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Encyclopedia > Rickey Henderson
Rickey Henderson
Left fielder
Born: December 25, 1958 (1958-12-25) (age 48)
Batted: Right Threw: Left
MLB debut
June 24, 1979
for the Oakland Athletics
Final game
September 19, 2003
for the Los Angeles Dodgers
Career statistics
Batting average     .279
Stolen bases     1406
Hits     3055
Teams
Career highlights and awards
Career Records Held
Awards
Notable Achievements
  • 2,190 career walks (2nd all time)
  • 3,055 career hits (20th all time)
  • 3,081 career games (4th all time)
  • All-Star (AL) (x10)
  • Led the AL in stolen bases (x12)
  • Led the AL in runs (x5)
  • Led the AL in walks (x4)
Currently
  • First base coach for the New York Mets

Rickey Henley Henderson (born December 25, 1958 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder who is baseball's all-time leader in stolen bases[1] and runs scored.[2] In a 25-year career with nine clubs, Henderson's high on-base percentage, power, runs scored, and stolen base totals made him the premier leadoff hitter of his era; many consider him the best ever.[3][4][5] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The position of the left fielder A left fielder, abbreviated LF, is an outfielder in the sport of baseball who plays defense in left field. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1979 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the events of the year 2003 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899-1910), (1913) Brooklyn Grooms... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1988. ... In Major League Baseball history, Ty Cobb had a record 4,191 hits by 1928; Pete Rose would surpass it 57 years later, and finish with 4,256 career hits. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... The following are the baseball events of the year 1979 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1984 throughout the world. ... 1989 in baseball - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... // This year in baseball Events January - Reggie Jackson is elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America, receiving 94% of the vote. ... The following are the events of the year 1994 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1995 throughout the world. ... This year in baseball 1995 - 1996 - 1997 - 1998 - 1999 - 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 Events January-March January 5 - Don Sutton, a 324-game winner is elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame on his fifth try. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 7 - Outfielder Lou Brock and knuckleballer Hoyt Wilhelm are elected to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America. ... 1989 in baseball - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) East Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Toronto Blue Jays (1977–present) Other nicknames The Jays Ballpark Rogers Centre (1989–present) a. ... // This year in baseball Events January - Reggie Jackson is elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America, receiving 94% of the vote. ... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 6, 19, 31, 35, 42 Name San Diego Padres (1969–present) Other nicknames Pads, Friars Ballpark PETCO Park (2004–present) Qualcomm Stadium (1969-2003) a. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1996 throughout the world. ... The following are the events of the year 1997 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 2001 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 11, 26, 29, 30, 42, 50 Name Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (2005–present) Anaheim Angels (1997-2004) California Angels (1965-1996) Los Angeles Angels (1961-1965) Other nicknames The Halos, The Wings, The Seraphs... The following are the events of the year 1997 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... The following are the baseball events of the year 1999 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 2000 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) West Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Seattle Mariners (1977–present) Other nicknames The Ms Ballpark Safeco Field (1999–present) King County Domed Stadium (Kingdome) (1977-1999) Major league titles World Series titles (0) none AL Pennants (0) None... The following are the baseball events of the year 2000 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... This year in baseball: 1999 - 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 Events January-March January 8 - Ozzie Smith is elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899-1910), (1913) Brooklyn Grooms... The following are the events of the year 2003 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1988. ... Bengie Molina of the Anaheim Angels (in gray and red) scores a run by touching home plate after rounding all the bases. ... The Most Valuable Player Award (commonly known as the MVP award) is an annual award given to one outstanding player in each league of Major League Baseball. ... In Major League Baseball, the American League Championship Series (ALCS), played in October, is a playoff round that determines the winner of the American League pennant. ... List of AL Silver Slugger Winners at Outfield Silver Slugger AL: DH | C | 1B | 2B | SS | 3B | OF NL: P | C | 1B | 2B | SS | 3B | OF Categories: | | ... This is a list of Rawlings Gold Glove Award winners in the outfield in American League baseball. ... In baseball statistics, a base on balls (BB), also called a walk, is credited to a batter and against a pitcher when a batter receives four pitches that the umpire calls balls. ... In Major League Baseball history, Ty Cobb had a record 4,191 hits by 1928; Pete Rose would surpass it 57 years later, and finish with 4,256 career hits. ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the respective managers (from the previous years World... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1988. ... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Bengie Molina of the Anaheim Angels (in gray and red) scores a run by touching home plate after rounding all the bases. ... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... In baseball statistics, a base on balls (BB), also called a walk, is credited to a batter and against a pitcher when a batter receives four pitches that the umpire calls balls. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Austin Kearns, an outfielder, catches a fly ball. ... This article is about the sport. ... The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1988. ... Bengie Molina of the Anaheim Angels (in gray and red) scores a run by touching home plate after rounding all the bases. ... In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ... In baseball, a leadoff hitter is a batter who bats first in the lineup. ...


At the time of his last game in 2003, Henderson ranked among the sport's top 100 all-time home run hitters; he was also the all-time leader in walks, a record since surpassed by Barry Bonds. Rashad Eldridge of the Oklahoma Redhawks walks to first base after drawing a base on balls. ... Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964 in Riverside, California) He is the son of former Major League All-Star Bobby Bonds, cousin of Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson, and the godson of Hall of Famer Willie Mays. ...


When asked if he thought Rickey Henderson was a Hall of Famer, statistician Bill James replied, "If you could split him in two, you'd have two Hall of Famers."[6][7][8] The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... Statisticians are mathematicians who work with theoretical and applied statistics in the both the private and public sectors. ... George William “Bill” James (born October 5, 1949 in Holton, Kansas) is a baseball writer, historian and statistician whose work has been widely influential. ...

Contents

Early years and personal life

Henderson was born as Rickey Nelson Henley, named after musician Ricky Nelson[9] to John L. & Bobbie Henley in Chicago on Christmas Day, 1958, in the back seat of an Oldsmobile on the way to the hospital. His father left home when he was two years old, and the rest of his family moved to Oakland, California at age seven.[10] His father died in an automobile accident when he was 12. When he was a junior in high school, his mother married a man named Paul Henderson, the family adopting his surname.[11] This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... “Oakland” redirects here. ...


