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Encyclopedia > Richard Hawkins

Sir Richard Hawkins (c. 1562-April 17, 1622), British seaman, was the only son of Admiral Sir John Hawkins by his first marriage. Events Earliest English slave-trading expedition under John Hawkins. ... April 17 is the 107th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (108th in leap years). ... Events January 1 - In the Gregorian calendar, January 1 is declared as the first day of the year, instead of March 25. ... Sir John Hawkins (1532 - November 12, 1595) was an English navigator. ...


He was from his earliest days familiar with ships and the sea, and in 1582 he accompanied his uncle, William Hawkins, to the West Indies. In 1585 he was captain of a galliot in Drake's expedition to the Spanish main, in 1588 he commanded a queen's ship against the Armada, and in 1590 served with his fathers expedition to the coast of Portugal. The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... Events January 12 - The Netherlands adopts the Gregorian calendar Beginning of the Eighth War of Religion in France (also known as the War of the Three Henrys) August 8 - John Davis enters Cumberland Sound in quest for the North West Passage. ... A French galley and Dutch men-of-war off a port by Abraham Willaerts, painted 17th century. ... Sir Francis Drake, c. ... Spanish Armada Conflict Anglo-Spanish War Date June 19, 1588 – August 12, 1588 Place The English Channel off Gravelines, France Result Decisive English victory The Spanish Armada (Old Spanish: la Felicissima Armada, most fortunate fleet; Modern Spanish: la Armada Invencible, the Invincible Fleet) was a fleet sent by King Philip...


In 1593 he purchased the "Dainty," a ship originally built for his father and used by him in his expeditions, and sailed for the West Indies, the Spanish Main and the South Seas. It seems clear that his project was to prey on the oversea possessions of the king of Spain. Hawkins, however, in an account of the voyage written thirty years afterwards, maintained, and by that time perhaps had really persuaded himself, that his expedition was undertaken purely for the purpose of geographical discovery. After visiting the coast of Brazil, the Dainty passed through the Straits of Magellan, and in due course reached Valparaiso. Events May 18 - Playwright Thomas Kyds accusations of heresy lead to an arrest warrant for Christopher Marlowe. ... The Spanish Main was a name given to the Caribbean coast of the Spanish Empire in mainland Central and South America. ... The Federative Republic of Brazil (República Federativa do Brasil in Portuguese) is the largest and most populous country in South America, and fifth largest in the world. ... The Strait of Magellan, near Punta Arenas The Strait of Magellan is a navigable route immediately south of mainland South America. ... Valparaiso is the name of at least three cities and a village: Valparaíso, Chile Valparaiso, Florida Valparaiso, Indiana Valparaiso, Nebraska This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Having plundered the town, Hawkins pushed north, and in June 1594, a year after leaving Plymouth, arrived in the bay of San Mateo. Here the "Dainty" was attacked by two Spanish ships. Hawkins was hopelessly outmatched, but defended himself with great courage. At last, when he himself had been severely wounded, many of his men killed, and the "Dainty" was nearly sinking, he surrendered on the promise of a safe-conduct out of the country for himself and his crew. This article is about Plymouth, England. ... San Mateo, Spanish for Saint Matthew, is the name of several places: San Mateo County, California, United States of America San Mateo, California, United States of America (in San Mateo County) San Mateo, Rizal, Philippines This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise...


Through no fault of the Spanish commander this promise was not kept. In 1597 Hawkins was sent to Spain, and imprisoned first at Seville and subsequently at Madrid. He was released in 1602, and, returning to England, was knighted in 1603. Events January 24 - Battle of Turnhout. ... This article is about the city in Spain. ... Coat of arms The Plaza de España square Madrid, the capital of Spain, is located in the center of the country at 40°25′ N 3°45′ W. Population of the city of Madrid proper was 3,093,000 (Madrilenes, madrileños) as of 2003 estimates. ...


In 1604 he became Member of Parliament for Plymouth and vice-admiral of Devon, a post which, as the coast was swarming with pirates, was no sinecure. In 1620-1621 he was vice-admiral, under Sir Robert Mansell of the fleet sent into the Mediterranean to reduce the Algeriar corsairs. He died in London on the 17th of April 1622. Events January 14 – Hampton Court conference with James I of England, the Anglican bishops and representatives of Puritans September 20 - Capture of Ostend by Spanish forces under Ambrosio Spinola after a three year siege. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... Devon is a county in South West England, bordering on Cornwall to the west, Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... This article is about sea pirates. ... Corsair can refer to: a pirate who used to operate in the Mediterranean Sea, see Corsair (pirate) a French airline, see: Corsair (airline) several aircraft of the US Navy: the O2U Corsair the F4U Corsair the A-7 Corsair II a kind of fireworks a poem, The Corsair, by Lord...


See his Observations in his Voiage into the South Sea (1622), re-published by the Hakluyt Society.


This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica ( 1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sir Richard Hawkins - LoveToKnow 1911 (385 words)
In 1585 he was captain of a galliot in Drake's expedition to the Spanish main, in 1588 he commanded a queen's ship against the Armada, and in 1590 served with his father's expedition to the coast of Portugal.
Hawkins, however, in an account of the voyage written thirty years afterwards, maintained, and by that time perhaps had really persuaded himself, that his expedition was undertaken purely for the purpose of geographical discovery.
In 1597 Hawkins was sent to Spain, and imprisoned first at Seville and subsequently at Madrid.
Richard Hawkins, Mayor of Oxford (1246 words)
Richard Hawkins (or Haukyns) (1611–1699) was a heraldic painter and "paynte stayner" of All Saints parish.
Hawkins served as Constable for the South-East ward in 1642/3, and on 1 October 1646 was elected on to the Common Council.
Coll., died in the house of his grandfather Richard Hawkyns, a painter-stayner, one of the 13 of the Mayor's Asociats of the city of Oxon, and was buried, Su., March 30, in the north churchyard of All Saints church Oxon.
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