FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Rick Perry
Rick Perry
Rick Perry

Incumbent
Assumed office 
December 21, 2000
Lieutenant Bill Ratliff (2000-2003)(acting)
David Dewhurst (2003-Present)
Preceded by George W. Bush

In office
January 17, 1999 – December 21, 2000
Governor George W. Bush
Preceded by Bob Bullock
Succeeded by Bill Ratliff(acting)

Born March 4, 1950 (1950-03-04) (age 58)
Paint Creek, Texas
Political party Republican
Spouse Anita Thigpen Perry
Alma mater Texas A&M University
Profession Politician
Religion Methodist
Perry was succeeded by Bill Ratliff in the Lt. Governor's post by a vote of the Texas Senate, in which Ratliff served until the election and inauguration of David Dewhurst. See related articles for details.

James Richard "Rick" Perry (born March 4, 1950) is a Republican politician and the current Governor of Texas. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 379 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (584 × 923 pixels, file size: 68 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... In politics, Governor of Texas is the title given to the chief executive of the state of Texas. ... Open seat redirects here. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Lieutenant Governor of Texas is the second-highest executive office in state government. ... Bill Ratliff, born 1937, is a Texas politician who served as a member of the Texas State Senate from 1988 to 2004. ... Texas Lt. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Lieutenant Governor of Texas is the second-highest executive office in state government. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Texas Lieutenant Governor Bob Bullock Bob Bullock (July 10, 1929 - June 18, 1999) was an American politician from Texas. ... Bill Ratliff, born 1937, is a Texas politician who served as a member of the Texas State Senate from 1988 to 2004. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Paint Creek is an unincorporated community in southeastern Haskell County, Texas, (USA). ... GOP redirects here. ... Anita Thigpen Perry attended West Texas State University and has a degree in nursing. ... For other uses, see Alma mater (disambiguation). ... Texas A&M University redirects here. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... Bill Ratliff, born 1937, is a Texas politician who served as a member of the Texas State Senate from 1988 to 2004. ... Texas Lt. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... GOP redirects here. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ...


He assumed office in December 2000 when George W. Bush resigned to prepare for his inauguration as President of the United States. Perry was elected to full terms in 2002 and 2006. George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...


On November 30, 2007, Perry was named the 2008 chairman of the Republican Governors Association. He succeeds Sonny Perdue of Georgia. is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Republican Governors Association is an association for governors in the United States who belong to the United States Republican Party. ... George Ervin Sonny Perdue III (born December 20, 1946) is the governor of the U.S. state of Georgia. ...


If he serves a full second term, Perry would become the longest serving governor in Texas history, with ten years of uninterrupted service. This would break the records held by Republican Bill Clements (eight years, over two non-consecutive terms) and Democrat Allan Shivers (7.5 years of consecutive service). This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Texas governor Allan Shivers Robert Allan Shivers (October 5, 1907 - January 14, 1985) was a politician from the state of Texas. ...

Contents

Early life

A fifth-generation Texan, Perry was born in tiny Paint Creek, sixty miles north of Abilene in West Texas, to ranchers Joseph Ray Perry and the former Amelia June Holt. His father, a Democrat, was a long-time Haskell County commissioner and school board member. As a child, Perry was in the boy scouts and earned the rank of Eagle Scout, as did his son.[1][2][3] Perry graduated from Paint Creek High School. Paint Creek is an unincorporated community in southeastern Haskell County, Texas, (USA). ... Abilene is located in Taylor County, Texas, United States, in the central portion of the state. ... West Texas is a region in Texas that has more in common geographically with the Southwestern United States than it does with the rest of the state. ... Ranching is the raising of cattle or sheep on rangeland, although one might also speak of ranching with regard to less common livestock such as elk, bison or emu. ... Haskell County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. ... This article or section should be merged with board of education A school board (or school committee) is an elected council that helps determine educational policy in a small regional area, such as a city, state, or province. ... An Eagle Scout is a Scout with the highest rank attainable in the Boy Scouting program of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). ... Paint Creek is an unincorporated community in southeastern Haskell County, Texas, (USA). ...


Perry attended Texas A&M University where he was a member of the Corps of Cadets and one of A&M's yell leaders. He graduated from A&M in 1972 with a degree in animal science. While at Texas A&M University Perry successfully completed a static line skydive at Ags Over Texas (a United States Parachute Association dropzone), the dropzone that was then in operation at Coulter Field (KCFD) in Bryan. Texas A&M University redirects here. ... Corps of Cadets Corps Stack The Texas A&M University Corps of Cadets (often The Fightin Texas Aggie Corps of Cadets, The Corps of Cadets, or simply The Corps) is a student military organization at Texas A&M University. ... Zoology (Greek zoon = animal and logos = word) is the biological discipline which involves the study of animals. ... Bryan is a city in Brazos County, Texas, United States. ...


After finishing his university work, he joined the United States Air Force and flew C-130 tactical airlift in the United States, the Middle East, and Europe until 1977. He left the Air Force with the rank of captain, returned to Texas and went into business farming cotton with his father. USAF redirects here. ... The Lockheed C-130 Hercules, a four-engine turboprop aircraft, is the main tactical air transport aircraft of the United States and UK military forces. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Captain (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ...


In 1982, Perry married Anita Thigpen, his childhood sweetheart whom he had known since elementary school. They have two children, Griffin (who followed his father's footsteps and also became an Eagle Scout) and Sydney. Anita Perry attended West Texas State University and has a degree in nursing. She has spearheaded a number of health-related initiatives such as the Anita Thigpen Perry Endowment at the San Antonio Health Science Center, which focuses on nutrition, cardiovascular disease, health education, and early childhood programming. Anita Thigpen Perry attended West Texas State University and has a degree in nursing. ... Primary or elementary education is the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... West Texas A&M University (also known as WTAMU, or WT), part of the Texas A&M University System, is a public university located in Canyon, Texas, a small city south of Amarillo, Texas. ... This article is about the practice in general. ... The UT Health Science Centers administration building. ... Heart disease is an umbrella term for a number of different diseases which affect the heart and as of 2007 it is the leading cause of death in the United States,[1] and England and Wales. ...


