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Encyclopedia > Richard Rodgers
Richard Rodgers

Background information
Birth name Richard Charles Rodgers
Born June 28, 1902
New York City, New York
Died December 30, 1979 (aged 77)
New York City, New York
Occupation(s) composer, songwriter, playwright

Richard Charles Rodgers (June 28, 1902December 30, 1979) was one of the great composers of musical theater, best known for his song writing partnerships with Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein II. He wrote more than 900 published songs, and forty Broadway musicals. Many of his compositions continue to have a broad appeal and have had a significant impact on the development of popular music. He is one of only two individuals to have won an Oscar, Grammy, Emmy, Tony Award, and Pulitzer Prize. For the American composer, see Richard Rodgers. ... Image File history File links An autographed photo of Richard Rodgers, a famous composer. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... New York, New York redirects here. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... New York, New York redirects here. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle &#8212... Lorenz (Larry) Hart (May 2, 1895 - November 22, 1943) was the lyricist half of the famed Broadway songwriting team Rodgers and Hart. ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... For the music genre, see Pop music. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An Emmy Award. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...

Contents

Life and career

Born in Arverne, Queens, New York to a prosperous Jewish family, Richard Rodgers was the son of Dr. Will Rodgers, a prominent physician who had changed the family name from Abrahams, and his wife Mamie (née Levy). Richard Rodgers attended the same public school as Bennett Cerf and began playing the piano at age six. Rodgers attended Townsend Harris Hall and DeWitt Clinton High School. In 1919 Phillip Leavitt, a friend of Rodger's older brother, introduced him to lyricist Lorenz Hart. Rodgers, Hart, and Rodgers' later partner Oscar Hammerstein II all attended Columbia University; Rodgers dropped out in 1921 and then attended the Institute of Musical Art (Juilliard). Rodgers was influenced by composers like Victor Herbert and Jerome Kern, as well as by the operettas his parents took him to see on Broadway when he was a child. Arverne is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens, on the Rockaway Peninsula. ... This article is about the state. ... Bennett Cerf on Whats My Line?, 1962 Bennett Alfred Cerf (May 25, 1898 - August 27, 1971) was a publisher and co-founder of Random House, also known for his own compilations of jokes and puns, for regular personal appearances lecturing across the United States, and for his television appearances... DeWitt Clinton High School is an American high school located in New York City. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Lorenz (Larry) Hart (May 2, 1895 - November 22, 1943) was the lyricist half of the famed Broadway songwriting team Rodgers and Hart. ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Juilliard School is a performing arts conservatory in New York City, informally but definitively identified as simply Juilliard, and most famous for its musically-trained alumni. ... Victor Herbert Victor August Herbert (February 1, 1859–May 26, 1924) was a popular composer of light opera, and an accomplished cellist and conductor. ... Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 – November 11, 1945) was an American composer of popular music. ...


Rodgers and Hart

Main article: Rodgers and Hart

Rodgers and Hart struggled for years in the field of musical comedy, writing a number of amateur shows, but they made their professional debut with the song "Any Old Place With You," featured in the 1919 Broadway musical comedy A Lonely Romeo. Their first professional production was Poor Little Ritz Girl in 1920, and their next professional show was not until The Melody Man in 1924. Rodgers was considering quitting show biz to sell children’s underwear when he and Hart finally broke through in 1925. They wrote the songs for a benefit show presented by the prestigious Theatre Guild, called The Garrick Gaieties, and the critics found the show fresh and delightful. Only meant to run one day, the Guild knew they had a success and allowed it to re-open later. The show's biggest hit, the song that Rodgers believed "made" Rodgers and Hart, was "Manhattan." The two were now a Broadway songwriting force. Rodgers and Hart was the songwriting team consisting of Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart. ... Rodgers and Hart was the songwriting team consisting of Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart. ... The Theatre Guild was a theatrical society founded by Lawrence Langner in New York City in 1918, with the purpose of producing noncommercial american and foreign plays. ... The Garrick Gaieties, which opened on Broadway in 1925, was first of a long line of Rodgers and Hart musicals. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ...


