed in a kettle left by the last glacier 20,000 years ago. A particularly interesting feature is Cameron's Line, named for Eugene N. Cameron, who discovered that rocks west of the line differed greatly from those east of it. This fault line was formed some 250 million years ago by the collison of "Proto North America" and "Proto Africa", and there are still occasional light earthquakes felt along its length. The line bisects the southern half of the town, running generally north of West Lane, across the north end of the village, past the south end of Great Swamp and generally easterly into Redding in the Topstone area. North of Cameron's Line, the town is rich in limestone. The mineral was extensively mined, and remnants of several limekilns exist today. Also mined here in the 19th Century was mica, pegmatite, and quartz. Gold, as well as gemstones such as garnet and beryl, have been found here, and dozens of minerals have been unearthed at the old Branchville Mica Quarry. Uraninite, a source of uranium, is found here, too. Branchville (ca. ... Austrias longest glacier, the Pasterze, winds its 8 km (5 mile) route at the foot of Austrias highest mountain, the Grossglockner A glacier is a large, long-lasting river of ice that is formed on land and moves in response to gravity. ... A kettle is a landform feature in glaciated terrain. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... A 19th century limekiln A preserved lime kiln in London A lime kiln is a kiln used to produce quicklime by the calcination of limestone (calcium carbonate). ... Rock with mica Mica sheet Mica flakes The mica group of sheet silicate minerals includes several closely related materials having highly perfect basal cleavage. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Quartz (disambiguation). ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Garnet is a group of minerals that have been used since the Bronze Age as gemstones and abrasives. ... Three varieties of beryl: Morganite, Aquamarine, and Heliodor The mineral beryl is a beryllium aluminium cyclosilicate with the chemical formula Be3Al2(SiO3)6. ... For the band, see Pitchblende (band). ... General Name, symbol, number uranium, U, 92 Chemical series actinides Group, period, block n/a, 7, f Appearance silvery gray metallic; corrodes to a spalling black oxide coat in air Standard atomic weight 238. ...


History

Historical
population
of Ridgefield
[1]
1756 1,115
1774 1,708
1782 1,697
1790 1,947
1800 2,025
1810 2,103
1820 2,310
1830 2,305
1840 2,474
1850 2,337
1860 2,213
1870 1,919
1880 2,028
1890 2,235
1900 2,626
1910 3,118
1920 2,707
1930 3,580
1940 3,900
1950 4,356
1960 8,165
1970 18,188
1980 20,120
1990 20,919
2000 23,643
Main Street, looking south, 1875
Main Street, looking south, 1875

Ridgefield was first settled by English colonists from Norwalk and Milford in 1708 when a group of settlers purchased land from Chief Catoonah of the Ramapoo tribe. The town was incorporated under Royal Charter in 1709. The most notable 18th Centery event was the Battle of Ridgefield (on April 27, 1777). This Revolutionary War skirmish involved a small colonial militia force (the Connecticut Continentals, part of the Continental Army), led by, among others, General David Wooster, who died in the engagement, and Benedict Arnold,[2] whose horse was shot from under him. They faced a larger British force that had landed at Norwalk and was returning from a raid on the colonial supply depot in Danbury, Connecticut. The battle was a tactical victory for the British but a strategic one for the Colonials since the British never again attempted a landing by ship to attack colonial strongholds during the war. Today, the dead from both sides are buried together in a small cemetery....."...foes in arms, brothers in death...". The Keeler Tavern, a local inn and museum, features a British cannonball still lodged in the side of the building. There are many other landmarks from the Revolutionary War in the town, with most along Main Street. 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File linksMetadata RidgefieldCTMainSt1875. ... Image File history File linksMetadata RidgefieldCTMainSt1875. ... Motto: The Right Place, The Right Time Location in Fairfield County, Connecticut Coordinates: NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Western Region Incorporated 1651 Consolidated 1913 Government type Mayor-council Mayor Dick Moccia Area    - City 36. ... Nickname: A Small City with a Big Heart Coordinates: NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Central Region Named 1640 Incorporated (city) 1959 Government type Mayor-council  - Mayor James L. Richetelli, Jr. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... Year 1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... David Wooster (1710–1777) was an American military leader from Connecticut. ... For other persons named Benedict Arnold, see Benedict Arnold (disambiguation). ... Norwalk is the name of several places in the United States of America: Norwalk, Connecticut A river running through southwestern Connecticut Norwalk, California - a suburb of Los Angeles Norwalk, Iowa - near Des Moines Norwalk, Ohio Norwalk, Wisconsin The name can also be used to describe the Norwalk virus. ... Nickname: Located in Fairfield County, Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated (town) 1702 Incorporated (city) 1889 Consolidated 1965 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Mark D. Boughton (R) Area  - City 114. ... A strategy is a long term plan of action designed to achieve a particular goal. ... Keeler Tavern seen from Main Street The Keeler Tavern is an 18th-century historical building in Ridgefield, Connecticut, United States of America. ...


