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Encyclopedia > Richard Epstein
Richard Epstein
Richard Epstein
Part of the Politics series on
Libertarianism

Factions
Agorism
Anarcho-capitalism
Geolibertarianism
Libertarian Socialism
Left-libertarianism
Minarchism
Neolibertarianism
Paleolibertarianism
Image File history File links Epstein. ... Politics is a process by which decisions are made within groups. ... Libertarianism is a political philosophy advocating that individuals should be free to do whatever they wish with their person or property, as long as they do not infringe on the same liberty of others. ... Agorism is a radical left-libertarian political philosophy popularized by Samuel Edward Konkin III, who defined an agorist as a conscious practitioner of counter-economics (peaceful black markets and grey markets). ... Anarcho-capitalism refers to an anti-statist philosophy that embraces capitalism as one of its foundational principles. ... Geolibertarianism (also geoanarchism) is a liberal political philosophy that holds along with other forms of libertarian individualism that each individual has an exclusive right to the fruits of his or her labor, as opposed to this product being owned collectively by society or the community. ... Libertarian socialism is any one of a group of political philosophies dedicated to the abolition of property by restoring direct control of production and resources to the working class. ... Historically, the term libertarianism was first coined by leftist followers of Mikhail Bakunin to describe their own, anti-statist version of socialism, as contrasted with the state socialism propounded by Karl Marx. ... In civics, minarchism, sometimes called minimal statism or small government, is the view that the size, role and influence of government in a free society should be minimal - only large enough to protect the liberty of each and every individual, without violating the liberty of any individuals itself, thus maximizing... Neolibertarianism is a political philosophy combining elements of libertarian and conservative thought that embraces incrementalism and pragmatism domestically, and a generally interventionist foreign policy based on self-interest, national defense and the expansion of freedom. ... Paleolibertarianism is a school of thought within American libertarianism founded by Murray Rothbard and Lew Rockwell, and closely associated with the Ludwig von Mises Institute. ...


Influences
Anarchism
Austrian School
Chicago School
Classical liberalism
Objectivism
This article or section may contain inappropriate or misinterpreted citations. ... The Austrian School is a school of economic thought that rejects economists overreliance on methods used in natural science for the study of human action, and instead bases its formalism on a logic of action known as praxeology. ... The Chicago School of Economics is a school of thought in economics; it refers to the style of economics practiced at and disseminated from the University of Chicago after 1946. ... Classical liberalism (also called laissez-faire liberalism[1]) is a term used to describe the following: the philosophy developed by early liberals from the Age of Enlightenment until John Stuart Mill and revived in the 20th century by Friedrich Hayek and Milton Friedman. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Ideas
Civil liberties
Free markets
Laissez-faire
Liberty
Individualism
Non-aggression
Private property
Self-ownership
Free trade
To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. ... The Statue of Liberty is a very popular icon of liberty. ... Methodological individualism is a philosophical orientation toward explaining broad society-wide developments as the accumulation of decisions by individuals. ... The non-aggression principle (also called the non-aggression axiom, anticoercion principle, or zero aggression principle) is a deontological ethical stance associated with the libertarian movement. ... This page deals with property as ownership rights. ... Self-ownership is the condition where an individual has the exclusive moral or legal right to control his or her own body and life. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ...


Key issues
Parties
Economic views
Views of rights
Theories of law
Many countries and subnational political entities have libertarian political parties. ... The Austrian School of economics and the Chicago School of economics are important foundations of the economic system favored by modern libertarians —capitalism, where the means of production are privately owned, economic and financial decisions are made privately rather than by state control, and goods and services are exchanged in... Libertarians and Objectivists limit what they define as rights to variations on the right to be left alone, and argue that other rights such as the right to a good education or the right to have free access to water are not legitimate rights and do not deserve the same... Libertarian theories of law build on libertarianism or classical liberalism. ...

Politics Portal ·  v·d·e 


Richard A. Epstein, born in 1943, is currently the James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. He has written on a wide variety of legal topics, and is known for a generally libertarian approach to issues in legal theory. Epstein is well-known for his arguments against anti-discrimination laws, among other positions. At the Law School, Epstein is known for his cheerful, talkative manner as well as his confident views. He prefers to be identified as a classical liberal rather than as a libertarian. 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... See also Wikipedias Law Portal. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois. ... The University of Chicago Law School is a part of the University of Chicago. ... The word discrimination comes from the Latin discriminare, which means to distinguish between. To discriminate socially is to make a distinction between people on the basis of class or category without regard to individual merit. ... Classical liberalism (also called laissez-faire liberalism[1]) is a term used to describe the following: the philosophy developed by early liberals from the Age of Enlightenment until John Stuart Mill and revived in the 20th century by Friedrich Hayek and Milton Friedman. ... Libertarianism is a political philosophy advocating that individuals should be free to do whatever they wish with their person or property, as long as they do not infringe on the same liberty of others. ...


