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Encyclopedia > Richard Rush

Wikipedia also has an entry for Richard Rush (director) For the United States statesman, see Richard Rush Richard Rush is a movie director, best known for the Oscar-nominated The Stunt Man. ...

Richard Rush
Richard Rush

Richard Rush (August 29, 1780July 30, 1859) was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was the second son (and third child) of Benjamin Rush, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence and Julia (Stockton) Rush. He entered the College of New Jersey (now known as Princeton College) at the age of 14, and graduated in 1797 as the youngest member of his class. He was admitted to the bar in 1800, when he was barely 20 years old, and studied law at the office of William Draper Lewis. He married Catherine Eliza Murray on August 29, 1809, and fathered ten children, of whom three sons and two daughters survived him. 1810 engraving by Joseph Ives Pease This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... 1810 engraving by Joseph Ives Pease This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... August 29 is the 241st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (242nd in leap years), with 124 days remaining. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... July 30 is the 211th day (212th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 154 days remaining. ... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Official website: http://www. ... Dr. Benjamin Rush painted by Charles Wilson Peale, 1783 Dr. Benjamin Rush (December 24, 1745–April 19, 1813) was a Founding Father of the United States. ... A declaration of independence is a proclamation of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... Princeton University, located in Princeton, New Jersey, is one of the eight Ivy League universities, and is widely recognized as one of the most prestigious institutions in the world. ... William Draper Lewis was the founder and first director of the American Law Institute. ... August 29 is the 241st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (242nd in leap years), with 124 days remaining. ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


He enjoyed a cultivated childhood; during his life he was a statesman, diplomat, widely-praised orator and key figure in two Administrations (James Madison and John Quincy Adams), and carved a distinguished career in public affairs in his own right. Quickly gaining statewide then national attention as a public speaker and successful trial lawyer, Rush was appointed Attorney General in Pennsylvania in 1811, after refusing to be a candidate for Congress. In November of the same year, President James Madison made him Comptroller of the Treasury. James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was the fourth (1809–1817) President of the United States. ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was an American lawyer, diplomat, politician, and President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 3, 1829). ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Official language(s) None Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 33rd 119,283 km² 255 km 455 km 2. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was the fourth (1809–1817) President of the United States. ... The Comptroller of the Treasury is a U.S. federal government official who examines accounts and signs drafts. ...


From this relatively subordinate position, Rush functioned as one of President Madison's closest friends and confidential advisors throughout the War of 1812. In 1814 he was offered the choice of Secretary of the Treasury or Attorney General of the United States, and choosing the latter, serving until 1817 when, as Acting Secretary of State until the return of John Quincy Adams from Europe, Rush concluded the Rush-Bagot Convention, demilitarizing the Canadian boundary on the Great Lakes. The War of 1812 was fought between the United States and British Empire from 1812 to 1815, on land in North America and at sea around the world. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the finance minister of the Federal Government of the United States. ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... The Rush-Bagot Treaty signed in 1817 between the United States and the United Kingdom demilitarized the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain, where many British naval armaments and forts still remained, and laid the basis for a demilitarized boundary between the US and British North America. ... The Great Lakes from space The Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes on or near the United States-Canadian border. ...


In October 1817, Rush was appointed Minister to Britain to succeed John Quincy Adams, who had taken the position of Secretary of State upon his return. His "gentlemanly" attitude was appreciated by the British, and he remained there for nearly eight years, proving singularly effective in negotiating a number of important treaties, including the Anglo-American Convention of 1818. John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was an American lawyer, diplomat, politician, and President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 3, 1829). ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... The Convention of 1818 between the United States and Great Britian, also known as the London Convention, Anglo-American Convention of 1818, or simply the Treaty of 1818, was a treaty signed in United States and the United Kingdom. ...


He became surprisingly popular in England, despite his previous anti-British record. Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the British Isles Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK...


He received one electoral vote as a Federalist for the office of Vice President in the 1820 election, even though the Federalist Party nominated no candidate for President in that election. The label Federalist refers to two major groups in the history of the United States of America: (1. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


Upon the election of John Quincy Adams in 1825, Rush (having made a study of Britain, and the British Navy in particular, while he was there) desired to become the Secretary of the Navy. Adams, however, immediately nominated him for the post of 8th Secretary of the Treasury, which he accepted. In this office he which he served with remarkable success during the entire Adams Administration from March 7, 1825 until March 5, 1829. Notably, he turned over to his successor a large treasury surplus, and nearly the whole of the public debt was paid. The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the finance minister of the Federal Government of the United States. ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (67th in Leap years). ... 1825 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... March 5 is the 64th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (65th in leap years). ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1828, he was a candidate for Vice President on the re-election ticket with John Quincy Adams, but was defeated. After leaving the Treasury Department, he was sent to England and the Netherlands by the cities of Georgetown and Alexandria to negotiate a large loan for the cities, a mission which met with prompt success. A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department, a treasury, of the United States government established by an Act of U.S. Congress in 1789 to manage the revenue of the United States government. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the British Isles Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK... The familiar golden dome of Riggs Bank lies on the corner of Wisconsin Avenue and M Street Georgetown is a neighborhood, located in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., along on the Potomac River waterfront. ... Old Town Alexandria, viewed from the west, as seen from the observation deck of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial. ...