When first learning to play baseball, Henderson learned to bat right-handed even though he was a natural left-handed thrower — a rare combination for baseball players, especially non-pitchers. Only two other such players, Hal Chase, and Cleon Jones, bat righty and threw lefty in careers of more than 4,000 at-bats. Henderson stated that, "All my friends were right-handed and swung from the right side, so I thought that's the way it was supposed to be done." [12] Hal Chase, of the Chicago White Sox, at Comiskey Park. ... Cleon Jones (1969) Cleon Joseph Jones (born June 7, 1942 in Plateau, Alabama) is a former Major League Baseball left fielder who played for the New York Mets from 1963 to 1975. ...


He graduated in 1976 from Oakland Technical High School, where he played baseball, basketball, and football, in which he was an All-American running back. He received two dozen scholarship offers to play football, but turned them down.[13] Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Oakland Technical High School is a public high school in Oakland, California. ... This article is about the sport. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... All-American, a Broadway musical with book by Mel Brooks, music by Charles Strouse, and lyrics by Lee Adams, opened in New York on March 19, 1962, and played 80 performances. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Although a high-profile baseball player on the field, there is little written about Henderson's personal life, since he leads a quiet, low-key life off the field. He is married to his high-school sweetheart, Pamela, and they have three children: Angela, Alexis, and Adriann.[14][15]


Minor leagues

Henderson was drafted by Oakland in the fourth round in 1976.[16] In each of his four minor league seasons, he batted .309 or better, with an OBP of .417 or better, and more walks than strikeouts.[17] In May 1977, Henderson stole seven bases in one game, tying the minor league record. Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ...


Henderson played the 1978-1979 winter season for the Navojoa Mayos of the Mexican Pacific League, which won its first championship in 30 years. Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Logo of the team The Mayos de Navojoa is a Mexican baseball team of the Liga Mexicana del Pacífico (Mexican Pacific League). They have been champions of the league twice. ... The Mexican Pacific league (Spanish: Liga Mexicana del Pacífico) is a developmental Baseball league playing in the winter months in northwestern Mexico. ...


Major leagues

Oakland Athletics (1979-84)

Henderson made his major-league debut with Oakland on June 24, 1979, going 2-for-4 with a stolen base. Henderson batted .274 with 33 stolen bases in a little more than half a season. is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1979 throughout the world. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ...


A's owner Charlie Finley hired Billy Martin in 1980, and Martin's aggressive "Billy-Ball" philosophy helped Henderson into stardom. Henderson became the 3rd modern-era player to steal 100 bases in a season (Maury Wills (104) and Lou Brock (118) had preceded him). His 100 steals set a new American League record, surpassing Ty Cobb's 96, set in 1915. That winter, Henderson played in the Puerto Rican Professional Baseball League, where his 42 stolen bases broke that league's record as well.[18] Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... Charles Oscar Finley (February 22, 1918 - February 19, 1996), born in Ensley, Alabama, was an American businessman who is best remembered for his tenure as the flamboyant owner of the Oakland Athletics Major League Baseball team. ... Alfred Manuel Billy Martin (May 16, 1928 – December 25, 1989) was an American second baseman and manager in Major League Baseball. ... This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 9 - Al Kaline and Duke Snider are elected to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America. ... Maurice Morning Maury Wills (born October 2, 1932 in Washington, DC) is a former Major League Baseball shortstop and switch-hitting batter who played most prominently with the Los Angeles Dodgers (1959-66, 1969-72), and also with the Pittsburgh Pirates (1967-68) and Montreal Expos (1969). ... Louis Clark Lou Brock (born June 18, 1939, El Dorado, Arkansas) is an American former player in Major League Baseball. ... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Puerto Rican Professional Baseball League (Spanish: or LBPPR) is the main professional baseball league in Puerto Rico. ...


Henderson was a serious Most Valuable Player candidate a year later, in a season shortened by a players' strike. He hit .319, fourth in the American League, led the league in hits, and in steals with 56. Finishing second to Milwaukee's Rollie Fingers in the MVP voting, Henderson's fielding that season also earned him his only Gold Glove Award. Rickey Henderson later became known for his showboating "snatch catches," in which he would flick his glove out at incoming fly balls, then whip his arm behind his back.[19] The 1981 baseball strike was the fifth work stoppage since 1972. ... Roland Fingers giving his trademark handlebar moustache a twirl. ... In American baseball, the Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to simply as the Gold Glove, is the award annually given to the Major League player judged to be the most superior individual fielding performance at each position (in each league), as voted by the managers and coaches in each...

Henderson steals third base for the New York Yankees in 1988
Henderson steals third base for the New York Yankees in 1988

In 1982, Henderson shattered Lou Brock's modern major league record by stealing 130 bases, a total which has not been approached since. He stole an astounding 84 stolen bases by the All-Star break; no player has stolen as many as 84 bases in an entire season since 1988, when Henderson himself stole 93. Tim Raines had the next highest stolen base total in 1982 behind Henderson's 130 steals, with 78. Image File history File links Baseball_steal. ... Image File history File links Baseball_steal. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1982 throughout the world. ... Louis Clark Lou Brock (born June 18, 1939, El Dorado, Arkansas) is an American former player in Major League Baseball. ... Timothy Raines (born September 16, 1959 in Sanford, Florida), nicknamed Rock, is a former American left fielder in Major League Baseball known for his speed and ability to get on base. ...


Henderson also continued to develop as a hitter, and was able to take advantage of his muscular frame to become a power hitter, eventually establishing the record for home runs to lead off a game. For his career, he would hit more than 20 home runs in four different seasons, with a high of 28 in 1986 and again in 1990. This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 8 - Willie McCovey is the only player elected this year to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America, and becomes the 16th player elected in his first year of eligibility. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1990 throughout the world. ...


NY Yankees (1985-89)

In 1985, Henderson was traded to the New York Yankees for five players. That year he led the league in runs scored (146) and stolen bases (80), was fourth in the league in walks (99) and on base percentage (.419), and had 24 home runs while hitting .314. He also won the Silver Slugger Award, and was third in the voting for the MVP. His 146 runs scored were the most since Ted Williams had 150 in 1950. This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 7 - Outfielder Lou Brock and knuckleballer Hoyt Wilhelm are elected to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Silver Slugger Award In Major League Baseball, the Louisville Silver Slugger award is given annually to the best offensive player at each position in each league. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1950 throughout the world. ...


