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Encyclopedia > Richmond and Danville Railroad

The Richmond & Danville Railroad was chartered in Virginia in the United States in 1847. The portion between Richmond and Danville, Virginia was completed in 1856. State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Richmond is the capital of the state of Virginia (officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) of the United States of America. ... Danville is an independent city located in Virginia, bounded by Pittsylvania County, Virginia and Caswell County, North Carolina. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


The railroad played a vital role during the American Civil War. The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ...


After the war, it grew to become the Richmond and Danville Railroad System, eventually covering 3,300 miles in 9 states. In 1894, the R&D became part of the the Southern Railway Company. In 1980, it changed its name to Norfolk Southern Railway, and became part of today's Norfolk Southern Corporation. 1894 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Southern Railway (AAR designation SOU) was the product of nearly 150 predecessor lines that were combined, reorganized and recombined since the 1830s. ... 1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Norfolk Southern Corporation (NYSE: NSC) is a US publicly-traded stock corporation based in Norfolk, Virginia. ...

Contents

Whitmell P. Tunstall: a dream and a charter

The very existence of the Richmond & Danville Railroad was largely due to the efforts of one man, Whitmell Pugh Tunstall (1810-1854) of Pittsylvania County, Virginia. Tunstall was educated at Danville Academy and the University of North Carolina. Whitmell Pugh Tunstall (April 15, 1810 – February 19, 1854) was a lawyer and state legislator in Chatham, Virginia. ... Pittsylvania County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... The University of North Carolina, often called the University of North Carolina System to avoid confusion, is a federation of all sixteen public universities in North Carolina. ...


A railroad was a revolutionary idea in the 1830's. Many people had no confidence in them. However, the greatest opposition in the southern portion of Virginia came from those who ran the Roanoke Navigation Company and its system of canals along the Roanoke River in Virginia and northeastern North Carolina. They feared a rival in the transportation business. Categories: Water-transport stubs | Canals | Water transport ... The Roanoke River is a river in southern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina in the United States, approximately 410 mi (660 km) long. ... State nickname: Tar Heel State Other U.S. States Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley Official languages English Area 139,509 km² (28th)  - Land 126,256 km²  - Water 13,227 km² (9. ...


A lawyer by profession, Tunstall was admitted to the Virginia State Bar in 1832. He was a member of the Railroad Convention that met at Danville October 5, 1835, and at Richmond June 11, 1836. He served in the Virginia General Assembly in both houses. He was a delegate in the House of Delegates from 1836 to 1841, a senator in the State Senate in 1841 and 1842, and a delegate again from 1845 to 1848. He introduced a bill on April 13, 1838, to charter the R&D with an impassioned speech. No action was taken, In the Virginia legislature, he fought tirelessly for almost a decade. It was not until 1845 that petitions were again introduced. Finally, after a struggle of nine years, the charter was granted on March 9, 1847. Records reveal Tunstall's dedication to the cause in this statement made to a friend, "Tis the proudest day of my life, and I think I may now say that I have not lived in vain." 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year (279th in Leap years). ... 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Virginia. ... 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... April 13 is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (104th in leap years). ... 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (69th in Leap years). ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Construction, antebellum period

Whitmell P. Tunstall became the Richmond and Danville Railroad's first president in 1847. All along its route, agents seeking right-of-way for the roadbed frequently met with strong opposition from landowners who did not want their land disturbed or who did not consider the fee to be paid them adequate. There were numerous court suits to settle the disputes. Whitmell Pugh Tunstall (April 15, 1810 – February 19, 1854) was a lawyer and state legislator in Chatham, Virginia. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


When faced with such opposition, Mr. Tunstall frequently sent word to the recalcitrant landowners that, if a satisfactory settlement could not be reached, the builders would be obliged to "tunnel under" the objectors' farms. Objections quickly faded away.

Share Certificate

Construction on the 140-mile long line began in 1849 under the supervision of Col. Andrew Talcott, who was later to become the R&D's general manager. By 1850, the new railroad had reached Coalfield Station, near the coal mines in an area known today as Midlothian in western Chesterfield County. There, it competed with the mule-powered Chesterfield Railroad. Lawsuits followed, but the older railroad, the first in Virginia, was quickly supplanted by the competition. Share certificate from the Richmond and Danville Railroad This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Share certificate from the Richmond and Danville Railroad This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Coalfield Station was located on the Richmond and Danville Railroad in Chesterfield County, Virginia. ... Midlothian, Virginia is an unincorporated place located in Chesterfield County, Virginia. ... Chesterfield County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... The Chesterfield Railroad was located in Chesterfield County, Virginia. ...