In the summer of 1781, the French army, under the Comte de Rochambeau marched through Connecticut, encamping in the Ridgebury section of town, where the first Catholic Mass in Ridgefield was offered. Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau (July 1, 1725 – May 10, 1807), French soldier, was born at Vendôme (Loir-et-Cher). ...


For much of its three centuries, Ridgefield was a farming community. Among the important families in the 19th Century were the Rockwells and Lounsburys, which intermarried. They produced two Connecticut governors, George and Phineas Lounsbury. The Ridgefield Veterans Memorial Community Center, also called the Lounsbury House, on Main Street was built by Gov. Phineas Chapman Lounsbury around 1896 as his home.

The Ridgefield School (postcard sent in 1909)
The Ridgefield School (postcard sent in 1909)

In the late 1800s, spurred by the new railroad connection to its lofty village and the fact that nearby countryside reaches 1,000 feet above sea level, Ridgefield began to be discovered by wealthy New York City residents, who assembled large estates and built huge "summer cottages" throughout the higher sections of town. Among the more noteworthy estates were Col. Louis D. Conley's "Outpost Farm", which at one point totalled nearly 2,000 acres, some now Bennett's Pond State Park; Seth Low Pierrepont's "Twixthills", more than 600 acres, much now Pierrepont State Park; Frederic E. Lewis's "Upagenstit", 100 acres that became Grey Court College in the 1940s, but now mostly subdivision; and Col. Edward M. Knox's "Downesbury Manor", whose 300 acres included a 45-room mansion that Mark Twain often visited. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ...


These and dozens of other estates became unaffordable and unwieldy during and after the Great Depression, and most were broken up. Many mansions were razed. In their place came subdivisions of one- and two-acre lots that turned the town into a suburban, bedroom community in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. However, strong planning and zoning has maintained much of the 19th and early 20th Century charm of the town, especially along its famous mile-long Main Street. For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...


Right after World War II, Ridgefield was one of the locations considered for the United Nations secretariate building.


On the National Register of Historic Places

  • Benedict House and Shop — 57 Rockwell Road (added 1998)
  • Branchville Railroad Tenement — Old Main Highway (added September 12, 1982)
  • Frederic Remington House — 154 Barry Ave. (added November 15, 1966)
  • Hugh Cain Fulling Mill and Elias Glover Woolen Mill Archeological Site (added October 19, 1985)
  • J. Alden Weir Farm Historic District — 735 Nod Hill Road and Pelham Lane (added February 5, 1984; see Weir Farm National Historic Site, below)
  • Keeler Tavern — 132 Main St. (added May 29, 1982)
  • Lewis June House — 478 N. Salem Road (added March 16, 1984)
  • March Route of Rochambeau's Army: Ridgebury Road — Ridgebury Road, from intersection with Old Stagecoach South (added July 6, 2003)
  • Phineas Chapman Lounsbury House — 316 Main Street, also known as the Ridgefield Veterans Memorial Community Center (added November 3, 1975)
  • Ridgebury Congregational Church — Ridgebury Road and George Washington Highway (added April 1, 1984)
  • Ridgefield Center Historic District — Roughly bounded by Pound Street, Fairview Avenue, Prospect, Ridge, and Whipstick Roads (added October 7, 1984)
  • Thomas Hyatt House — 11 Barlow Mountain Road (added March 16, 1984)
  • West Mountain Historic District — state Route 102 (added March 23, 1984)