Throughout the rest of the decade, the duo wrote several hit shows for both Broadway and London, including Dearest Enemy (1925), The Girl Friend (1926), Peggy-Ann (1926), A Connecticut Yankee (1927), and Present Arms (1928). Their 1920s shows produced standards such as "Here In My Arms," "Mountain Greenery," "Blue Room," "My Heart Stood Still" and "You Took Advantage of Me." Dearest Enemy is a musical with a book by Herbert Fields, lyrics by Lorenz Hart, and music by Richard Rodgers. ... The Girl Friend is a Broadway musical comedy that opened December 27, 1926, with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Lorenz Hart and book by Herbert Fields. ... Peggy-Ann is a Broadway musical comedy that opened December 27, 1926, with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Lorenz Hart and book by Herbert Fields, based on Tillie’s Nightmare by Edgar Smith. ... A Connecticut Yankee was a 1927 musical by Rogers and Hart, based upon A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthurs Court, a novel by American humorist Mark Twain. ... Present Arms is a Broadway musical comedy that opened April 26, 1928, with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Lorenz Hart and book by Herbert Fields. ... Here In My Arms is a popular song. ... Mountain Greenery is a 1927 popular song composed by Richard Rodgers, with lyrics by Lorenz Hart for the musical The Garrick Gaieties (1925). ... Blue Room is a popular song. ... My Heart Stood Still is a 1927 popular song composed by Richard Rodgers, with lyrics by Lorenz Hart for the musical A Connecticut Yankee (1927), where it was introduced by Constance Carpenter and William Gaxton. ... You Took Advantage of Me is a 1928 popular song composed by Richard Rodgers, with lyrics by Lorenz Hart for the musical Present Arms (1928), where it was introduced by Joyce Barbour and Busby Berkeley. ...


With the Depression in full swing, the team sought greener pastures in Hollywood during much of the first half of the 1930s. The hardworking Rodgers later regretted these relatively fallow years, but he and Hart did create some classics while out west, writing a number of songs and film scores, including Love Me Tonight (1932) (directed by Rouben Mamoulian, who would direct Rodgers' Oklahoma! on Broadway) which introduced three standards: "Lover," "Mimi", and "Isn't It Romantic?." Also, after trying several different lyrics that didn't quite work, they put out a song that became one of their most famous, "Blue Moon." Other film work includes the scores to The Phantom President (1932), starring George M. Cohan, Hallelujah, I'm a Bum (1933), starring Al Jolson, and, in a quick return after having left Hollywood, Mississippi (1935), starring Bing Crosby and W.C. Fields. For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Love Me Tonight is a 1932 musical comedy film which tells the story of a penniless nobleman who moves a tailor to whom he owes money into his chateau and passes him off as nobility. ... Rouben Mamoulian (October 8, 1897 – December 4, 1987) was an American film and theatre director. ... Oklahoma! was the first musical play written by composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II (see Rodgers and Hammerstein). ... Lover is a popular song written by Richard Rodgers, with words by Lorenz Hart. ... Mimi is a popular song written by Richard Rodgers, with words by Lorenz Hart. ... Isnt It Romantic? is a popular song. ... Cover of sheet music for Blue Moon arranged by Jeff Funk, scored by SATB choir, and published by Alfred Publishing Co. ... George Michael Cohan (July 3, 1878 – November 5, 1942) was a United States entertainer, playwright, composer, lyricist, actor, singer, dancer, director, and producer of Irish descent. ... Al Jolson was a highly acclaimed American singer, comedian and actor of Jewish heritage whose career lasted from 1911 until his death in 1950. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... W. C. Fields (January 29, 1880 - December 25, 1946) was an American comedian and actor. ...


