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Encyclopedia > Ridge
Stratigraphic ridge found in Northeastern Tennessee
Stratigraphic ridge found in Northeastern Tennessee

A ridge is a geological feature that is also known as a Rip in the earth causing magma to flow out and forming an undersea volcano, it also has geological features, a continuous elevational crest for some distance. Ridges are usually termed hills or mountains as well, depending on size. There are several main types of ridges: Look up ridge in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... The panoramic view from Connors Hill, near Swifts Creek, Victoria A hill is a landform that extends above the surrounding terrain, in a limited area. ... For other uses, see Mountain (disambiguation). ...

  • Dendritic ridge: In a typical plateau terrain, the stream drainage valleys will leave intervening ridges. These are by far the most common ridges. These ridges usually represent slightly harder rock, but not always -- they are often simply because there were larger joint spaces where the valleys formed, or other chance occurrences. This type of ridge is generally somewhat random in orientation, often changing direction frequently, often with knobs at intervals on the ridge top.
  • Stratigraphic ridge: In places such as the Ridge-and-valley Appalachians, very long, very even, very straight ridges are formed due to the fact that they're the uneroded remaining edges of the more resistant strata that were folded laterally. Similar ridges have formed in places such as the Black Hills, where the ridges form concentric circles around the igneous core. Sometimes these ridges are called "hogback ridges".
  • Oceanic spreading ridge: In tectonic spreading zones around the world, such as at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the volcanic activity forming new plate boundary forms volcanic ridges at the spreading zone. Isostatic settling and erosion gradually reduce the elevations moving away from the zone.
  • Volcanic caldera ridges: Large volcanoes often leave collapsed central calderas that are bordered by circular ridges.
  • Thrust fault ridges: Thrust faults often form escarpments. Sometimes the tops of the escarpments form not plateaus, but slope back so that the edges of the escarpments form ridges.
  • Dune ridges: In areas of large-scale dune activity, certain types of dunes result in sand ridges.
  • Moraines and eskers: Glacial activity may leave ridges in the form of moraines and eskers. An arĂȘte is a thin ridge of rock that is formed by glaciers.

The Ridge-and-valley Appalachians are a belt within the Appalachian Mountains extending from northern New Jersey westward into Pennsylvania and southward into Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia. ... The Black Hills The Black Hills are a small, isolated mountain range rising from the Great Plains of North America in western South Dakota and extending into Wyoming, USA. Set off from the main body of the Rocky Mountains, the region is something of a geological anomaly—accurately described as... Igneous rocks are formed when molten rock (magma) cools and solidifies, with or without crystallization, either below the surface as intrusive (plutonic) rocks or on the surface as extrusive (volcanic) rocks. ... ... Courtesy USGS The ridge was central in the breakup of Pangaea that began some 180 million years ago. ... Willamette Meteorite A meteorite is a natural object originating in outer space that survives an impact with the Earths surface without being destroyed. ... Tycho crater on Earths moon. ... For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... Satellite image of Santorini. ... A thrust fault is a particular type of fault, or break in the fabric of the Earths crust with resulting movement of each side against the other, in which a lower stratigraphic position is pushed up and over another. ... In geology, an escarpment is a transition zone between different physiogeographic provinces that involves an elevation differential, often involving high cliffs. ... A diagram showing the formation of a dune with a slipface. ... For other uses, see Sand (disambiguation). ... This article is about the geological formation. ... This article is about geological phenomena. ... A part of the Mason Esker Esker in Sims Corner Eskers and Kames National Natural Landmark, Washington state. ...

See also

A tectonic uplift is a geological process most often caused by plate tectonics which increases elevation. ...

External links

  • InterRidge An initiative for international cooperation in ridge-crest studies

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (204 words)
Ridges are usually termed hills or mountains as well, depending on size.
This type of ridge is generally somewhat random in orientation, often changing direction frequently, often with knobs at intervals on the ridge top.
Stratigraphic ridge: In places such as the Ridge-and-valley Appalachians, very long, very even, very straight ridges are formed due to the fact that they're the uneroded remaining edges of the more resistant strata that were folded laterally.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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