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Encyclopedia > Richard Burton
Richard Burton
Birth name Richard Walter Jenkins Jr.
Born November 10, 1925(1925-11-10)
Pontrhydyfen, Wales, UK
Died August 5, 1984 (aged 58), (aged 58)
Céligny, Switzerland
Spouse(s) Sybil Williams (1949-1963)
Elizabeth Taylor (1964-1974, 1975-1976)
Susan Hunt (1976-1982)
Sally Hay (1983-1984)

Richard Burton, CBE (November 10, 1925August 5, 1984) was a Welsh actor. He was at one time the highest-paid actor in Hollywood.[1] Known for his distinctive voice, he was nominated seven times for Academy Awards for acting, yet never won. Notable people named Richard Burton include: Richard Burton, actor Richard Francis Burton, 19th-century explorer, scholar, and orientalist, Richard Burton (golfer) Richard Henry Burton, recipient of the Victoria Cross Richard Burton (comics), comic writer and editor Richard M. Burton, organizational theorist Richard M. Burton, M.D., PhD, physician and behaviorist... If you hold the copyright to an image (e. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pontrhydyfen is a village in south Wales. ... This article is about the country. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Céligny is a Swiss commune in the canton of Geneva. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role has been presented to its winners since 1952 and actors of all nationalities are eligible to receive the award. ... Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a 1966 film adaptation of the play of the same name by Edward Albee. ... The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is a 1963 espionage novel by John le Carré, adapted into a 1965 film starring Richard Burton. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... My Cousin Rachel is a 1952 mystery film/romance film directed by Henry Koster and starred Olivia de Havilland, Richard Burton, Audrey Dalton, Ronald Squire, George Dolenz and John Sutton. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture - Drama was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1951. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... The Grammy Award for Best Album for Children has been awarded since 1959. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ... The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical is awarded to the actor who was voted as the best actor in a musical play, whether a new production or a revival. ... The 1960 Original Broadway cast recording album cover Camelot is a 1960 musical play by Alan Jay Lerner (book and lyrics) and Frederic Loewe (music). ... Special Tony Award includes Lifetime Achievement Award: // 1947 Dora Chamberlain for unfailing courtesy as treasurer of the Martin Beck Theatre 1947 Mr. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ...

Contents

Background and education

He was born Richard Walter Jenkins Jr. in the village of Pontrhydyfen, Wales, near Port Talbot and grew up in a poor, Welsh-speaking household, the twelfth of thirteen children.[1] His father was a coalminer, and his mother died after the last birth, before he was two years old; thenceforth a sister in Port Talbot took him into her family[2] [3] where he was raised a Presbyterian. Pontrhydyfen is a village in south Wales. ... This article is about the country. ... Port Talbot (Welsh: Aberafan or Porth Talbot) is an industrial town in the traditional county of Glamorgan, south Wales, with a population of approximately 50,000. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ...


He showed a talent for English literature at grammar school, though his consuming interest was sport.[4] With the assistance of his inspirational schoolmaster, Philip H. Burton (who mentored him), he excelled in school productions. Philip could not legally adopt Burton because their ages were too close together. [2] It was at this time that he began to develop the distinctive speaking voice that became his hallmark, having been encouraged by Philip (who sidelined as a BBC radio producer) to "lose his Welsh accent". To this day, many aspiring actors study Burton's style of elocution which has been hailed by critics worldwide. His official website claims that he was the highest paid actor in Hollywood during his heyday of on-screen and off-screen collaborations with fellow icon Liz Taylor, and he is often ranked among the greatest actors of all time. A grammar school is a school that may, depending on regional usage as exemplified below, provide either secondary education or, a much less common usage, primary education (also known as elementary). Grammar schools trace their origins back to medieval Europe, as schools in which university preparatory subjects, such as Latin... This article is about the actress. ...


There is a widespread myth (perhaps encouraged or even believed by some members of his stoutly working-class family) that Richard Burton "won a scholarship to Oxford at the age of sixteen" but left after six months. The facts, as recorded by Burton himself in his autobiography and in Richard and Philip, which he co-wrote, are as follows: At the age of sixteen, he was forced to leave school and find work as a shop assistant. His former teacher, Philip Burton, recognising his talent, adopted him and enabled him to return to school. In 1943, at the age of eighteen, Richard Burton (who had now taken his teacher's surname), was allowed into Exeter College, Oxford, for a term of six months study. This was made possible only because it was wartime and he was an air force cadet. College name Exeter College Latin name Collegium Exoniense Named after Walter de Stapledon, Bishop of Exeter Established 1314 Sister college Emmanuel College, Cambridge Rector Ms Frances Cairncross JCR President Simon Heawood Undergraduates 299 MCR President Meredith Riedel Graduates 150 Location of Exeter College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Exeter College...