To the Texas legislature

Perry has said that his interest in politics probably began in November 1961, when, at the age of eleven, his father took him to the funeral of the legendary Sam Rayburn, who during his long public career served as Speaker of the Texas House and the U.S. House. Dignitaries from all over the nation descended on the small town of Bonham, the seat of Fannin County for the official farewell to Rayburn. For other uses, see Funeral (disambiguation). ... For the current professional American football player, see Sam Rayburn (football player). ... Look up Speaker in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Bonham is a city in Fannin County, Texas, United States. ... Fannin County is a county located in the state of Texas. ...


In 1982, Perry was elected to the Texas House of Representatives as a Democrat from a district that included his home county of Haskell. He served on the important House Appropriations and Calendars committees during his three terms. One of the freshman legislators that he befriended was Lena Guerrero of Austin, a staunch Democratic liberal who surprisingly endorsed Perry's reelection bid in 2006 on personal, rather than philosophical grounds. Perry was part of the "Pit Bulls," a group of Appropriations members who sat on the lower dais in the committee room (or "pit") who pushed for austere state budgets during the lean 1980s. In 1989, The Dallas Morning News named him one of the most effective legislators in the 71st legislature. In 1989, Perry announced that he was joining the Republican Party. Texas Senate in session The Texas Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Texas. ... Haskell County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. ... Lena Guerrero Aguirre, known as Lena Guerrero (November 27, 1957 – April 24, 2008), was the first woman and the first person of ethnic minority background to have served on the Texas Railroad Commission,[1] an elected body which currently regulates the oil and natural gas industry. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... The Dallas Morning News is the major daily newspaper serving the Dallas, Texas area. ...


As agriculture commissioner (1991-1999)

In 1990, he challenged incumbent Democratic Agriculture Commissioner Jim Hightower. Hightower had worked for Jesse Jackson for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1988, while Perry had supported U.S. Senator Al Gore of Tennessee. He narrowly unseated Hightower, even as the Republican gubernatorial candidate Clayton Wheat Williams, Jr., went down to defeat at the hands of Dorothy Ann Willis Richards.[4] Open seat redirects here. ... Hightowers book Thieves in High Places James Allen Jim Hightower (born January 11, 1943) is a well-known populist activist and a former Texas Commissioner of Agriculture. ... Jesse Louis Jackson, Sr. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... A governor is an official who heads the government of a colony, state or other sub-national state unit. ... Clayton Wheat Claytie Williams, Jr. ... This article is about the American politician/teacher, for the Australian-American actress, see Ann Richards (actress). ...


As agriculture commissioner, Perry was responsible for promoting the sale of Texas farm produce to other states and foreign nations and supervising the calibration of weights and measures, such as gasoline pumps and grocery store scales. Petrol redirects here. ... For a large scale grocery store, see supermarket. ...


In 1994, Perry was reelected agriculture commissioner by a large margin, having polled 2,546,287 votes (61.92 percent) to Democrat Marvin Gregory's 1,479,692 (35.98 percent). Libertarian Clyde L. Garland received the remaining 85,836 votes (2.08 percent).[5] The Libertarian Party is a United States political party founded on December 11, 1971. ...


As lieutenant governor, 1999-2000

In 1998, Perry ran not for agriculture commissioner but for lieutenant governor to succeed the retiring Democrat Bob Bullock. Perry polled 1,858,837 votes (50.04 percent) to the 1,790,106 (48.19 percent) cast for Democrat John Sharp of Victoria, who relinquished the comptroller's position after two terms to seek the lieutenant governorship. Libertarian Anthony Garcia polled another 65,150 votes (1.75 percent).[6] A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... Texas Lieutenant Governor Bob Bullock Bob Bullock (July 10, 1929 - June 18, 1999) was an American politician from Texas. ... John Sharp (February 16, 1643 - February 2, 1714), English divine, archbishop of York, was born at Bradford, and was educated at Christs College, Cambridge. ... Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: , Country State County Victoria Government  - Mayor Will Armstrong Area  - Total 33. ... Look up comptroller in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ...


Governorship

Perry assumed the governorship late in 2000 when George W. Bush resigned to prepare for his presidential inauguration. Perry won the office in his own right in 2002, when he defeated the Laredo businessman Antonio R. "Tony" Sanchez, Jr. In the 2002 general election, Perry polled 2,632,591 votes (57.80 percent) to Sanchez's 1,819,798 (39.96 percent). Four minor candidates shared some 2.21 percent of the vote.[7] An inauguration is a ceremony of formal investiture whereby an individual assumes an office or position of authority or power. ... Nickname: Location of Laredo in Texas Coordinates: , Country State County Webb Settled 1755 Government  - Type Mayor / City Manager  - Mayor Raul G. Salinas  - City Manager Carlos R. Villarreal Area  - City 84. ... Antonio R. Tony Sanchez, Jr. ... The 2002 Texas gubernatorial election was held on November 5, 2002 to select the governor of the state of Texas. ...


In the general election held on November 7, 2006, Perry defeated former Congressman Chris Bell, a Democrat from Houston; a Libertarian, sales consultant James Werner; and two independent candidates, outgoing Republican Comptroller Carole Keeton Strayhorn and Richard "Kinky" Friedman, a country singer. Perry polled 1,714,618 votes (39 percent) to Bell's 1,309,774 (29.8 percent), Strayhorn's 789,432 (18 percent), Friedman's 553,327 (12.6 percent), and Werner's 26,726 (0.6 percent). The 2006 Texas gubernatorial election will be held on November 7, 2006 to select the next governor of the state of Texas, who will serve a four year term starting on January 20, 2007. ... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Robert Christopher Chris Bell (born November 23, 1959) is a Democratic Party politician in the United States. ... Houston redirects here. ... The Libertarian Party is a United States political party founded on December 11, 1971. ... In politics, an independent is a politician who is not affiliated with any political party. ... Look up comptroller in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Carole Stewart Keeton was born September 13, 1939 in Austin. ... Kinky Friedman contemplates a question from the audience at a campaign rally in Bastrop, Texas Richard S. Kinky Friedman (born October 31, 1944) is an American singer, songwriter, novelist, humorist, politician and former columnist for Texas Monthly. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ...


