FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Richmond, Virginia
City of Richmond, Virginia
Flag of City of Richmond, Virginia
Flag

Seal
Nickname: River City, Cap City
Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars)
Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia
Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia
Coordinates: 37°31′58.8″N 77°28′1.2″W / 37.533, -77.467
Country United States
State Virginia
Government
 - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I)
Area
 - City 62.5 sq mi (162.0 km²)
 - Land 60.1 sq mi (155.6' km²)
 - Water 2.5 sq mi (6.4 km²)
Elevation 166.45 ft (45.7 m)
Population (2007)
 - City 200,123 (estimate)
 - Density 3,211.1/sq mi (1,239.8/km²)
 - Urban 1,045,250
 - Metro 1,194,008
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 804
FIPS code 51-67000[1]
GNIS feature ID 1499957[2]
Website: http://www.ci.richmond.va.us

Richmond (IPA: /ˈrɪtʃmənd/) is the capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the United States. Like all Virginia municipalities incorporated as cities, it is an independent city and not part of any county. Richmond is the center of the Richmond Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) and the Greater Richmond area. Surrounded by Henrico and Chesterfield Counties, the city is located at the intersections of Interstate 95 and Interstate 64 in central Virginia. As of 2006, the city's estimated population is 192,913, with a metropolitan area population of 1.2 million, making the Richmond Metropolitan Area the third largest metropolitan area in Virginia after Washington-Baltimore and Hampton Roads. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 563 pixel Image in higher resolution (1072 × 754 pixel, file size: 267 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Richmond, Virginia at night I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Flag of Richmond Virginia Taken from http://www. ... Image File history File links Richmondseal. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. state. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Lawrence Douglas Wilder (born January 17, 1931) is an American politician. ... Not to be confused with Independent Party or Independence Party. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... North American area code 804 includes cities and regions in eastern Central Virginia (Richmond, Petersburg, West Point, Chester; Northern Neck, and Middle Peninsula) Historically, area code 804 was one of only two area codes serving all of Virginia (the other, area code 703, assigned to the geographical areas of Northern... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas, which are organized around county boundaries. ... Richmond-Petersburg is a region located in a central part of the state of Virginia in the United States. ... Henrico County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ... Chesterfield County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ... I-95 south coming off the Woodrow Wilson Bridge Interstate 95 runs 179 miles through Virginia. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 64 Interstate 64 (abbreviated I-64) is an Interstate Highway in the eastern United States. ... The Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area is the metropolitan area consisting of Washington, DC, Baltimore, Maryland, Northern Virginia, Central Maryland, and Eastern West Virginia. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the...


The site of Richmond, at the fall line of the James River in the Piedmont region of Virginia, was briefly settled by English settlers from Jamestown in 1607, near the site of a significant native settlement. The present city of Richmond was founded in 1737. It became the capital of the Colony and Dominion of Virginia in 1780. During the Revolutionary War period, several notable events occurred in the city, including Patrick Henry's, "Give me liberty or give me death," speech in 1775 at St. John's Church, and the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom in 1779; the latter of which was written by Thomas Jefferson in the city. During the American Civil War, Richmond served as the capital of the Confederate States of America, and many important civil war landmarks remain in the city today, including the Virginia State Capitol and the White House of the Confederacy, among others. The fall line has meanings in both geographical features and the sport of alpine skiing. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ... The James River winds its way among piedmont hills in central Virginia. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... At Jamestown Settlement, replicas of Christopher Newports 3 ships are docked in the harbour. ... A map of the Colony of Virginia. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... Patrick Henrys Treason speech before the House of Burgesses in an 1851 painting by Peter F. Rothermel Give me liberty or give me death is a famous quotation from a speech made by Patrick Henry to the Virginia House of Burgesses. ... Thomas Jefferson was the author of the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... The Virginia State Capitol is the seat of state government in the Commonwealth of Virginia, located in Richmond, the third State Capital of Virginia. ... White House of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia, built in 1818, photo circa 1939. ...


Richmond's economy is primarily driven by law, finance, and government with several notable legal and banking firms, as well as federal, state, and local governmental agencies, located in the downtown area. The Richmond area was ranked 3rd best city for business by MarketWatch in 2007. Richmond is one of twelve cities in the United States to be home to a Federal Reserve Bank. There are also nine Fortune 500, and thirteen Fortune 1000 companies, in the city. Richmond is also home to several smaller companies which contribute to its small town, friendly, southern atmosphere. For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... MarketWatch is the operator of a leading business news and information Website that provides headline news, analysis and stock market data to some 6 million people. ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central banking system of the United States. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Fortune 1000 is a reference to a list maintained by the American business magazine Fortune. ...


Residents of the city are commonly referred to as Richmonders, and they may refer to their city in everyday language as, RVA, RIC, (its airport code), or The 804 (its area code). An IATA airport code, also known an IATA location identifier or simply a location identifier [1], is a three-letter code designating many airports around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). ... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ...

Contents

History

The Christopher Newport Cross monument on the canal, commemorating the cross erected at the current site of Richmond by an English exploration party that claimed the site and the river for King James in 1607. The party was led by Capt. Christopher Newport and Capt. John Smith.
The Christopher Newport Cross monument on the canal, commemorating the cross erected at the current site of Richmond by an English exploration party that claimed the site and the river for King James in 1607. The party was led by Capt. Christopher Newport and Capt. John Smith.

In 1606, James I granted a royal charter to the Virginia Company of London to settle colonists in North America.[3] After the first permanent English settlement was established in April, 1607, at Jamestown, Captain Christopher Newport and Captain John Smith led explorers northwest up the James River, and on June 3, 1607, erected a cross on one of the small islands in the middle of the part of the river that runs through today's downtown area. The first permanent settlement within the present limits of the city was made in 1609 in the district known as Rockett's.[4] Before 1607, Indian tribes of the Powhatan Confederacy had lived in the region. For centuries, the tribe recognized the value of this site, rich in natural beauty. They knew it as a place to hunt, fish, play, and trade, and they called it "Shocquohocan,", or Shockoe.[4][5] // History See also: Timeline of Richmond, Virginia Settlement High-angle view looking west toward the capitol from Church Hill, 1862. ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... British colonization of the Americas (including colonization under the Kingdom of England before the 1707 Acts of Union created the Kingdom of Great Britain) began in the late 16th century, before reaching its peak after colonies were established throughout the Americas, and a protectorate was established in Hawaii. ... Virginia Company of London Seal The London Company (also called the Virginia Company of London) was an English joint stock company established by royal charter by James I on April 10, 1606 with the purpose of establishing colonial settlements in North America. ... North American redirects here. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... At Jamestown Settlement, replicas of Christopher Newports 3 ships are docked in the harbour. ... Christopher Newport (c. ... John Smith (1580-1631) was an English soldier and sailor, now chiefly remembered for his role in establishing the first permanent English colony in North America, and his brief association with the Native American princess Pocahontas. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1607 (MDCVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the Algonquian tribe. ...


Later the same year, Captain Smith bought a tract of land on the east bank of the river from the Indians, about 3 miles (4.8 km) from the initial settlement. He named this tract, "Nonesuch," and attempted to establish a small garrison, which was later abandoned due to ongoing attacks by the Indians. In 1645, Fort Charles was erected at the falls of the James – the highest navigable point of the James River – as a frontier defense. New settlers moved in, and the community grew into a bustling trading post for furs, hides, and tobacco.[4][5]


In 1673, William Byrd I was granted lands on the James River that included the area around Falls that would become Richmond and already included small settlements. Byrd was a well-connected Indian trader in the area and established a fort on the site. William Byrd II inherited his father's land in 1704, and in 1737 founded the town of Richmond at the Falls of the James and commissioned Major William Mayo to lay out the original town grid. Byrd named the city Richmond after the town of Richmond in England (a suburb of London) because the view of the James River was strikingly similar to the view of the River Thames from Richmond, England, where he had spent time during his youth. The settlement was laid out in April, 1737, and was incorporated as a town in 1742.[4][5] William Byrd I (1652-1704), was the father of William Byrd II. William Byrd I (1652-1704), came from England in the late 1660s, and became a well-connected fur trader in the Richmond, Virginia area. ... William Byrd IIII (1674-1744) was born at Westover Plantation in Charles City County, Virginia, and educated in England for the law. ... William Mayo (c. ... Richmond is a suburb and the principal settlement of the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames in south west London, England. ... This article is about the River Thames in southern England. ...


American Revolutionary War

Patrick Henry delivering his, "Liberty or Death," speech at St. John's Church in Richmond, helping to ignite the American Revolution.
Patrick Henry delivering his, "Liberty or Death," speech at St. John's Church in Richmond, helping to ignite the American Revolution.

In 1775, Patrick Henry delivered his famous, "Give me Liberty or Give me Death," speech in St. John's Church in Richmond that was crucial for deciding Virginia's (then the largest of the 13 colonies) participation in the First Continental Congress and setting the course for revolution and independence. Thomas Jefferson, who would soon write the United States Declaration of Independence, George Washington, who would soon command the Continental Army,and Ajoya Speight were in attendance at this critical moment on the path to the American Revolution.[6] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (580x750, 116 KB) [edit] Summary From: http://cgfa. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (580x750, 116 KB) [edit] Summary From: http://cgfa. ... Saint Johns Church on a winter day. ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... Patrick Henrys Treason speech before the House of Burgesses in an 1851 painting by Peter F. Rothermel Give me liberty or give me death is a famous quotation from a speech made by Patrick Henry to the Virginia House of Burgesses. ... Saint Johns Church on a winter day. ... The First Continental Congress was a body of representatives appointed by the legislatures of twelve North American colonies of the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1774. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen...


On April 18, 1780, as Virginia’s population moved further west, the state capital was moved from the colonial capital of Williamsburg to Richmond, to provide a more centralized location, as well as to isolate the capital from British attack.[7] In 1781, under the command of Benedict Arnold, Richmond was burned by British troops causing Governor Thomas Jefferson to flee the city. Yet Richmond shortly recovered and, by 1782, Richmond was once again a thriving city.[8] is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... For other persons named Benedict Arnold, see Benedict Arnold (disambiguation). ...


In 1786, one of the most important and influential passages of legislation in American history was passed at the temporary state capital in Richmond, the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom. Written by Thomas Jefferson and sponsored by James Madison, the statute was the basis for the separation of church and state, and led to freedom of religion for all Americans as protected in the religion clause in the U.S. Constitution's First Amendment. Its importance is recognized annually by the President of The United States, with January 16 established as National Religious Freedom Day.[9] Thomas Jefferson was the author of the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... For other persons named James Madison, see James Madison (disambiguation). ... The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen guarantees freedom of religion, as long as religious activities do not infringe on public order in ways detrimental to society. ... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Syng inkstand, with which the Constitution was signed The Constitution of the United States is the supreme... The first ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. ... National Religious Freedom Day commemorates the Virginia General Assemblys adoption of Thomas Jeffersons landmark Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom on January 16, 1786. ...

The Virginia Capitol Building, designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clérisseau.
The Virginia Capitol Building, designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clérisseau.

The Virginia State Capitol building, designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clérisseau, was completed in 1788. It is the second-oldest US statehouse in continuous use (Maryland's is the oldest) and was the first US government building built in the neo-classical Roman style of architecture, setting the trend for other state houses and the federal government buildings (including the White House and The Capitol) in Washington, DC. The state capitol is one of thirteen in the United States without a dome and underwent a complete renovation which was completed in May 2007.[10] Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Falls of the Aniene at Tivoli, gouache, 1769 (Victoria and Albert Museum) Charles-Louis Clérisseau (August 28, 1721–January 9, 1820), the French architectural draughtsman, antiquary, and artist, occupies a unique position in the genesis of neoclassical architecture during the second half of the 18th century. ... The Virginia State Capitol is the seat of state government in the Commonwealth of Virginia, located in Richmond, the third State Capital of Virginia. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Falls of the Aniene at Tivoli, gouache, 1769 (Victoria and Albert Museum) Charles-Louis Clérisseau (August 28, 1721–January 9, 1820), the French architectural draughtsman, antiquary, and artist, occupies a unique position in the genesis of neoclassical architecture during the second half of the 18th century. ... The Cathedral of Vilnius (1783), by Laurynas Gucevičius. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United...


Early Nineteenth Century

After the Revolutionary War, Richmond emerged an important industrial center; it also became a crossroads of transportation and commerce, much of this tied to its role as a major hub in the Transatlantic slave trade. George Washington proposed and received the support of the Virginia legislature for the establishment of the James River and Kanawha Canal, the first canal system to be established in the U.S. The canal allowed goods and services coming up the James River to be navigated around the falls at Richmond and connect Richmond and the eastern part of Virginia with the west. As a result, Richmond became home to some of the largest manufacturing facilities in the country, including iron works and flour mills, the largest facilities of their kind in the south. Canal traffic peaked in the 1860s and slowly gave way to railroads, allowing Richmond to become a major railroad crossroads, eventually including the site of the world's first triple railroad crossing.[11] The Canal officially ceased operations in the 1880s, although portions of the canal have been preserved and rebuilt by 1998–1999, spurring tourism and economic development along the old canal route in downtown Richmond.[12] The Atlantic slave trade was the capture and transport of black Africans into bondage and servitude in the New World. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... The James River and Kanawha Canal was a canal in Virginia, which was built to facilitate shipments of passengers and freight by water between the western counties of Virginia and the coast. ... For other uses, see Canal (disambiguation). ...


Besides transportation and industry, antebellum Richmond was also the center of regional communications, with several newspapers and book publishers, including John Warrock, helping shape public opinion and further the education of the populace. Antebellum is a Latin word meaning before war(ante means before and bellum is war). ...


The resistance to the slave trade was growing by the mid-nineteenth century; in one famous case in 1848, Henry “Box” Brown made history by having himself nailed into a small box and shipped from Richmond to abolitionists in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, escaping slavery.[13] Henry Box Brown was born into slavery in 1815 in Louisa County, Virginia. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ...


Civil War and Reconstruction

Shells of the buildings of Richmond, silhouetted against a dark sky after the destruction by Confederates fleeing advancing Union forces, 1865.
Shells of the buildings of Richmond, silhouetted against a dark sky after the destruction by Confederates fleeing advancing Union forces, 1865.

