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Encyclopedia > Richard Olney

Richard Olney (September 15, 1835April 8, 1917) was an American statesman. He served as both United States Attorney General and Secretary of State under President Grover Cleveland. Public domain portrait of U.S. Sec. ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... 1917 was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ... Alberto Gonzales, current Attorney General of the United States The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... The Seal of the United States Secretary of State The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... The President of the United States (often abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ...


He was born at Oxford, Massachusetts, and studied at Brown University (Class of 1856), and Harvard Law School (Class of 1858). In 1859 he began the practice of law at Boston, Massachusetts, and attained a high position at the bar. He served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1874, and in March 1893 became Attorney General of the United States in the cabinet of Cleveland. In this position, during the strike of the railway employees in Chicago in 1894, he instructed the district attorneys to secure from the Federal Courts writs of injunction restraining the strikers from acts of violence, and thus set a precedent for "government by injunction." He also advised the use of Federal troops to quell the disturbances in the city, on the ground that the government must prevent interference with its mails and with the general railway transportation between the states. Upon the death of Secretary of State Walter Q. Gresham, Olney succeeded him as secretary of state on the l0th of June 1895. He quickly elevated U.S. foreign diplomatic posts to the title of Embassy, thus making it official that the U.S. would be regarded as an equal of the world's greater nations. Up until that time, America only had Legations. He became specially prominent in the controversy with United Kingdom concerning the boundary dispute between the British and Venezuelan governments, and in his correspondence with Lord Salisbury gave an extended interpretation to the Monroe Doctrine which went considerably beyond previous statements on the subject. In 1897, at the expiration of President Cleveland's term, he returned to the practice of the law. Oxford is a town located in Worcester County, Massachusetts. ... Brown University is an Ivy League university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Harvard Law School (HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The Massachusetts House of Representatives is the lower house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ... United States Attorneys represent the U.S. federal government in United States district court. ... Walter Quintin Gresham (March 17, 1832–May 28, 1895) was an American statesman and jurist. ... The Most Honourable Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury, KG, GCVO, PC (3 February 1830–22 August 1903), known as Lord Robert Cecil before 1865 and as Viscount Cranborne from 1865 until 1868, was a British statesman and Prime Minister. ... The Olney interpretation (also known as Olney Declaration) was United States Secretary of State Richard Olneys interpretation of the Monroe Doctrine when a border dispute occurred between British Guiana and Venezuela. ... The Monroe Doctrine, expressed in 1823, proclaimed that the Americas should be closed to future European colonization and free from European interference in sovereign countries affairs. ...


This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, which is in the public domain. Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) represents, in many ways, the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...



Preceded by:
William H.H. Miller
United States Attorney General
1893–1895
Succeeded by:
Judson Harmon
Preceded by:
Walter Q. Gresham
United States Secretary of State
1895–1897
Succeeded by:
John Sherman


William Henry Harrison Miller (September 6, 1840&ndsah;May 25, 1917) was an American lawyer and Attorney General of the United States. ... Alberto Gonzales, current Attorney General of the United States The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Judson Harmon (February 3, 1846 - February 22, 1927) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Walter Quintin Gresham (March 17, 1832–May 28, 1895) was an American statesman and jurist. ... The Seal of the United States Secretary of State The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ...



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The Seal of the United States Secretary of State The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 – July 4, 1826) was the third (1801–1809) President of the United States, second (1797)–1801) Vice President of the United States, and an American statesman, ambassador to France, political philosopher, revolutionary, agriculturalist, horticulturist, land owner, architect, archaeologist, slaveowner, author, inventor, and founder of the... Edmund Jennings Randolph (August 10, 1753 – September 12, 1813) was an American attorney, Governor of Virginia, Secretary of State, and the first United States Attorney General. ... Timothy Pickering (July 17, 1745–January 29, 1829) was the third United States Secretary of State, serving in that office from 1795 to 1800 under Presidents George Washington and John Adams. ... 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Blaine James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830–January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... Categories: People stubs | 1836 births | 1917 deaths | U.S. Army generals | U.S. Secretaries of State ... Walter Quintin Gresham (March 17, 1832–May 28, 1895) was an American statesman and jurist. ... John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Supreme Court justices | Judges of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit | U.S. Secretaries of State | Spanish-American War people | American lawyers | 1849 births | 1923 deaths ... John Milton Hay (October 8, 1838 – July 1, 1905) was an American politician who served as Secretary of State from 1898 to 1905. ... Elihu Root (February 15, 1845–February 7, 1937) was an American lawyer and statesman. ... 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John Foster Dulles John Foster Dulles (February 2, 1888 – May 24, 1959) was an American statesman who served as Secretary of State under President Dwight D. Eisenhower from (1953 - 1959). ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State Christian Herter Christian Archibald Herter (March 28, 1895–December 30, United States politician and statesman, governor of Massachusetts, and Secretary of State 1959-1961. ... David Dean Rusk (February 9, 1909 – December 20, 1994) was the United States Secretary of State from 1961 to 1969 under presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. ... William Pierce Rogers (June 23, 1913 – January 2, 2001) was an American politician, who served as a Cabinet officer in the administrations of two U.S. Presidents in the third quarter of the 20th century. ... Henry Kissinger Henry Alfred Kissinger (born May 27, 1923 as Heinz Alfred Kissinger) is a German-born American diplomat and statesman. ... Cyrus Vance Cyrus Roberts Vance (March 27, 1917, Clarksburg, West Virginia – January 12, 2002,), was the United States Secretary of State under President Jimmy Carter from 1977 to 1980. ... Edmund Muskie Edmund Sixtus Muskie (Edmund Marciszewski) (March 28, 1914–March 26, 1996) was a Polish-American politician from Maine. ... Alexander Haig Alexander Meigs Haig, Jr. ... Shultz in his official D.O.L. portrait. ... James Baker James Addison Baker III (born April 28, 1930), American politician and diplomat, was Chief of Staff in the President Ronald Reagans first administration, and Secretary of State in the administration of President George H. W. Bush and as United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1985 to... Lawrence Sidney Eagleburger (born August 1, 1930), is an American statesman and diplomat who served under Presidents Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, and George H. W. Bush. ... Warren Minor Christopher (born October 27, 1925) is an American diplomat and lawyer. ... Madeleine Korbel Albright née Marie Korbel (born May 15, 1937 in Prague, Czechoslovakia, now in the Czech Republic), American diplomat, served as the 64th United States Secretary of State. ... Colin Luther Powell, (pronounced koh-lihn, born April 5, 1937) was the 65th United States Secretary of State, serving from January 20, 2001 to January 26, 2005 under President George W. Bush. ... Condoleezza Condi Rice, (born November 14, 1954), is the second United States Secretary of State in the administration of President George W. Bush. ...

United States Attorney General Seal of the United States Department of Justice
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  Results from FactBites:
 
Richard Olney Biography | World of Criminal Justice (538 words)
Olney left the post to serve as Cleveland's secretary of state, but he is best remembered for breaking a 1894 nationwide railroad worker strike by prosecuting union leaders for violating a federal court injunction.
Olney was born on September 15, 1835 in Oxford, Massachusetts.
Cleveland's second presidential administration was mired in controversy and Olney was at the center of one of the greatest: the 1894 Pullman strike.
Richard Olney - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (299 words)
Richard Olney (September 15, 1835 – April 8, 1917) was an American statesman.
Olney was born in Oxford, Massachusetts, and studied at Brown University (Class of 1856), and Harvard Law School (Class of 1858).
In 1897, at the expiration of Cleveland's term, Olney returned to the practice of the law.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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