In 1986 he led the AL in runs scored (130) and stolen bases (87) for the second year in a row, and was 7th in walks (89). In 1987, he had an off-season by his standards, fueling the New York media, which had never covered Henderson or his eccentricities kindly.[20] Yankees owner George Steinbrenner issued a press release claiming that manager Lou Piniella wanted to trade Henderson for "jaking it" (playing lackadaisically).[21] Still, Henderson had his best OBP to that point in his career (.423), and was fifth in the AL in stolen bases (41) despite playing only 95 games. In 1988 Henderson led the AL in stolen bases (93), was third in runs scored (118), fifth in OBP (.394), and seventh in walks (82), while hitting .305. While only in New York for three and a half seasons, Henderson stole 326 bases, still the Yankees franchise record. This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 8 - Willie McCovey is the only player elected this year to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America, and becomes the 16th player elected in his first year of eligibility. ... This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 14 - Catfish Hunter and Billy Williams are elected to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America. ... George Michael Steinbrenner III (born July 4, 1930 in Rocky River, Ohio), often known as The Boss, is an American businessman and the principal owner of Major League Baseballs New York Yankees. ... Louis Victor Piniella (born August 28, 1943, in Tampa, Florida) is the current manager of the Chicago Cubs and a former Major League Baseball outfielder. ... This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 12 - Former Pittsburgh Pirates slugger Willie Stargell is the only player elected this year to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America. ...


Back to Oakland (1989-93)

Following a mid-season trade to Oakland in 1989, Henderson reasserted himself as one of the game's greatest players; his 126 walks were the most for any AL hitter since 1970. He flourished during that postseason. Henderson was MVP of the American League Championship Series with 8 steals in 5 games to go with a 1.000 slugging percentage. Leading the A's to their first World Series title since 1974, he hit .474 with a .895 slugging average. In Major League Baseball, the American League Championship Series (ALCS), played in October, is a playoff round that determines the winner of the American League pennant. ... In baseball statistics, slugging average (SLG) is a measure of the power of a hitter. ... Dates: October 14, 1989–October 28, 1989 MVP: Dave Stewart (Oakland) Television: ABC CBS Radio Network (Jack Buck, Johnny Bench and John Rooney Announcers: Al Michaels, Tim McCarver and Jim Palmer Umpires: Rich Garcia (AL), Paul Runge (NL), Al Clark (AL), Dutch Rennert (NL), Vic Voltaggio (AL), Eric Gregg (NL... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ...


A year later, Henderson finished second in the league in batting average with a mark of .325, losing out to George Brett on the final day of the season. Henderson had a remarkably consistent season, with his batting average falling below .320 for only one game, the third of the year. Reaching safely by a hit or a walk in 125 of his 136 games, his on-base average was a league-leading .439. With 119 runs scored, 28 homers, 61 RBI and 65 stolen bases, Rickey Henderson won the 1990 MVP award and helped Oakland to another pennant. He again performed well in the World Series (.333 batting, .667 slugging, 3 steals in 4 games), but the A's were swept by the underdog Cincinnati Reds. George Howard Brett (born May 15, 1953 in Glen Dale, West Virginia) is a former Major League Baseball player for the Kansas City Royals. ... In American sports, a Most Valuable Player (MVP) award is an honor typically bestowed upon the best performing player or players on a specific team, in an entire league, or for a particular contest or series of contests. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine...


Later years (1993-2003)

Henderson was a man on the move in the last decade-plus of his career, playing for eleven teams in eleven years (including two separate tours with the San Diego Padres, and three with the Oakland A's.)


In July 1993 he was traded by the Oakland Athletics to the playoff-bound Toronto Blue Jays for Steve Karsay and Jose Herrera. After winning his second World Series ring with Toronto, Henderson re-signed as a free agent with Oakland In December 1993. Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) East Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Toronto Blue Jays (1977–present) Other nicknames The Jays Ballpark Rogers Centre (1989–present) a. ... Stefan Andrew Karsay (born March 24, 1972 in Flushing, New York) is a Major League Baseball pitcher for the Oakland Athletics. ... José Concepción Herrera Ontiveros, best known as José Herrera [er-RAY-rah], and nicknamed Loco, is a former Major League Baseball outfielder and right-handed batter who played for the Houston Astros (1967-68) and Montreal Expos (1969-70). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ...


In 1994 and 1995, Henderson finished in the top-10 in the league in walks, steals, and on base percentage. His .300 average in 1995 marked his sixth and final season in the American League with a .300 or better average. He signed with San Diego in the offseason, where he had another respectable year in 1996, again finishing in the top ten in walks, OBP and steals, and runs. The following are the events of the year 1994 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1995 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1996 throughout the world. ...


In August 1997 he was traded by the Padres to the Anaheim Angels for Ryan Hancock and Stevenson Agosto; his brief stint as an Angel was uneventful. In January 1998 he signed as a free agent with the Oakland Athletics, the fourth separate time he played for the franchise. That season he led the American League in stolen bases (66) and walks (118), while scoring 101 runs. For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 11, 26, 29, 30, 42, 50 Name Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (2005–present) Anaheim Angels (1997-2004) California Angels (1965-1996) Los Angeles Angels (1961-1965) Other nicknames The Halos, The Wings, The Seraphs... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The...


A year later, Henderson signed as a free agent with the New York Mets. In 1999 he batted .315 with 37 steals and was 7th in the National League in on base percentage — his .423 OBP was his 9th year in a row above .400. Nonetheless, Henderson and the Mets were an uneasy fit, and in May 2000 he was released by the team. He quickly signed as a free agent with the Seattle Mariners. Despite the late start, he finished fourth in the AL in stolen bases (31). Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... The following are the baseball events of the year 1999 throughout the world. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in May, 2000. ... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) West Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Seattle Mariners (1977–present) Other nicknames The Ms Ballpark Safeco Field (1999–present) King County Domed Stadium (Kingdome) (1977-1999) Major league titles World Series titles (0) none AL Pennants (0) None...