Perhaps his most well-known work is Takings: Private Property and the Power of Eminent Domain, published by Harvard University Press in 1985. In that book, Epstein argues the government should be regarded with the same respect as any other private entity in a property dispute. Though Senator Joseph Biden denounced the book in Justice Clarence Thomas' confirmation hearings, the book served as a focal point in the argument about the government's ability to control private property. [1] The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A senate is a deliberative body, often the upper house or chamber of a legislature. ... Senator Joe Biden Joseph Robinette Biden Jr. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ...


Epstein graduated summa cum laude from Columbia with a B.A. in 1964. He received a B.A. in jurisprudence from Oxford in 1966 (with First Class Honors). He graduated cum laude from Yale Law School with an LL.B. in 1968. He began his teaching career at the University of Southern California Law School. Latin honors are Latin phrases used to indicate the level of academic distinction with which an academic degree was earned. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Jurisprudence is the theory and philosophy of law. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Latin honors are Latin phrases used to indicate the level of academic distinction with which an academic degree was earned. ... Yale Law School, established in 1843 in New Haven, Connecticut, is a division of Yale University. ... The degree of Bachelor of Laws is the principal academic degree in law in most common law countries. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... USC Law School The University of Southern California Law School (Gould School of Law), located in Los Angeles, CA, is part of the University of Southern California. ...


Books Epstein has written or edited

  • 2006. How Progressives Rewrote the Constitution. Cato Institute.
  • 2003. Skepticism and Freedom: A Modern Case for Classical Liberalism. University of Chicago Press.
  • 2001 (with Cass Sunstein). The Vote: Bush, Gore & the Supreme Court. University of Chicago Press.
  • 2000. Cases and Materials on Torts, 7th ed. Aspen Law & Business. 1995, 6th ed., Little, Brown & Co. 1990, 5th ed., Little, Brown & Co.
  • 2000 (editor). Liberty, Property and the Law (5 Volumes, with series introduction and volume introductions). Garlard Press.
  • 1999. Torts Aspen Law & Business.
  • 1998. Principles for a Free Society: Reconciling Individual Liberty with the Common Good. Perseus.
  • 1997. Mortal Peril: Our Inalienable Right to Health Care? Addison-Wesley.
  • 1995. Simple Rules for Complex World. Harvard University Press.
  • 1993. Bargaining with the State. Princeton University Press.
  • 1993. Torts Supplement for Epstein, Cases and Materials on Torts. Little, Brown Inc.
  • 1992. Forbidden Grounds: The Case Against Employment Discrimination Laws. Harvard University Press.
  • 1992 (edited with Geoffrey R. Stone & Cass R. Sunstein). The Bill of Rights in the Modern State. University of Chicago Press.
  • 1987. Supplement to Cases and Materials on Tort. Little, Brown & Co.
  • 1985 (edited with Jeffrey Paul). Labor Law and the Employment Market. New Brunswick: Transaction Press.
  • 1985. Takings: Private Property and the Power of Eminent Domain. Harvard University Press.
  • 1984 (with C. Gregory and H. Kalven). Cases and Materials on the Law of Tort, 4th ed. Little, Brown.
  • 1981. Supplement to Cases and Materials on the Law of Tort. Little, Brown.
  • 1980. Modern Products Liability Law. Quorum Books of the Greenwood Press.

See also

Jason Fahrenbach Libertarian theories of law build on libertarianism or classical liberalism. ...


External links

  • Richard Epstein's Home Page at University of Chicago
  • "Taking Exception", interview in Reason by Steve Chapman

  Results from FactBites:
 
Richard A. Epstein (256 words)
Richard A. Epstein, professor of law at the University of Chicago, is an expert on numerous areas of the law, including property, torts, land use, civil procedure, contract law, workers' compensation, and Roman law.
Part two of Richard Epstein.s discussion of the Constitution on PBS Think Tank with Ben Wattenberg.
Richard Epstein discusses his latest book, How Progressives Rewrote the Constitution, on PBS Think Tank with Ben Wattenberg.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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