In 1935 they returned to Broadway with a vengeance, writing an almost unbroken string of hit shows that only stopped when Hart, a troubled alcoholic, died in 1943. Among the most notable are Jumbo (1935), On Your Toes (1936, which included the ballet "Slaughter on Tenth Avenue", choreographed by George Balanchine), Babes In Arms (1937), I Married an Angel (1938), The Boys From Syracuse (1938), Pal Joey (1940), and their last original work, By Jupiter (1942). Rodgers also contributed to the book on several of these shows. Jumbo is also the title of a musical produced in 1935 by Billy Rose, with music and lyrics by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart and book by Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur, and directed by John Murray Anderson and George Abbott. ... On Your Toes has two possible meanings. ... Babes in Arms is a 1937 musical theater production which tells the story of a boy who puts on a show to avoid being sent to a work farm. ... I Married An Angel is a musical with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Lorenz Hart and book by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart. ... The Boys from Syracuse is a musical by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart, based on William Shakespeares play, The Comedy of Errors, as adapted by librettist George Abbott, who also directed. ... Pal Joey Studio cast album 1950 Pal Joey is a 1940 Broadway musical by American writer John OHara, with music and lyrics by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart. ... Ray Bolger in the original Broadway production of By Jupiter By Jupiter is a musical with a book by Lorenz Hart and Richard Rodgers, music by Rodgers, and lyrics by Hart. ...


Many of the songs from these shows are still being sung today, including "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World," "My Romance," "Little Girl Blue," "There's a Small Hotel," "Where or When," "My Funny Valentine," "The Lady Is a Tramp," "Falling In Love With Love," "Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered" and "Wait Till You See Her." The Most Beautiful Girl in the World can refer to: The Most Beautiful Girl in the World, a 1935 song by Rodgers and Hart The Most Beautiful Girl, a 1974 song by Wilson, Sherrill and Rourke recorded by Charlie Rich The Most Beautiful Girl in the World, a 1994 song... My Romance may refer to: My Romance, a 1935 song written by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart My Romance, a 1990 Carly Simon album This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Little Girl Blue is a popular song. ... Theres a Small Hotel is a 1936 popular song composed by Richard Rodgers, with lyrics by Lorenz Hart for the musical On Your Toes (1936), where it was introduced by Ray Bolger and Doris Carson. ... Where or When is a song that was written by Richard Rogers and Lorenz Hart for the 1937 Broadway musical Babes In Arms. ... My Funny Valentine is a song composed by Richard Rodgers to lyrics by Lorenz Hart and is now considered a jazz standard, appearing on over 1300 albums performed by over 600 artists. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Falling in Love with Love is a popular song. ... Buffy the Vampire Slayer episode, see Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered (Buffy episode). ... Wait Till You See Her (or, sung by a female, Wait Till You See Him) is a popular song. ...


Much of Rodgers work with both Hart and Hammerstein was orchestrated by Robert Russell Bennett. For other men named Robert Bennett, see Robert Bennett (disambiguation). ...


Rodgers and Hammerstein

Anticipating the end of a partnership, Rodgers began working with Oscar Hammerstein II, with whom he had previously written a number of songs (before ever working with Lorenz Hart). Their first musical, the groundbreaking hit, Oklahoma! (1943), marked the beginning of the most successful partnership in musical theatre history. Their work revolutionized the form. What was once a collection of songs, dances and comic turns held together by a tenuous plot became an integrated work of art. Rodgers (left) and Hammerstein (right), with Irving Berlin (middle) and Helen Tamiris, watching auditions at the St. ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ...