In 2006, Perry gained a second term with 39 percent of the vote. (The states do not require runoffs from a general election in the event that no candidate receives a majority of the votes.) Perry is the first governor since 1861 to have been elected by a plurality of less than 40 percent. (There was a similar plurality winner in 1853.) Run-off or runoff may refer to one of the following. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A general election is an election in which all or most members of a given political body are up for election. ... For the use of the term in political theory, see Pluralism (political theory). ...


Perry is the first graduate of Texas A&M to serve as Governor of Texas. In addition to the Republican Governors Association, Perry is by default a member of the National Governors Association, the Western Governors' Association, and the Southern Governors' Association. The National Governors Association (NGA) is an organization of the governors of the fifty U.S. states and five U.S. territories (American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). ... Southern Governors Association (SGA) was founded in 1934, and is the oldest and historically the largest of the USAs regional governors associations. ...


Early in his term as governor Perry worked to make health care more accessible. he pushed through the CHIP program designed to insure 500,000 children. He convinced the legislature to increase health funding by $6 billion.[citation needed] Some of these programs have since faced funding problems. He also increased school funding prior to the 2002 election and created new scholarship programs to help needy children, including $300 million for the Texas GRANT Scholarship Program.[citation needed] Some $9 billion was allocated to Texas public schools, colleges, and universities and combined with a new emphasis on accountability for both teachers and students.[citation needed] The State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) is a national program in the United States designed for families who earn too much money to qualify for Medicaid, yet cannot afford to buy private insurance. ... This article is about scholarship (noun) and scholarship as a form of financial aid. ...


Perry's lieutenant governor and governor campaigns focused on a tough stance on crime. In June 2002, he vetoed a ban on the execution of mentally retarded inmates. He has also supported block grants for crime programs. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... Half-wit redirects here. ... In a federal system of taxation systems and spent it without any restrictions from above. ...


Another element of Perry's platform has been tort reform; as lieutenant governor he had tried and failed to place a limit on class action awards and allowing plaintiffs to distribute awards among several liable sources. In 2003, Perry sponsored a controversial state constitutional amendment to[citation needed] cap medical malpractice rewards; this proposal was narrowly approved by voters. Tort reform is the phrase used by its advocates who claim it is a change in the legal system to reduce litigations alleged adverse effects on the economy. ... In law, a class action is an equitable procedural device used in litigation for determining the rights of and remedies, if any, for large numbers of people whose cases involve common questions of law and fact. ... Medical malpractice is an act or omission by a health care provider which deviates from accepted standards of practice in the medical community and which causes injury to the patient. ...


This legislation has resulted in a decrease in malpractice insurance rates and a marked increase in the number of doctors seeking certification[8] to practice in Texas, bringing skilled practitioners to areas of the state long in need of quality care.


Fiscal issues

Perry, a proclaimed proponent of fiscal conservatism, has often campaigned on tax reform and job growth. Perry resisted state income taxes and sales tax increases, protected the state's "Rainy Day fund", balanced the state budget as required by state law, and worked to reduce property taxes that exploded with the inflation of property values in the late 1990s and the 21st century. He has been credited with attracting thousands of jobs to Texas in recent years.[citation needed] American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... Tax reform is the process of changing the way taxes are collected or managed by the government. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ... From a Keynesian point of view, a balanced budget in the public sector is achieved when the government has enough fiscal discipline to be able to equate the revenues with expenditure over the business cycles. ... Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ...


In early 2006 Perry angered many fiscal conservatives in his own party by supporting an increase in the state franchise tax alongside a property tax reform bill. Many organizations within the Republican Party itself condemned Perry's tax bill, HB-3, and likened it to a "back door" state income tax.[9] Perry claimed in a statewide advertising campaign that the bill would save the average taxpayer $2,000 in property taxes. Critics contended that Perry inflated these numbers. The actual tax savings, they contend, will average only $150 per family.[10] Franchise tax is a tax charged by some US states to corporations formed in those states based on the number of shares they issue or, in some cases, the amount of their assets. ...


In 2003, Perry signed legislation that created the Texas Enterprise Fund ostensibly to enhance the development of the economy of Texas a top priority. His sales tax cuts have attracted new retail businesses to Texas, but in recent years his tax relief has come under scrutiny for having sapped strength from government programs, particularly education. The Texas Enterprise Fund is a business incentive fund that was created by legislation in 2003. ... The economy of Texas is a dominant force in the economy of the United States. ...


Perry has faced considerable resistance in balancing fiscal conservatism, education equity, and the politics of school finance. As lieutenant governor, he initially sponsored a controversial school vouchers bill as an alternative to the "Robin Hood" school finance proposal. In 2004, Perry attacked the same "Robin Hood" plan as detrimental to the educational system. He attempted to get the legislature to abolish the system and replace it with one that he believed would encourage greater equity, cost less, hold down property and sales taxes, and foster job growth. Perry objected to the legalization of video lottery terminals at racetracks and on Indian reservations as well as increases in cigarette taxes. A school voucher, also called an education voucher, is a certificate issued by the government by which parents can pay for the education of their children at a school of their choice, rather than the public school (UK state school) to which they are assigned. ... This article is about Native Americans. ... The cigarette is the most common method of smoking tobacco. ...


In 2003, Perry called three consecutive special legislative sessions to procure a congressional redistricting plan more favorable to Republicans. The plan finally adopted, supported by then U.S. House Majority Leader Tom DeLay of Sugar Land, brought about a five-seat Republican gain in the delegation. In 2006, however, the five-seat edge was reduced to three seats. Spokesmen for minority groups claimed that the plan was designed to reduce the legislative clouts of African Americans and Hispanic voters. The process known as redistricting in the United States and redistribution in many Commonwealth countries is the changing of political borders (in many countries, specifically the electoral district/constituency boundaries) usually in response to periodic census results. ... Thomas Dale DeLay (born April 8, 1947) is a former member of the United States House of Representatives from Sugar Land, Texas. ... Sugar Land is a city located along the Gulf Coast region in the U.S. state of Texas within the Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown metropolitan area. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ...