is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... The Hunters Supper, 1909, National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Frederic Remington (October 4, 1861 - December 26, 1909) was an American painter, illustrator, sculptor, and writer who specialized in depictions of the American West. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The Red Bridge, ca. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Keeler Tavern seen from Main Street The Keeler Tavern is an 18th-century historical building in Ridgefield, Connecticut, United States of America. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... March 16 is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... March 16 is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...

Attractions, landmarks, and institutions

The Keeler Tavern Museum preserves an early 1700s house that, by the time of the Revolution, had become a tavern and inn. The tavern was a center of community activities, an early post office, and a stop on the northern New York to Boston post road. In the early 20th Century, it was the home of noted architect Cass Gilbert. The tavern is open several days a week, offers tours, and has a gift shop. Keeler Tavern seen from Main Street The Keeler Tavern is an 18th-century historical building in Ridgefield, Connecticut, United States of America. ... Woolworth Building (New York City), was the worlds tallest building at the time it was built, in 1909. ...


The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is a leading venue for the world's best contemporary artists. Its exhibitions have attracted international attention and respect. The museum was redesigned and expanded in 2004, and offers many special programs, including concerts. Overview One of the first contemporary art museums in America, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum was opened to the public by founder Larry Aldrich in 1964. ...


Ridgefield Symphony Orchestra began as the Ridgefield Symphonette in 1965 with 20 players, only a third of them professionals. It became fully professional by the end of the decade and today has 75 musicians and draws soloists of international reputation. In 1984, Maxim Shostakovich, then a Ridgefielder, conducted a sold-out concert of music by his father, Dmitri Shostakovich, with the composer's grandson, Dmitri, performing as piano soloist. Maxim Dmitrievich Shostakovich (born May 10, 1938) is a Russian conductor and pianist. ... Dmitri Shostakovich   (Russian: , Dmitrij Dmitrievič Å ostakovič) (September 25 [O.S. September 12] 1906–August 9, 1975) was a Russian composer of the Soviet period. ...


The Ridgefield Playhouse, opened in December 2000, is housed in the "old Ridgefield High School" auditorium, designed in the 1940s by Cass Gilbert Jr. (son of Cass Gilbert, architect of the Supreme Court building and the Woolworth Building), and extensively remodeled as a playhouse. The Playhouse is the year-round venue for dozens of concerts and other performances, many by internationally known artists such as Joan Baez, Paul Newman, Arlo Guthrie, Jose Feliciano, the Bacon Brothers, Peter Yarrow, Marcel Marceau, Barbara Cook, and Moscow Boys Choir. The Playhouse also shows movies, many of them first-run. Woolworth Building (New York City), was the worlds tallest building at the time it was built, in 1909. ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... Paul Leonard Newman (born January 26, 1925) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Cannes Award, and Emmy Award-winning American actor and film director. ... Arlo Davy Guthrie (born July 10, 1947) is an American folk singer. ... José Montserrate Feliciano (born September 10, 1945 in Lares, Puerto Rico) is a Puerto Rican singer. ...


Weir Farm National Historic Site straddles the Ridgefield-Wilton border, and is the only National Park Service property in Connecticut. The site preserves much of the farm of J. Alden Weir (1852-1919), a painter of the American Impressionism style, and was later used by his son-in-law, Mahonri Young (1877-1957), noted sculptor and a grandson of Brigham Young. The site include the Weir Farm Art Center and a gallery, and many special events take place there, including shows by visiting artists in residence. The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... The Red Bridge, ca. ... Impressionism, a style of painting characterized by loose brushwork and vivid colors, was practiced widely among American artists in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... Mahonri Macintosh Young (August 9, 1877 – November 2, 1957) was an American sculptor and artist. ... See also, Brigham Young University Brigham Young (June 1, 1801 – August 29, 1877) was a leader in the Latter Day Saint movement. ...