The team went on to create four more hits that are among the most popular of all musicals and were each made into hit films, Carousel (1945), South Pacific (1949, another Pulitzer Prize winner), The King And I (1951), and The Sound Of Music (1959). Other shows include the minor hit, Flower Drum Song (1958), as well as relative failures Allegro (1947), Me And Juliet (1953) and Pipe Dream (1955). They also wrote the score to the movie State Fair (1945) and a special TV production of Cinderella (1957). Carousel is a 1945 stage musical by Richard Rodgers (music) and Oscar Hammerstein II (book and lyrics) that was adapted from Ferenc Molnars play Liliom. ... This article is about the stage musical. ... The King and I is a musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, with a script based on the book Anna and the King of Siam by Margaret Landon. ... For other uses, see The Sound of Music (disambiguation). ... Flower Drum Song was originally a novel by Chinese American author C.Y. Lee. ... play the music Fast, lively ... ... Pipe Dream is a musical adaptation of John Steinbecks book Cannery Row. ... A state fair is a competitive and recreational gathering of a U.S. states population. ... Rodgers and Hammersteins Cinderella is the name of a musical written for television by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II based upon the fairy tale, Cinderella. ...


Their collaboration produced many well-known songs, including "Oh What a Beautiful Mornin'," "People Will Say We're In Love," "If I Loved You," "You'll Never Walk Alone," "It Might As Well Be Spring," "Some Enchanted Evening," "Getting To Know You," "My Favorite Things," "The Sound of Music," "Sixteen Going on Seventeen," "Climb Ev'ry Mountain," "Do-Re-Mi," and "Edelweiss," Hammerstein's last song. Oh What a Beautiful Mornin is a song from the musical Oklahoma! written by composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II. It is sung by Curly at the opening of the first scene. ... People Will Say Were In Love was written by Oscar Hammerstein II and composed by Richard Rogers for the musical Oklahoma!. It is sung by Curly McLane and Laurey Williams as a duet. ... If I Loved You is a popular song. ... Youll Never Walk Alone is a song written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II for their 1945 musical, Carousel. ... It Might As Well Be Spring is a song featured in the 1945 film State Fair. ... Some Enchanted Evening is a popular song from the musical South Pacific, written by Richard Rodgers (music), and Oscar Hammerstein II (lyrics). ... Getting to Know You is a science fiction short story by David Marusek, that was published in the March 1998 issue of Isaac Asimovs Science Fiction Magazine. ... My Favorite Things can refer to: A song from The Sound of Music A famous interpretation of the song by John Coltrane The album on which Coltranes version was first recorded A remix of Coltranes version by Outkast on the album The Love Below This is a disambiguation... The Sound of Music is the class song from the movie under the same title. ... Sixteen Going on Seventeen, not to be confused with Sixteen Goin On Seventeen, sung by Maria and Liesl in the Sound of Music, is a love song sung in the musical the Sound of Music. ... Climb evry mountain Search high and low Follow evry by-way Every path you know Climb evry mountain Ford evry stream Follow evry rainbow Till you find your dream A dream that will need All the love you can give Everyday of your life For... Do Re Mi is a theater musical with music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green and book by Garson Kanin. ... Binomial name Leontopodium alpinum Cass. ...


Rodgers and Hammerstein musicals earned a total of 35 Tony Awards, 15 Academy Awards, two Pulitzer Prizes, two Grammy Awards, and two Emmy Awards. Rodgers (left) and Hammerstein (right), with Irving Berlin (middle) and Helen Tamiris, watching auditions at the St. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Pulitzer Prize is a United States literary award given out each April. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... An Emmy Award. ...


Rodgers worked without a lyricist to provide twelve themes for Robert Russell Bennett to use in scoring for the 26-episode World War II television documentary "Victory at Sea" (1952-53). This NBC production (26 half-hour episodes) pioneered the "compilation documentary"--programming based on pre-existing footage--and would be eventually syndicated for broadcast in dozens of countries worldwide. Rodgers likewise composed themes for ABC's similar Winston Churchill: The Valiant Years (documentary), scored by Eddie Sauter and Robert Emmett Dolan, for which he won an Emmy Award. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Victory at Sea (abbreviated to VAS) is a set of World War II naval wargaming rules published by Mongoose Publishing. ...