At the outbreak of the American Civil War in 1861, the strategic location of the Tredegar Iron Works was one of the primary factors in the decision to make Richmond the Capital of the Confederacy.[14] From this arsenal came the 723 tons of armor plating that covered the CSS Virginia, the world’s first ironclad used in war, as well as much of the Confederates' heavy ordnance machinery.[15] In February, 1861, Jefferson Davis was inaugurated as President of the Confederate States of America in Montgomery, Alabama, the first Confederate capital. In the early morning of April 12, 1861, the Confederate army fired on Fort Sumter in Charleston, South Carolina, and the Civil War had begun. On April 17, 1861, Virginia seceded from the United States and joined the Confederate States, and soon thereafter the Confederate government moved its capital to Richmond.[16] The Confederate Congress shared quarters with the Virginia General Assembly in the Virginia State Capitol, and the Confederacy's executive mansion, the "White House of the Confederacy", was two blocks away in the upscale Court End neighborhood. Download high resolution version (1380x1111, 212 KB)Shells of the buildings of Richmond, Virginia, silhouetted against a dark sky after the destruction by Confederates, 1865. ... Download high resolution version (1380x1111, 212 KB)Shells of the buildings of Richmond, Virginia, silhouetted against a dark sky after the destruction by Confederates, 1865. ... Shells of the buildings of Richmond, silhouetted against a dark sky after the destruction by Confederates, 1865. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Tredegar Iron Works, Richmond, Virginia, USA, photograph by Alexander Gardener Tredegar Iron Works is a historic iron foundry in Richmond, Virginia, United States of America. ... CSS Virginia was an ironclad warship of the Confederate States Navy during the American Civil War (built using the remains of the scuttled USS Merrimack). ... Ironclad warships, frequently shortened to just ironclads, were ships sheathed with thick iron plates for protection. ... Ordnance is a general term for a quantity of military equipment, usually specifying the ammunition for artillery, bombs, or other large weapons. ... For other uses, see Jefferson Davis (disambiguation). ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Coordinates: , Country State County Montgomery Incorporated December 3, 1819 Government  - Mayor Bobby Bright Area  - City  156. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Fort Sumter, a Third System masonry coastal fortification located in Charleston harbor, South Carolina, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Confederate Congress was the legislative body of the Confederate States of America, existing during the American Civil War between 1861 and 1865. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a U.S. state. ... The Virginia State Capitol is the seat of state government in the Commonwealth of Virginia, located in Richmond, the third State Capital of Virginia. ... White House of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia, built in 1818, photo circa 1939. ...


The Seven Days Battles, in which Union General McClellan threatened Richmond and came very near but ultimately failed to take the city, followed in late June and early July of 1862. Three years later on April 3, 1865, Ulysses S. Grant and the Union Army captured Richmond, and the state capital was then relocated to Danville. Six days later, Robert E. Lee's retreating Army of Northern Virginia surrendered to Grant at Appomattox Court House, symbolically ending the war. On April 2, 1865, about 25% of the city's buildings were destroyed in a fire set by retreating Confederate soldiers. Union soldiers put out the fires as they entered the city.[16] Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George B. McClellan Robert E. Lee Strength Army of the Potomac; 105,445 Army of Northern Virginia; 90,500 Casualties 1,734 killed 8,062 wounded 6,053 missing/captured 3,286 killed 15,009 wounded 946 missing/captured Peninsula... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Nickname: River City, City of Churches Motto: A World Class Organization Country United States State Virginia County Independent City  - Mayor R. Wayne Williams, Jr. ... For other uses, see Robert E. Lee (disambiguation). ... The Army of Northern Virginia was the primary military force of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War in the eastern theater. ... McLean house, April 1865. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ...

A historic postcard showing electric trolley-powered streetcars in Richmond, Virginia, where Frank J. Sprague successfully demonstrated his new system on the hills in 1888. The intersection shown is at 8th & Broad Streets.
A historic postcard showing electric trolley-powered streetcars in Richmond, Virginia, where Frank J. Sprague successfully demonstrated his new system on the hills in 1888. The intersection shown is at 8th & Broad Streets.

After the Civil War, Richmond entered a phase of recovery and reconstruction. Monument Avenue was laid out in 1887, with a series of monuments at various intersections honoring the city's Confederate heroes, included (east to west) J.E.B. Stuart, Robert E. Lee, Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson, and Matthew F. Maury.[17] Richmond's Hollywood Cemetery is the final resting place of both Stuart and Davis. 8th & Broad Streets, Richmond, Virginia The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States. ... 8th & Broad Streets, Richmond, Virginia The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Frank Julian Sprague (1857-1934) American inventor, Father of Electric Traction Frank Julian Sprague (1857–1934) was an American naval officer and inventor who contributed to the development of the electric motor, electric railways, and electric elevators. ... Jefferson Davis monument on Monument Avenue, Richmond, Virginia Monument Avenue, in Richmond, Virginia, memorializes Virginian native Confederate participants of the Civil War and one 20th century Richmond native. ... James Ewell Brown Stuart (February 6, 1833 – May 12, 1864) was an American soldier from Virginia and a Confederate Army general during the American Civil War. ... For other uses, see Robert E. Lee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jefferson Davis (disambiguation). ... For other uses of Stonewall Jackson, see Stonewall Jackson (disambiguation). ... Matthew Fontaine Maury Matthew Fontaine Maury (January 14, 1806 – February 1, 1873), nicknamed Pathfinder of the Seas, was an oceanographer who made important contributions to charting wind and ocean currents. ... A view of Hollywood Cemetery and Presidents Circle Hollywood Cemetery is a large, sprawling cemetery in Richmond, Virginia, characterized by rolling hills and winding paths overlooking the James River. ...


Contributing to Richmond's industrial reconstruction was the first successful electrically-powered trolley system in the United States, the Richmond Union Passenger Railway. Designed by electric power pioneer Frank J. Sprague, the trolley system opened its first line in 1888, and electric streetcar lines rapidly spread to other cities.[18] Sprague's system used an overhead wire and trolley pole to collect current, with electric motors on the car's trucks.[19] This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ... Richmond Union Passenger Railway. ... Frank Julian Sprague (1857-1934) American inventor, Father of Electric Traction Frank Julian Sprague (1857–1934) was an American naval officer and inventor who contributed to the development of the electric motor, electric railways, and electric elevators. ...


Twentieth Century

By the beginning of the Twentieth Century, the city's population had reached 85,050 in 5 square miles, making it the most densely populated city in the southern United States.[20]


In 1903, African-American businesswoman and financier Maggie L. Walker chartered St. Luke Penny Savings Bank, and served as its first president, as well as the first female bank president in the United States. Today, the bank is called the Consolidated Bank and Trust Company, and it is the oldest surviving African-American bank in the U.S. The Governor's School in Richmond City is also dedicated to her name.[21] Maggie Lena Walker (July 15, 1867-December 15, 1934) was an American teacher, businesswoman, and banker. ...


In 1910, the former city of Manchester was consolidated with the city of Richmond, and in 1914, the city annexed the Barton Heights, Ginter Park, and Highland Park areas of Henrico County.[22] Factories at Manchester, Virginia, looking across James River, circa 1865 Manchester, Virginia was an independent city in Virginia in the United States. ... Henrico County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ...


In May of 1914, Richmond became the headquarters of the Fifth District of the Federal Reserve Bank. It was selected due to the city's geographic location, its importance as a commercial and financial center, its transportation and communications facilities, as well as Virginia's leading regional role in the banking business. The bank was originally located near the federal courts downtown and moved to a new headquarters building near the Capitol in 1922, and finally to its present location overlooking the James River in 1978.[23] Richmond's business and industrial development continued throughout the decade, and in 1929, Philip Morris, which began as a British company about 100 years earlier, opened its first US factory in the city. Richmond was chosen because the town's rich tobacco history.[24] The Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond is the headquarters of the Fifth District of the Federal Reserve. ... Altria Group, Inc. ...


Richmond entered the broadcasting era in late 1925 when WRVA, originally known as the Edgeworth Tobacco Station and owned by Larus & Brothers, went on the air. The white ballad singers and black gospel quartets that were popular on the radio at the time were often urban and sometimes even professional men. At the time, Richmond was particularly self-conscious with its southern roots, and such music was seen as culturally inferior. WTVR-TV (CBS 6), the first television station in Richmond, was the first television station south of Washington, D.C.[25] Newsradio 1140 WRVA is an AM radio station in Richmond, Virginia in the United States. ... WTVR-TV (CBS6) is a CBS television affiliate based in Richmond, Virginia. ...

The Landmark Theater, originally known as The Mosque, adjacent to Monroe Park.
The Landmark Theater, originally known as The Mosque, adjacent to Monroe Park.

Several performing arts venues were constructed during the 1920s. In 1926, The Mosque (now called the Landmark Theater) was constructed by the Shriners as their Acca Temple Shrine, and since then, many of America's greatest entertainers have appeared on its stage beneath its towering minarets and desert murals.[26] Loew's Theater was built in 1927, and was described as, "the ultimate in 1920s movie palace fantasy design." It later suffered a decline in popularity as the movie-going population moved to the suburbs, but was restored during the 1980s and renamed as the Carpenter Center for the Performing Arts.[27] In 1928, the Byrd Theater was built by local architect Fred Bishop on Westhampton Avenue (now called Cary Street) in a residential area of the city. To this day, the Byrd remains in operation as one of the last of the great movie palaces of the 1920s and 1930s.[28] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (576x768, 399 KB)Landmark Theater in Richmond, VA. Photo by G. Snyder. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (576x768, 399 KB)Landmark Theater in Richmond, VA. Photo by G. Snyder. ... Landmark Theater, Richmond, VA. The Landmark Theater in Richmond, VA is a theater at the southwest corner of Monroe Park. ... A member of the Syrian Corvettes group of Shriners participates in a Memorial Day parade The Shriners, or Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, are an Order appendant to Freemasonry. ... History of the Byrd Theatre in Richmond Virginia The Byrd Theatre, named after William Byrd, the founder of Richmond, is one of Virginias finest cinema treasures. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ...


In his autobiography, "The Moon's A Balloon". Academy award winning actor David Niven described how he was on a trip from New York to Florida in the late 1930s when he decided to spend the night at Richmond's famous Jefferson Hotel, located in downtown Richmond. Niven stated that as he was signing the guest registry at the Jefferson, his eyes snapped open with amazement when he noticed a full sized alligator swimming in a small pool located six feet from the reception desk.[29] Alligators at The Jefferson would become world famous, and the last alligator living in the marble pools of the Jefferson's Palm Court, named Old Pompey, remained there until he died in 1948.[30] This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Jefferson Hotel is a famous luxury hotel in Richmond, Virginia. ...


Between 1963 and 1965, there was a, "downtown boom," that led to the construction of more than 700 buildings in the city. In 1968, Virginia Commonwealth University was created by the merger of the Medical College of Virginia with the Richmond Professional Institute.[31] In 1970, Richmond's borders expanded by an additional 27 square miles (69 km²) on the south. After several years of court cases in which Chesterfield County fought annexation, more than 47,000 people who once were Chesterfield County residents found themselves in the city’s perimeters on January 1, 1970.[32] Virginia Commonwealth University, or VCU, is a large public American research university with its main campuses located in downtown Richmond, Virginia. ... The Medical College of Virginia was the name of the medical school that merged with the Richmond Professional Institute to form Virginia Commonwealth University. ... Virginia Commonwealth University or VCU for short, is a large American research university with its main campus located in urban Richmond, Virginia. ... Chesterfield County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Between the 1984 and 1985 seasons, the city completed construction of the Diamond, a new baseball stadium for the Richmond Braves, a AAA baseball team in the Atlanta Braves minor league system. The park opened on April 17, 1985, replacing the old Parker Field, which previously occupied the same site.[33] Also in 1985, Richmond saw the opening of 6th Street Marketplace, a downtown festival marketplace, which was envisioned as a solution to the downtown areas urban erosion. The project ultimately failed, and the shopping center was closed and demolished in 2004.[34] This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the building type. ... Class-Level Triple-A (1966-Present) Minor League affiliations International League South Division Major League affiliations Atlanta Braves (1966-Present) Name Richmond Braves (1966-Present) Ballpark The Diamond (1985-Present) Parker Field (1966-1985) Minor League titles League titles 1978, 1986, 1989, 1994, 2007 Division titles Owner(s)/Operated by... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...

A multi-million dollar flood wall was completed in 1995, in order to protect the city and the Shockoe Bottom businesses from the rising waters of the James River. After the flood wall was completed, the River District businesses grew rapidly, and today the area is home to much of Richmond's entertainment, dining and nightlife activity.[35] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x1040, 691 KB) Summary photo by Einar Einarsson Kvaran for Monument Avenue Carptrash 08:25, 14 March 2006 (UTC) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x1040, 691 KB) Summary photo by Einar Einarsson Kvaran for Monument Avenue Carptrash 08:25, 14 March 2006 (UTC) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms... Arthur Robert Ashe, Jr. ... Jefferson Davis monument on Monument Avenue, Richmond, Virginia Monument Avenue, in Richmond, Virginia, memorializes Virginian native Confederate participants of the Civil War and one 20th century Richmond native. ...


In 1996, a reminder of Richmond's Confederate history arose amid controversy involved in placing a statue of African American Richmond native and tennis star Arthur Ashe to the famed series of statues of Confederate heroes of the Civil War on Monument Avenue.[36] After several months of controversy, the bronze statue of Ashe was finally completed on Monument Avenue facing the opposite direction of the Confederate Heroes on July 3, 1996.[37] An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Arthur Robert Ashe, Jr. ... Jefferson Davis monument on Monument Avenue, Richmond, Virginia Monument Avenue, in Richmond, Virginia, memorializes Virginian native Confederate participants of the Civil War and one 20th century Richmond native. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


Twenty-first century

Richmond entered the twenty-first century in the process of undergoing several redevelopment initiatives. The city completed a $52 million restoration of the James River and Kanawha Canals, as well as the Haxall Canal, in 1999, which included a Canal Walk, designed to attract businesses such as restaurants and nightclubs to the area. The riverfront project has brought the 1.25-mile corridor back to life, with trendy loft apartments, restaurants, shops and hotels winding along the Canal Walk, along with canal boat cruises and walking tours.[12] Riverfront development continued in April 2003 with the start of construction of Riverside on the James, a 720,000 square foot (66,890 sq m) residential and office complex near Brown's Island between 10th and 12th Streets downtown. The project, costing $90 million, was completed in July 2005, and is expected to attract even more commercial development to the downtown area.[38] USD redirects here. ... The James River and Kanawha Canal was a canal in Virginia, which was built to facilitate shipments of passengers and freight by water between the western counties of Virginia and the coast. ...


On September 19, 2003, despite Hurricane Isabel's sustained winds of 40–60 mph (64–96 km/h) the day before, as well as major power outages in the area, the city saw the opening of its first open air shopping center, Stony Point Fashion Park. The 690,000  square foot (64,103 sq m) center is located off of Stony Point Parkway just south of the James River, and saw the arrival of 45 new stores to the area, including Sak's Fifth Avenue, Galyen's Sporting Goods, and Dillard's.[39] Short Pump Town Center, a similar shopping center, opened later in the fall in the nearby suburb of Short Pump. is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hurricane Isabel was the ninth named storm, the fifth hurricane, the second major hurricane, and the only Category 5 hurricane of the 2003 Atlantic hurricane season. ... Stony Point Fashion Park is an upscale lifestyle center mall in Richmond, Virginia that opened in 2003. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about a department store chain. ... Short Pump Town Center is located in Henrico County, Virginia on Broad Street, approximately 1 mile (1. ... Short Pump is a census-designated place (CDP) in Henrico County, Virginia, United States. ...