A special session of the legislature was convened on June 21, 2005, to address education issues, but resistance developed from House Speaker Tom Craddick, a Republican from Midland. Perry's proposal was attacked by members from property-poor districts and was rejected. During the session, Perry became involved in a heated debate with Comptroller Carole Strayhorn about the merits of his school finance proposal. Strayhorn initially planned to oppose Perry in the 2006 Republican primary but instead ran as an independent in the general election.[11] Another special session was convened on July 21, 2005 after Perry vetoed all funding for public schools for the 2007-2008 biennium. He vowed not to "approve an education budget that shortchanges teacher salary increases, textbooks, education technology, and education reforms. And I cannot let $2 billion sit in some bank account when it can go directly to the classroom." is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up Speaker in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Tom Craddick (Republican) succeeded Pete Laney as Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives during the 78th legislative session on January 11, 2003. ... Nickname: Location within the state of Texas Coordinates: , Country State Counties Midland Government  - Mayor Mike Canon Area  - City 173. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Perry's campaign office in 2006 declared that without the special session, some "$2 billion that had been intended for teacher pay raises, education reforms, and other school priorities would have gone unused because House Bill 2 [the public school reform package] didn’t pass."[12] The bill failed to pass in the first session, and was refiled in a second session, in which the bill was defeated 62-79, after 50 amendments were added without discussion or debate.[13]


Late in 2005, as approval of his governorship sunk to all-time lows in public opinion polls, Perry requested assistance from his former lieutenant-governor rival, John Sharp, who is a former Texas State Comptroller and a member of the Texas Railroad Commission, Texas State Senate and Texas House of Representatives, to head an education task force charged with preparing a bipartisan education plan. The special session convened on April 17, 2006. Sharp accepted Perry's offer and removed himself as a potential candidate for governor in 2006. The task force issued its final plan several months later, and the legislature adopted it.[14] For his successful efforts, Sharp was later nominated by the Dallas Morning News for the "Texan of the Year" award. [15] The Texas Railroad Commission was a government agency created in the 1930s to regulate the petroleum industry in the state of Texas. ... The Texas Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Texas. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dallas Morning News is the major daily newspaper serving the Dallas, Texas area. ...


Social Conservatism

In 2005, Perry, a social conservative, signed an abortion bill that limits late term abortions and requires girls under the age of eighteen who procure abortions to notify their parents. Under criticism from abortion advocates, Perry signed the bill in the gymnasium of Calvary Christian Academy in Fort Worth, an evangelical Christian school. Social conservatism is a belief in traditional morality and social mores and the desire to preserve these in present day society, often through civil law or regulation. ... Nickname: Motto: Where the West Begins Location of Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas Coordinates: , Country State Counties Tarrant, Denton Government  - Mayor Michael J. Moncrief Area  - City 298. ... Evangelicalism, in a strictly lexical, but rarely used sense, refers to all things that are implied in belief that Jesus is the savior. ...


Perry is also known for his socially conservative views on homosexuality. He condemned the United States Supreme Court decision in Lawrence vs. Texas striking down sodomy laws and called Texas' last such law "appropriate."[16] Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Holding A Texas law prohibiting homosexual sodomy violated the liberty under the Fourteenth Amendment of adults to engage in private intimate conduct. ... A sodomy law is a law that defines certain sexual acts as sex crimes. ...


Record use of vetoes

Perry set a record in the 2001 legislative session for the use of the veto: he rejected legislation a total of eighty-two times, more than any other governor in any single legislative session in the history of the state since Reconstruction. Perry's use of the veto drew criticism from both parties in the 2002 gubernatorial campaign, having used the veto only nine fewer times than preceding Governor George W. Bush had during three legislative sessions and twenty-two more than Ann Richards cast in two sessions.[17] In the two legislative sessions since the 2001 session, Perry was more conservative in his use of the veto, employing it only fifty-one times.[18] However, as of 2005, he has used the veto more than any other Texas governor in a continuous administration; the only governor who exceeded Perry's total was Bill Clements, who faced a heavily Democratic legislature. Clements vetoed legislation 184 times in eight years: Perry, 132 times in five years. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In the history of the United States, Reconstruction refers to the period between 1863 or 1865 and 1877 when the federal government focused on resolving the consequences and aftermath of the American Civil War (1861–1865). ...


Purging of Supreme Court Justice Steve Smith

Perry has made numerous appointments to the Texas courts, the Railroad Commission, as secretary of state, and to other boards and commissions during his tenure as governor. One of his first selections was the appointment of Xavier Rodriguez to succeed Greg Abbott on the Texas Supreme Court. Rodriguez, who called himself a moderate, was quickly unseated in the 2002 Republican primary by conservative Steven Wayne Smith, the attorney in the Hopwood v. Texas suit in 1996, which successfully challenged affirmative action at the University of Texas Law School. Hopwood, however, was overturned in a 2003 decision stemming from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.[citation needed]. Steven Smith was elected by a comfortable margin over Democratic opposition in the 2002 general election. Xavier Rodriguez is a former Justice on the Texas State Supreme Court. ... For the soccer player, see Greg Abbott (footballer) Greg Abbott in front of the Ten Commandments display he argued for in front of the U.S. Supreme Court. ... “Moderates” redirects here. ... Steven Wayne Smith (born 1961), is a Republican former Texas Supreme Court associate justice, who was defeated for renomination in 2004 through the active opposition of Governor Rick Perry. ... The first successful legal challenge to racial preferences in student admissions since Bakke. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities, and six are health institutions. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, U-M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... Ann Arbor redirects here. ...


Perry objected to Smith's tenure on the court and refused to meet with the new justice when Smith attempted to mend fences with the governor. Perry encouraged Judge Paul Green to challenge Smith in the 2004 Republican primary. Perry raised a lot of campaign cash for Green, who defeated Smith in the primary and was then elected without opposition in the general election. Smith attempted a comeback in the 2006 Republican primary by waging a shoestring challenge to Justice Don Willett, another Perry appointee who was considered a conservative on the court. Smith polled an impressive 49.5 percent of the primary vote, but Willett narrowly prevailed. Paul Green (17 March 1894 - 4 May 1981) American Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright. ... Texas Supreme Court Justice Don Willett Don Willett has been a member of the Supreme Court of Texas since August 24, 2005. ...