Henderson with Boston in 2002
Henderson with Boston in 2002

A free agent in March 2001 he returned to the San Diego Padres. During the 2001 season, Henderson broke two major league records and reached a career milestone. He broke Babe Ruth's all-time record for walks, Ty Cobb's all-time record for runs (doing so with a home run), and on the final day of the season, he had his 3,000th career hit. That final game was also Padre legend Tony Gwynn's last major league game, and Rickey had originally wanted to sit out so as not to detract from the occasion, but Gwynn insisted that Henderson play. At the age of 42, his last substantial major league season, Henderson finished the year with 25 stolen bases, ninth in the NL. It also marked Rickey Henderson's 23rd consecutive season in which he'd stolen more than 20 bases. He'd aged well; of the ten top base stealers who were still active as of 2002, all nine of the others stole fewer bases in 2002 than the 42-year-old Henderson. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (520x624, 43 KB) Summary This photo was taken by user dlz28 and has been released in the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (520x624, 43 KB) Summary This photo was taken by user dlz28 and has been released in the public domain. ... March 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December March 3 - A U.S. Air Force Materials Command C-23 Sherpa transport crashes during stormy weather in the U.S. state of Georgia, killing 21. ... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 6, 19, 31, 35, 42 Name San Diego Padres (1969–present) Other nicknames Pads, Friars Ballpark PETCO Park (2004–present) Qualcomm Stadium (1969-2003) a. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 2001 throughout the world. ... This article is about the pitcher and outfielder. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... Anthony Keith Gwynn (born May 9, 1960 in Los Angeles, California) is a former right fielder in Major League Baseball, statistically one of the best and most consistent hitters in baseball history. ...


In February 2002 he signed as a free agent with the Boston Red Sox, where he became the oldest player to play center field in major league history when he stood in for starter Johnny Damon. Incredibly, dating from 1979-2001, Rickey Henderson had stolen more bases than his new team, the Red Sox, had managed over the identical span: 1,395 steals for Rickey, 1,382 for the Boston franchise. 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December February 27, 2002 Alicia Keys wins five Grammys. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


As the 2003 season began, Henderson was without a team for the first time in his career. He played in the independent Atlantic League with the Newark Bears, hoping for a chance with another major league organization. Rickey got that chance (after much media attention) when the Los Angeles Dodgers signed him over the All-Star break. The following are the events of the year 2003 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... The Atlantic League has operated since 1998 The Atlantic League of Professional Baseball Clubs, Inc. ... The Newark Bears are an Atlantic League team based in Newark, New Jersey. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899-1910), (1913) Brooklyn Grooms...

Stolen base king

It took a long time, huh? (Pause for cheers). First of all, I would like to thank God for giving me the opportunity. I want to thank the Haas family, the Oakland organization, the city of Oakland, and all you beautiful fans for supporting me. (Pauses for cheers). Most of all, I'd like to thank my mom, my friends, and loved ones for their support. I want to give my appreciation to Tom Trebelhorn and the late Billy Martin. Billy Martin was a great manager. He was a great friend to me. I love you, Billy. I wish you were here. (Pauses for cheers). Lou Brock was the symbol of great base stealing. But today, I'm the greatest of all time. Thank you.
Rickey Henderson's full speech after breaking Lou Brock's record.[22]

On May 1, 1991, Henderson broke one of baseball's most famous records when he stole the 939th base of his career, one more than Lou Brock. However, Henderson's achievement was somewhat overshadowed because Nolan Ryan, at age 44, set a record that same night by throwing a no-hitter against Toronto, the seventh of his career. Two years earlier, Ryan had previously achieved glory at Henderson's expense by making him his 5,000th strikeout victim. Henderson took an odd delight in the occurrence, saying, "If you haven't been struck out by Nolan Ryan, you're nobody."[23] Tom Trebelhorn (born January 27, 1948 in Portland, Oregon) is a former manager in Major League Baseball for the Milwaukee Brewers (1986-1991) and Chicago Cubs (1994). ... Alfred Manuel Billy Martin (May 16, 1928 – December 25, 1989) was an American second baseman and manager in Major League Baseball. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Louis Clark Lou Brock (born June 18, 1939, El Dorado, Arkansas) is an American former player in Major League Baseball. ... Lynn Nolan Ryan, Jr. ... In baseball and softball, a no-hit game (more commonly known as a no-hitter) refers to a contest in which one of the teams has prevented the other from getting an official hit during the entire length of the game, which must be at least 9 innings by the... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) East Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Toronto Blue Jays (1977–present) Other nicknames The Jays Ballpark Rogers Centre (1989–present) a. ...


Rickey's speech (at right) after breaking Lou Brock's all-time steals record sounds like the standard victory/award speech. Henderson thanked God and his mother, as well as the people that helped him in baseball. All that is remembered, however, is the "I am the greatest of all time" quote, which has been taken out of context to support the notion that Henderson is selfish and arrogant.[24] Years later, Henderson revealed that he had gone over his planned remarks ahead of time with Brock, and the Cardinals Hall of Famer "had no problem with it. In fact, he helped me write what I was going to say that day." Louis Clark Lou Brock (born June 18, 1939, El Dorado, Arkansas) is an American former player in Major League Baseball. ...


As it now stands, however, Henderson has 468 more stolen bases than Brock. For his career, Henderson has 50% more stolen bases (1,406) than the sport's all-time runner-up (938). Just the difference in the two men's totals would place in the Top 25 on the all-time modern list. The proportional margin is one of the greatest for any career statistical category in professional sport.


Henderson has mixed feelings about his comments:

"As soon as I said it, it ruined everything. Everybody thought it was the worst thing you could ever say. Those words haunt me to this day, and will continue to haunt me. They overshadow what I've accomplished in this game."

Asked if he believes the passage of time will improve his reputation, Henderson said:

"If you talk about baseball, you can't eliminate me, because I'm all over baseball... It's the truth. Telling the truth isn't being cocky. What do you want me to say, that I didn't put up the numbers? That my teams didn't win a lot of games? People don't want me to say anything about what I've done. Then why don't you say it? Because if I don't say it and you don't say it, nobody says it."[25]

In 1993, Henderson stole his 1,066th base, surpassing the worldwide record established ten years earlier by Yutaka Fukumoto for the Hankyu Braves in the Japanese Baseball League. Yutaka Fukumoto (福本豊, born November 7, 1947) was a professional baseball player born in Osaka, Osaka. ... The Orix BlueWave (オリックスブルーウェーブ) is a baseball team in Kōbe, Japan, that plays in the Pacific League. ... The Japanese Baseball League was a professional baseball league in Japan. ...