He subsequently served in the RAF (1944-1947) as a navigator. His eyesight was not good enough for him to be considered pilot material. [5]. “RAF” redirects here. ...


Early acting career

In the 1940s and early 1950s Burton worked on stage and in cinema in the United Kingdom. Before his war service with the RAF, he had made his professional debut in Liverpool, appearing in a play called Druid's Rest, but his career was interrupted by conscription in 1944. While making his first film, The Last Days of Dolwyn in 1947, he met his future wife, the young actress Sybil Williams, and they married in February 1949. They had two daughters, but divorced in 1963, after Burton hit the big time. In the year of his marriage to Sybil, Burton appeared in the West End in a highly successful production of The Lady's Not For Burning, alongside Sir John Gielgud. He had small parts in various British films: Now Barabbas Was A Robber; Waterfront (1950) with Robert Newton; The Woman With No Name (1951); and a bigger part as a smuggler in Green Grow The Rushes, a B-movie. In the 1951 season at Stratford , he gave a critically acclaimed performance as Prince Hal. This prompted Alexander Korda to try to get Burton to sign a contract with him, and in 1952 Burton signed a five year contract with Korda at £100 a week. For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... The Ladys Not for Burning is a 1948 play by Christopher Fry. ... Sir Arthur John Gielgud, OM, CH (14 April 1904 – 21 May 2000), known as Sir John Gielgud, was an Emmy, Grammy, Tony and Academy Award-winning British theatre and film actor. ... Robert Newton as Long John Silver. ... The term B-movie originally referred to a film designed to be distributed as the lower half of a double feature, often a genre film featuring cowboys, gangsters or vampires. ... Sir Alexander Korda (September 16, 1893 - January 23, 1956) was a film director and producer, a leading figure in the British film industry and the founder of London Films. ...


Hollywood and later career

Richard Burton in the movie Cleopatra (1963)
Richard Burton in the movie Cleopatra (1963)

In 1952, Burton successfully made the transition to a Hollywood star; on the recommendation of Daphne du Maurier, he was given the leading role in My Cousin Rachel opposite Olivia de Havilland. 20th century Fox negotiated with Korda to borrow him for this film and a further two at $50,000 a film. The film was a critical success, established Burton as a Hollywood leading man, and won him his first Academy Award nomination. The following year he created a sensation by starring in The Robe, the first film to be shot in the wide-screen process Cinemascope, winning another Oscar nomination. In 1954, he took his most famous radio role, as the narrator in the original production of Dylan Thomas' Under Milk Wood, a role he would reprise in the film version twenty years later. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Cleopatra is a 1963 film directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz. ... ... Dame Daphne du Maurier DBE (13 May 1907–19 April 1989) was a famous British novelist best known for her short story The Birds and her classic novel Rebecca, published in 1938. ... My Cousin Rachel is a 1952 mystery film/romance film directed by Henry Koster and starred Olivia de Havilland, Richard Burton, Audrey Dalton, Ronald Squire, George Dolenz and John Sutton. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... A cinema presenting The Robe The Robe is a 1953 Biblical epic film that tells the story of a Roman tribune who commands the unit that crucifies Jesus. ... A Fox logo used to promote the CinemaScope process. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Dylan Thomas Dylan Marlais Thomas (October 27, 1914 – November 9, 1953) was a Welsh poet and writer. ... We are not wholly bad or good, who live our lives under Milk Wood - prayer of the Rev Eli Jenkins from Under Milk Wood Statue of Dylans fictional Captain Cat, in Swanseas Maritime Quarter Under Milk Wood was originally a radio play and later a stage play and...