Trans-Texas Corridor

In an effort to improve the state's infrastructure to accommodate a population that has grown at a rate of more than 1,000 people per day, Perry has been the lead proponent of the Trans-Texas Corridor, a $145+ billion-dollar project that would encompass multi-lane highways, rail and utilities, speeding the movement of people, products and power across the state. Rather than place constrictive tax burdens on businesses and citizens, the project was proposed to be partially financed, partially built and wholly operated by private contractors who, in exchange for a multi-billion dollar investment, will receive all toll proceeds, notably Cintra, a Spanish-owned company, and its minority partner, San Antonio-based Zachry Construction Corporation, one of Texas' largest road construction companies[19]. Some of the more controversial aspects of the project include tolls, private operation of toll collections (at rates set by local municipalities), and extensive use of eminent domain (or the option for landowners to maintain a lucrative equity stake in the project) to acquire property. Perry has come under fire for opposing the public release of the actual terms of the 50-year deal with Cintra to the public for fear they would chill the possibility of the company's investment; Perry's former liaison to the legislature and expert in public-private partnership, former State Senator Dan Shelly, returned to his consulting/lobbying work with Cintra after securing the TTC deal while on the state payroll. All of Perry's gubernatorial opponents opposed the corridor project. The 2006 state party platforms of both the Democratic and Republicans parties also opposed the current corridor legislation.[20][21] The Trans-Texas Corridor (TTC) is a transportation network in the planning and early construction stages in the U.S. state of Texas. ... District Lisbon Mayor   - Party Fernando Seara PSD Area 316. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: Counties Bexar County Government  - Mayor Phil Hardberger Area  - City  412. ... Zachry Construction Corporation is a construction company headquartered in San Antonio, Texas, founded in 1924 by H. Bartell Zachry. ...


In 2001, Perry appointed Ric Williamson of Weatherford, an old friend, former legislative colleague and innovator, to the Texas Transportation Commission. Williamson became the commission chairman in 2004 and worked for TTC until his sudden death of a heart attack on December 30, 2007. Richard F. Williamson[1] (January 25, 1952 – December 30, 2007) was the chairman of the Texas Transportation Commission and a former Democrat-turned-Republican member of the Texas House of Representatives. ... Weatherford is a city in Parker County, Texas, United States. ...


In 2007 Governor Perry endorsed Rudy Giuliani for President. Many found this to be strange considering the two differed on many issues. It has been speculated that the endorsement came because Giuliani's law firm represents Cintra, the Spanish owned company connected to the Trans Texas Corridor 35 project.[citation needed]


Death penalty

Along with the vast majority of Texans, Rick Perry supports the death penalty.[22] Perry has been criticized by anti-death penalty groups including some human rights organizations worldwide. Under Texas law, the Board of Pardon and Parole must make a recommendation to commute such a sentence, which the Governor is free to ignore, but the reverse is not true – if the Board does not make such a recommendation the Governor cannot then commute the sentence. The only power the Governor has is to issue one, 30-day reprieve.


However, the chairman of the board is appointed by the governor, and serves at his pleasure.[23] Also, all the members of the Parole Board have been appointed by the incumbent Governor of Texas.[24] The mission statement for the work of the board is laid down after consultation with the Governor and the procedures and policies of the Board are to a great extent decided by the chairperson the Governor has chosen; the chairman also decides which Board members are to serve when an individual case is decided.[23][25]


In 2005, Frances Newton's appeal for a commutation of her death penalty was declined, although some allege that there was insufficient evidence to convict. Her attorney had also argued Newton was incapable of standing trial. Newton was executed on September 14, 2005. The Board of Pardon and Parole did not recommend a commutation, thus Perry could not do so himself, and chose not to grant the one-time reprieve. Frances Elaine Newton (April 12, 1965 – September 14, 2005) was an African-American woman who was executed by lethal injection in the state of Texas for the April 7, 1987 murder of her husband, Adrian, 23, her son, Alton, 7, and daughter, Farrah, 21 months. ...


On August 30, 2007, Perry commuted the death sentence of Kenneth Foster, an accomplice in a 1996 slaying. Evidence had shown that while Foster was present at the scene of the crime (transporting the individual who actually committed the crime away from the scene in his car), he had nothing to do with the actual commission of the murder, and, for that matter, may not have even been aware that it had been taking place, as he was outside in his car at the time. The Board of Pardon and Parole had recommended the commutation, and Perry chose to convert the sentence to life in prison, with a possibility of parole in 2037, doing so three hours before Foster was to die by lethal injection. [26] is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Kenneth Foster, Jr. ...


Environmental issues

Texas-based TXU is planning a $10 billion investment in eleven new coal-fired power plants over the next several years. In 2006, Perry fast-tracked the permitting process and limited the time frame for public comment on this proposal.[27] TXU (formerly TU Electric) NYSE: TXU is an energy company headquartered in Energy Plaza in Dallas, Texas. ...


Views on non-Christians

In what was described as a "God and country" sermon at the Cornerstone church in San Antonio, attended by Perry and other mostly Republican candidates, the Rev. John Hagee stated, "If you live your life and don't confess your sins to God Almighty through the authority of Christ and His blood, I'm going to say this very plainly, you're going straight to hell with a nonstop ticket." Perry was asked if he agreed with those comments and said, "It is my faith, and I'm a believer of that." [28] Perry went on to say that there was nothing in the sermon that he took exception with. Perry said he believes in the inerrancy of the Bible and those who reject Jesus Christ as their Saviour will go to hell. Condemnation from his opponents was swift. Kinky Friedman, the Jewish independent candidate for governor said, "He doesn't think very differently from the Taliban, does he?" Carole Keeton Strayhorn disagreed with Perry's comments, and Democrat Chris Bell said that one who is in public office should "respect people of all faiths and denominations." [29] John Charles Hagee (born April 12, 1940) is the founder and senior pastor of Cornerstone Church in San Antonio, Texas, a non-denominational charismatic church with more than 19,000 active members. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Kinky Friedman contemplates a question from the audience at a campaign rally in Bastrop, Texas Richard S. Kinky Friedman (born October 31, 1944) is an American singer, songwriter, novelist, humorist, politician and former columnist for Texas Monthly. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... The Taliban (Pashto: - , also anglicised as Taleban) are a Sunni Islamist and Pashtun nationalist movement[2] that ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, when their leaders were removed from power by a cooperative military effort between the Northern Alliance and NATO countries. ...