After Hammerstein's death in 1960, Rodgers wrote both words and music for his first new Broadway project No Strings (1962, which earned two Tony Awards). The show was a minor hit and featured perhaps his last great song, "The Sweetest Sounds." He went on to work with lyricists Stephen Sondheim (protege of Hammerstein), Sheldon Harnick, and Martin Charnin, with uneven results. No Strings is a musical drama with a book by Samuel Taylor and words and music by Richard Rodgers, his only score written without a collaborator. ... The Sweetest Sounds is a popular song, written by Richard Rodgers (unlike most of his compositions, writing both music and lyrics) for the musical No Strings, in 1962. ... Stephen Joshua Sondheim (b. ... Sheldon Harnick (born 1924) is an American lyricist best known for his collaboration with composer Jerry Bock on hit musicals such as Fiddler on the Roof. ... Martin Charnin (b. ...


A survivor of cancer of the jaw, a heart attack and a laryngectomy, Richard Rodgers died aged 77 in 1979 in New York City. In 1990 he was honored posthumously when the 46th Street Theatre was renamed The Richard Rodgers Theatre. In 1999, Rodgers and Hart were each commemorated on United States postage stamps. In 2002, Rodgers' centennial was celebrated worldwide, with books, retrospectives, performances, new recordings of his music, and a Broadway revival of Oklahoma!


Critical reputation

In his landmark book American Popular Song: The Great Innovators, 1900-1950, Alec Wilder said of Rodgers: Alec Wilder (born Alexander Lafayette Chew Wilder in Rochester, New York, February 16, 1907; d. ...

Of all the writers whose songs are considered and examined in this book, those of Rodgers show the highest degree of consistent excellence, inventiveness, and sophistication...[A]fter spending weeks playing his songs, I am more than impressed and respectful: I am astonished.[1]

Alec Wilder, American Popular Song: The Great Innovators, 1900-1950

Family

In 1930, Rodgers married Dorothy Belle Feiner. Their daughter, Mary, is the composer of Once Upon a Mattress and an author of children's books. Rodgers' grandson, Adam Guettel, also a musical theatre composer, won Tony Awards for Best Score and Best Orchestrations for The Light in the Piazza in 2005. Peter Melnick, another grandson, is the composer of Adrift In Macao, which debuted at the Philadelphia Theatre Company in 2005 and was produced Off Broadway in 2007. Mary Rodgers (born January 11, 1931) is a composer of musicals, an author of childrens books, and daughter of Richard Rodgers. ... Once Upon a Mattress is a critically-acclaimed musical comedy that opened on Broadway on May 11, 1959 and ran for 460 performances. ... Adam Guettel (pronounced Gettle; b. ... The Light in the Piazza is a musical drama by Adam Guettel (music and lyrics) and Craig Lucas (book). ... Off-Broadway plays or musicals are performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway, but larger than Off-Off-Broadway, productions. ...