In his prime, Henderson had a virtual monopoly on the stolen base title in the American League. Between 1980 and 1991, he led the league in steals every season except 1987[26], when he missed part of the season due to a nagging hamstring injury[27], allowing Seattle Mariners second baseman Harold Reynolds to win the title. He had one more league-leading season after that stretch, when his 66 steals in 1998 made him the oldest SB leader in baseball history. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Henderson also owns the record for times caught stealing (335). However, his overall 81% success rate on the basepaths is among the highest percentages in history. (Tim Raines ranks first with 84%.) Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) West Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Seattle Mariners (1977–present) Other nicknames The Ms Ballpark Safeco Field (1999–present) King County Domed Stadium (Kingdome) (1977-1999) Major league titles World Series titles (0) none AL Pennants (0) None... Harold Craig Reynolds (born November 26, 1960 in Eugene, Oregon) is a former second baseman in Major League Baseball. ... Timothy Raines (born September 16, 1959 in Sanford, Florida), nicknamed Rock, is a former American left fielder in Major League Baseball known for his speed and ability to get on base. ...


On July 29, 1989, Henderson stole 5 bases against the Seattle Mariners' left-handed Randy Johnson, his career high, and one shy of the single-game MLB record. Unusually, Henderson was 0-0 in the game (he had four walks). Henderson had eighteen 4-steal games during his career. In August 1983, in a 3-game series against the Brewers and a short 2-game one versus the Yankees, Henderson had 13 stolen bases in 5 games. No surprise; he'd just done the same thing, 13 steals in 5 games, that July. Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) West Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Seattle Mariners (1977–present) Other nicknames The Ms Ballpark Safeco Field (1999–present) King County Domed Stadium (Kingdome) (1977-1999) Major league titles World Series titles (0) none AL Pennants (0) None... For other people named Randy Johnson, see Randy Johnson (disambiguation) Randall David Johnson (born September 10, 1963), nicknamed The Big Unit is a left-handed American starting pitcher who currently plays for Major League Baseballs Arizona Diamondbacks. ...


Longtime scout Charlie Metro remembered the havoc caused by Henderson: '"I did a lot of study and I found that it's impossible to throw Rickey Henderson out. I started using stopwatches and everything. I found it was impossible to throw some other guys out also. They can go from first to second in 2.9 seconds; and no pitcher catcher combination in baseball could throw from here to there to tag second in 2.9 seconds, it was always 3, 3.1, 3.2. So actually, the runner that can make the continuous, regular move like Rickey's can't be thrown out, and he's proven it." Charlie Metro (born Charles Moreskonich on April 28, 1919) was an outfielder for the Detroit Tigers and the Philadelphia Athletics, as well as a manager for the Chicago Cubs and the Kansas City Royals. ...


In July 2007, New York Sun sportswriter Tim Marchman wrote about Henderson's accomplishments: The modern New York Sun is a daily newspaper published in New York City. ... Tim Marchman is a baseball columnist for the New York Sun newspaper. ...

"He stole all those bases and scored all those runs and played all those years not because of his body, but because of his brain. Rickey could tell from the faintest, most undetectable twitch of a pitcher's muscles whether he was going home or throwing over to first. He understood that conditioning isn't about strength, but about flexibility. And more than anyone else in the history of the game, he understood that baseball is entirely a game of discipline — the discipline to work endless 1–1 counts your way, the discipline to understand that your job is to get on base, and the discipline to understand that the season is more important than the game, and a career more important than the season. Maybe he'd get a bit more credit for all this if he were some boring drip like Cal Ripken Jr., blathering on endlessly about humility and apple pie and tradition and whatever else, but we're all better off with things the way they are... Everyone had their fun when he broke Lou Brock's stolen base record and proclaimed, 'I am the greatest', but he was, of course, just saying what was plainly true."

Henderson was an All-Star in 10 of his first 12 seasons. He went on to have many more good years, and earned a second World championship ring with the Toronto Blue Jays, who acquired him in midseason from Oakland, in 1993 for Steve Karsay. In fact, Henderson was the first of two men on base (the other was Paul Molitor) when Joe Carter hit his legendary walkoff home run to end the World Series. Henderson's stint in Toronto was nevertheless nothing to write home about. After hitting .215 in 44 games, he returned to Oakland where he remained for two years, and made a 3rd return to Oakland in 1998, where he led the American League in stolen bases for a record 12th time at age 39. He also scored 101 runs, his 13th and final season topping 100. That season he also led the league in walks with 118. Cal Ripken, Jr. ... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) East Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Toronto Blue Jays (1977–present) Other nicknames The Jays Ballpark Rogers Centre (1989–present) a. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Stefan Andrew Karsay (born March 24, 1972 in Flushing, New York) is a Major League Baseball pitcher for the Oakland Athletics. ... Reverse side of a Paul Molitor baseball card Paul Leo Molitor (born August 22, 1956 in St. ... Joe Carter is a member of the Toronto Blue Jayss Level of Excellence Joseph Christopher Carter (born March 7, 1960 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) is a former right fielder in Major League Baseball who played from 1983 to 1998, most famous for hitting a walk-off home run to... In baseball, a walk-off home run is a home run that ends the game. ... Dates October 16, 1993–October 23, 1993 MVP Paul Molitor (Toronto) Television network CBS & Simulcast in Canada on CTV Announcers Sean McDonough, Tim McCarver Umpires Dave Phillips (AL), Paul Runge (NL), Tim McClelland (AL), Charlie Williams (NL), Mark Johnson (AL), Dana DeMuth (NL) The 1993 World Series was the second... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...


Career milestones

So far, Rickey Henderson ranks 4th all-time in games played (3,081), 10th in at-bats (10,961), 20th in hits (3,055), and first in runs scored (2,295) and stolen bases (1,406). His record for most walks all-time (2,190) has since been broken by Barry Bonds; Henderson is now second. He also holds the record for most home runs to lead off a game, with 81; Houston's Craig Biggio has the second-most ever, with 53. During the 2003 season, Henderson surpassed Babe Ruth for the career record in secondary bases (total bases compiled from extra base hits, walks, stolen bases, and hit by pitch). In 1993, he led off both games of a doubleheader with HRs. At the time of his last major league game, Henderson was still in the all-time Top 100 home run hitters, with 297. Bill James wrote in 2000, "Without exaggerating one inch, you could find fifty Hall of Famers who, all taken together, don't own as many records, and as many important records, as Rickey Henderson."[28][7] The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1988. ... Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964 in Riverside, California) He is the son of former Major League All-Star Bobby Bonds, cousin of Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson, and the godson of Hall of Famer Willie Mays. ... Craig Alan Biggio (born December 14, 1965 in Smithtown, New York) is a seven-time All-Star Major League baseball player who has played his entire career with the Houston Astros. ... George William “Bill” James (born October 5, 1949 in Holton, Kansas) is a baseball writer, historian and statistician whose work has been widely influential. ...