The next year, in September 2004, Tropical Storm Gaston swept through the area, bringing with it intense rain, causing severe flooding in the Shockoe Bottom business district, as well as major electrical outages throughout the metropolitan area.[40] The 2004 Atlantic hurricane season officially started June 1, 2004, and lasted until November 30, 2004. ...


Geography and climate

Geography

Richmond-Petersburg area
See also: Richmond-Petersburg

Richmond is located at 37°32′18.05″N, 77°27′41.42″W (37.538346, -77.461507).[41] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 62.5 sq mi (162.0 km²). 60.1 sq mi (155.6 km²) of it is land and 2.5 sq mi (6.4 km²) of it (3.96%) is water. The city is located in the Piedmont region of Virginia, at the highest navigable point of the James River. The Piedmont region is categorized by relatively low, rolling hills, and lies between the low, sea level tidewater region and the Blue Ridge Mountains. Significant bodies of water in the region include the James River, the Appomattox River, and the Chickahominy River. Image File history File links Richmond-Petersburg_TIGER_MAP.gif Summary Created by User:MPS using TIGER MAP tool at the US census bureau page Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Richmond-Petersburg_TIGER_MAP.gif Summary Created by User:MPS using TIGER MAP tool at the US census bureau page Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Richmond-Petersburg is a region located in a central part of the state of Virginia in the United States. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... The James River winds its way among piedmont hills in central Virginia. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... In the United States: Tidewater is a name used to refer to an area in Virginia, in the region around Hampton Roads, Newport News, Norfolk, and Virginia Beach: see Tidewater region of Virginia. ... Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ... The Appomattox River at Matoaca, Virginia The Appomattox River is a tributary of the James River, approximately 137 mi (220 km), in central and eastern Virginia in the United States. ... Chickahominy also known as the Chick is a river in the southeastern portion of the U.S. state of Virginia, near which several battles of the United States Civil War were fought in 1862 and 1864. ...


The Richmond-Petersburg Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), the 43rd largest in the United States, includes the independent cities of Richmond, Colonial Heights, Hopewell, and Petersburg, as well as the counties of Charles City, Chesterfield, Dinwiddie, Goochland, Hanover, Henrico, New Kent, Powhatan, and Prince George.[42] As of July 1, 2005, the total population of the Richmond—Petersburg MSA is 1,194,008.[43] Richmond-Petersburg is a region located in a central part of the state of Virginia in the United States. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... The following is a list (by population) of all Metropolitan Statistical Areas as defined by the United States Census Bureau. ... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Incorporated 1948 Government  - Mayor John T. Wood Area  - City  7. ... Waterfront at City Point, Virginia (now Hopewell) in 1865 Hopewell is an independent city in the state of Virginia. ... Nickname: Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Founded December 17, 1748 Government  - Mayor Annie M. Mickens Area  - City  23. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1619 Seat Charles City Area  - Total  - Water 529 km² (204 mi²) 56 km² (21 mi²) 10. ... Chesterfield County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ... Dinwiddie County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1727 Seat Goochland Area  - Total  - Water 751 km² (290 mi²) 14 km² (6 mi²) 1. ... Hanover County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Henrico County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ... New Kent County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... Powhatan County is a county located in the U.S. state — officially, Commonwealth — of Virginia. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed Seat Prince George Area  - Total  - Water 730 km² (282 mi²) 42 km² (16 mi²) 5. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas, which are organized around county boundaries. ...


Cityscape

Richmond is often subdivided into North Side, Southside, East End and West End
Richmond is often subdivided into North Side, Southside, East End and West End
See also: Neighborhoods of Richmond, Virginia

Richmond's original street grid, laid out in 1737, included the area between what are now Broad, 17th, and 25th Streets and the James River. Modern Downtown Richmond is located slightly farther west, on the slopes of Shockoe Hill. Nearby neighborhoods include Shockoe Bottom, the historically significant and low-lying area between Shockoe Hill and Church Hill, Jackson Ward, a historic neighborhood rich in African American history which was once called, "The Wall Street of Black America," and Monroe Ward, which contains the Jefferson Hotel. Richmond's East End includes neighborhoods like rapidly gentrifying Church Hill, home to St. John's Church, as well as poorer areas like Fulton, Union Hill, and Fairmont, and public housing projects like Mosby Court, Whitcomb Court, Fairfield Court, and Creighton Court closer to Interstate 64.[44] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The North Side is a section of Richmond, Virginia that home to many diverse neighborhoods, including Barton Heights, Bellevue, Ginter Park, Washington Park, Hermitage Rd, Highland Park, Sherwood Park, etc. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Richmond is often subdivided into North Side, Southside, East End and West End The East End of Richmond, Virginia is actually a collection of neighborhoods. ... Richmond is often subdivided into North Side, Southside, East End and West End The West End is an urban and suburban region of Richmond, Virginia. ... (External links for some of the following areas can be found at [1] ) // Carver The Carver neighborhood, also called Sheep Hill, lies north of Broad Street (Richmond, Virginia) to the west of Jackson Ward and downtown Richmond. ... Downtown Richmond refers to a business area in Richmond, Virginia. ... (External links for some of the following areas can be found at [1] ) // Carver The Carver neighborhood, also called Sheep Hill, lies north of Broad Street (Richmond, Virginia) to the west of Jackson Ward and downtown Richmond. ... Church Hill is a historic district of Richmond, Virginia. ... Jackson Ward is an historically African-American neighborhood in Richmond, Virginia. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The Jefferson Hotel is a famous luxury hotel in Richmond, Virginia. ... Church Hill is a historic district of Richmond, Virginia. ... St. ... Fulton Hill is a neighborhood located in the East End of Richmond. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 64 Interstate 64 (abbreviated I-64) is an Interstate Highway in the eastern United States. ...


The area between Belvidere Street, Interstate 195, Interstate 95, and the river, which includes Virginia Commonwealth University, is socioeconomically and architecturally diverse. North of Broad Street, the Carver and Newtowne West neighborhoods are demographically similar to neighboring Jackson Ward, with Carver experiencing some gentrification due to its proximity to VCU. The affluent area between the Boulevard, Main Street, Broad Street, and VCU, known as the Fan, is home to Monument Avenue, an outstanding collection of Victorian architecture, and many students. West of the Boulevard is the Museum District, the location of the Virginia Historical Society and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. South of the Downtown Expressway are Byrd Park, Maymont, Hollywood Cemetery, the predominantly black working class Randolph neighborhood, and white working class Oregon Hill. Cary Street between Interstate 195 and the Boulevard is a popular commercial area called Carytown.[44] Interstate 195 (abbreviated I-195) is a connector route from a junction with Interstate 95 and Interstate 64 to a junction with the Powhite Parkway (Virginia State Highway 76) and the Downtown Expressway (Virginia State Highway 195) in Richmond, Virginia. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 95 Interstate 95 (I-95) is the main highway on the East Coast of the United States,[1] paralleling the Atlantic Ocean from Maine to Florida and serving some of the best-known cities in the country including Boston, New York City, and... Virginia Commonwealth University, or VCU, is a large public American research university with its main campuses located in downtown Richmond, Virginia. ... Jackson Ward is an historically African-American neighborhood in Richmond, Virginia. ... Boulevard (usually referred to as The Boulevard although the street name does not include any definite article) is a historic street in the near West End of Richmond, Virginia providing access to Byrd Park. ... The Fan is a district of Richmond, Virginia, so named because of the fan shape of the roads that extend west from N. Belvidere St. ... Jefferson Davis monument on Monument Avenue, Richmond, Virginia Monument Avenue, in Richmond, Virginia, memorializes Virginian native Confederate participants of the Civil War and one 20th century Richmond native. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... Boulevard (usually referred to as The Boulevard although the street name does not include any definite article) is a historic street in the near West End of Richmond, Virginia providing access to Byrd Park. ... The Virginia Historical Society, founded in 1831, is a major repository, research and teaching center for Virginia history. ... The Virginia Museum of Fine arts, or ‘’’VMFA’’’ is an art museum in Richmond, Virginia. ... The Downtown Expressway in Richmond, Virginia is a toll road operated by the Richmond Metropolitan Authority (RMA). ... Categories: Stub | Richmond, Virginia ... Maymont is a 100 acre (400,000 m²) Victorian estate in Richmond, Virginia with a museum, formal gardens, native wildlife exhibits, nature center, carriage collection, and petting zoo known as The Maymont Childrens Farm. In 1893, Major James H. Dooley, a wealthy Richmond lawyer and philanthropist, and his wife... A view of Hollywood Cemetery and Presidents Circle Hollywood Cemetery is a large, sprawling cemetery in Richmond, Virginia, characterized by rolling hills and winding paths overlooking the James River. ... Oregon Hill is a historically white working class neighborhood in Richmond, Virginia. ... Interstate 195 (abbreviated I-195) is a connector route from a junction with Interstate 95 and Interstate 64 to a junction with the Powhite Parkway (Virginia State Highway 76) and the Downtown Expressway (Virginia State Highway 195) in Richmond, Virginia. ... Boulevard (usually referred to as The Boulevard although the street name does not include any definite article) is a historic street in the near West End of Richmond, Virginia providing access to Byrd Park. ... Carytown is a city located in Jasper County, Missouri. ...


Further to the west is the affluent, suburban West End. There are three major neighborhoods in the West End: Westhampton, Windsor Farms, and Sauer's Gardens. The University of Richmond and the Country Club of Virginia can also be found here.[44] Richmond is often subdivided into North Side, Southside, East End and West End The West End is an urban and suburban region of Richmond, Virginia. ... The University of Richmond is a private, nonsectarian, liberal arts university located on the border of the city of Richmond and Henrico County, Virginia. ...


The portion of the city south of the James River is known as the Southside. Neighborhoods in the city's Southside area range from affluent and middle class suburban neighborhoods like Westover Hills, Southampton, Stratford Hills, Oxford, Huguenot Hills, Hobby Hill, and Woodland Heights to the impoverished Manchester and Blackwell areas, the Hillside Court housing projects, and the ailing Jefferson Davis Highway commercial corridor. Other Southside neighborhoods include Fawnbrook, Broad Rock, Cherry Gardens, Cullenwood, and Beaufont Hills. Much of Southside developed a suburban character as part of Chesterfield County before being annexed by Richmond, most notably in 1970.[44] Factories at Manchester, Virginia, looking across James River, circa 1865 Manchester, Virginia was an independent city in Virginia in the United States. ... Chesterfield County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ...


The other side of the city, the Northside, began to develop at the end of the 19th century when the new streetcar system made it possible for people to live on the outskirts of town and still commute to jobs downtown. Several neighborhoods developed here: Ginter Park, Bellevue, Barton Heights, Highland Park, Azalea and Chamberlayne among others.[44]


Climate

Richmond has a humid subtropical climate with moderate changes of seasons. Spring arrives in March with mild days and cool nights, and by late May, the temperature has warmed up considerably to herald warm summer days. Summer temperatures can be unpleasantly hot, often topping 90 °F with high humidity. On average, July is the warmest month of the year, with the maximum average precipitation. Days stay warm to mild until October, and fall is marked by nights once again becoming cooler. Winter is usually mild in Richmond, with the coldest days featuring lows in the mid-upper 20s and highs in the mid 40s. The highest temperature ever recorded was 107 °F in 1918, and the lowest temperature ever recorded was -12 °F in 1940. On average, the coolest month of the year is January.[45] Snow falls every winter, averaging 12 inches per season.[46] The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ... Spring is one of the four temperate seasons. ... This article is about the temperate season. ...

Monthly Normal and Record High and Low Temperatures
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Record high 81°F (27°C) 83° (28°) 94° (34°) 96° (36°) 100° (38°) 104° (40°) 105° (41°) 107° (42°) 103° (39°) 99° (37°) 86° (30°) 81° (27°)
Normal high 45° (7°) 49° (9°) 58° (14°) 69° (21°) 76° (24°) 84° (29°) 88° (31°) 86° (30°) 70° (21°) 69° (21°) 60° (16°) 50° (10°)
Normal low 28° (-2°) 30° (-1°) 37° (3°) 45° (7°) 55° (13°) 63° (17°) 68° (20°) 67° (19°) 60° (16°) 47° (8°) 38° (3°) 31° (-1°)
Record low -12° (-24°) -10° (-23°) 11° (-12°) 19° (-7°) 31° (-1°) 40° (4°) 51° (11°) 39° (4°) 35° (2°) 21° (-6°) 10° (-12°) -2° (-19°)
Precipitation 3.6 in. (9 cm.) 3 (7.6) 4.1 (10.4) 3.2 (8.1) 4 (10.1) 3.5 (9) 4.7 (11.9) 4.2 (10.6) 4 (10.1) 3.6 (9.1) 3.1 (7.8) 3.1 (7.9)
Source: The Weather Channel[45]

Demographics

City of Richmond
Population by year[20]
1790 3,761
1800 5,737
1810 9,735
1820 12,067
1830 16,060
1840 20,153
1850 27,570
1860 37,910
1870 51,038
1880 63,600
1890 81,388
1900 85,050
1910 127,628
1920 171,667
1930 182,929
1940 193,042
1950 230,310
1960 219,958
1970 249,621
1980 219,214
1990 203,056
2000 197,790
2007 200,123

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 197,790 people, 84,549 households, and 43,627 families residing in the city. The estimated population for 2006 is 192,913.[47][48] The population density was 3,292.6 people per square mile (1,271.3/km²). There were 92,282 housing units at an average density of 1,536.2/sq mi (593.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 38.30% White, 57.19% African American, 0.24% Native American, 1.25% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 1.49% from other races, and 1.46% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.57% of the population. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 84,549 households out of which 23.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 27.1% were married couples living together, 20.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 48.4% were non-families. 37.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.21 and the average family size was 2.95. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 21.8% under the age of 18, 13.1% from 18 to 24, 31.7% from 25 to 44, 20.1% from 45 to 64, and 13.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 87.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.5 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $31,121, and the median income for a family was $38,348. Males had a median income of $30,874 versus $25,880 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,337. About 17.1% of families and 21.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 32.9% of those under age 18 and 15.8% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Being home to many institutions of higher education, the Richmond area boasts a college student population of nearly 45,000 (not including the two large community colleges and many technical schools in the area). Many of these students, especially those living in dormitories, are not included in the official population count.