Major works

The Garrick Gaieties, which opened on Broadway in 1925, was first of a long line of Rodgers and Hart musicals. ... Dearest Enemy is a musical with a book by Herbert Fields, lyrics by Lorenz Hart, and music by Richard Rodgers. ... A Connecticut Yankee was a 1927 musical by Rogers and Hart, based upon A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthurs Court, a novel by American humorist Mark Twain. ... UB40s 2nd album, Present Arms was released in 1981. ... Love Me Tonight is a 1932 musical comedy film which tells the story of a penniless nobleman who moves a tailor to whom he owes money into his chateau and passes him off as nobility. ... On Your Toes has two possible meanings. ... Babes in Arms is a 1937 musical theater production which tells the story of a boy who puts on a show to avoid being sent to a work farm. ... Id Rather Be Right is a 1937 Moss Hart and George Kaufman musical play about Franklin Roosevelt, with George M. Cohan, lyrics by Lorenz Hart, and music by Richard Rodgers. ... I Married An Angel is a musical with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Lorenz Hart and book by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart. ... The Boys from Syracuse is a musical by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart, based on William Shakespeares play, The Comedy of Errors, as adapted by librettist George Abbott, who also directed. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... This article is about the 1940 Broadway musical. ... Pal Joey Studio cast album 1950 Pal Joey is a 1940 Broadway musical by American writer John OHara, with music and lyrics by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart. ... Ray Bolger in the original Broadway production of By Jupiter By Jupiter is a musical with a book by Lorenz Hart and Richard Rodgers, music by Rodgers, and lyrics by Hart. ... Oklahoma! was the first musical play written by composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II (see Rodgers and Hammerstein). ... Carousel is a 1945 stage musical by Richard Rodgers (music) and Oscar Hammerstein II (book and lyrics) that was adapted from Ferenc Molnars play Liliom. ... A state fair is a competitive and recreational gathering of a U.S. states population. ... play the music Fast, lively ... This article is about the stage musical. ... The King and I is a musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, with a script based on the book Anna and the King of Siam by Margaret Landon. ... ... Pipe Dream is a musical adaptation of John Steinbecks book Cannery Row. ... Gustave Dorés illustration for Cendrillon Cinderella (French: Cendrillon) is a popular fairy tale embodying a classic folk tale myth-element of unjust oppression/triumphant reward. ... Flower Drum Song was originally a novel by Chinese American author C.Y. Lee. ... For other uses, see The Sound of Music (disambiguation). ... No Strings is a musical drama with a book by Samuel Taylor and words and music by Richard Rodgers, his only score written without a collaborator. ... Do I Hear A Waltz? is a musical play with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by Arthur Laurents. ... Stephen Joshua Sondheim (b. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Martin Charnin (b. ... Rex is a musical by Richard Rodgers, Sheldon Harnick, and Sherman Yellen. ... Sheldon Harnick (born 1924) is an American lyricist best known for his collaboration with composer Jerry Bock on hit musicals such as Fiddler on the Roof. ... I Remember Mama is a musical with a book by Thomas Meehan, primary lyrics by Martin Charnin, and music by Richard Rodgers. ... Martin Charnin (b. ... A Grand Night for Singing is a musical revue showcasing the music of Richard Rodgers and the lyrics of Oscar Hammerstein II. Featuring songs from such lesser-known works as Allegro, Flower Drum Song, State Fair, and Pipe Dream and hits like Carousel, Oklahoma!, The King and I, South Pacific... State Fair is a musical with a book by Tom Briggs and Louis Mattioli, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, and music by Richard Rodgers. ...

Wider influence

  • The Internet Movie Database lists 276 film and TV soundtracks using Rodgers' songs, as well as 46 films and TV events where he is credited as the composer.
  • In 1960, the waltz "My Favorite Things" from The Sound of Music was adopted and transformed into a seminal jazz performance by the saxophonist John Coltrane (The tune became a regular part of Coltrane's répertoire.)
  • "Blue Moon", written with lyricist Lorenz Hart, has become both a pop and rock standard, with Glen Gray & The Casa Loma Orchestra's version hitting #1 in 1935, and The Marcels's version hitting #1 in 1961. It is the only hit song Rodgers had that wasn't taken from a show or movie.
  • Due to its being covered by Liverpudlian band Gerry & The Pacemakers, "You'll Never Walk Alone", (originally from Carousel), is the anthem of Liverpool F.C. - and worldwide has become almost synonymous with a different football club, Celtic F.C.
  • Jerry Lewis ends his Labor Day telethon singing "You'll Never Walk Alone."
  • "Oh What a Beautiful Mornin'" from the musical Oklahoma! is sometimes mistaken for a traditional folk song.
  • "Edelweiss", the "Ländler" (Rodgers' version of a traditional Austrian dance-tune) and "Do-Re-Mi", from The Sound of Music frequently go unrecognized as Rodgers' work.
  • The song "Happy Talk" is covered by Daniel Johnston and Jad Fair. Captain Sensible did a jaunty rendition, complete with burlesque organ, in the mid-eighties. The Chorus is also used by Dizzee Rascal.