By the end of 1851, the new line had reached Jetersville in Amelia County. Two years later, it was completed to a point near Drake's Branch, and had been graded to South Boston in Halifax County. Events January 23 - The flip of a coin determines whether a new city in Oregon is named after Boston, Massachusetts, or Portland, Maine, with Portland winning. ... Amelia County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... South Boston is a town located in Halifax County, Virginia. ... Halifax County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ...


Stricken with typhoid fever, death claimed the life of Whitmell Pugh Tunstall on February 19, 1854, 2 years before the R&D was completed to Danville in 1856. This is about the disease typhoid fever. ... February 19 is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Danville is an independent city located in Virginia, bounded by Pittsylvania County, Virginia and Caswell County, North Carolina. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Serving in the US Civil War

Known as the "first railroad war," the American Civil War (1861-1865) left the South's railroads and economy devastated. In 1862, the Richmond and York River Railroad played a crucial role in George McClellan's Peninsula Campaign. After the war, it was to be acquired by the Richmond and Danville Railroad. The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... 1862 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... George Brinton McClellan (December 3, 1826 - October 29, 1885) was a Major General of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... Map of the events of the campaign. ...


The Richmond and Danville Railroad was an essential transportation link for the Confederacy throughout the war. It provided the production of south-central Virginia to Richmond. When the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad was cut in 1864, the R&D's connection with the Piedmont Railroad was the only remaining connection from Richmond to the rest of the South. A confederacy can refer to: A form of government formed as a union of political organizations, though it differs from a republic in that the separate political units retain a greater degree of sovereignty over themselves. ... Richmond is the capital of the state of Virginia (officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) of the United States of America. ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


During the Civil War, the Confederate Army was handicapped by a lack of supplies when there often were plenty of supplies in the depots, but the quartermaster corps of the southern army was unable to deliver the goods efficiently. In once case, however, the war finally forced the states-rights Confederate government to over-rule objections by North Carolina. That state had blocked construction of a rail connection from Greensboro to Danville, fearing that after the war trade from North Carolina's Piedmont would continue to flow to Richmond via the R&D. This article is in need of attention. ... State nickname: Tar Heel State Other U.S. States Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley Official languages English Area 139,509 km² (28th)  - Land 126,256 km²  - Water 13,227 km² (9. ... Greensboro is a city located in Guilford County in North Carolina, a state of the United States of America. ...

Ruins of Richmond & Danville Railroad bridge over James River 1865

Following successful Union attacks on April 1, 1865, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee decided to abandon Petersburg and head west and south in an attempt to join Gen. Joseph Johnston's army in North Carolina. Ruins of Richmond & Danville Railroad bridge over James River 1865 Template:PD-US File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Ruins of Richmond & Danville Railroad bridge over James River 1865 Template:PD-US File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Robert Edward Lee, as a U.S. Army Colonel before the war Robert Edward Lee (January 19, 1807 – October 12, 1870) was a career army officer and the most successful general of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. ... Petersburg is an independent city located in Virginia. ... Joseph Eggleston Johnston (February 3, 1807 - March 21, 1891) was a military officer in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War, whose effectiveness was undercut by tensions with President Jefferson Davis. ...


After evacuating Richmond the next day, on April 2, 1865, Confederate President Jefferson Davis and his cabinet left Richmond on the R&D. The departing Confederates set fire to the bridge across the James River between Richmond and Manchester. They traveled to Danville, where they attempted to set up a temporary government. April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ... Jefferson Davis Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808–December 6, 1889) was an American soldier and politician. ... Factories at Manchester, Virginia, looking across James River, circa 1865 Manchester, Virginia was an independent city in Virginia in the United States. ...