Economy

Historic development as a commercial center

Richmond's strategic location on the James River, built on undulating hills at the rocky fall line separating the piedmont and tidewater regions of Virginia provided a natural site for the development of commerce. The James River winds its way among piedmont hills in central Virginia. ... In the United States: Tidewater is a name used to refer to an area in Virginia, in the region around Hampton Roads, Newport News, Norfolk, and Virginia Beach: see Tidewater region of Virginia. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


The first European explorers came in 1607, from the Virginia Company of London. They discovered a fragrant weed grown by the natives, and tobacco became a lucrative commodity in the area. The trading post developed into a village, and by 1733 a town was laid out by William Byrd II and William Mayo. Its early buildings were clustered around the Farmers' Market, existing today at 17th Street. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The 1606 grants by James I to the London and Plymouth companies. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... William Byrd IIII (1674-1744) was born at Westover Plantation in Charles City County, Virginia, and educated in England for the law. ... William Mayo is the name of: A former chief engineer of the Ford Motor Company, William B. Mayo The co-founder of the Mayo Clinic The civil engineer, born in about 1685, who laid out the city of Richmond, Virginia The vicar of Folke, Dorset, England in about 1845 This...


Early trade grew rapidly, primarily in the agriculture sector, but also in the slave trade. Slaves were imported to Richmond's Manchester docks from Africa, and were bought and sold at the same market. This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


To facilitate the transfer of cargo from the flat-bottomed bateaux above the fall line to the ocean-faring ships below, George Washington helped design the James River and Kanawha Canal in the 1700s to bypass Richmond's rapids. The canal was later superseded by rail in the 1800s, and the railroads were laid on the original canal towpaths. In the 1900s highways were constructed in the air over the same area. Bateau men poling the James River The James River Bateau was a shallow draft river craft used during the period from 1775 to 1840 to transport tobacco and other cargo on the James river and its tributaries in the state of Virginia. ... The fall line has meanings in both geographical features and the sport of alpine skiing. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... The James River and Kanawha Canal was a canal in Virginia, which was built to facilitate shipments of passengers and freight by water between the western counties of Virginia and the coast. ...


Throughout these three centuries and three modes of transportation, downtown has always been a hub, with the Great Turning Basin for boats, the world's only triple crossing of rail lines, and the intersection of two major interstates.

See also: Transportation in Richmond, Virginia

Transportation in Richmond, Virginia and its immediate surroundings include land, sea and air modes. ...

Industries that defined Richmond

Richmond emerged from the smoldering rubble of the Civil War as an economic powerhouse, with iron front buildings and massive brick factories. Innovations of this era included the world's first cigarette-rolling machine, invented by James Albert Bonsack of Roanoke in 1880/81, and the world's first successful electric street car system. The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the northern states, popularly referred to as the U.S., the Union, the North, or the Yankees; and the seceding southern states, commonly referred to as the Confederate States of America, the CSA, the Confederacy... James Albert Bonsack (1859 - ?, Lynchburg, Virginia USA) invented and patented the Bonsack-Machine, the first cigarette rolling machine, in 1880. ... Nickname: Location in Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor Nelson Harris Area  - City  43 sq mi (111. ... This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ...


Freed slaves and their descendants created a thriving African-American business community, led by such influential people as Maggie L. Walker (first woman to charter a bank in the U.S.) and John Mitchell, Jr. The city's historic Jackson Ward became known as the "Wall Street of Black America." Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Maggie Lena Walker (July 15, 1867-December 15, 1934) was an American teacher, businesswoman, and banker. ... John Mitchell, Jr. ... Jackson Ward is an historically African-American neighborhood in Richmond, Virginia. ...


Law and finance have long been driving forces in the economy. Because the city is home to both a U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and a Federal Reserve Bank, as well as offices for international firms such as Hunton & Williams LLP, McGuireWoods LLP, Troutman Sanders LLP, CapitalOne, Philip Morris USA, and numerous other banks and brokerages, Richmond was cited as having minimal evidence of being a Global city.[49] The United States Courts of Appeals (or circuit courts) are the mid-level appellate courts of the United States federal court system. ... Federal Reserve Districts The United States Federal Reserve System consists of twelve Federal Reserve Banks, each responsible for a particular district, and some with branches. ... Capital One Financial Corp NYSE: COF is a McLean, Fairfax County, Virginia-based bank holding company specializing in credit cards, home loans, auto loans, and savings products. ... Philip Morris USA is the United States tobacco division of Altria Group, Inc. ... “World city” redirects here. ...


Since the 1960s Richmond has been a prominent hub for advertising agencies and advertising related businesses, including The Martin Agency. As a result of local advertising agency support, VCU's graduate advertising school (VCU BrandCenter) is consistently ranked the #1 advertising graduate program in the country.[50] The Martin Agency is a fully integrated, national advertising agency founded in 1965 by David N. Martin with offices in Richmond, VA and New York City. ... Virginia Commonwealth University or VCU for short, is a large American research university with its main campus located in urban Richmond, Virginia. ...


Fortune 500 Companies and other large corporations

The Greater Richmond area was named the third best city for business by MarketWatch in September of 2007; ranking only behind the Minneapolis and Denver areas and just above Boston. The area is home to nine Fortune 500 companies, including electric utility Dominion Resources; consumer electronics retailer Circuit City, which also spun off the used car retailer CarMax, now a separate Fortune 500 company; Performance Food Group; LandAmerica Financial Group; Owens & Minor; Brink's Company, a security services outfit; Genworth Financial, the former insurance arm of GE and the recently relocated MeadWestvaco, a leading global producer of packaging, coated and specialty papers, consumer and office products and specialty chemicals. MarketWatch is the operator of a leading business news and information Website that provides headline news, analysis and stock market data to some 6 million people. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Dominion NYSE: D (formerly Dominion Resources) is a power and energy company headquartered in Richmond, Virginia, USA, that supplies electricity, natural gas, or other energy services to homes in Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and eastern North Carolina. ... Circuit City (NYSE: CC) is a dealer and retailer in brand-name consumer electronics, personal computers, and entertainment software. ... CarMax is the United States largest used-car retailer. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Performance Food Group is a Fortune 400 company that was founded in 1875. ... LandAmerica Financial Group (NYSE: LFG) is one of the top title insurers in the US. It is just large enough to have gotten into the Fortune 500 several times, however it has dropped off that list for 2007. ... Owens & Minor is a Fortune 500 company based in Mechanicsville, Virginia. ... The Brinks Company NYSE: BCO is a security and protection company headquarted in Richmond, Virginia, United States. ... Genworth Financial is a financial services organization that offers of a portfolio of primarily consumer focused products, including life insurance, retirement income and investments, long term care, employer benefits, mortgage insurance and payment protection insurance. ... Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent loss. ... GE redirects here. ... MeadWestvaco Corp. ...


Richmond has the most Fortune 500 headquarters of any city in Virginia and only five metro areas in the country have more Fortune 500 company headquarters than the Richmond area. In addition to the nine Fortune 500 companies headquartered in the Richmond area, four Fortune 1000 companies also have their headquarters located in the area.[51]


Other Fortune 500 companies, while not headquartered in the area, do have a major presence here. These include Wachovia Securities headquarters (a subsidiary of Charlotte-based Wachovia Corporation), SunTrust Banks Incorporated (based in Atlanta), credit card agency Capital One Financial Corporation (officially based in McLean, Virginia, but founded in Richmond with its operations center and most employees in the Richmond area), the medical and pharmaceutical giant, McKesson (based in San Francisco). Philip Morris USA (a division of Altria Group), one of the world's largest tobacco companies, maintains their corporate headquarters in Henrico County just outside the city, and has several other facilities in the area. Universal Corporation, also in the tobacco industry, has its corporate headquarters here as well. Capital One and Phillip Morris USA are two of the largest private Richmond-area employers. In 2007, Altria announced its plans to move the corporate HQ from New York City to Richmond in 2008, adding another Fortune 500 corporation to Richmond's list. The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Categories: Stub | Fortune 500 companies | Financial services companies of the United States ... Charlotte redirects here. ... Wachovia Corporation (NYSE: WB) is a large banking chain in the United States. ... SunTrust Banks, Inc. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... Capital One Financial Corp (NYSE: COF) is a Diversity Capital One received a 100% rating on the Corporate Equality Index released by the Human Rights Campaign starting in 2003, the second year of the report. ... Boundaries of the McLean CDP as of 2003. ... The McKesson Corporation (NYSE: MCK) is a large USA-based corporation specialising in medical and pharmaceutical products. ... San Francisco redirects here. ... Philip Morris USA is the United States tobacco division of Altria Group, Inc. ... Philip Morris redirects here. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... Henrico County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ... Universal Corporation (NYSE: UVV) is one of the worlds leading tobacco merchants. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ...


DuPont also maintains a production facility known as the Spruance Plant, and Qimonda, formerly Infineon Technologies, has a facility located at Elko Tract (a former WWII airfield and ghost town) near Richmond International Airport, and produces DRAM computer memory in the area. This article is about E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. ... For the raceway, see Infineon Raceway. ... Elko Tract is a 2,220 acre (9 km²) tract of land in Henrico County, Virginia. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses, see Ghost town (disambiguation). ... Richmond International Airport (IATA: RIC, ICAO: KRIC) is a public airport located in Sandston, Virginia, an unincorporated community within Henrico County which is about 5 miles (8 km) east of Richmond. ... Dram can mean several things: Dram (unit), an imperial unit of volume Dram, an imperial unit of weight or mass, see avoirdupois and apothecaries system Ottoman dram, a unit of weight, see dirhem Armenian dram, a monetary unit DRAM, a type of RAM Category: ...


Richmond is also home to the rapidly developing Virginia BioTechnology Research Park, which opened in 1995 as an incubator facility for biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. Located adjacent to the Medical College of Virginia (MCV) Campus of Virginia Commonwealth University, the park currently has more than 575,000 square feet (53,000 m²) of research, laboratory and office space for a diverse tenant mix of companies, research institutes, government laboratories and non-profit organizations. The United Network for Organ Sharing, which maintains the nation's organ transplant waiting list, occupies one building in the park. Philip Morris USA also recently opened a $350 million research and development facility in the park as well. With approximately 600 additional Philip Morris researchers in 2007, once fully developed in the next five to 10 years, park officials expect the site to employ roughly 3,000 scientists, technicians and engineers. Virginia Commonwealth University, or VCU, is a large public American research university with its main campuses located in downtown Richmond, Virginia. ... Located in Richmond, Virginia, the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) is a non-profit, scientific and educational organization that administers the nations only Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN), established by the U.S. Congress in 1984. ... Transplant redirects here. ... Philip Morris USA is the United States tobacco division of Altria Group, Inc. ...


Richmond is also the home of the Ukrop's Super Market, a regional, family-owned chain of supermarkets, known for its remarkable customer service, innovation, and friendly employees, as well as its closed-on-Sundays and no-alcohol-on-the-shelves policies. Ukrops is a high-profile sponsor of community events like the Monument Avenue 10K, Easter on Parade, and the Ukrop's Christmas Parade. Ukrops is a family-owned and operated grocery store chain located in central Virginia. ... Supermarket produce section A supermarket is a store that sells a wide variety of goods including food and alcohol, medicine, clothes, and other household products that are consumed regularly. ... Jefferson Davis monument on Monument Avenue, Richmond, Virginia Monument Avenue, in Richmond, Virginia, memorializes Virginian native Confederate participants of the Civil War and one 20th century Richmond native. ...


Recent economic developments

In recent years, Richmond has been attempting to revive its downtown. Recent downtown initiatives include the Canal Walk, a new Greater Richmond Convention Center, and expansion on both VCU campuses. Despite numerous controversies related to excessive employee salaries and wasteful spending of public tax money,[52] a new performing arts center, Richmond CenterStage, will reportedly open in 2009.[53] The complex will include a renovation of the Carpenter Center and construction of a new multipurpose hall, community playhouse, and arts education center in parts of the old Thalhimers department store.[54] As planned by the Virginia Performing Arts Foundation (VAPAF), the publicly-funded arts center project now known as CenterStage has been mired in controversy, poor planning and questionable spending of money raised from a special citywide meals tax hike.[55] Virginia Commonwealth University or VCU for short, is a large American research university with its main campus located in urban Richmond, Virginia. ...


The center is set to receive $25 million in 'City of the Future' funds from Mayor Doug Wilder even though the current planners of CenterStage have yet to disclose annual administrative and operating expenses or initiate an artists endowment.[56] There are also few representatives from the area's performing arts community in key positions of authority within the project, leading critics to speculate that CenterStage is more of a real estate deal designed to prop up a failing convention center expansion than a worthwhile arts venture.[57] The city has entertained multiple proposals for a new baseball stadium for the AAA Class Richmond Braves in recent years, but none has yet advanced beyond initial planning. In January, 2008, the Braves announced that in 2009 they will be leaving Richmond for Gwinnett County, GA due to Richmond's continued inaction on an improved ballpark. Lawrence Douglas Wilder (born January 17, 1931) is an American politician. ... Class-Level Triple-A (1966-Present) Minor League affiliations International League South Division Major League affiliations Atlanta Braves (1966-Present) Name Richmond Braves (1966-Present) Ballpark The Diamond (1985-Present) Parker Field (1966-1985) Minor League titles League titles 1978, 1986, 1989, 1994, 2007 Division titles Owner(s)/Operated by...


In February, 2006, MeadWestvaco announced that they would move from Stamford, Connecticut, to Richmond in 2008.[58] The company is planning an 8-10 story office building downtown, near the Federal Reserve building.[59] MeadWestvaco Corp. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Settled 1641 Incorporated (city) 1893 Consolidated 1949 Government  - Type Mayor-Board of representatives  - Mayor Dannel Malloy (Dem) Area  - City 134. ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central banking system of the United States. ...


Arts and culture

Museums and art galleries

The Jefferson Davis Monument, located at the intersection of Monument Avenue and Davis Avenue in Richmond.
The Jefferson Davis Monument, located at the intersection of Monument Avenue and Davis Avenue in Richmond.

Richmond has a significant art community, and the Virginia Commonwealth University School of the Arts is consistently ranked as one of the best in the nation.[60] In addition to many art venues associated with the university, there are also several attractions nearby, including the Library of Virginia, the Valentine Richmond History Center, the Virginia Historical Society, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Richmond Symphony, and the Richmond Ballet. The Byrd Theatre in Carytown is a classical movie theater from the 1920s era that still features second-run movies on a regular basis, and is popular among the college student population, particularly because of its low ticket price of $1.99. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 206 KB)Photo of the Jefferson Davis Monument, midway along Monument Avenue in Richmond, VA. Photo taken in summer 2004 by Gabriel Snyder and licensed under terms of GNU free doc. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 206 KB)Photo of the Jefferson Davis Monument, midway along Monument Avenue in Richmond, VA. Photo taken in summer 2004 by Gabriel Snyder and licensed under terms of GNU free doc. ... Jefferson Davis monument on Monument Avenue, Richmond, Virginia Monument Avenue, in Richmond, Virginia, memorializes Virginian native Confederate participants of the Civil War and one 20th century Richmond native. ... Virginia Commonwealth University, or VCU, is a large public American research university with its main campuses located in downtown Richmond, Virginia. ... Library of Virginia in Richmond, Virginia is the library agency of the Commonwealth of Virginia, its archival agency, and the reference library at the seat of government. ... The Virginia Historical Society, founded in 1831, is a major repository, research and teaching center for Virginia history. ... The Virginia Museum of Fine arts, or ‘’’VMFA’’’ is an art museum in Richmond, Virginia. ... The Byrd Theatre, named after William Byrd I and William Byrd II, founders of Richmond, Virginia, is one of Virginias finest cinema treasures in the United States of America. ... USD redirects here. ...