Henderson is baseball's all-time leader in stolen bases before the age of 30. He is also its all-time leader after the age of 30. He has the most postseason stolen bases, 33 (Kenny Lofton, still active, currently has 32 in about 45% more plate appearances). Henderson also achieved an odd distinction by having four separate playing tenures with the same team, the Oakland A's. Kenneth Lofton (born May 31, 1967 in East Chicago, Indiana) is a Major League Baseball center fielder who plays with the Cleveland Indians. ...


In 1999, before breaking the career records for runs scored and walks, Henderson was ranked number 51 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players, and was a nominee for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. In 2005, The Sporting News updated their 100 Greatest Players list, and Henderson had inched up to number 50. This article is about the year. ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ... In 1999, MasterCard sponsored the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ...


Asked to choose the best player in history, Henderson declined, saying, "There are guys who have done different things very well, but I don't know of anyone who mastered everything." Offered the chance to assess his own placement among the game's greats, he said, "I haven't mastered the homers or RBI. The little things, I probably mastered." Of his various records and achievements, Henderson values his career runs scored mark the most: "You have to score to win."[25]


Retirement?

Before the 2003 season, his last, Henderson discussed his reputation for hanging onto his lengthy baseball career:

"Each and every day I set a record, but we never talk about it. We'll talk about a home run hitter 24/7. Well, they haven't broken any all-time records, but they hit homers, and that's what matters nowadays. You continue playing, you accomplish a lot, and you'd think people would look at it as a fantastic career. Instead, I think people want me to quit more than anything. (chuckle)"[25]

Henderson played his last major league game September 19, 2003; he was hit by a pitch in his only plate appearance, and came around to score his 2,295th run. Though it became increasingly unlikely that he would return to major league action, his status continued to confound, as he publicly debated his own official retirement from professional baseball. Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After leaving the Dodgers, Henderson started his second consecutive season with the Newark Bears in the spring of 2004. In 91 games he had a .462 obp, more than twice as many walks (96) as strikeouts (41), and stole 37 bases while being caught only twice. The Newark Bears are an Atlantic League team based in Newark, New Jersey. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On May 9, 2005, Rickey signed with the San Diego Surf Dawgs of the Golden Baseball League, a Class-A independent league. This was the SurfDawgs' and the Golden Baseball League's inaugural season and Henderson helped the SurfDawgs to the league championship. In 73 games he had a .456 obp, 73 walks while striking out 43 times, and 16 steals while being caught only twice. is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The San Diego Surf Dawgs were a Golden Baseball League team based in San Diego, California. ... The Golden Baseball League, based in Pleasanton, California, is a professional, independent baseball league which operates in the Western United States. ...


Henderson would not accept the end of his MLB career. In May 2005, he was still insisting that he is capable of playing in the major leagues. It was reported by NBC and ESPN that Henderson had announced his much-delayed official retirement on December 6, 2005, but this was denied by his agent the following day. On February 10, 2006, Henderson accepted a position as a hitting instructor for the New York Mets, while leaving the door open to returning as a player. In July 2006, Henderson discussed an offer he'd received to rejoin the SurfDawgs for the 2006 season, which would have been his 31st in professional baseball, but suggested he'd had enough. But six weeks later, on August 11, Henderson claimed "It's sort of weird not to be playing, but I decided to take a year off," adding, "I can't say I will retire. My heart is still in it... I still love the game right now, so I'm going to wait it out and see what happens." The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... ESPN/ESPN-DT, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an [[United States|Amer<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here--68. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On May 8, 2007, Henderson again expressed his unquenchable desire to return to major league action: "I see Roger [Clemens] can come back and play. I can come back and play. They say I've done too much... I might come out with some crazy stuff, a press conference telling every club, 'Put me on the field with your best player and see if I come out of it.' If I can't do it, I'll call it quits at the end... I just want a spring training invite... I'm through, really. I'm probably through with it now. It's just one of those things. I thank the good Lord I played as long as I played and came out of it healthy. I took a lot of pounding."[29]


On May 18, 2007, the San Francisco Chronicle reported that Oakland general manager Billy Beane was considering adding Henderson to the roster for one game in September, provided it did not "infringe on the integrity of the roster or of the season," so that Henderson could retire as an Oakland A's player.[30] A month later, Henderson appeared to reject the overture, saying, "One day? I don't want one day. I want to play again, man. I don't want nobody's spot... I just want to see if I deserve to be out there. If I don't, just get rid of me, release me. And if I belong, you don't have to pay me but the minimum — and I'll donate every penny of that to some charity. So, how's that hurtin' anybody?... Don't say goodbye for me... When I want that one day they want to give me so bad, I'll let you know.""[31] Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... William Lamar Billy Beane (born March 29, 1962 in Orlando, Florida) is a former Major League Baseball player and the current general manager of the Oakland Athletics. ...


Contrary to speculation[32][33][34], Henderson's refusal to officially retire was not delaying his eligibility for Hall of Fame induction; the five-year waiting period is based on major league service only. Henderson will become eligible for the 2009 induction vote, provided he does not return to major league play. The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related...


Henderson finally conceded his "official retirement" on July 13, 2007: "I haven't submitted retirement papers to MLB, but I think MLB already had their papers that I was retired." Characteristically, he added, "If it was a situation where we were going to win the World Series and I was the only player that they had left, I would put on the shoes."[35]


Coaching

The New York Mets hired Henderson as a special instructor in 2006, primarily to work with hitters and to teach basestealing. Henderson's impact has been noticeable on Jose Reyes, the Mets' current leadoff hitter.[36] "I always want to be around the game," Henderson said in May 2007. "That's something that's in my blood. Helping them have success feels just as good."[29] Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... José Reyes (born June 11, 1983 born in Villa Gonzalez, Dominican Republic) is a Major League Baseball shortstop who has played for the New York Mets since 2003. ...


On July 13, 2007, the New York Mets promoted Henderson from special instructor to first base coach, replacing Howard Johnson, who became the hitting coach. [37] Howard Michael Johnson (born November 29, 1960), nicknamed HoJo, is a former switch hitting third baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers, New York Mets, Colorado Rockies and Chicago Cubs from 1982 to 1995. ...