The Ridgefield Conservatory of Dance was founded as the Ridgefield Studio of Classical Ballet in 1965 by Patricia Schuster. In 2002 it became the Ridgefield Conservatory of Dance, a non-profit 501(c)3 organization. The Ridgefield Conservatory of Dance is home to two pre-professional performance companies: The Ridgefield Civic Ballet and The Contemporary Dance Ensemble. The conservatory presents the Nutcracker annually at The Ridgefield Playhouse. A variety of nutcrackers A nutcracker consists of a mechanical device for cracking nuts. ...


Ridgefield's public open space includes Aldrich Park (65 acres), Bennett's Pond state park (460 acres), Brewster Farm (103 acres), Florida Refuge (63 acres), Hemlock Hills/Lake Windwing (421 acres), Pine Mountain (368 acres), the Seth Low Pierrepont State Park (313 acres), and the Weir Farm National Historic Site (57 acres). A more complete list, along with descriptions and a few trail maps, can be found the Ridgefield Open Space Association's website. Rules governing the use of this land can be found at town hall, or on ROSA's page.


The town's largest industry is Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc., whose United States headquarters are located in the Ridgebury section of town. Boehringer Ingelheim is a global pharmaceutical company based in Germany. ...


In 2006, the tree selected to display in Rockefeller Center, New York for the Christmas season was chosen from Ridgefield.


Schools

Ridgefield has nine public schools and two private schools. The six public elementary schools are Veterans Park, Branchville, Farmingville, Scotland, Barlow Mountain, and Ridgebury. Scotts Ridge (Ridgefield's newest school) and East Ridge are the town's two middle schools. The only high school is Ridgefield High School. The school's teams are called the Tigers. Primary or elementary education is the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... Middle school (also known as intermediate school or junior high school) covers a period of education that straddles primary education and secondary education, serving as a bridge between the two. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... Ridgefield High School is a public high school in Ridgefield, Connecticut. ...


Ridgefield's Roman Catholic school, St. Mary, serves kindergarten through eighth grade. A private school, Ridgefield Academy, teaches preschool through eighth grade and is situated on a former turn-of-the-20th-Century estate on West Mountain. There are also various preschools and a Montessori school.


Annual events

  • The Nutmeg Festival on Main Street is in August. It has been organized by St. Stephen's Church and held on its grounds since 1906, when it was started there as an "apron and cake sale" by the Ladies Guild to raise money for charity.[3]

Demographics

As of the census² of 2000, there were 23,643 people, 8,433 households, and 6,611 families residing in the town. The population density was 265.1/km² (686.7/mi²). There were 8,877 housing units at an average density of 99.5/km² (257.8/mi²). The racial makeup of the town was 96.12% White, 0.62% Black or African American, 0.09% Native American, 2.08% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.36% from other races, and 0.70% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.97% of the population. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The following is a list of sources used in the creation of encyclopedia articles on various geographic topics and locations, such as cities, counties, states, and countries. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 8,433 households out of which 43.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.6% were married couples living together, 6.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.6% were non-families. 18.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78 and the average family size was 3.21. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In the town the population was spread out with 30.6% under the age of 18, 3.2% from 18 to 24, 27.8% from 25 to 44, 27.5% from 45 to 64, and 10.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 92.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.4 males.


The median income for a household in the town was $107,351, and the median income for a family was $127,981. Males had a median income of $100,000 versus $50,236 for females. The per capita income for the town was $51,795. About 1.3% of families and 2.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.7% of those under age 18 and 5.3% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Notable people, past and present

For further information see People of Ridgefield, Connecticut Notable people, past and present who have lived in Ridgefield, Connecticut or are closely associated with the town, listed by area in which they are best known: // Authors, writers Jessica Auerbach, novelist (current resident) Robert Daley, author (Prince of the City, Night Falls on Manhattan) resident 1984-89) Howard Fast...