The Science Museum of Virginia, is also located on Broad Street near the Fan district. It is housed in the neoclassical Union Station, designed by Beaux-Arts-trained John Russell Pope in 1919. Adjacent to the Science Museum is the Richmond Children's Museum, a fun-filled museum with many hands-on activities. The Science Museum of Virginia is a science museum located in Richmond, Virginia. ... Late Baroque classicizing: G. P. Pannini assembles the canon of Roman ruins and Roman sculpture into one vast imaginary gallery (1756) Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that... Beaux-Arts architecture[1] denotes the academic classical architectural style that was taught at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. ... The Jefferson Memorial, built 1939 — 1943 John Russell Pope (April 24, 1874 – August 27, 1937) was an architect most known for his designs of the Jefferson Memorial (completed in 1943) and the West Building of the National Gallery of Art (completed in 1941) in Washington, DC. Pope was born in...


As the former Capital of the Confederate States of America, Richmond is home to many museums and battlefields of the American Civil War. The Museum of the Confederacy, located near the Virginia State Capitol and the MCV Campus of Virginia Commonwealth University, is in Court End along with the Davis Mansion, also known as the White House of the Confederacy; both today feature a wide variety of objects and material from the era. Near the riverfront is the Tredegar Iron Works and Civil War Battlefields National Park Visitors Center. There is a former slave trail along the river as well. The dome-like structure to commemorate the Centennial Exhibition of the American Civil War now serves as a cafeteria on the MCV Campus of VCU. The National Park Service's Richmond Civil War Visitor Center, in the Tredegar Iron Works, has three floors of exhibits and artifacts, films, a bookstore, picnic areas and more. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... White House of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia, built in 1818, photo circa 1939. ... The Virginia State Capitol is the seat of state government in the Commonwealth of Virginia, located in Richmond, the third State Capital of Virginia. ... Virginia Commonwealth University, or VCU, is a large public American research university with its main campuses located in downtown Richmond, Virginia. ... Tredegar Iron Works, Richmond, Virginia, USA, photograph by Alexander Gardener Tredegar Iron Works is a historic iron foundry in Richmond, Virginia, United States of America. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... Tredegar Iron Works, Richmond, Virginia, USA, photograph by Alexander Gardener Tredegar Iron Works is a historic iron foundry in Richmond, Virginia, United States of America. ...


Other historical points of interest include St. John's Church, the site of Patrick Henry's famous, "Give me liberty or give me death" speech, and the Edgar Allan Poe Museum, features many of his writings and other artifacts of his life, particularly when he lived in the city as a child, a student, and a successful writer. The John Marshall House, the home of the former Chief Justice of the United States, is also located downtown and features many of his writings and objects from his life. Hollywood Cemetery is also the burial grounds of two U.S. Presidents as well as many other civil war officers and soldiers. The home of former Confederate General Robert E. Lee still stands on Franklin Street in downtown Richmond. St. ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... Patrick Henrys Treason speech before the House of Burgesses in an 1851 painting by Peter F. Rothermel Give me liberty or give me death is a famous quotation from a speech made by Patrick Henry to the Virginia House of Burgesses. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other persons named John Marshall, see John Marshall (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial... A view of Hollywood Cemetery and Presidents Circle Hollywood Cemetery is a large, sprawling cemetery in Richmond, Virginia, characterized by rolling hills and winding paths overlooking the James River. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ...


The city is also home to many monuments, most notably several along Monument Avenue in the Fan District. Other monuments of interest in the city include the A.P. Hill monument, the Bill "Bojangles" Robinson monument, the Christopher Columbus monument, and the Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument. Jefferson Davis monument on Monument Avenue, Richmond, Virginia Monument Avenue, in Richmond, Virginia, memorializes Virginian native Confederate participants of the Civil War and one 20th century Richmond native. ... The Fan is a district of Richmond, Virginia, so named because of the fan shape of the roads that extend west from N. Belvidere St. ... Ambrose Powell Hill (November 9, 1825 _ April 2, 1865), was a Confederate States of America general in the American Civil War. ... Bill Bojangles Robinson (May 25, 1878 – November 25, 1949) was a pioneer and pre-eminent African-American tap dance performer. ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator, colonizer, and explorer and one of the first Europeans to explore the Americas after the Vikings. ...


Dedicated in 1956, the Virginia War Memorial is also located on Belvedere near the riverfront, and is a monument to Virginians who died in battle in World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Persian Gulf War. Located near Byrd Park is the famous World War I Memorial Carillon, a 56 bell carillon tower. The Virginia War Memorial is a memorial in Richmond, Virginia. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... See also: 2003 invasion of Iraq and Gulf War (disambiguation) C Company, 1st Battalion, The Staffordshire Regiment, 1st UK Armoured Division The Persian Gulf War was a conflict between Iraq and a coalition force of 34 nations led by the United States. ... For the University of Regina student newspaper, see The Carillon. ... For the University of Regina student newspaper, see The Carillon. ...


Performing arts

  • Richmond Ballet - Founded in 1957. Current artistic director is Stoner Winslet.
  • Richmond Symphony - Current music director is Mark Russell Smith.
  • Richmond Virginians - Barbershop chorus founded in the 1950s (as the Tobaccoland Chorus). Current music director is Mike Wallen.
  • Virginia Opera - The Official Opera Company of the Commonwealth of Virginia, founded in 1974. Current artistic director is Peter Mark. Presents eight mainstage performances every year at the Landmark Theater.
  • Greater Richmond Chorus - Sweet Adeline chorus. Current music director is Roger Tarpy.
  • Richmond Department of Recreation and Parks presents an annual Festival of the Arts at Dogwood Dell in Byrd Park.
  • Barksdale Theatre- Founded in 1953, originally as the Hanover Tavern. Created the nation's first dinner theatre. The Barksdale was Virginia’s first performing arts organization to open its doors to integrated audiences. Continues today as The Hanover Tavern, in Hanover Virginia, Barksdale Theatre in Richmond.
  • Theatre IV- founded in 1975 by Bruce Miller and Phil Whiteway and is one of the largest running theatres in Virginia. Tours children's shows all over the country. Now a family playhouse after Bruce and Phil took over Barksdale Theatre in Willow Lawn in 2001.
  • S.P.A.R.C. - School Of The Performing Arts in the Richmond Community. SPARC was founded in 1981, and trained children to become "triple threats", meaning they were equally versed in singing, acting, and dancing. SPARC has become the largest community-based theater arts education program in Virginia and it offers classes to every age group, during the summer and throughout the year.
  • Recently, the Richmond Coliseum has drawn high-profile acts such as Cher, Bette Midler, Bruce Springsteen, Elton John, Keith Urban, Martina McBride, Hilary Duff, George Strait, Mary J. Blige, Nine Inch Nails, Tim McGraw and Faith Hill, Alison Krauss, Toby Keith, Dancing with the Stars, Blue Man Group, R. Kelly, My Chemical Romance and Tool.
  • Richmond CenterStage, a new performing arts center planned to open in Downtown Richmond in 2009. The complex will reportedly include a renovation of the Carpenter Center and construction of a new multipurpose hall, community playhouse, and arts education center in parts of the old Thalhimers department store.
  • Classic Amphitheatre at Strawberry Hill, the former summer concert venue located at Richmond International Raceway. Full season schedules from 1993-1998 are listed.
  • Theatre IV - the Children's Theatre of Virginia offers year-round live performances for families, geared for ages four and up.
  • A local franchise of ComedySportz in the West End just outside the city in Henrico county.

The Richmond Symphony Orchestras Logo The Richmond Symphony Orchestra is based in Richmond, Virginia. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Virginia Opera is led by its Artistic Director, Peter Mark, who has been with the company since its first major performances in 1975. ... Landmark Theater, Richmond, VA. The Landmark Theater in Richmond, VA is a theater at the southwest corner of Monroe Park. ... Categories: Stub | Richmond, Virginia ... Richmond Coliseum is an arena in Richmond, Virginia where the Richmond RiverDogs and the Richmond Bandits play. ... This article is about the entertainer. ... Bette Midler (born December 1, 1945) is an American singer, actress and comedienne, also known to her fans as The Divine Miss M. She is named after the actress Bette Davis although Davis pronounced her first name in two syllables, and Midler uses one. ... Springsteen redirects here. ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Keith Lionel Urban (born 26 October 1967, New Zealand), is a New Zealand country music singer. ... Martina McBride (born Martina Mariea Schiff, July 29, 1966 in Sharon, Kansas) is an American Grammy nominated country music singer-songwriter. ... Hilary Erhard Duff (born September 28, 1987) is an American actress, singer, songwriter, producer, fashion designer, and spokesperson. ... George Harvey Strait, (born May 18, 1952), is an American country music singer. ... Mary Jane Blige (born January 11, 1971) is an American R&B, soul, and hip hop soul singer-songwriter, occasional rapper, record producer, actress, and hip hop icon who has sold more than 40 million records and over 10 million singles worldwide. ... Nine Inch Nails (abbreviated as NIN) is an American industrial rock band, founded in 1988 by Trent Reznor in Cleveland, Ohio. ... For the song by Taylor Swift, see Tim McGraw (song). ... Audrey Faith Perry McGraw, known professionally as Faith Hill (born September 21, 1967), is an American country singer, known for her commercial success as well as her marriage to fellow country singer Tim McGraw. ... Alison Krauss (born July 23, 1971)[1] is an American bluegrass-country singer and fiddle player. ... Toby Keith Covel (born July 8, 1961) is an American country music singer-songwriter who has enjoyed commercial success throughout the 1990s and 2000s. ... For the video game based on the American series, see Dancing with the Stars (video game) International versions of Dancing with the Stars Dancing with the Stars is the name for a number of international television series based on the format of the British series Strictly Come Dancing. ... For the novel by Kin Platt, see The Blue Man. ... R. Kelly (born Robert Sylvester Kelly on January 8, 1967 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American R&B and pop singer, songwriter, record producer, and occasional rapper. ... My Chemical Romance are an American rock band formed in 2001. ... This article is about the instrument. ... Richmond International Raceway (RIR) is a A 3/4 mile, D shaped, asphalt race track located outside Richmond, Virginia. ... ComedySportz is an improvisational comedy organization started in 1984 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, by Dick Chudnow. ...

Sports

Richmond does not have any major league professional sports teams. However, there are several minor league teams. The city's professional baseball team is the Richmond Braves, a AAA minor league baseball team (the farm team of the Atlanta Braves). The Braves currently play at The Diamond through the 2008 season, although they recently announced plans to move to Gwinnett County, Georgia at the start of the 2009 season.[61] Class-Level Triple-A (1966-Present) Minor League affiliations International League South Division Major League affiliations Atlanta Braves (1966-Present) Name Richmond Braves (1966-Present) Ballpark The Diamond (1985-Present) Parker Field (1966-1985) Minor League titles League titles 1978, 1986, 1989, 1994, 2007 Division titles Owner(s)/Operated by... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... An undated file photo from the RMA Web site The Diamond, a stadium located in Richmond, Virginia, USA, on Boulevard, is the home of the Richmond Braves, the AAA affiliate of the Atlanta Braves, as well as the Virginia Commonwealth University baseball team. ... Gwinnett County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ...


The Richmond Lions, a USA Rugby Division 2 rugby union team, play at Dorey Park. The Richmond Kickers, a United Soccer Leagues Second Division soccer team, play at the University of Richmond Stadium. The sport of rugby in the United States has always had a close relationship with the sport of American football. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Richmond Kickers are an American soccer team, founded in 1993. ... The United Soccer Leagues Second Division is a professional mens soccer league in North America, part of the United Soccer Leagues (USL) league pyramid. ... The University of Richmond stadium is used by the Richmond Kickers for soccer and the University of Richmond for American football. ...


The Richmond Coliseum, a 13,000 plus seat multi-purpose arena in downtown Richmond, is the home of a large number of sporting events, concerts, festivals, and trade shows and is also home to the Richmond Renegades of the Southern Professional Hockey League. The Colonial Athletic Association has hosted its annual men's basketball tournament at the Coliseum since 1990. The Coliseum has played host as a NCAA men's basketball tournament site and in 1994 played host to the women's basketball Final Four. In December 2006, WWE's Armageddon Live Pay-Per-View was held at the Coliseum. Richmond Coliseum is an arena in Richmond, Virginia where the Richmond RiverDogs and the Richmond Bandits play. ... The Richmond Renegades are a SPHL ice hockey team in Richmond, Virginia. ... The Colonial Athletic Association, also known as the CAA, is a NCAA Division I college athletic conference whose members are located in East Coast states from Massachusetts to Georgia. ... NCAA redirects here. ... The NCAA Womens Division I Championship is an annual basketball tournament for women. ...


Th Stuart C. Siegel Center, on the campus of Virginia Commonwealth University in downtown Richmond, is the 7,500 plus seat home multi-purpose arena of the Virginia Commonwealth University Rams. The area also plays host to concerts and local and state high school basketball games and tournaments as well as several high school graduations in the surrounding area. Stuart C. Siegel Center is a 7,500-seat multi-purpose arena in Richmond, Virginia. ... Virginia Commonwealth University, or VCU, is a large public American research university with its main campuses located in downtown Richmond, Virginia. ... The VCU Rams can be considered one of two things: The name of the team that VCU has a sport in, for their mascot is a ram, or, a reference to the students as being Rams due to them intransitively being part of VCU. This makes the student body, and...


The Robins Center, a 9,071-seat multi-purpose arena, is home to the University of Richmond Spiders basketball. Robins Center is a 9,171-seat multi-purpose arena in Richmond, Virginia. ...


