FACTOID # 27: If you're itching to live in a trailer park, hitch up your home and head to South Carolina, where a whopping 18% of residences are mobile homes.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Ridge and valley Appalachians
Shaded relief map of Cumberland Plateau and Ridge and Valley Appalachians on the Virginia/West Virginia border
Appalachian zones in the US - USGS

The Ridge-and-valley Appalachians are a belt within the Appalachian Mountains extending from northern New Jersey westward into Pennsylvania and southward into Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, and Tennessee. They form a broad arc between the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Appalachian Plateau physiographic province (the Allegheny and Cumberland Plateaus). Download high resolution version (800x784, 472 KB)Relief Map: Cumberland Plateau, West Virginia and Ridge and Valley region of Virginia Image is Shaded Relief Imagery, derived from the US Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset, modified by Pollinator. ... Download high resolution version (800x784, 472 KB)Relief Map: Cumberland Plateau, West Virginia and Ridge and Valley region of Virginia Image is Shaded Relief Imagery, derived from the US Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset, modified by Pollinator. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (432x613, 55 KB)The Appalachians - USGS http://3dparks. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (432x613, 55 KB)The Appalachians - USGS http://3dparks. ... A rainy day in the Great Smoky Mountains, Western North Carolina The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of North American mountains mostly in the United States, and partly in Canada, forming a zone, from 100 to 300 miles wide, running from the island of Newfoundland some 1,500 miles... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... Official language(s) English, Pennsylvania Dutch Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... The Appalachian Plateau is the western part of the Appalachian mountain system, stretching from New York to Alabama. ... The Allegheny Plateau is a large, dissected plateau area in southern New York, western Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and eastern Ohio. ... The Cumberland Plateau includes much of eastern Kentucky and western West Virginia in the United States. ...


The eastern edge of the Ridge and Valley region is marked by the Great Appalachian Valley, which lies just west of the Blue Ridge region. The western side of the Ridge and Valley region is marked by steep escarpments such as the Allegheny Front, the Cumberland Mountains, and Walden Ridge. The Great Valley, also called the Great Appalachian Valley or Great Valley Region, is one of the major landform features of eastern North America. ... The Allegheny Front is an escarpment delineating the eastern edge of the Allegheny Mountains. ... Cumberland Mountains is a region in the southeastern section of the Appalachian Mountains. ...


These mountains are notable because they form long, even ridges, with long, continuous valleys in between. From a great enough altitude, they look almost like corduroy, except that the widths of the valleys are somewhat variable and ridges sometimes meet in a vee. A ridge is a geological feature that features a continuous elevational crest for some distance. ... Fljótsdalur in East Iceland, a rather flat valley A valley or a low area between two hills dale (in Scotland, a glen) is a landform, which can range from a few square kilometres to hundreds or even thousands of square kilometres in area. ... Corduroy is a fabric composed of twisted fibers that when woven lie parallel (similar to twill) to one another to form the cloths distinct pattern, a cord. ...


These curious formations are the remnants of an ancient fold-and-thrust belt, west of the mountain core that formed in the Alleghenian orogeny(Stanley, 421-2). Here, strata have been folded westward, and forced over massive thrust faults; there is little metamorphism, and no igneous intrusion.(Stanley, 421-2) The ridges represent the edges of the erosion-resistant strata, and the valleys portray the absence of the more erodible strata. Smaller streams have developed their valleys following the lines of the more easily eroded strata. But a few major rivers, such as the Delaware River, the Susquehanna River, and the Potomac River are evidently older than the present mountains, having cut water gaps that are perpendicular to hard strata ridges. The evidence point to a wearing down of the entire region (the original mountains) to a low level with little relief, so that major rivers were flowing in unconsolidated sediments that were unaffected by the underlying rock structure. Then the region was uplifted slowly enough that the rivers were able to maintain their course, cutting through the ridges as they developed. The Appalachian Orogeny, a result of three separate continental collisions. ... A thrust fault is a particular type of fault, or break in the fabric of the Earths crust with resulting movement of each side against the other, in which one side is pushed up relative to the other and somewhat over it. ... Quartzite, a form of metamorphic rock, from the Museum of Geology at University of Tartu collection. ... Severe soil erosion in a wheat field near Washington State University, USA. For erosion as understood by materials science, see Erosion (materials science) For erosion as an English analogy, see Erosion (figurative) For erosion as an operation of Mathematical morphology, see Erosion (morphology) Erosion is the displacement of solids (soil... For the Delaware River in Kansas, see Delaware River (Kansas) The Delaware River is a river on the Atlantic coast of the United States. ... The Susquehanna River, originally Sasquesahanough as per the 1612 John Smith map, is a river in the northeastern United States. ... The Potomac River flows into the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... Water gap is a term geologists use to describe a notch which flowing water has carved into a mountain. ...


Valleys may be synclinal valleys or anticlinal valleys. Road Cut near Ft. ... Anticline with syncline visible at far right- USGS In structural geology, an anticline is a Fold (geology) that is convex to the youngest beds—youngest sediments are on back of hand, older under the palm. ...


