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Encyclopedia > Richard of Dover

Richard (d. 1184), archbishop of Canterbury, was a Norman monk at Canterbury, where he acted as chaplain to Archbishop Theobald and was a colleague of Thomas Becket. // Events Abbeville receives its commercial charter. ... Arms of the see of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Norman conquests in red. ... A monk is a person who practices asceticism, the conditioning of mind and body in favor of the spirit. ... St Peters St, Canterbury, from the West Gate, 1993 Canterbury (Latin: Duroverum) is a cathedral city in the county of Kent in southeast England. ... Theobald (died April 18, 1161) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1138 to 1161. ... St. ...


Life

In 1173, more than two years after the murder of Becket, it was decided to fill the vacant archbishopric of Canterbury; there were two candidates, Richard, at that time prior of St Martin's, Dover, and Odo, prior of Canterbury, and in June Richard was chosen, although Odo was the nominee of the monks. Objections were raised against this election both in England and in Rome, but in April 1174 the new archbishop was consecrated at Anagui by Pope Alexander III, and he returned to England towards the close of the year. Events Canonization of Saint Thomas à Becket, buried at Canterbury August 9th - Construction starts on the Leaning tower of Pisa Castle at Abergavenny was seized by the Welsh. ... Arms of Dover Borough Council This article is about the English port. ... Alexander III, né Orlando Bandinelli (c. ...


The ten years during which Richard was archbishop were disturbed by disputes with Roger, archbishop of York, over the respective rights of the two sees, and in 1175, at a council held in London, there was a free fight between their partisans. Henry II arranged a truce for five years between the rival prelates, but Richard was soon involved in another quarrel, this being with Roger, abbot of St. Augustine's, Canterbury, whose action also trenched upon the privileges of the archbishop. Roger de Pont LEvêque was a contemporary of Thomas Becket. ... A see (from the Latin word sedem, meaning seat) is the throne (cathedra) of a bishop. ... Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland[], eastern Ireland, and western France. ... Look up prelate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Richard was more acceptable to Henry II than Becket had been; he attended the royal councils, and more than once he was with the king in Normandy. Henry probably preferred him because he insisted less on the rights of the clergy than his great predecessor had done; but the monastic writers and the followers of Becket regarded this attitude as a sign of weakness. Richard died at Rochester on February 16, 1184 and was buried in his cathedral. Mont Saint-Michel, one of the famous symbols of Normandy. ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... Monasticism (from Greek: monachos—a solitary person) is the religious practice of renouncing all worldly pursuits in order to fully devote ones life to spiritual work. ... Rochester is a small town in Kent, at the lowest bridging point of the River Medway about 30 miles (50 km) from London. ... February 16 is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... // Events Abbeville receives its commercial charter. ...


References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
  • See the article by W. Hunt in the Dict. Nat. Biog. vol. xlviii (1896); and W.F. Hook, Lives of the Archbishops of Canterbury.
 This article about an Archbishop of Canterbury is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.
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Richard of Dover Information (321 words)
The ten years during which Richard was archbishop were disturbed by disputes with Roger, archbishop of York, over the respective rights of the two sees, and in 1175, at a council held in London, there was a free fight between their partisans.
Richard was more acceptable to Henry II than Becket had been; he attended the royal councils, and more than once he was with the king in Normandy.
Richard died at Rochester on February 16 1184 and was buried in his cathedral.
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