Auto racing is also very popular in the area, and the Richmond International Raceway also hosts two annual NASCAR Nextel Cup races, the Suntrust Indy Challenge, as well as the Virginia State Fair and other community and sporting events. Southside Speedway also sits just southwest of Richmond in Chesterfield County, and is a .33 mile oval short-track that features weekly stock car racing on Friday nights. Southside Speedway has acted as the breeding grounds for many past NASCAR legends including Richard Petty, Bobby Allison and Darrell Waltrip, and claims to be the home track of current NASCAR superstar Denny Hamlin. Richmond was considered as one of the possible resting places for the future NASCAR Hall of Fame, but it was ultimately awarded to Charlotte, North Carolina. Richmond International Raceway (RIR) is a A 3/4 mile, D shaped, asphalt race track located outside Richmond, Virginia. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... The NEXTEL Cup Series is NASCARs top racing series. ... Carnival rides at the fair The Virginia State Fair is held annually at the end of September, at the former State Fairgrounds (now known as The Richmond International Raceway Complex) located in eastern Henrico County, just outside of the City of Richmond, VA. Competitive weight pumpkins at the State Fair... Southside Speedway (affectionately dubbed The Toughest Short Track in the South) is a short track used for stock car auto racing located just South of Richmond, Virginia in Chesterfield County. ... Richard Lee Petty (born July 2, 1937) is an American former NASCAR Winston Cup Series driver. ... Bobby Allison (born December 3, 1937) was one of the first NASCAR drivers and was named one of NASCARs 50 greatest drivers. ... Darrell Lee Waltrip (born February 5, 1947 in Owensboro, Kentucky) is a three-time former NASCAR Winston Cup champion, the 1989 Daytona 500 winner, and current television race commentator with Fox Broadcasting Company. ... James Dennis Hamlin, Jr. ... NASCAR has committed itself to building a Hall of Fame at some location in the southern or midwestern United States. ... Charlotte redirects here. ...


Colonial Downs is a horse racing track in New Kent, Virginia adjacent to Interstate 64, approximately 20 miles east of Richmond's city limits. The track plays host to the Virginia Derby each July. Colonial Downs is a horse racing track in New Kent, Virginia adjacent to Interstate 64, halfway between Richmond, Virginia and Williamsburg, Virginia. ...


Richmond has played host to the Xterra (off-road triathlon) East Championship since 2000. Mountain bikers and Triathletes alike revel in the incredible trail system of the James River Park. Each June the best off-road Triathletes in the world converge on Richmond for the Xterra East Regional Championship bringing with them the Xterra Triathlon festival, including family events, athletic competitions, and a twilight concert.


Richmond is also the home of the River City Rollergirls, a rookie league for the Women's Flat Track Derby Association (WFTDA),and of Richmond Lucha Libre, a popular local independent wrestling group. This is a list of roller derby leagues. ... WFTDA Logo Founded in April 2004 as the United Leagues Coalition (ULC) and renamed in early 2006, the Womens Flat Track Derby Association (WFTDA) is an association of womens flat track roller derby leagues in the United States. ... WFTDA Logo Founded in April 2004 as the United Leagues Coalition (ULC) and renamed in early 2006, the Womens Flat Track Derby Association (WFTDA) is an association of womens flat track roller derby leagues in the United States. ...


WWE Diva and former WWE Women's Champion Mickie James resides in Richmond, Virginia. World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... Victoria, who has been in WWE since 2000 but made her debut on the main roster in 2002, is a two time Women’s Champion Diva is a term used by the professional wrestling promotion World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) to refer to its female talent. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Womens Championship is a professional wrestling championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... Mickie Laree James[2] (born on August 31, 1979) is an American professional wrestler currently signed to World Wrestling Entertainment wrestling on its RAW brand. ...


Parks and outdoor recreation

The city operates one of the oldest municipal park systems in the country. The park system began when the city council voted in 1851 to acquire 7.5 acres (3 hectares), now known as Monroe Park. Today, Monroe Park sits adjacent to the Virginia Commonwealth University campus and is one of more than 40 parks comprising a total of more than 1,500 acres (610 hectares). Image File history File links Botanicalgarden. ... Image File history File links Botanicalgarden. ... The Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden is a botanical garden located on the North Side of Richmond, Virginia. ... Virginia Commonwealth University, or VCU, is a large public American research university with its main campuses located in downtown Richmond, Virginia. ...


Several parks are located along the James River, and the James River Parks System offers bike trails, hiking and nature trails, and many scenic overlooks along the river's route through the city. The mountain bike trail system in James River and Forest Hill parks is considered by professional riders to be one of the best urban trail systems in the country. The trails are used as part of the Xterra East Championship course for both the running and mountain biking portions of the off-road triathlon.


There are also parks on two major islands in the river: Belle Isle and Brown's Island. Belle Isle, at various former times a Powhatan fishing village, colonial-era horse race track, and Civil War prison camp, is the larger of the two, and contains many bike trails as well as a small cliff that is used for rock climbing instruction. One can walk the island and still see many of the remains of the Civil War prison camp, such as an arms storage room and a gun emplacement that was used to quell prisoner riots. Brown's Island is a smaller island and a popular venue of a large number of free outdoor concerts and festivals in the spring and summer, such as the weekly Friday Cheers concert series or the James River Beer and Seafood Festival. There are several areas in Downtown Richmond, including Shockoe Bottom, Shockoe Slip, the River District, Belle Isle, Monroe Ward, Manchester Jackson Ward, Main Street, Court End, Tobacco Row, and the Canal Walk. ... Climbers on Valkyrie at the Roaches. ... Spring is one of the four temperate seasons. ...


Two other major parks in the city are Byrd Park and Maymont, located near the fan district of Richmond. Byrd Park features a one mile running track, with exercise stops, a public dog park, and a number of small lakes for small boats, as well as two monuments and an amphitheatre. Prominently featured in the park is the World War I Memorial Carillon, built in 1926 as a memorial to those that died in the war. Maymont, located adjacent to Byrd Park, is a 100-acre (40-hectare) Victorian estate with a museum, formal gardens, native wildlife exhibits, nature center, carriage collection, and children's farm. Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden is also located in the city. Categories: Stub | Richmond, Virginia ... Maymont is a 100 acre (400,000 m²) Victorian estate in Richmond, Virginia with a museum, formal gardens, native wildlife exhibits, nature center, carriage collection, and petting zoo known as The Maymont Childrens Farm. In 1893, Major James H. Dooley, a wealthy Richmond lawyer and philanthropist, and his wife... These standard poodles are playing at a dog park. ... A boat, like a ship, is a buoyant vessel designed for the purpose of transporting people and possibly goods across water. ... For the University of Regina student newspaper, see The Carillon. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... For other uses, see Museum (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Garden (disambiguation). ... Catherine IIs carved, painted and gilded Coronation Coach (Hermitage Museum) George VI and Queen Elizabeth in a landau with footmen and an outrider, Canada 1939 The classic definition of a carriage is a four-wheeled horse drawn private passenger vehicle with leaf springs (elliptical springs in the 19th century... Major Lewis Ginter was a prominent businessman and philanthopist in Richmond, Virginia who had a number of careers, arguably making and losing a fortune three times. ... Inside the United States Botanic Garden Washington, D.C. Botanical gardens grow a wide variety of plants primarily categorized and documented for scientific purposes. ...


Other parks in the city include Joseph Bryan Park Azalea Garden, Forest Hill Park (former site of the Forest Hill Amusement Park), Chimborazo Park (site of the National Battlefield Headquarters), among others. The Joseph Bryan Park Azalea Garden (17 acres) is a botanical garden specializing in azaleas, located within Joseph Bryan Park (262 acres), Bryan Park Avenue, Richmond, Virginia. ...


Several theme parks are also located near the city, including Kings Dominion to the north, and Busch Gardens to the east, near Williamsburg. UK-based Diggerland will soon begin construction of a construction-themed park planned to open in 2007.[62] Theme Park is a simulation computer game designed by Bullfrog Productions, released in 1994, in which the player designs and operates an amusement park. ... Kings Dominion is a 400 acre amusement park located in Doswell in Hanover County 23 miles (37 km) north of Richmond, Virginia and 83 miles (134 km) south of Washington, DC on Interstate 95. ... Busch Gardens is the name of two amusement parks in the United States owned and operated by Busch Entertainment Corporation, a division of Anheuser-Busch. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Diggerland is a the name of four theme parks in England based around the theme of diggers and JCBs. ...


Media and popular culture

The Richmond Times-Dispatch is the local daily newspaper in Richmond, with a Sunday circulation of 215,000. Style Weekly is an alternative weekly publication covering popular culture, arts, and entertainment. City Edition is a weekly news magazine distributed throughout Richmond that focuses on city government and civic life in the city. Richmond Magazine is the city's monthly magazine. The Richmond Free Press and the Voice cover the news from an American perspective. Spanish-language publications in the city include the magazine La Voz Hispana de Virginia and the newspaper, Centro. According to nielsonmedia. ... The Richmond Times-Dispatch (RTD or TD for short) is the primary daily newspaper in Richmond, Virginia the capital of Virginia, and is commonly considered the newspaper of record for events occurring in much of the state. ... Style Weekly is an alternative weekly newspaper published in Richmond, Virginia. ... La Voz Hispana de Virginia magazine is the only Hispanic magazine in the state of Virginia and was recognized in 2005 as the best Latino publication in the state by Governor Mark Warner. ...


The Richmond metro area is served by many local television and radio stations. The Richmond-Petersburg designated market area (DMA) is the 61st largest in the U.S. with 517,800 homes (0.46% of the total U.S.).[63] The major network television affiliates are WTVR-TV 6 (CBS), WRIC-TV 8 (ABC), WWBT 12 (NBC), WRLH 35 (FOX), and WUPV 65 (CW). Public Broadcasting Service stations include WCVE-TV 23 and WCVW 57. There are also a wide variety of radio stations in the Richmond area, catering to many different interests, including news, talk radio, and sports, as well as an eclectic mix of musical interests. A designated market area is a group of counties in the United States that are covered by a specific television station. ... WTVR-TV (CBS6) is a CBS television affiliate based in Richmond, Virginia. ... CBSs first color logo, which debuted in the fall of 1965. ... WRIC-TV is the ABC affiliate for the Richmond, Virginia television market. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... WWBT, also known locally as NBC12 is a television station on VHF channel 12 in Richmond, Virginia. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... The Sinclair Broadcast Group (SBG) is the operator of the largest number of local television stations in the United States, with a total of 62 stations across the country in 39 small and medium markets. ... FOX redirects here. ... WUPV Channel 65 is a UPN television affiliate servicing the Richmond, Virginia television market and licensed to the nearby town of to Ashland. ... CW may stand for: The CW Television Network (colloquially The CW), a television network which launched in September 2006 as a merger of both the UPN and The WB networks. ... PBS redirects here. ... WCVE (WCVE-TV since WCVE-FM was added in 1988) is a public television station licensed to Richmond, Virginia. ... WCVE (WCVE-TV since WCVE-FM was added in 1988) is a public television station licensed to Richmond, Virginia. ... For other uses, see News (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Talk Radio. ... A sport consists of a physical activity or skill carried out with a recreational purpose: for competition, for self-enjoyment, to attain excellence, for the development of a skill, or some combination of these. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ...


Many films and television shows have been filmed, in whole or in part, in Richmond, including Finnegan Begin Again, Hannibal, The Jackal, Hearts in Atlantis, The Contender, Shadow Conspiracy, Evan Almighty, and Iron Jawed Angels.[64] Richmond's elite society has also been portrayed in various popular culture references, such as in 1920s novels by Ellen Glasgow and James Branch Cabell, or the 1990s television sitcom A Different World, which featured the character Whitley Gilbert, an obnoxious and wealthy African American debutante.[65] This article is about motion pictures. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Hannibal (aka The Silence of the Lambs 2) is a 2001 film directed by Ridley Scott, adapted from the Thomas Harris novel of the same name. ... The Jackal is a 1997 suspense film starring Richard Gere, Bruce Willis, Diane Venora and Sidney Poitier, directed by Michael Caton-Jones. ... Hearts in Atlantis is a 2001 film directed by Scott Hicks. ... For other uses of this term, see Contender. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Evan Almighty is a 2007 comedy film, and sequel to the 2003 film Bruce Almighty. ... Movie poster for Iron Jawed Angels Iron Jawed Angels is a highly acclaimed film about the American womens rights movement during the early 1900s produced by HBO Films. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... Ellen Glasgow Ellen Anderson Gholson Glasgow (April 22, 1873 - November 21, 1945) was a Pulitzer Prize winning American novelist from Richmond, Virginia. ... James Branch Cabell photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1935 James Branch Cabell (April 14, 1879 - May 5, 1958) was an American author of fantasy fiction and belles lettres. ... This article is about a genre of comedy. ... A Different World was an American television sitcom. ... Whitley Marion Gilbert Wayne is a fictional character from the 1980s Black sitcom A Different World. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... A debutante (or deb) (from the French débutante, female beginner) is a young lady from an aristocratic or upper class family who has reached the age of maturity, and as a new adult, is introduced to society at a formal presentation known as her debut or coming out. Originally...


Several rock bands were also formed in Richmond, including GWAR, Avail, Carbon Leaf, and Lamb of God. The city is considered a hotbed of underground music, especially in the punk and heavy metal genres. The Dave Matthews Band is also often mistakenly associated with the city, as it was actually formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, about 65 miles to the west. This article is about the genre. ... GWAR is a satirical thrash metal and shock rock band formed in 1985. ... This article is about the band named Avail. ... Carbon Leaf is a five-piece pop rock band from Richmond, Virginia. ... Lamb of God is a Grammy-nominated five-piece metal band from Richmond, Virginia, formerly known as Burn the Priest. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... Dave Matthews Band (also known by the acronym DMB) is a United States-based alternative rock band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1991 by singer, songwriter, and guitarist Dave Matthews. ... Charlottesville is an independent city located within the confines of Albemarle County in the Commonwealth of Virginia, United States, and named after Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the queen consort of King George III of the United Kingdom. ...


Religion

The Cathedral of the Sacred Heart, located in the Fan district, adjacent to Monroe Park, was dedicated in 1906.
The Cathedral of the Sacred Heart, located in the Fan district, adjacent to Monroe Park, was dedicated in 1906.

Richmond has several historic churches. Because of its early English colonial history from the early 1600s to 1776, Richmond has a number of prominent Anglican/Episcopal churches including Monumental Church, St. Paul's Episcopal Church and St. John's Episcopal Church. Methodists and Baptists made up another section of early churches, and First Baptist Church of Richmond was the first of these, established in 1780. In the Reformed church tradition, the first Presbyterian Church in the City of Richmond was First Presbyterian Church, organized on June 18, 1812. On February 5, 1845, Second Presbyterian Church of Richmond was founded, which was a historic church where Stonewall Jackson attended and was the first Gothic building and the first gas-lit church to be built in Richmond.[66] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (768x1024, 123 KB) Summary Beschreibung: Cathedral of the sacred heart, die katholische Kathedrale von Richmond, Virginia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (768x1024, 123 KB) Summary Beschreibung: Cathedral of the sacred heart, die katholische Kathedrale von Richmond, Virginia. ... Cathedral of the Sacred Heart is the cathedral of the Catholic Diocese of Richmond, located in the Fan district of Richmond, Virginia. ... The Fan is a district of Richmond, Virginia, so named because of the fan shape of the roads that extend west from N. Belvidere St. ... In Richmond, Virginia, architect Robert Mills designed this Episcopal Church to commemorate the victims of an 1812 theater fire. ... St. ... Saint Johns Church on a winter day. ... First Baptist Church is an historic Baptist Church in Richmond Virginia. ... The Reformed churches are a group of Protestant denominations historically related by a similar Zwinglian or Calvinist system of doctrine but organizationally independent. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses of Stonewall Jackson, see Stonewall Jackson (disambiguation). ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... Gas lighting is the process of burning piped natural gas or coal gas for illumination. ...