Idiosyncrasies

Many stories have been told about Rickey Henderson over the years, both the player and person. He is well known for his malapropisms, being an illeist (for example, calling Padres GM Kevin Towers to inquire about a contract and leaving a message starting "this is Rickey, calling on behalf of Rickey."), and for talking to himself at length when he is up to bat. He has been known to speak to his bats, asking them which one has the next hit inside them. Teammates have reported seeing Henderson standing naked in front of a mirror before a game, practicing his swing, and declaring, "Rickey's the best! Rickey's the best!" [38] This article or section seems to contain too many examples (or examples of poor quality) for an encyclopedia entry. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... In Major League Baseball, the General Manager of a team typically controls player transactions and bears the primary responsibility on behalf of the ballclub during contract discussions with players. ... Kevin Towers is the Major League Baseball San Diego Padres executive vice president (2000-present). ...


In 2003, he discussed his unusual habit, saying, "People are always saying, 'Rickey says Rickey.' But it's been blown way out of proportion. I say it when I don't do what I need to be doing. I use it to remind myself, like, `Rickey, what you doing, you stupid....' I'm just scolding myself."[25]


In 2001, he described a long single this way: "I hit it out, but it didn't go out." Another time, Tony Gwynn offered a seat to Rickey on the team bus, saying that Henderson had tenure.[39] To which Rickey replied, "Ten years? What are you talking about? Rickey got 16, 17 years." Anthony Keith Gwynn (born May 9, 1960 in Los Angeles, California) is a former right fielder in Major League Baseball, statistically one of the best and most consistent hitters in baseball history. ... Look up tenure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Another story occurred while Henderson was playing for the Oakland A's. Team bookkeepers could not account for a $1 million discrepancy in their finances. The mysterious figure was eventually traced to Henderson, who had received the sum as a signing bonus. Instead of cashing the check, he had it framed, and it still hung on his wall.[40]


One widely reported story, however, is by all accounts a fabrication.[41] Supposedly while playing for Seattle in 2000, Henderson went up to John Olerud, and remarked on Olerud's practice of wearing a batting helmet out on the field, noting that "Rickey used to have a teammate in Toronto who did the same thing," to which Olerud was said to have replied, "That was me." The two men had been together the previous season, with the 1999 New York Mets, as well as with the 1993 World Champion Blue Jays. John Garrett Olerud (nicknamed Big Rude and Johnny O (born August 5, 1968 in Seattle, Washington) is a retired American first baseman in Major League Baseball. ...


David Cross' comedy album, Shut Up You Fucking Baby!, has an extended bit about Henderson's illeism.[42] David Cross (born April 4, 1964) is an Emmy-winning American comedian, writer and actor. ... Shut Up You Fucking Baby! is a 2 CD comedy album by David Cross. ...


Accomplishments

Image File history File links Rickey_henderson. ...

Career records

  • Most stolen bases in a career (1,406)
  • Most times caught stealing in a career (335)
  • Most runs scored in a career (2,295)
  • Most consecutive seasons with at least one home run (25)
  • Most consecutive seasons with at least one stolen base (25)
  • Most consecutive seasons with at least 20 stolen bases (23)
  • Most consecutive seasons with at least 40 stolen bases (14)
  • Most postseason stolen bases (33)
  • Most games led off with a home run (81)
  • Most unintentional walks (2129)

Single-season records

  • Most stolen bases in a season (130, in 1982)
  • Most times caught stealing in a season (42, in 1982)

Season highlights

  • Led the American League 12 times in stolen bases (1980-86, 1988-91, 1998)
  • Led the Major Leagues 6 times in stolen bases (1980, 1982-83, 1988-89, 1998)
  • Led the Major Leagues 5 times in runs scored (1981, 1985-86, 1989-90)
  • Led the American League 4 times in walks (1982-83, 1989, 1998)
  • Led the Major Leagues once in times on base (301, in 1980)
  • Led the Major Leagues once in on-base percentage (.439, in 1990)
  • Led the American League once in hits (1981 (strike-shortened season), with 135)
  • Most seasons by a non-pitcher since 1900 (25)

Awards

In the game of baseball, both amateur and professional, it is tradition to annually recognize the one player in the league who has contributed the most to the success of the players team. ... In Major League Baseball, the American League Championship Series (ALCS), played in October, is a playoff round that determines the winner of the American League pennant. ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the respective managers (from the previous years World... In American baseball, the Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to simply as the Gold Glove, is the award annually given to the Major League player judged to be the most superior individual fielding performance at each position (in each league), as voted by the managers and coaches in each... Silver Slugger Award In Major League Baseball, the Louisville Silver Slugger award is given annually to the best offensive player at each position in each league. ... The Major League Baseball Comeback Player of the Year Award is the newest annual award officially sponsored by Major League Baseball. ...

Miscellaneous

  • Oldest player in the American League (2002, at 43)
  • One of only two players (with Eric Davis) to steal over 80 bases with over 20 home runs in the same season.
  • Only American League player to steal at least 100 bases in a single season.
  • Ended his career with the record for most walks in a career (2,190, since broken by Barry Bonds). Note: Bonds, who ended 2006 with 1781 unintentional walks, still trails Henderson in unintentional walks.
  • One of three players (with Tim Raines and Ted Williams) to have stolen bases in four separate decades. (Strangely, Williams only had 24 stolen bases in his entire career.)
  • Henderson is the all-time stolen base leader for two different franchises: the Oakland A's and the New York Yankees.

For others of the same name, see Eric Davis. ... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964 in Riverside, California) He is the son of former Major League All-Star Bobby Bonds, cousin of Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson, and the godson of Hall of Famer Willie Mays. ... Timothy Raines (born September 16, 1959 in Sanford, Florida), nicknamed Rock, is a former American left fielder in Major League Baseball known for his speed and ability to get on base. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ...

See also

In Major League Baseball, the 3,000 hit club is an informal term applied to the group of players who have made 3,000 or more career base hits. ... Below is the list of Major League Baseball players who have reached the 2,000 hit milestone. ... In the sport of baseball, a home run is the act of hitting the ball in such a manner, whether out of the park or in (see inside the park home run), that allows the batter to safely reach home and score in one play. ... This is a list of Major League Baseball leaders in career stolen bases. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of Major League Baseball all-time leaders in doubles. ... Below is the list of 295 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 Runs milestone. ... Below is the list of 252 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 RBI milestone. ... Below is the list of 36 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 500 stolen base milestone. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs scored champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes stolen base champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Below is the list of 65 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 400 stolen base milestone. ... At the end of each Major League Baseball season, the league leaders of various statistical categories are announced. ...