Ridgefield has been associated with numerous famous people in many different fields. A brief summary includes actor Robert Vaughn and actor/playwright Harvey Fierstein live in town. Authors have included Eugene O'Neill, Howard Fast and Cornelius Ryan. Children's book authors Richard Scarry, Maurice Sendak and Andy Luckey have lived in town. Ridgefield is home to American portrait artist John Howard Sanden. Businesswoman Carolyn Kepcher, who appeared on the NBC show The Apprentice, is a resident, as is Judy Collins. Conductor Maxim Shostakovich once lived in town, as did Time magazine owner Henry Luce and his wife, Clare Boothe Luce, who was also a playwright and Congresswoman. Jeremiah Donovan was a United States Representative from Connecticut. Robert Francis Vaughn (born November 22, 1932) is an American actor noted for stage, film and television work. ... Harvey Fierstein (born June 6, 1952) is a Tony Award-winning and Emmy Award-nominated American actor, playwright, and screenwriter. ... Eugene Gladstone ONeill (October 16, 1888 – November 27, 1953) was a Nobel- and four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning American playwright. ... Howard Melvin Fast (November 11, 1914 – March 12, 2003) was a Jewish American novelist and television writer. ... Cornelius Ryan (5 June 1920 – 23 November 1974) was an Irish-American journalist and author mainly known for his writings on popular military history, especially World War II. His two best-known books are The Longest Day (1959), which tells the story of the D-Day (day one of the... The cover of a Richard Scarry book. ... Maurice Bernard Sendak (born June 10, 1928) is an American writer and illustrator of childrens literature who is best known for his book Where the Wild Things Are, published in 1963. ... Andy Luckey, born in San Francisco, California, 1965, is a Writer, Director and Producer. ... John Howard Sanden (born 1935 in Austin, Texas) is an American portrait artist. ... Carolyn Kepcher (b. ... The Apprentice is a television franchise that originated in 2004 in the United States. ... Judy Collins Judith Marjorie Collins (born May 1, 1939 in Seattle, Washington) is an American folk and standards singer. ... Maxim Dmitrievich Shostakovich (born May 10, 1938) is a Russian conductor and pianist. ... Time (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... Luce with wife Clare Boothe Luce (1954) Henry Robinson Luce (pronounced like loose) (April 3, 1898 – February 28, 1967) was an influential American publisher. ... Clare Boothe Luce (April 10, 1903 – October 9, 1987) was an American editor, playwright, social activist, politician, journalist, and diplomat. ... Jeremiah Donovan (October 18, 1857 - April 22, 1935) was a United States Representative from Connecticut. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ...


Kurt Waldheim, the former Secretary General of the United Nations, rested in town at the estate of a friend, and Theodore Sorenson, former advisor to President John F. Kennedy, was once a town resident. Ira Joe Fisher, a poet who is also a weatherman on CBS television, lives in town as does veteran newsman Morton Dean Kurt Josef Waldheim (21 December 1918 – 14 June 2007) was an Austrian diplomat and politician. ... Theodore Chaikin Ted Sorensen (b. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Ira Joe Fisher on WCBS News 2 in 1995. ... Morton Dean (born August 22, 1935, Fall River, Massachusetts) is an American television news journalist who has worked for several networks since the mid-1960s. ...


Health services in town

Danbury Hospital serves the health needs of the town for emergency services, primary care services, and risk reduction and wellness. The Hospital is readily accessible from most parts of town through route 7 to Interstate 84. Danbury Hospital is a 371-bed hospital in Danbury, Connecticut. ...


In Ridgefield This Summer", undated news release near a 2006 news release, accessed September 13, 2006</ref> The hospital's Ridgefield Specimen Collection Facility is at 10 South St. is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Ridgefield Visiting Nurse Association at 80 East Ridge offers (fee based) home health care, community wellness, and public health and safety programs.