Due to the influx of German immigrants in the 1840s, Saint Johns German Evangelical church was formed in 1843. Richmond is also home to a prominent Greek-American community. Saints Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox Cathedral held its first worship service in a rented room at 309 North 7th Street in 1917. The cathedral relocated to 30 Malvern Avenue in 1960 and is noted as one of two Eastern Orthodox churches in Richmond and home to the annual Richmond Greek Festival. There are two other Orthodox churches in the immediate Metropolitan area. The community which now comprises St Cyprian of Carthage Orthodox Church was begun in 1974 by Fr George and Mary Ann DeTrana prior to the formation of the Diocese of the South of the Orthodox Church in America. Services were held in two temporary locations until property was purchased in 1978 at 3820 Chamberlayne Ave on the Northside. From the outset, the purpose of the mission has been to bring the Orthodox Christian Church in English to the people of Central Virginia. The congregation currently represents a cross-section of Orthodoxy in America with members drawn from every major jurisdiction as well as a significant number of converts to the faith. St Cyprian of Carthage Orthodox Church is a parish of the Diocese of the South under the leadership of His Eminence, the Most Rev Dmitri, Archbishop of Dallas and the South. [1] St. Andrew's Orthodox Church is located at 117 Linden St in Ashland, just a few miles north of Richmond on I-95. St. Andrew's is a small community that entered into canonical communion with the Orthodox Church within the last decade. Today, St. Andrew's is the spiritual home of a multi-ethnic congregation, composed of a diverse mixture of converts and "cradle" Orthodox. They offer a very rich and attractive cycle of services, and congregational singing. As the northernmost outpost of the Diocese of the South, they have drawn families from the Fredericksburg area as well. [2] . Another Orthodox church in Richmond is St. James Armenian Church, located at 834 Pepper Avenue, established in the 1950s, and is the home to the annual Armenian Food Festival[3]. Saint Johns Church on a winter day. ...


The first Jewish congregation in Richmond was Kahal Kadosh Beth Shalom. Kahal Kadosh Beth Shalom was the sixth congregation in the United States and was the westernmost in the United States at the time of its foundation. By 1822 K.K. Beth Shalom members worshipped in the first synagogue building in Virginia. They eventually merged with Congregation Beth Ahabah, an offshoot of Beth Shalom. Today there is a diverse Jewish community. There are three Orthodox Synagogues, Congregation Kol Emes, Keneseth Beth Israel, and Chabad of the Virginias[67]. There is an Orthodox Yeshivah K-12 school system known as Rudlin Torah academy, with two locations (the boys high school being located further east). There are two Conservative synagogues, Beth El and Or Atid. There are two Reform synagogues, Beth Ahabah and Or Ami. The largest synagogue, Temple Beth El, is located in Henrico County. Along with such religious congregations, there are a variety of other Jewish charitable, educational and social service institutions, each serving the Jewish and general communities. These include the Weinstein Jewish Community Center, Jewish Family Services, Jewish Community Federation of Richmond and Richmond Jewish Foundation. The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... The synagogue Scolanova Trani in Italy. ... Congregation Kol Emes (Young Israel of Richmond) is an Orthodox Jewish synagogue in Richmond, Virginia. ... A yeshiva (Hebrew, pl. ... There are many Jewish temples that go by the name Beth-El (sometimes written as Beth El), meaning house of God. Some notable Temples Beth-El in the United States include: Temple Beth-El (Birmingham, Alabama) Temple Beth-El (Charlotte, North Carolina) Temple Beth-El (Pensacola, Florida) Temple Beth-El... Richmond Jewish Foundation [1] is a charity based in Richmond, Virginia. ...


Tikvat Israel Messianic Jewish Congregation is located on the corner of Boulevard and Grove Avenue in the Fan district. This building was originally constructed around 1915 as the home of Grace Baptist Church. In the 1940's the building experienced a devastating fire. At that time a former synagogue purchased it and renovated it, naming itself Kenneset Beth Israel. Beth Israel remained here until the mid-1970's when they moved to their current location about five miles west on Patterson Avenue. Since then the building changed hands a few times, with no regular residences, until December, 1990, when Tikvat Israel moved in and later purchased it.


There are several seminaries in Richmond. Three of these have banded together to become the Richmond Theological Consortium. This consortium consists of a theology school at Virginia Union University, a Presbyterian seminary called Union PSCE , and a Baptist seminary known as Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond. For the Ecuadorian artist, see Manuel Rendón Seminario. ... Richmond Theological Consortium is a group of theological schools in the Richmond, Virginia area that cooperates and shares resources. ... A consortium is an association of two or more individuals, companies, organisations or governments (or any combination of these entities) with the objective of participating in a common activity or pooling their resources for achieving a common goal. ... Virginia Union University (VUU) is a historically black university located in Richmond, Virginia. ... Union Theological Seminary & Presbyterian School of Christian Education is an institution of the Presbyterian Church (USA). ... Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond (BTSR) is a seminary in Richmond, Virginia. ...


Two bishops sit in Richmond, those of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia (the denomination's largest) and the Catholic Diocese of Richmond, which encompasses all of central and southern Virginia and its eastern shore. The Presbytery of the James -- Presbyterian Church (USA) -- also is based in the Richmond area. Francis Xavier Dilorenzo is the current Bishop of Richmond. ... The Eastern Shore of Virginia is on the Atlantic Coast of the Commonwealth of Virginia. ...


There are five masjids in the Greater Richmond area, accommodating the growing Muslim population. They are Islamic Center of Virginia (ICVA) in the south side, Islamic Society of Greater Richmond (ISGR) in the west end, Masjidullah in the north side, Masjid Bilal near downtown, and Masjid Ar-Rahman in the east end.[68] A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ...


The Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom was penned in Richmond by Thomas Jefferson. Thomas Jefferson was the author of the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ...


Government

See also: List of mayors of Richmond, Virginia
Richmond City Hall.
Richmond City Hall.

Richmond city government consists of a city council with representatives from nine districts serving in a legislative and oversight capacity, as well as a popularly elected, at-large mayor serving as head of the executive branch. Citizens in each of the nine districts elect one council representative each to serve a two-year term. Beginning with the November 2008 election Council terms will be lengthened to 4 years. The city council elects from among its members one member to serve as Council President and one to serve as Council Vice President. The city council meets at City Hall (900 E. Broad St., 2nd Floor) on the second and fourth Mondays of every month, except August. This is a List of mayors of Richmond, Virginia, arranged chronologically. ... A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative body with the power to adopt laws. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... The executive is the branch of a government charged with implementing, or executing, the law and running the day-to-day affairs of the government or state. ...


As of January, 2007, the Richmond City Council consists of: William (Bill) J. Pantele, 2nd District, President of Council; Rev. Delores L. McQuinn, 7th District, Vice-President of Council; Bruce Tyler, 1st District; Chris A. Hilbert, 3rd District; Kathy C. Graziano, 4th District; E. Martin (Marty) Jewell, 5th District; Ellen F. Robertson, 6th District; Reva M. Trammell, 8th District; and Douglas Conner Jr., 9th District.


Richmond's government changed in 2004 from a council-manager form of government to an at-large, popularly elected Mayor. In a landslide election, incumbent mayor Rudy McCollum was defeated by L. Douglas Wilder, who previously served Virginia as the first elected African American governor in the United States since Reconstruction. The Mayor is not a part of the Richmond City Council. The council-manager government is one of 2 main variations of representative municipal government (for contrast, also see Mayor-Council government). ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Lawrence Douglas Wilder (born January 17, 1931) is an American politician. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ...


Education

See also: Richmond Public Schools

The city of Richmond operates 31 elementary schools, nine middle schools, and eight high schools, with a cosmopolitan student population of 25,000 students. . ...


There are also many private, college preparatory schools in Richmond. Several of these, such as St. Christopher's School, St. Catherine's School, Collegiate School and the Steward School, which offer a full K-12 education. Other area prep schools include Benedictine High School, Trinity Episcopal School, and St. Gertrude High School. Richmond is also home to the Maggie L. Walker Governor's School, an esteemed public regional magnet high school. St. ... St. ... Collegiate School is a preparatory school for boys and girls located in Richmond, Virginia. ... Founded in 1972, The Steward School is a private day school in the suburbs of Richmond, Virginia. ... Benedictine High School is a private, Roman Catholic, college preparatory high school for men, located in Cleveland, Ohio, USA. The school serves grades 9-12 and has an enrollment of over 420 young men for the 2005-2006 school year. ... Maggie L. Walker Governors School for Government and International Studies The Maggie L. Walker Governors School for Government and International Studies (MLWGSGIS) is a public regional magnet high school in Richmond, Virginia, directed by Mr. ...


The Richmond area has many major institutions of higher education, including the University of Richmond (private), Virginia Commonwealth University (public), Virginia Union University (private), and the Union Theological Seminary & Presbyterian School of Christian Education (private). Several community colleges are found in the metro area, including J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College and John Tyler Community College (Chesterfield County). In addition, there are several Technical Colleges in Richmond including, ITT Technical Institute, ECPI College of Technology and Beta Tech. The University of Richmond is a private, nonsectarian, liberal arts university located on the border of the city of Richmond and Henrico County, Virginia. ... Virginia Commonwealth University, or VCU, is a large public American research university with its main campuses located in downtown Richmond, Virginia. ... Virginia Union University (VUU) is a historically black university located in Richmond, Virginia. ... Union Theological Seminary & Presbyterian School of Christian Education is an institution of the Presbyterian Church (USA). ... J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College is a community college in central Virginia, named after J. Sargeant Reynolds. ... John Tyler Community College is a public two-year community college open since 1967. ... Chesterfield County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ... ECPI College of Technology ECPI College of Technology is an on-campus (Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina) and online private college providing degree and diploma programs and graduate employment services. ...


Virginia State University is located about 20 miles south of Richmond, in the suburb of Ettrick, just outside of Petersburg, and Randolph-Macon College is located about 15 miles north of Richmond, in the incorporated town of Ashland. Virginia State University is an historically black university located in Ettrick, Virginia (near Petersburg, in the Richmond area), and was founded on March 6, 1882. ... Ettrick is a census-designated place located in Chesterfield County, Virginia. ... Nickname: Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Founded December 17, 1748 Government  - Mayor Annie M. Mickens Area  - City  23. ... For the former womens college, see Randolph College. ... Ashland is a town located in Hanover County, Virginia. ...


Infrastructure

Transportation

Richmond's downtown Main Street Station in 1971.
Richmond's downtown Main Street Station in 1971.

The Greater Richmond area is served by the Richmond International Airport (IATA: RIC, ICAO: KRIC), located in nearby Sandston, seven miles southeast of Richmond and within an hour drive of historic Williamsburg, Virginia. Richmond International is now served by nine airlines with over 200 daily flights provide non-stop service to major destination markets and connecting flights to destinations worldwide. A record 3.3 million passengers used Richmond International Airport in 2006, a 13% increase over 2005. Image File history File links Richmond Main Street Station headhouse in 1971. ... Image File history File links Richmond Main Street Station headhouse in 1971. ... Transportation in Richmond, Virginia and its immediate surroundings include land, sea and air modes. ... Richmond International Airport (IATA: RIC, ICAO: KRIC) is a public airport located in Sandston, Virginia, an unincorporated community within Henrico County which is about 5 miles (8 km) east of Richmond. ... An IATA airport code, also known an IATA location identifier, IATA station code or simply a location identifier [1], is a three-letter code designating many airports around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). ... The ICAO (IPA pronunciation: ) airport code or location indicator is a four-letter alphanumeric code designating each airport around the world. ... Sandston, Virginia, is located right outside of Richmond, the capital of Virginia. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ...


Intercity bus service is provided by Greyhound Lines. Local transit and paratransit bus service in Richmond, Henrico, and Chesterfield counties is provided by the Greater Richmond Transit Company (GRTC). The GRTC, however, serves only small parts of the suburban counties. The far West End (Innsbrook and Short Pump) and almost all of Chesterfield County have no public transportation despite dense housing, retail, and office development. Recent statistics in the Richmond Times-Dispatch have shown that the vast majority of GRTC riders ride the bus because they do not own a car and have no other choice. Autobus redirects here. ... This article is about the US bus line. ... In the United States of America, transit describes local area common carrier passenger transportation configured to provide scheduled service on fixed routes on a non-reservation basis. ... Paratransit is an alternative mode of flexible passenger transportation that does not follow fixed routes or schedules. ... Henrico County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ... Chesterfield County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ... The Greater Richmond Transit Company, known locally as GRTC, is a local government-owned urban-suburban bus line based in Richmond, Virginia, USA. It serves the independent city of Richmond and the adjacent counties of Henrico and Chesterfield with a fleet of over 200 diesel-powered transit buses purchased with...


Richmond also has two railroad stations served by Amtrak. Each station receives regular service from north of Richmond from Washington, DC, Philadelphia, and New York. The suburban Staples Mill Road Station is located on a major north-south freight line and receives all service to and from all points south including, Raleigh, Durham, Savannah, Newport News, Williamsburg and Florida. The historic and recently renovated Main Street Station near downtown Richmond only receives trains bound for Newport News and Williamsburg at this time, due to its track layout. As a result, the Staples Mill Road station receives more service overall. The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Richmond Staples Mill Road Amtrak station lies about 5 miles (8 km) north of downtown Richmond, Virginia. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Durham, Orange, Wake Government  - Mayor Bill Bell Area  - City  94. ... Savannah redirects here. ... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Incorporated 1896 Government  - Mayor Joe Frank Area  - City  119. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Richmond Main Street Station in 1971 Richmond Main Street Station in 2007 Richmond Main Street Station is a railroad station and office building in Richmond, Virginia. ... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Incorporated 1896 Government  - Mayor Joe Frank Area  - City  119. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ...


Richmond also benefits from an excellent position in reference to the state's transportation network, lying at the junction of east-west Interstate 64 and north-south Interstate 95, two of the most heavily traveled highways in the state, as well as along several major rail lines. Other major highways passing through Richmond include U.S. Routes 1, 33, 60, 250, 301 and 360. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 64 Interstate 64 (abbreviated I-64) is an Interstate Highway in the eastern United States. ... I-95 south coming off the Woodrow Wilson Bridge Interstate 95 runs 179 miles through Virginia. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: U.S. Route 1 U.S. Route 1 (also called U.S. Highway 1, and abbreviated US 1) is a United States highway which parallels the east coast of the United States. ... United States Highway 33 is a north-south United States highway that runs northwest-southeast for 709 miles (1,141 km) from northern Indiana to Richmond, Virginia. ... U.S. Route 60 in Virginia runs east-west through the central part of the state, generally following the Interstate 64 corridor. ... U.S. Highway 250 is a spur of U.S. Highway 50. ... U.S. Route 301 is a spur of U.S. Route 1. ... U.S. Highway 360 is a spur of U.S. Highway 60. ...