Inauguration concert controversy

Perry invited his friend, rocker Ted Nugent, to perform at a black-tie gala hours after Perry's second inauguration ceremony. Using machine guns as props, and with skulls adorned with head dresses representing dead Native Americans, Nugent appeared onstage during the inaugural ball wearing a cutoff T-shirt emblazoned with the Confederate flag and shouting offensive remarks about non-English speakers, according to press reports.[30] The NAACP condemned Nugent's flying of the Confederate flag as a symbol of "the enslavement of African-Americans and more recently the symbol of hate groups and terrorists".[31] [32] Nugent denied making any racial comments. [33] Theodore Ted Nugent (born December 13, 1948) (a. ... The following are the flags used by the short-lived Confederate States of America. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is one of the oldest and most influential hate organizations in the United States. ...


HPV vaccine

On February 2, 2007, Perry issued an executive order mandating that Texas girls be vaccinated with Gardasil, a newly approved drug manufactured by Merck that protects against some strains of the human papilloma virus which causes cervical cancer. The move made national headlines.[34] is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... An executive order is an edict issued by a member of the executive branch of a government, usually the head of that branch. ... Gardasil (Merck & Co. ... Merck & Co. ... Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a virus which affects humans. ... Cervical cancer is a malignant cancer of the cervix. ...


Perry's move has been criticized by some social conservatives and some parents due to concerns about the moral implications of the vaccine and safety concerns. On February 22, 2007, a group of families sued in an attempt to block Gov. Perry's executive order.[35] Several financial connections between Merck and Rick Perry have been reported by news outlets, such as a $6,000 campaign contribution, as well as Merck's hiring of former Perry Chief of Staff Mike Toomey to handle its Texas lobby work.[36] Social conservatism is a belief in traditional morality and social mores and the desire to preserve these in present day society, often through civil law or regulation. ... Parenting comprises all the tasks involved in raising a child to an independent adult. ...


Adding to the criticism of Perry's order is what is viewed by some as a high price of the vaccine which is approximately $US360 in Texas.[37] Gardasil is a patent-restricted vaccine and Merck is the sole producer. USD redirects here. ...


On May 9, 2007, Perry allowed a bill to go into law that would undo his executive order.[38] is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


A year later, a CDC report detailing runaway STD rates in American teenage girls and the deadly effects of the HPV virus had opponents reconsidering their attacks on Perry's effort.[39]


Other Pardons and Commutations

Tyrone Brown was an African-American who was sentenced to life in a Texas maximum security prison in 1990 for smoking marijuana while on probation. Texas Judge Keith Dean had originally placed Brown on probation but changed the sentence after Brown tested positive for marijuana. After being defeated in the last Dallas election, Judge Dean requested the governor pardon Brown. On March 9, 2007, Perry (upon approval of the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles) granted Brown a conditional pardon (under Texas law Perry could not grant a pardon without the Board's consent).[40] Tyrone Brown is an African-American Texan who was serving a life term in Texas maximum security prison for stealing two U.S. dollars and smoking marijuana while on probation. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja (Hindi: गांजा),[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Bilderberg Group meeting

Perry attended the 2007 meeting of the secretive Bilderberg Group in Istanbul, Turkey.[41] The Bilderberg conferences are meetings of influential persons in the fields of business, media and politics, and have been the subject of a number of conspiracy theories. Texas Republican Congressman and presidential candidate Ron Paul accused Perry of violating the Logan Act, which forbids unauthorized citizens from negotiating with foreign governments. Paul told Alex Jones that "This information about him going over there and violating the Logan Act and getting involved - I'm just impressed that that's in the ordinary media - I think that's encouraging too," and that Perry's visit was "A sign that he's involved in the international business, not in the interests of Texas."[42] The front cover of the allegedly privately circulated report of the 1980 Bilderberg conference in Bad Aachen, Germany. ... Location of Istanbul on the Bosphorus Strait, Turkey Coordinates: , Country Turkey Region Province Istanbul Founded 667 BC as Byzantium Roman/Byzantine period AD 330 as Nova Roma (original name given in 330 and used during Constantines reign) and later Constantinople (following Constantines death in 337) Ottoman period 1453... Ronald Ernest Ron Paul (b. ... The Logan Act is a United States federal law that forbids unauthorized citizens from negotiating with foreign governments. ... For other persons of the same name, see Alex Jones. ...


Fire at Texas Governor's Mansion

On June 8, 2008, the 152-year-old historic state governor's residence inhabited by Perry was swept by a fire the local authorities suspected was a result of arson. Much of the building was badly damaged but no one was inside during the fire. Rick Perry was in Stockholm, Sweden at the time of the fire. He had not been living in the mansion since the previous fall, as it was being renovated.[43] For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ...


Political future

Should he complete his current term, Perry will have been in office for over ten consecutive years (the remainder of George W. Bush's second term after he left to become President, plus two elected full terms). This would make him the longest serving Governor of Texas in terms of both total time in office and continuous time in office (those distinctions are currently held by Bill Clements and Allan Shivers, respectively). Barring any unexpected events, Perry will surpass Shivers' continuous time record in June 2008 and Clements' total time record in January 2009. George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Texas governor Allan Shivers Robert Allan Shivers (October 5, 1907 - January 14, 1985) was a politician from the state of Texas. ...


Texas does not impose term limits on its governors; thus, Perry is free to run for a third full term if he chooses. In an interview with Texas Monthly, Perry indicated that he had not ruled out running again, but that he may not make that decision until 2009. In April 2008, Perry said that he would run for reelection in 2010.[44] There is considerable speculation that U.S. Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison, who has announced she will not run for another term in 2012 and could retire before then, will also run for Governor in 2010, setting up a primary challenge to Perry. Texas Monthly is a monthly American magazine published in Austin, Texas. ... Kathryn Ann Bailey Hutchison, usually known as Kay Bailey Hutchison (born July 22, 1943, in Galveston, Texas), is the senior United States Senator from Texas. ...