On reaching Amelia Courthouse during the morning of April 4, 1865, Lee's first thought was for the commissary stores. He found ordnance supplies in abundance, but no food. Lee waited 24 hours in vain there for R&D trains to arrive with badly needed supplies. Union cavalry, meanwhile, sped forward and cut the Richmond & Danville at Jetersville. Lee had to abandon the railroad, and his army stumbled across rolling country towards Lynchburg. On the morning of April 9, 1865, "Palm Sunday", Lee met Grant in the front parlor of Wilmer McLean's home near Appomattox Courthouse to surrender. April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... A Union is a single entity which is a collection of two or more entities. ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... Wilmer McLean , was an older gentleman from Virginia who had an unusual distinction during the American Civil War. ...


Reconstruction, Richmond & Danville Railroad System (1865-1894)

At the close of the War Between the States the railroad was in a deplorable condition, tracks torn up and bridges burned. A former Confederate soldier, Colonel Algernon S. Buford, proved to be a great leader during the impoverished years following the War. Algernon S. Buford (1826-1911) Algernon Sidney Buford (January 2, 1826_May 6, 1911) of Chatham, Virginia is best known for his presidency of the Richmond and Danville Railroad during its massive post civil war expansion into the Southern Railway system (now part of Norfolk Southern). ...


Algernon Sidney Buford, Bon Air

Algernon Sidney Buford, of Chatham, Virginia is best known for his presidency of the Richmond and Danville Railroad during its massive post civil war expansion into the Southern Railway system (now part of Norfolk Southern). Long before that, Buford spent a number of years as a young professional in Chatham, Virginia. Algernon S. Buford (1826-1911) Algernon Sidney Buford (January 2, 1826_May 6, 1911) of Chatham, Virginia is best known for his presidency of the Richmond and Danville Railroad during its massive post civil war expansion into the Southern Railway system (now part of Norfolk Southern). ... Chatham is a town located in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. ... The Southern Railway (AAR designation SOU) was the product of nearly 150 predecessor lines that were combined, reorganized and recombined since the 1830s. ... Norfolk Southern Corporation (NYSE: NSC) is a US publicly-traded stock corporation based in Norfolk, Virginia. ... Chatham is a town located in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. ...


Buford was a graduate of the University of Virginia, and apparently came to Chatham in order to enter the practice of law. His choice was understandable, since, several illustrious attorneys had established practices in the town, including Whitmell P. Tunstall, who had been the creator and first president of the R&D. The University of Virginia (also referred to as UVa and often called simply Virginia for short) is a research university in Charlottesville, Virginia. ... Whitmell Pugh Tunstall (April 15, 1810 – February 19, 1854) was a lawyer and state legislator in Chatham, Virginia. ...


Buford was related to Tunstall. He was Tunstall's nephew-in-law and in manner of speaking, his brother-in-law as well. He married Emily Winifred Townes, daughter of George Townes and Eliza Barker Tunstall. Eliza was the older sister of Whitmell P. Tunstall, and had reared him after the death of their mother,


Also like Tunstall, Buford had represented Pittsylvania County in the Virginia House of Delegates during 1853 and 1854. Pittsylvania County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Virginia. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


During the American Civil War, in 1863, Buford was in charge of the Virginia Depot, on 13th street, south of Cary, (Shockoe Slip), in Richmond, and became known after the War as Colonel Buford. . The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ...


Col. Buford is honored by the naming of the thoroughfare Buford Road in Bon Air, Virginia. Buford personally (as well as through the Richmond and Danville Railroad) was much involved in the development of Brown's Summit (renamed Grand Summit, then Bon Air). He was among the first investors and officers in the Bon Air Land and Improvement Company. Other R&D officials involved in the development of Bon Air were General Thomas M. Logan, Col. Andrew Talcott, and Talcott's son, Thomas Mann Randolph Talcott. Bon Air is a census-designated place and an unincorporated town located in Chesterfield County, Virginia. ...


Buford builds the R&D System 1865-1892

From Travelers' Official Railway Guide for the United States and Canada, September, 1882

With the support of Virginia Governor Francis H. Pierpont, on September 13, 1865, Buford became president of the 140-mile Richmond and Danville Railroad (R&D). Damage from the war, including the bridge across the James River between Manchester and Richmond was repaired. Download high resolution version (1108x1319, 506 KB)From Travelers Official Railway Guide for the United States and Canada, September, 1882. ... Download high resolution version (1108x1319, 506 KB)From Travelers Official Railway Guide for the United States and Canada, September, 1882. ... Francis Harrison Pierpont (January 25, 1814–March 24, 1899), called the Father of West Virginia, was an American lawyer, politician, and governor of (the free parts of) Virginia during the Civil War. ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Algernon S. Buford (1826-1911) Algernon Sidney Buford (January 2, 1826_May 6, 1911) of Chatham, Virginia is best known for his presidency of the Richmond and Danville Railroad during its massive post civil war expansion into the Southern Railway system (now part of Norfolk Southern). ... The James River is the name of several rivers in the United States. ... Factories at Manchester, Virginia, looking across James River, circa 1865 Manchester, Virginia was an independent city in Virginia in the United States. ... Richmond is the capital of the state of Virginia (officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) of the United States of America. ...