Utilities

View of the Richmond skyline at night, while crossing the Manchester Bridge.
View of the Richmond skyline at night, while crossing the Manchester Bridge.

Electricity in the Richmond Metro area is provided by Dominion Virginia Power. The company, based in Richmond, is one of the nation's largest producers of energy, serving retail energy customers in nine states. Electricity is provided in the Richmond area primarily by the North Anna Nuclear Generating Station and Surry Nuclear Generating Station, as well as a coal-fired station in Chester, Virginia. These three plants provide a total of 4,453 megawatts of power. Several other natural gas plants provide extra power during times of peak demand. These include a facility in Chester, in Surry, and two plants in Richmond (Gravel Neck and Darbytown).[69] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 563 pixel Image in higher resolution (1072 × 754 pixel, file size: 267 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Richmond, Virginia at night I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 563 pixel Image in higher resolution (1072 × 754 pixel, file size: 267 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Richmond, Virginia at night I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... For delivered electrical power, see Electrical power industry. ... The North Anna nuclear power plant is on a 1,075 acre (4. ... The Surry plant, named for the county in which it is located, is on an 840 acre (3. ... Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal is a fossil fuel formed in ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... Chester is a census-designated place (CDP) in Chesterfield County, Virginia, United States. ... The megawatt (symbol: MW) is a unit for measuring power corresponding to one million (106) watts. ... For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ... Chester is a census-designated place (CDP) in Chesterfield County, Virginia, United States. ... Surry is a town located in Surry County, Virginia. ...


Water is provided by the city's Department of Public Utilities, and is one of the largest water producers in Virginia, with a modern plant that can treat up to 132 million gallons of water a day from the James River.[70] Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ...


Wastewater: The treatment plant and distribution system of water mains, pumping stations and storage facilities provide water to approximately 62,000 customers in the city. The facility also provides water to the surrounding area through wholesale contracts with Henrico, Chesterfield, and Hanover counties. Overall, this results in a facility that provides water for approximately 500,000 people. There is also a wastewater treatment plant located on the south bank of the James River. This plant can treat up to 70 million gallons of water per day of sanitary sewage and stormwater before returning it to the river. The wastewater utility also operates and maintains 1,500 miles of sanitary sewer, pumping stations, 38 miles of intercepting sewer lines, and the Shockoe Retention Basin, a 44-million-gallon stormwater reservoir used during heavy rains. Wastewater is any water that has been adversely affected in quality by anthropogenic influence. ... Henrico County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ... Chesterfield County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ... Hanover County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ...


Sister cities

Richmond has six sister cities, as designated by the Sister Cities International, Inc.:[71] Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... Olsztyn ( ; German: ; Old Prussian: Alnāsteini) is a city in northeast Poland, on the Łyna river. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Richmond is a suburb and the principal settlement of the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames in south west London, England. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Saitama ) is the capital and the most populous city of Saitama Prefecture in Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Uijeongbu is a city in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Namibia. ... --193. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Zhengzhou (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), formerly called Zhengxian (traditional form: Chengchow) , is a prefecture-level city and the capital of Henan province, Peoples Republic of China. ...

See also

John Marshall. ... New South is a term that has been used intermittently since the American Civil War to describe the American South, in whole or in part. ...

References

  1. ^ a b American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  2. ^ US Board on Geographic Names. United States Geological Survey (2007-10-25). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ "History of Jamestown." APVA Preservation Virginia. 1997, 2000. Retrieved on July 9, 2007.
  4. ^ a b c d "Richmond, Virginia." Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition. Retrieved on July 9, 2007.
  5. ^ a b c "Government & History of Richmond." City of Richmond. Retrieved on July 9, 2007.
  6. ^ Grafton, John. "The Declaration of Independence and Other Great Documents of American History: 1775-1864." 2000, Courier Dover Publications, pp. 1-4.
  7. ^ "April dates in Virginia history." Virginia Historical Society. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  8. ^ Morrissey, Brendan. "Yorktown 1781: The World Turned Upside Down." Published 1997, Osprey Publishing, pp. 14-16.
  9. ^ Peterson, Merrill D.; Vaughan, Robert C. "The Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom: Its Evolution and Consequences in American History." Published 1988, Cambridge University Press. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  10. ^ "Jefferson & The Capital Of Virginia." An Exhibition at the Library of Virginia; January 7June 15, 2002. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  11. ^ Dunaway, Wayland F. "History of the James River and Kanawha Company." Published 1922, Columbia University. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  12. ^ a b "MULTIMEDIA TOUR: Canal Walk." Discover Richmond. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  13. ^ Switala, William J. "The Underground Railroad in Pennsylvania." Published 2001, Stackpole Books. pp. 1-4.
  14. ^ "Capital Cities of the Confederacy." Civil War Preservation Trust. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  15. ^ Time-Life Books. "The Blockade: Runners and Raiders." Published 1983, Time-Life, Inc. ISBN 0809447096
  16. ^ a b Hansen, Harry. "The Civil War: A History." Published 2002, Signet Classic. ISBN 0451528492
  17. ^ Edwards, Kathy; Howard, Esme Joy; Prawl, Tony. "Monument Avenue: history and architecture." Published 1992, United States Department of the Interior.
  18. ^ Smil, Vaclav. "Creating the Twentieth Century: Technical Innovations of 1867-1914 and Their Lasting Impact." Published 2005, Oxford University Press, p. 94. ISBN 0195168747
  19. ^ Harwood, Jr., Herbert H. "Baltimore Streetcars: The Postwar Years." Published 2003, Johns Hopkins University Press, p. vii. ISBN 0801871905
  20. ^ a b Gibson, Campbell. "Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990." United States Census Bureau. June, 1998. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  21. ^ Felder, Deborah G. "A Century of Women: The Most Influential Events in Twentieth-Century Women's History." Published 1999, Citadel Press, p. 338. ISBN 1559724854
  22. ^ Chesson, Michael B. "Richmond After the War, 1865 to 1890." Published 1981, Virginia State Library, p. 177.
  23. ^ "Richmond Federal Reserve Bank History." RichmondFed.org. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  24. ^ Mollenkamp et al. "The People Vs. Big Tobacco: How the States Took on the Cigarette Giants." Published 1998, Bloomberg Press, p. 151. ISBN 1576600572
  25. ^ Tyler-McGraw, Marie. "At the Falls: Richmond, Virginia, and Its People." Published 1994, UNC Press, p. 257. ISBN 0807844764
  26. ^ Staff Writer. "Richmond's Landmark Theater." Virginia.Org. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  27. ^ Renouf, Norman; Renouf, Kathy. "Romantic Weekends." Published 1999, Hunter Publishing, Inc. p. 42. ISBN 1556508352
  28. ^ Trader, Carly. "A Grand Old House." Inside Richmond. September 15, 1992. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  29. ^ Niven, David. "The Moon's a Balloon." Published 1972, Putnam Publishing. ISBN 0399105573
  30. ^ "Jefferson Hotel: History." Jefferson Hotel. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  31. ^ "About VCU." Virginia Commonwealth University. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  32. ^ "City of Richmond v. United States, 422 U.S. 358." 1975. United States Supreme Court. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  33. ^ "The Diamond." Richmond Metropolitan Authority. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  34. ^ Ward, Mike. "6th Street to be torn down?" richmond.com. September 26, 2001. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  35. ^ "River District History." Richmond River District. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  36. ^ Edds, Margaret; Little, Robert. "Why Richmond voted to Honor Arthur Ashe on Monument Avenue. The Final, Compelling Argument for Supporters: A Street Reserved for Confederate Heroes had no Place in this City." The Virginian-Pilot. July 19, 1995. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  37. ^ Staff Writer. "Arthur Ashe Statue Set Up in Richmond at Last." New York Times. July 5, 1996. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  38. ^ Philips, Matthew. "Riverside on the James adds 230,000 sq ft. of high-end office space to Downtown Richmond." June 9, 2005. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  39. ^ Williams, Melody. "Open, But No Party." richmond.com. September 19, 2003. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  40. ^ Crocker, Robb. "Gaston Aftermath." September 2, 2004. Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  41. ^ US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990. United States Census Bureau (2005-05-03). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  42. ^ "The Richmond-Petersburg MSA at a Glance." Richmond Regional Planning District Commission. January 2006. Retrieved on July 12, 2007.
  43. ^ "Population Estimates for Metropolitan, Micropolitan, and Combined Statistical Areas Population Estimates for Metropolitan, Micropolitan, and Combined Statistical Areas." United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on July 12, 2007.
  44. ^ a b c d e "Neighborhood Guide." City of Richmond. Retrieved on July 12, 2007.
  45. ^ a b Seasonal Temperature and Precipitation Information from The Weather Channel." Retrieved on July 11, 2007.
  46. ^ "Quick Data View Richmond." National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 1971-2000.
  47. ^ 2006 Population Estimate. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on July 10, 2007.
  48. ^ "2000 Census Reports." City of Richmond. 2000. Retrieved on February 22, 2007.
  49. ^ Taylor, P.J. "The GaWC Inventory of World Cities." Globalization and World Cities Study Group & Network. Accessed on May 31, 2006.
  50. ^ The Top 5. Creativity. March, 2005.
  51. ^ FORTUNE 500 2006: States: Virginia. Money (2006). Retrieved on 2007-11-24.
  52. ^ Jones, Will. "Arts Foundation Misstated Salary." "Richmond Times-Dispatch." June 22, 2007. Retrieved on July 18, 2007.
  53. ^ "Richmond CenterStage performing arts center." Richmond Times-Dispatch. January 13, 2007. Retrieved on February 22, 2007.
  54. ^ Jones, Will. "Showtime's set." "Richmond Times-Dispatch." January 14, 2007. Retrieved on February 22, 2007.
  55. ^ Bass, Scott. "The Untold Story of Richmond's Arts Center." "Style Weekly." June 8, 2005. Retrieved on July 18, 2007.
  56. ^ Harrison, Don. "Centerstage on Paper." "Saverichmond.com." June 26, 2007. Retrieved on July 18, 2007.
  57. ^ Harrison, Don. "The Missing Notes." "Style Weekly." January 10, 2007. Retrieved on July 18, 2007.
  58. ^ O'Dell, Larry. "MeadWestvaco to Move Headquarters to Virginia." ABC News. February 15, 2006.
  59. ^ Blackwell, John Reid. "Big plans in store for Foundry Park." "Richmond Times-Dispatch." December 17, 2006.
  60. ^ "Top-ranked Graduate and First Professional Programs." U.S. News & World Report. March 31, 2006. Retrieved on February 22, 2007.
  61. ^ Bowman, Mark. "Braves moving Triple-A team in '09." MLB.com. January 15, 2008. Retrieved on January 27, 2008.
  62. ^ "Diggerland Take to the Beach at Eastbourne." Eastbourne. July 10, 2006. Retrieved on February 22, 2007.
  63. ^ Holmes, Gary. "Nielsen Reports 1.1% increase in U.S. Television Households for the 2006-2007 Season." Nielsen Media Research. September 23, 2006. Retrieved on September 28, 2007.
  64. ^ "Titles with locations including Richmond, Virginia, USA." IMDB. Retrieved on September 28, 2007.
  65. ^ "A Different World." IMDB. Retrieved on September 28, 2007.
  66. ^ "History of Second Presbyterian Church, Richmond." Second Presbyterian Church.
  67. ^ Chabad of the Virginias
  68. ^ "History of Local Masajid." Islamic Society of Greater Richmond. February, 2006. Retrieved on February 22, 2007.
  69. ^ Dominion Virginia Power Website.
  70. ^ City of Richmond, Department of Public Utilities
  71. ^ Sister Cities information obtained from the Sister Cities International, Inc. (SCI)." Retrieved on February 22, 2006.

The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Library of Virginia in Richmond, Virginia is the library agency of the Commonwealth of Virginia, its archival agency, and the reference library at the seat of government. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages and conserves most federally owned land. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Virginia Commonwealth University, or VCU, is a large public American research university with its main campuses located in downtown Richmond, Virginia. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Virginian-Pilot is a daily newspaper, serving the area around Norfolk, Virginia. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a scientific agency of the United States Department of Commerce focused on the conditions of the oceans and the atmosphere. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Money is a Time Warner financial magazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Richmond Times-Dispatch (RTD or TD for short) is the primary daily newspaper in Richmond, Virginia the capital of Virginia, and is commonly considered the newspaper of record for events occurring in much of the state. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Richmond Times-Dispatch (RTD or TD for short) is the primary daily newspaper in Richmond, Virginia the capital of Virginia, and is commonly considered the newspaper of record for events occurring in much of the state. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Richmond Times-Dispatch (RTD or TD for short) is the primary daily newspaper in Richmond, Virginia the capital of Virginia, and is commonly considered the newspaper of record for events occurring in much of the state. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Style Weekly is an alternative weekly newspaper published in Richmond, Virginia. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Style Weekly is an alternative weekly newspaper published in Richmond, Virginia. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... ABC News logo ABC News Special Report ident, circa 2006 ABC News is a division of American television and radio network ABC, owned by The Walt Disney Company. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Richmond Times-Dispatch (RTD or TD for short) is the primary daily newspaper in Richmond, Virginia the capital of Virginia, and is commonly considered the newspaper of record for events occurring in much of the state. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Nielsen Media Research (NMR) is a U.S. firm, headquartered in New York City, and operating primarily from Oldsmar, FL, which measures media audiences, including television, radio and newspapers. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) [1] is an online database of information about actors, movies, television shows, television stars and video games. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) [1] is an online database of information about actors, movies, television shows, television stars and video games. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Find more about Richmond, Virginia on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
Textbooks
Quotations
Source texts
Images and media
News stories
Learning resources
  • Official Government Website
  • Richmond Region Tourism Website
  • Greater Richmond Convention Center
  • Richmond Chamber of Commerce
  • Richmond.Com

  Results from FactBites:
 
Richmond, Virginia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6104 words)
Richmond is the capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the United States of America.
Yet Richmond shortly recovered, and, in May 1782, was incorporated as a town "to be styled the City of Richmond." Richmond was incorporated as a city in 1842.
Richmond city government consists of a city council with representatives from nine districts serving in a legislative and oversight capacity, as well as a popularly elected, at-large mayor serving as head of the executive branch.
Encyclopedia4U - Richmond, Virginia - Encyclopedia Article (545 words)
Richmond is the capital of Virginia, a state (officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) of the United States of America.
Richmond served as the capital of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War.
Richmond is the home of the University of Richmond and Virginia Commonwealth University.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m