In 1836, President Andrew Jackson sent him to England as Commissioner to secure for the United States the legacy left the government by James Smithson. He was successful in this undertaking, bringing to this country the sum of $508,318.46, afterward used to establish the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC. Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845), was the seventh President of the United States (1829-1837), hero of the Battle of New Orleans (1815), a founder of the Democratic Party, and the eponym of the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... James Smithson (1765 - June 27, 1829) was a British mineralogist and chemist noted for having left a bequest in his will to the United States of America, which was used to fund the Smithsonian Institution. ... The Smithsonian Institution Building or Castle on the National Mall serves as the Institutions headquarters. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United...


In 1847, Richard Rush was appointed as Minister to France by President James K. Polk, a position he held until 1851, when he returned to the land of his birth, to retire in Philadelphia. He there died on July 30, 1859. James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795–June 15, 1849) was the eleventh President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1845 to March 3, 1849. ... Philadelphia is a village located in Jefferson County, New York. ... July 30 is the 211th day (212th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 154 days remaining. ... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ...


Source

This article contains material from the US Department of Justice Attorneys General of the United States which, as a US government publication, is in the public domain. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

Preceded by:
William H. Crawford
United States Secretary of the Treasury
18251829
Succeeded by:
Samuel D. Ingham
Preceded by:
William Pinkney
Attorney General of the United States
18141817
Succeeded by:
William Wirt
Preceded by:
(none)
National Republican Party vice presidential candidate
1828 (lost)
Succeeded by:
John Sergeant
United States Attorneys General Seal of the United States Department of Justice
Randolph | Bradford | Lee | Lincoln | R Smith | Breckinridge | Rodney | Pinkney | Rush | Wirt | Berrien | Taney | Butler | Grundy | Gilpin | Crittenden | Legaré | Nelson | Mason | Clifford | Toucey | Johnson | Crittenden | Cushing | Black | Stanton | Bates | Speed | Stanberry | Evarts | Hoar | Akerman | Williams | Pierrepont | Taft | Devens | MacVeagh | Brewster | Garland | Miller | Olney | Harmon | McKenna | Griggs | Knox | Moody | Bonaparte | Wickersham | McReynolds | Gregory | Palmer | Daugherty | Stone | Sargent | W Mitchell | Cummings | Murphy | Jackson | Biddle | T Clark | McGrath | McGranery | Brownell | Rogers | Kennedy | Katzenbach | R Clark | J Mitchell | Kleindienst | Richardson | Saxbe | Levi | Bell | Civiletti | W Smith | Meese | Thornburgh | Barr | Reno | Ashcroft | Gonzales
United States Secretaries of the Treasury Seal of the United States Department of the Treasury
Hamilton | Wolcott | Dexter | Gallatin | Campbell | Dallas | Crawford | Rush | Ingham | McLane | Duane | Taney | Woodbury | Ewing | Forward | Spencer | Bibb | Walker | Meredith | Corwin | Guthrie | Cobb | Thomas | Dix | Chase | Fessenden | McCulloch | Boutwell | Richardson | Bristow | Morrill | Sherman | Windom | Folger | Gresham | McCulloch | Manning | Fairchild | Windom | Foster | Carlisle | Gage | Shaw | Cortelyou | MacVeagh | McAdoo | Glass | Houston | Mellon | Mills | Woodin | Morgenthau | Vinson | Snyder | Humphrey | Anderson | Dillon | Fowler | Barr | Kennedy | Connally | Shultz | Simon | Blumenthal | Miller | Regan | Baker | Brady | Bentsen | Rubin | Summers | O'Neill | Snow

  Results from FactBites:
 
Richard Rush - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (677 words)
Richard Rush (August 29, 1780–July 30, 1859) was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
He was the second son (and third child) of Benjamin Rush, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence and Julia (Stockton) Rush.
In 1847, Richard Rush was appointed as Minister to France by President James K. Polk, a position he held until 1851, when he returned to the land of his birth, to retire in Philadelphia.
Richard E. Rush (420 words)
Rush was frequently "lead" counsel in the defense of claims, because of his experience, his abilities to develop and present effective defenses to claims, and his knowledge of the underlying issues.
Rush has frequently been requested on the eve of trail to serve as primary defense counsel in cases throughout the country, involving demands or exposures at the seven-figure level.
Rush is fully familiar with the best way — as well as the most efficient manner — to defend more routine cases, such as those involving automobile accidents, underinsured and uninsured claims, slips and falls, and general negligence claims.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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