Utilities serving the town

  • Electricity: Connecticut Light & Power (CL&P)
  • Water: Aquarion serves central and west parts of town (down Route 33 south to St. Johns Road, north along Route 35 to Farmingville, west to the Eleven Levels area and West Lane). Small water companies serve some other parts of town.
  • Telephone/Internet: SBC SNET
  • Cable television/Telephone/Internet: Comcast Cable in Danbury

Books about Ridgefield

  • Images of America: Ridgefield (1999) 127 pages; 1890s to 1950s.
  • Ridgefield 1900-1950, by Jack Sanders (2003) 126 pages
  • Farmers against the Crown, by Keith Jones. An account of the Battle of Ridgefield during the Revolutionary War. 162 pages, paperback (2002)
  • The Farms of Farmingville, by Keith Marshall Jones, 509 pages (2001)
  • Five Village Walks, by Jack Sanders, 56 pages
  • Ridgefield in Review, by Silvio A. Bedini (1958) Out of print, but used copies often available locally
  • History of Ridgefield, by George L. Rockwell, 583 pages, long out of print
  • The Barbour Collection of Connecticut Town Records, Volume 36, an index to Ridgefield births, marriages and deaths from 1709 to 1850. Genealogical Publishing Company (2000)
  • The History of Ridgefield, Connecticut, by the Rev. Daniel Teller (1878), 251 pages. Teller was pastor of the First Congregational Church.
  • The Proprietors of Ridgefield, by Glenna M. Welsh (1976)
  • St. Stephen's Church: Its History for 250 years: 1725 to 1975, by Robert S. Haight, 220 pages,
  • Saint Stephen's Church Reaches the Millennium, by Dirk Bollenback, 114 pages, covers 1975 to 2000.
  • Lost in Place: Growing Up Absurd in Suburbia, by Mark Salzman (1996), 288 pages, Ridgefield native reflects on the idiosyncrasies and absurdities of suburban Connecticut life.

Footnotes

  1. ^ 2000 U. S. Census
  2. ^ See Benedict Arnold, a Ridgefield hero for more on his local exploits
  3. ^ "Nutmeg festival at 100: Ridgefield's oldest fair is today", article by Kathleen Flaherty in The Ridgefield Press, August 12, 2006

is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Government, health and eduction: Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ...

Local media:

  • The Ridgefield Press, Ridgefield's community newspaper since 1875.
  • Ridgefield Magazine, published bimonthly, with features on Ridgefield and surrounding towns.
  • The News-Times, published daily in Danbury, carries news of Ridgefield.
  • WLAD, 800 AM, covers breaking news of Ridgefield.

Jack Sanders' history Web site:


Jack Sanders, an editor at The Ridgefield Press, has extensive information about the town's history at his Web site.

Houses of worship:

Medical Services:

  • Family Practice MD and Pediatricians
  • Ridgefield Veterinary Hospital

  Results from FactBites:
 
HVCEO - Town of Ridgefield, Connecticut (4634 words)
Ridgefield's loss of territory was partially redressed at the time by action of the General Assembly in granting to Ridgefield an area of hitherto unclaimed territory in the Ridgebury section.
Northwest Ridgefield is the headwaters area of the westward flowing Titicus River, a tributary of the Croton River and water supply reservoirs in New York State.
A stagecoach line from Ridgefield to Branchville operated from 1852 to 1870 to serve visitors and summer residents and in July of 1870, the Ridgefield Branch Railroad was completed to the village from Branchville.
SEWERS IN RIDGEFIELD, CONNECTICUT (1530 words)
Ridgefield’s initial municipal sewer system was begun in the early 1900’s and served the Town Center area.
Intermunicipal agreements between Ridgefield and Danbury reserve 0.14 MGD of treatment capacity in the Danbury sewage treatment plant to serve this area of Ridgefield.
The Ridgefield Center sewage treatment plant discharges treated sewage effluent into the Great Swamp, which is considered to be the headwaters of the Norwalk River.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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