References

  1. ^ Career Leaders for Stolen Bases. Sports Reference, Inc (2000–2007). Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  2. ^ Baseball Almanac Runs Scored records
  3. ^ archive.salon.com/people/ bc/2001/10/09/henderson/print.html
  4. ^ www.baseballlibrary.com/baseballlibrary/ ballplayers/H/Henderson_Rickey.stm
  5. ^ www.usatoday.com/sports/baseball/ pinchhits/2001-04-18-pinchhits.htm
  6. ^ Baseball Musings
  7. ^ a b http://www.pushby.com/friends/jesse/archives/2005_12.html
  8. ^ http://bronxbanter.baseballtoaster.com/archives/651054.html
  9. ^ http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20070721&content_id=2100450&vkey=news_mlb&fext=.jsp&c_id=mlb
  10. ^ Henderson, Rickey; John Shea (June 1992). Off Base: Confessions of a Thief. HarperCollins, 22-23. ISBN 0-0601-7975-9. 
  11. ^ http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20070721&content_id=2100450&vkey=news_mlb&fext=.jsp&c_id=mlb
  12. ^ Henderson, Rickey; John Shea (June 1992). Off Base: Confessions of a Thief. HarperCollins, 52-53. ISBN 0-0601-7975-9. 
  13. ^ Frankel, Michael (2001). The Baseball Report. V (1). via Internet Archive. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  14. ^ Henderson, Rickey; John Shea (June 1992). Off Base: Confessions of a Thief. HarperCollins, 52-53. ISBN 0-0601-7975-9. 
  15. ^ Rickey Henderson Biography
  16. ^ 4th Round of the 1976 June Draft. Sports Reference, Inc. Retrieved on 2007-06-25.
  17. ^ Rickey Henderson Baseball Statistics. The Baseball Cube. Retrieved on 2007-06-25.
  18. ^ http://www.minorleaguenews.com/baseball/affiliated/aaa/pcl/features/articles2004/041404.1.html
  19. ^ Henderson, Rickey; John Shea (June 1992). Off Base: Confessions of a Thief. HarperCollins, 1-10. ISBN 0-0601-7975-9. 
  20. ^ Henderson, Rickey; John Shea (June 1992). Off Base: Confessions of a Thief. HarperCollins, 90-91, 164-165. ISBN 0-0601-7975-9. 
  21. ^ http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1208/is_22_224/ai_62650037
  22. ^ Henderson, Rickey; John Shea (June 1992). Off Base: Confessions of a Thief. HarperCollins, 153–154. ISBN 0-0601-7975-9. 
  23. ^ http://www.smackbomb.com/nolanryan/art-imjustaman.html
  24. ^ Zingler, David (September 2002). Meet the Real Rickey Henderson. Simply Baseball Notebook. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  25. ^ a b c d Manoloff, Dennis (February 2003). "One on one with Rickey Henderson: future Hall of Famer - Interview". Baseball Digest via FindArticles. Retrieved on 2007-06-24. 
  26. ^ Year-by-Year League Leaders for Stolen Bases. Sports Reference, Inc. Retrieved on 2007-06-25.
  27. ^ Martinez, Michael. "Henderson Placed on Disabled List", New York Times, 1987-08-02. Retrieved on 2007-06-05. 
  28. ^ James, Bill (2001). The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. Free Press, Unknown page. ISBN 0-684-80697-5. 
  29. ^ a b McCauley, Janie (May 8, 2007). Henderson would like one more chance to make a big league team. Associated Press via Yahoo! Sports. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  30. ^ Slusser, Susan. "A Rickey Reunion?", San Francisco Chronicle, May 18, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-06-24. 
  31. ^ http://www.recordonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070701/SPORTS/707010404
  32. ^ http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=2056132
  33. ^ http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/05/18/SPG11PTFL91.DTL
  34. ^ http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20050509/news_1s9rickey.html
  35. ^ http://www.recordonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070714/SPORTS/707140340
  36. ^ "Untitled", Sports Illustrated, Time Inc., May 7, 2007, pp. 57. 
  37. ^ [www.sports.yahoo.com/mlb/news?slug=ti-metshittingcoach071307&prov=yhoo&type=lgns]
  38. ^ Marchman, Tim (July 17, 2007). "Rickey Henderson A Steal for the Mets". The New York Sun: 1. Retrieved on 2007-07-13. 
  39. ^ BuckeyePlanet Ohio State Forums (2000–2007). Rickey Henderson (Being Rickey). Jelsoft Enterprises. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  40. ^ Heyman, Jon (April 17, 2000). "Henderson's antics tarnish his brilliant career". The Sporting News via FindArticles: 1. Retrieved on 2007-06-24. 
  41. ^ St. John, Allen (2001-10-09). Rickey Henderson. Salon.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  42. ^ "Pop Matters" comedy review

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External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Rickey Henderson
  • Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or The Baseball Cube
  • Manager Tom Trebelhorn on Rickey's minor league days


Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Rickey Henderson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2453 words)
Henderson was born in Chicago, Illinois, but grew up in the city of Oakland, California and became friends with Oakland Athletics owner Charles O. Finley as a boy.
Henderson, blessed with speed and explosiveness, was eventually drafted by Oakland in 1976 and worked his way through the minor leagues in just three seasons.
Henderson batted.274 with 33 stolen bases in little more than half a season and (it could be argued) was as strong a Rookie of the Year candidate in 1979 as either of the co-winners (John Castino and Alfredo Griffin).
Article about "Rickey Henderson" in the English Wikipedia on 24-Apr-2004 (872 words)
Henderson, was born in Chicago, but grew up in the city of Oakland, California and became friends with Oakland Athletics owner Charles O. Finley as a boy.
Henderson, blessed with speed and explosiveness, was eventually drafted by Oakland in the 1976 Major League Baseball draft and worked his way through the minor leagues in just three seasons.
Henderson batted.274 with 33 stolen bases in little more than half a season and was a strong Rookie of the Year candidate in 1979.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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