He has never publicly indicated aspirations to the Senate or any other higher office; however, in April 2008 while appearing as a guest on CNBC's Kudlow & Company he specifically stated that he would not agree to serve as Vice President in a McCain Administration, stating that he already had "the best job in the world" as Governor of Texas. Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about CNBC U.S., the business news channel in the U.S.. For other uses, see CNBC (disambiguation). ... Kudlow & Company is a news television program about U.S. business and politics hosted by Lawrence Kudlow that airs on the CNBC U.S. television channel at 5 PM ET since 2005-02-14. ...


2008 Presidential endorsements

In October 2007, despite their political differences on many social issues, he endorsed Rudy Giuliani for President. "Rudy Giuliani is the most prepared individual of either party to be the next President ... I'm not talkin' about any mayor, I'm talkin' about America's Mayor," Perry said.[45] Many conjectured that, if Giuliani were elected, Perry might have been considered for a position in the new President's cabinet, or perhaps the Vice Presidency.[46] However, Giuliani withdrew from the race on January 30, 2008 after failing to gain support in early primaries. Rudolph William Louis Rudy Giuliani (pronounced ;[1] born May 28, 1944) is an American lawyer, businessman, and politician from the state of New York who was Mayor of New York City from 1994 to 2001. ...


Both Giuliani and Perry immediately endorsed Arizona Senator John McCain for President.[47] Shortly after Mitt Romney's somewhat unexpected withdrawal from the race in early February, the Governor reportedly[citation needed] called McCain rival Mike Huckabee and suggested that he withdraw as well to clear the way for McCain to secure the nomination. Huckabee declined this request and made it clear publicly that he would only abandon his presidential bid if McCain secured enough delegates. Huckabee withdrew his presidential bid on March 5, 2008 after John McCain won the Texas and Ohio primaries. McCain redirects here. ... Willard Mitt Romney (born March 12, 1947) was the 70th Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Huckabee redirects here. ...


Publications

Rick Perry's first book, On My Honor: Why the American Values of the Boy Scouts are Worth Fighting For was published in February 2008 while he was serving his second term as governor.[48] In his book, he criticized the ACLU for its attacks on the Boy Scouts of America.[49] The American Civil Liberties Union, or ACLU, is a non_governmental organization devoted to defending civil rights and civil liberties in the United States. ... For the Boy Scouting program within the BSA, see Boy Scouting (Boy Scouts of America). ...


Electoral history

Texas Gubernatorial Election 2002
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Rick Perry (Incumbent) 2,617,106 58.1
Democratic Tony Sanchez 1,809,915 40.3
Texas Gubernatorial Election 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Rick Perry (Incumbent) 1,716,803 39.3 -18.8
Democratic Chris Bell 1,310,353 29.8 -10.5
Independent Carole Keeton Strayhorn 797,577 18.1
Independent Richard “Kinky” Friedman 546,869 12.4
Libertarian James Werner 133,806 1.8

This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... Antonio R. Tony Sanchez, Jr. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... Robert Christopher Chris Bell (born November 23, 1959) is a Democratic Party politician in the United States. ... Carole Stewart Keeton was born September 13, 1939 in Austin. ... Kinky Friedman contemplates a question from the audience at a campaign rally in Bastrop, Texas Richard S. Kinky Friedman (born October 31, 1944) is an American singer, songwriter, novelist, humorist, politician and former columnist for Texas Monthly. ...

References

  1. ^ "Rick Perry". Office of the Governor. Retrieved on 2006-11-08.
  2. ^ "Texas Governor Urges Protection for Boy Scouts of America". CNS News. Retrieved on 2008-02-11.
  3. ^ "Boy Scouts Honor Gov. and Mrs. Perry with Distinguished Citizen Award". Rick Perry.org. Retrieved on 2007-08-10.
  4. ^ New Faces Replace Washington-Bound Governors
  5. ^ http://elections.sos.state.tx.us/
  6. ^ http://elections.sos.state.tx.us/
  7. ^ http://elections.sos.state.tx.us/
  8. ^ More Doctors in Texas After Malpractice Caps - New York Times
  9. ^ Harris County GOP Passes Resolution Against HB3 « Right Of Texas
  10. ^ Burnt Orange Report::: Perry's Deceptive Advertising Analyzed by the Lone Star Project
  11. ^ http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20050618/ap_on_re_us/texas_governor_s_race
  12. ^ http://www.rickperry.org/news/display.php?id=11
  13. ^ http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/hjrnl/792/html/79c2day03final.htm
  14. ^ http://www.governor.state.tx.us/priorities/tax_reform/TTRC_report/files/TTRC_report.pdf
  15. ^ Dallas Morning News | News for Dallas, Texas | Opinion: DMN 2005 Texan of the Year
  16. ^ Perry Calls Sodomy Law ‘Appropriate’
  17. ^ Texas Politics - The Executive Branch
  18. ^ Texas Politics - Governors
  19. ^ "Trans-Texas Corridor: FAQs". Texas Department of Transporation (2004). Retrieved on 2008-06-26.
  20. ^ "2006 STATE REPUBLICAN PARTY PLATFORM" (PDF). Texas Republican Party (2006). Retrieved on 2008-06-26.
  21. ^ "2006 Texas Democratic Party Platform" (PDF) (2006). Retrieved on 2008-06-26.
  22. ^ Thomas, Evan; Martha Brant (2007-11-10). "Injection of Reflection". Newsweek. Retrieved on 2008-06-22.
  23. ^ a b "Texas Administrative Code". State of Texas. Retrieved on 2008-06-10.
  24. ^ "Year of Appointment of Board Members". State of Texas. Retrieved on 2008-06-10.
  25. ^ "Texas Administrative Code". State of Texas. Retrieved on 2008-06-10.
  26. ^ Governor Commutes Sentence in Texas - New York Times
  27. ^ Cut CO2 - You Can Help Reduce Carbon Dioxide Emissions
  28. ^ "Perry believes non-Christians doomed", Dallas Morning News (2006-11-06). 
  29. ^ Dallas Morning News | News for Dallas, Texas | Texas Southwest
  30. ^ Yahoo! Music News. "Rocker's Inaugural Act Creates Stir." January 18, 2007.[1]
  31. ^ Yahoo! Music News. "Rocker's Inaugural Act Creates Stir." January 18, 2007.
  32. ^ Ted Nugent News on Yahoo! Music
  33. ^ Ted Nugent controversy
  34. ^ "Monkey and other business", The Economist (2007-05-31). Retrieved on 2007-07-30. 
  35. ^ Texas Families Seek to Block Gov's Order
  36. ^ Perry's staff discussed vaccine on day Merck donated to campaign
  37. ^ PETERSON, LIZ AUSTIN (2007-02-02). "Texas Gov. Orders Anti-Cancer Vaccine", Washington Post. Retrieved on 2007-02-02. 
  38. ^ Perry lets HPV bill go into law
  39. ^ Houston Chronicle Editorial
  40. ^ "Inmate Given Life After Drug Use Is Pardoned in Texas". Associated Press / New York Times (2007-03-10).
  41. ^ HOPPE, CHRISTY (2007-05-31). "Perry off to secret forum in Turkey", The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved on 2007-06-22. 
  42. ^ "Ron Paul: Perry's Bilderberg Attendance Proof Governor Part Of "International Conspiracy"". PrisonPlanet.com (2007-06-01). Retrieved on 2007-06-22.
  43. ^ Star-Ledger Wire Services, Arson eyed in fire at historic Texas governor's mansion, The Star-Ledger (Newark, New Jersey), June 9, 2008, p. 11
  44. ^ [http://www.star-telegram.com/804/story/589097.html
  45. ^ Texas governor Rick Perry endorses Rudy Giuliani
  46. ^ Texas governor Rick Perry endorses Giuliani Dallas News, Oct. 17, 2007
  47. ^ Perry Picks McCain Day After Giuliani's Withdrawal Dallas Morning News, Jan. 31, 2008
  48. ^ Perry, Rick (February 2008). On My Honor: Why the American Values of the Boy Scouts are Worth Fighting For. Stroud & Hall. ISBN 978-0979646225. 
  49. ^ Selby, W. Gardner (2008-02-09). "In first book, Perry criticizes ACLU and defends Boy Scouts", Austin American-Statesman. Retrieved on 2008-06-22. 