The Sound of Music soundtrack cover My Favorite Things is a song from the musical The Sound of Music. ... For other uses, see The Sound of Music (disambiguation). ... A saxophonist is a musician who plays the saxophone. ... Coltrane redirects here. ... Cover of sheet music for Blue Moon arranged by Jeff Funk, scored by SATB choir, and published by Alfred Publishing Co. ... Lorenz (Larry) Hart (May 2, 1895 - November 22, 1943) was the lyricist half of the famed Broadway songwriting team Rodgers and Hart. ... The Marcels were a doo-wop group known for turning beloved American classical pop songs into rock and roll. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... Gerry & the Pacemakers were an English rock and roll group during the 1960s, and one of the few groups to initially challenge The Beatles in popularity. ... Youll Never Walk Alone is a song written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II for their 1945 musical, Carousel. ... Carousel is a 1945 stage musical by Richard Rodgers (music) and Oscar Hammerstein II (book and lyrics) that was adapted from Ferenc Molnars play Liliom. ... Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... The greatest football club in the known universe. ... For other persons named Jerry Lewis, see Jerry Lewis (disambiguation). ... Oh What a Beautiful Mornin is a song from the musical Oklahoma! written by composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II. It is sung by Curly at the opening of the first scene. ... Oklahoma! was the first musical play written by composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II (see Rodgers and Hammerstein). ... Edelweiss is a Rodgers and Hammerstein song from musical and film The Sound of Music. ... The ländler is a folk dance in 3/4 time which was popular in Austria, south Germany and German Switzerland at the end of the 18th century. ... Do Re Mi is a theater musical with music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green and book by Garson Kanin. ... For other uses, see The Sound of Music (disambiguation). ... Dylan Mills, known professionally as Dizzee Rascal (born November 1, 1985 [1] in Bow, East London)[2], is a Mercury Prize-winning English MC/rapper and producer. ...

Legacy

In 1950, the team of Rodgers and Hammerstein received The Hundred Year Association of New York's Gold Medal Award "in recognition of outstanding contributions to the City of New York." Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The logo of The Hundred Year Association of New York The Hundred Year Association of New York was founded in 1927 to recognize and reward dedication and service to the City of New York by businesses and organizations that have been in operation in the City for a century or...


At its 1978 commencement ceremonies, Barnard College awarded Rodgers its highest honor, the Barnard Medal of Distinction. Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ... The following is a list of individuals associated with Barnard College through attending as a student, serving as a member of the faculty or staff, or being awarded the Barnard Medal of Distinction. ...


Several US schools are named after Richard Rodgers. Richard Rodgers School refers to several schools named after the American composer Richard Rodgers: PS 166 Richard Rodgers School of Arts & Technology — New York City PS 166 Richard Rodgers School of Arts & Technology, Manhattan, New York, NY website ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ...


References

  1. ^ Wilder, Alec. American Popular Song: The Great Innovators, 1900-1950 Oxford University Press, (1973) pg. 163 ISBN 0-19-501445-6

For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Richard Rodgers - definition of Richard Rodgers in Encyclopedia (435 words)
Richard Rodgers (June 18, 1902 - December 30, 1979) was one of the great composers of musical theater, best known for his song writing partnerships with Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein II.
Rodgers, who had anticipated the end of the partnership, then began working with Oscar Hammerstein II, already a successful lyricist who had worked with Jerome Kern and others.
Rodgers' daughter, Mary, became a musical theater composer and an author of children's books: her son (Richard Rodgers' grandson), Adam Guettel, is a musical theater composer.
Richard Rodgers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (708 words)
Richard Rodgers (June 28, 1902 – December 30, 1979) was one of the great composers of musical theater, best known for his song writing partnerships with Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein II.
A survivor of cancer of the jaw, a heart attack and a laryngectomy, Richard Rodgers passed away aged 77 in 1979.
Rodgers' daughter, Mary, is the composer of Once Upon A Mattress and an author of children's books.
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