These mountains are at their highest development in central Pennsylvania, a phenomenon termed the Pennsylvania climax.


Reference

  • Stanley, Steven M. Earth System History. New York: W.H. Freeman and Company, 1999. ISBN 0-7167-2882-6

Significant ridges

Name State
Bays Mountain Tennessee
Clinch Mountain Tennessee and Virginia
Sleepy Creek Mountain West Virginia
North Mountain Virginia and West Virginia
Powell Mountain Tennessee and Virginia
Cacapon Mountain West Virginia
New Creek Mountain West Virginia
Knobly Mountain West Virginia
Mill Creek Mountain West Virginia
Patterson Creek Mountain West Virginia
South Branch Mountain West Virginia
Spruce Knob West Virginia
Sideling Hill West Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania
Bald Eagle Mountain Pennsylvania
Nittany Mountain Pennsylvania
Tussey Mountain Pennsylvania
Blue Mountain Pennsylvania
Kittatinny Mountains New Jersey
Shawangunk Ridge New York

Bays Mountain is a ridge of the Ridge-and-valley Appalachians, located in eastern Tennessee. ... Clinch Mountain is a ridge in the U.S. states of Tennessee and Virginia, lying in the ridge-and-valley Appalachians. ... Sleepy Creek Mountain forms the border between Morgan and Berkeley Counties. ... North Mountain is a mountain ridge within the Ridge-and-valley Appalachians in the U.S. states of Virginia and West Virginia. ... Powell Mountain (or Powells Mountain) is a mountain ridge of the Ridge-and-valley Appalachians of the Appalachian Mountains. ... Cacapon Mountain runs northwest through Morgan and Hampshire counties in West Virginias Eastern Panhandle, rising to its greatest elevation of 2,618 feet (798 m) above sea-level at High Point. ... New Creek Mountain is a mountain ridge of the Ridge-and-valley Appalachians in Grant and Mineral counties in the U.S. state of West Virginia. ... Knobly Mountain is a part of the Ridge-and-valley Appalachians, located in Mineral and Grant counties, West Virginia, in the United States. ... Mill Creek Mountain is a continuous mountain ridge that runs northeast through Hampshire and Hardy counties in West Virginias Eastern Panhandle, rising to its greatest elevation of 2,648 feet (807 m) above sea-level at High Knob. ... Patterson Creek Mountain forms the border between Mineral and Hampshire Counties and Grant and Hardy Counties in West Virginias Eastern Panhandle. ... South Branch Mountain is a mountain ridge that runs southwest to northeast through Hampshire and Hardy Counties in West Virginias Eastern Panhandle, rising to its greatest elevation of 3,028 feet (923 m) above sea-level in the Nathaniel Mountain Wildlife Management Area. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Sideling Hill is part of the Appalachian Mountains, specifically the Ridge-and-valley Appalachians. ... Bald Eagle Mountain is a stratigraphic ridge in central Pennsylvania, United States, running east of the Allegheny Front and northwest of Mount Nittany. ... Mount Nittany the common name for Nittany Mountain, a prominent geographic feature in Centre County, Pennsylvania. ... Tussey Mountain is a stratigraphic ridge in central Pennsylvania, United States, running east of the Bald Eagle Brush, Dunning and Evitts Mountain ridges. ... The Blue Mountain area ; Not shown to the west is Hawk Mountain area . Blue Mountain, is the prominent, most southeastern Appalachian ridge in the Ridge-and-Valley Province of Pennsylvania. ... The Kittatinny Mountains are a long ridge across northwestern New Jersey. ... Shawangunk Ridge from south of New Paltz, N.Y. The Shawangunk Ridge (also known as the Shawangunk Mountains, or The Gunks) is a ridge of mountains in Ulster County, Sullivan County and Orange County in the state of New York, extending from the northernmost point of New Jersey to the...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ridge-and-valley Appalachians - Definition, explanation (190 words)
The Ridge-and-valley Appalachians are a belt within the Appalachian Mountains extending from northern New Jersey westward into Pennsylvania and southward into Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, and Tennessee.
The ridges represent the edges of the erosion-resistant strata, and the valleys portray the absence of the more erodable strata.
Valleys may be synclinal valleys or anticlinal valleys.
New Georgia Encyclopedia: Valley and Ridge Geologic Province (1090 words)
The Valley and Ridge is the westernmost physiographic province of the Appalachian Mountains, bounded to the east by the Blue Ridge, the south by the Piedmont, and the northwest by the Appalachian Plateau.
The distribution of ridges and valleys played an important part in the westward expansion of the American colonies during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, and it continues to influence patterns of land use, settlement, and communication.
Throughout both the Valley and Ridge and the Appalachian Plateau, the geology is dominated by a succession of Paleozoic sedimentary rocks deposited when eastern North America was flooded by the ancient Iapetus Ocean.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m