Over the next 20 years, as R&D President, Buford extended the trackage to three thousand miles. The R&D's early acquisitions included the Piedmont Railroad in 1866, and the North Carolina Railroad in 1871. 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

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By 1890, the R&D System covered 3,300 miles of track in Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Texas. However, the R&D System had become financially unstable during all the growth. State nickname: Tar Heel State Other U.S. States Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley Official languages English Area 139,509 km² (28th)  - Land 126,256 km²  - Water 13,227 km² (9. ... State nickname: Palmetto State Other U.S. States Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford Official languages English Area 82,965 km² (40th)  - Land 78,051 km²  - Water 4,915 km² (6%) Population (2000)  - Population 4,012,012 (26th)  - Density 51. ... State nickname: Volunteer State Other U.S. States Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Governor Phil Bredesen Official languages English Area 109,247 km² (36th)  - Land 106,846 km²  - Water 2,400 km² (2. ... Alabama is a state located in the southern United States; the population of Alabama is 4,447,100 as of 2000. ... State nickname: Magnolia State Other U.S. States Capital Jackson Largest city Jackson Governor Haley Barbour Official languages English Area 125,546 km² (32nd)  - Land 121,606 km²  - Water 3,940 km² (3%) Population (2000)  - Population 2,697,243 (31st)  - Density 23. ... State nickname: The Natural State Other U.S. States Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Governor Mike Huckabee Official languages English Area 137,732 km² (29th)  - Land 134,856 km²  - Water 2,876 km² (2. ... State nickname: Lone Star State Other U.S. States Capital Austin Largest city Houston Governor Rick Perry Official languages None. ...


Southern Railway System 1894; Norfolk Southern 1982

In 1892, the R&D and subsidiaries entered receivership. Reorganized by J.P. Morgan and his New York banking firm of Drexel, Morgan and Company, they emerged in 1894 as the Southern Railway Company, which controlled over 4,000 miles of line at its inception. Samuel Spencer became Southern's first president. 1892 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... John Pierpont Morgan (April 17, 1837 – March 31, 1913), American financier and banker, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, a son of Junius Spencer Morgan (1813–1890), who was a partner of George Peabody and the founder of the house of J. S. Morgan & Co. ... 1894 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Southern Railway (AAR designation SOU) was the product of nearly 150 predecessor lines that were combined, reorganized and recombined since the 1830s. ...


In 1980, Southern Railway Company changed its name to Norfolk Southern Railway, and became part of today's Norfolk Southern Corporation. 1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Norfolk Southern Corporation (NYSE: NSC) is a US publicly-traded stock corporation based in Norfolk, Virginia. ...


References

External Links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Railroad Collection introduction (1201 words)
In 1892, Norfolk and Western leased the Roanoke and Southern Railroad, connecting Roanoke with Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and in 1893 it leased the Lynchburg and Durham, connecting Lynchburg with Durham, North Carolina.
The Richmond and Danville's early acquisitions included the Piedmont Railroad (1866), the North Carolina Railroad (1871), and the Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad (1878).
Railroads for which such extensive documentation exists include the Norfolk and Western and its direct predecessors, the Atlantic, Mississippi and Ohio, the Norfolk and Petersburg, the Southside, and the Virginia and Tennessee; the Shenandoah Valley; and the Georgia Pacific.
History of Richmond, Virginia: Information from Answers.com (3905 words)
Richmond was chartered as a town in 1742.
The Richmond and Danville Railroad was chartered in 1847, and completed the circuit to Danville, Virginia by 1854.
Richmond’s population had reached 60,600 by 1880, and the James River and Kanawha Canal closed with tracks of the Richmond and Allegheny Railroad of Major James H. Dooley laid on its towpath.
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