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dallas Morning News is the major daily newspaper serving the Dallas, Texas area. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Austin American-Statesman is the major daily newspaper for Austin, the capital city of Texas. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Preceded by
Joe C. Hanna
Member of the Texas House of Representatives
from District 64 (Haskell)

1985–1991
Succeeded by
John R. Cook
Preceded by
Jim Hightower
Texas Agriculture Commissioner
1991–1999
Succeeded by
Susan Combs
Preceded by
Bob Bullock
Lieutenant Governor of Texas
1999 – 2000
Succeeded by
Bill Ratliff
Preceded by
George W. Bush
Governor of Texas
2000 - present
Incumbent
Lieutenant Governor of Texas is the second-highest executive office in state government. ... James Wilson Henderson is the 4th Governor of Texas from November 1853 to December 1853. ... David Catchings Dickson (1818–1880) was an American politician and physician in early Texas who served as Lieutenant Governor of Texas and as Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives. ... Hardin Richard Runnels (August 30, 1820–December 25, 1873) was a U.S. political figure. ... Francis Richard Lubbock (October 16, 1815–June 22, 1905) was a governor of Texas during the American Civil War. ... This article concerns the Confederate governor of Texas. ... Fletcher Stockdale (1823 - 1902) was a U.S. political figure. ... George Washington Jones (5 September 1828–11 July 1903) was a Texas politician, a Lieutenant Governor of Texas and a Greenback member of the United States House of Representatives. ... James Winright Flanagan (September 5, 1805– September 19, 1887) was an American merchant, lawyer, and farmer from Henderson, Texas. ... The Albert Jennings Fountain disappearance involved an event which occurred on February 1, 1896 when Colonel Albert Jennings Fountain and his son Henry disappeared near Las Cruces, New Mexico. ... Richard Bennett Hubbard, Jr. ... Joseph Draper Sayers (September 23, 1841 — May 15, 1929) was Governor of Texas from 1899 to 1903. ... George Cassety Pendleton (April 23, 1845 - January 19, 1913) was a Democratic politician who served as Texas State Representative, Lieutenant Governor of Texas, and U.S. Representative (7th District). ... George Taylor Jester (August 23, 1847-July 19, 1922) served as Lieutenant Governor of Texas from 1895 to 1899. ... James Nathan Browning (March 13, 1850-November 9, 1921) was a Texas politician and lawyer. ... William Pettus Hobby (March 26, 1878–June 7, 1964) was the publisher of the Houston Post and the governor of the U.S. state of Texas from 1917 to 1921. ... Walter Frank Woodul (1892-1984) was a Texas politician who was an early proponent of a state highway system. ... Texas politician Coke Stevenson Coke Robert Stevenson (March 20, 1888–June 28, 1975) was a U.S. political figure. ... John Lee Smith (1894-1963) was the World War II lieutenant governor of Texas and a vocal opponent of Texas labor unions during his tenure. ... Texas governor Allan Shivers Robert Allan Shivers (October 5, 1907 - January 14, 1985) was a politician from the state of Texas. ... Ben Ramsey (1903-1985) was a Texas politician who served in a succession of offices during the mid-20th century. ... Preston Earnest Smith (March 8, 1912–October 18, 2003) was a U.S. politician who served as Governor of Texas from 1969 to 1973. ... This article is about an American politician. ... William P. Hobby, Jr. ... Texas Lieutenant Governor Bob Bullock Bob Bullock (July 10, 1929 - June 18, 1999) was an American politician from Texas. ... Bill Ratliff, born 1937, is a Texas politician who served as a member of the Texas State Senate from 1988 to 2004. ... Texas Lt. ... State seal of Texas. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Rick Perry - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2447 words)
A fifth-generation Texan, Rick Perry was born March 4, 1950 in the West Texas town of Paint Creek, 60 miles north of Abilene, to ranchers Joseph Ray Perry and the former Amelia June Holt.
Perry was reelected agriculture commissioner by a large margin in 1994.
Perry set a record in the 2001 legislative session for the use of the veto: he rejected legislation a total of 82 times, more than any governor in any single legislative session in the history of the state since reconstruction.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m