Stage career

Burton was still juggling theatre with film, playing Hamlet and Coriolanus at the Old Vic Theatre in 1953 and alternating the roles of Iago and Othello with the Old Vic's other rising matinee idol John Neville. He also appeared on Broadway, receiving a Tony Award nomination for Time Remembered (1958) and winning the award for playing King Arthur in the musical Camelot (1960). He then put his stage career on the back burner to concentrate on film, although he received a third Tony Award nomination when he reprised his Hamlet under John Gielgud's direction in 1964 in a production that holds the record for the longest run of the play in Broadway history. After that his stage appearances were rare, although he made a memorable return to Broadway in 1976 in Equus, his performance as psychiatrist Martin Dysart winning both a special Tony Award for his appearance as well as the role in the 1977 film version. Burton made only two more stage appearances after that, in a high-paying touring production of Camelot in 1980 that he was forced to leave early in the run due to a back injury (to be replaced by his friend Richard Harris), and in a critically reviled production of Noël Coward's Private Lives opposite his ex-wife Elizabeth Taylor in 1983. Most reviewers dismissed the production as a transparent attempt to capitalize on the couple's celebrity, although they grudgingly praised Burton as having the closest connection to Coward's play of anyone in the cast. Hamlet and Horatio in the cemetery by Eugène Delacroix For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... Gaius Marcius Coriolanus was a 5th century BC Roman general. ... The Old Vic is a theatre in the Waterloo area of London. ... Othello and Iago. ... For other uses, see Othello (disambiguation). ... John Neville as the Well Manicured Man in the TV-series The X-Files John Neville, C.M., OBE (born May 2, 1925) is an English theatre and film actor who moved to Canada in 1972. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... A bronze Arthur in plate armour with visor raised and with jousting shield wearing Kastenbrust armour (early 15th century) by Peter Vischer, typical of later anachronistic depictions of Arthur. ... The 1960 Original Broadway cast recording album cover Camelot is a 1960 musical play by Alan Jay Lerner (book and lyrics) and Frederic Loewe (music). ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Hamlet and Horatio in the cemetery by Eugène Delacroix For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... Sir Arthur John Gielgud, OM, CH (14 April 1904 – 21 May 2000), known as Sir John Gielgud, was an Emmy, Grammy, Tony and Academy Award-winning British theatre and film actor. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Cover of 1993 Longman edition of Equus. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Equus is a 1977 film by Sidney Lumet. ... The 1960 Original Broadway cast recording album cover Camelot is a 1960 musical play by Alan Jay Lerner (book and lyrics) and Frederic Loewe (music). ... Richard St. ... Noël Coward Sir Noel Peirce Coward (spelling his forename Noël with the diaeresis was an affectation of later life, and Peirce is the correct spelling) (December 16, 1899 - March 26, 1973) was an English actor, playwright, and composer of popular music. ... Private Lives is a play written by Noel Coward in 1930. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ...


Hollywood career in the 1950s and 1960s

In terms of critical success, his Hollywood roles throughout the 1950s did not live up to the early promise of his debut. Then in 1958, he was offered the part of Jimmy Porter in the film version of John Osborne's play Look Back in Anger, a gritty drama about middle-class life in the British Midlands. After playing King Arthur in Camelot on Broadway, he replaced Stephen Boyd as Mark Antony in the troubled production Cleopatra (1963). This film proved to be the start of his most successful period in Hollywood; he would remain among the top 10 box-office earners for the next four years. During the filming, Burton met and fell in love with Elizabeth Taylor, although the two would not be free to marry until 1965, when their respective divorces were complete. Their private lives turned out to be an endless source of curiosity for the media, and their marriage was also the start of a series of on-screen collaborations. John James Osborne (December 12, 1929 – December 24, 1994) was an English playwright, screenwriter, and critic of the Establishment. ... Look Back in Anger (1956) is a John Osborne play and 1958 movie about a love triangle involving an intelligent but disaffected young man (Jimmy Porter), his upper-middle-class, impassive wife (Alison), and her snooty best friend (Helena Charles). ... The 1960 Original Broadway cast recording album cover Camelot is a 1960 musical play by Alan Jay Lerner (book and lyrics) and Frederic Loewe (music). ... Stephen Boyd (born William Millar, July 4, 1928 – June 2, 1977) - was a Northern Ireland-born actor, born at Doagh Road, Whitehouse, County Antrim, who starred in over fifty films. ... Cleopatra is a 1963 film directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ...

Richard Burton as O'Brien in 1984

He played Taylor's tycoon husband in The V.I.P.s, an all-star film set in the VIP lounge of London Airport which proved to be a box-office hit. In 1964, Burton played defrocked Episcopal priest Dr. Lawrence T. Shannon in Tennessee Williams' The Night of the Iguana directed by John Huston, a film which became another critical and box office success. Richard Burton's perfomance in The Night of the Iguana may be his finest hour on the screen, and in the process helped put the town of Puerto Vallarta on the map. After playing the archbishop martyred by Henry II in the title role of Becket and British spy Alec Leamas in The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, he and Taylor had a great success in Mike Nichols's film of the Edward Albee play Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, in which a bitter erudite couple spend the evening trading vicious barbs in front of their horrified and fascinated guests, played by George Segal and Sandy Dennis. Although all four actors received Oscar nominations for their roles in the film, only Taylor and Dennis went on to win. Image File history File links Richard_Burton_O'Brien_1984. ... Image File history File links Richard_Burton_O'Brien_1984. ... 1984 (sometimes Nineteen Eighty-Four, which is how the title appears on screen) is a British film based upon the 1949 novel of the same name by George Orwell; the film was made in the year imagined by the author. ... The V.I.P.s is a 1963 film written by Terence Rattigan and directed by Anthony Asquith. ... A Very Important Person, or VIP (pronouced vee-eye-pee) is a person who is accorded special privileges due to his or her status or importance. ... London Airport is the name of several airports: London, England London Biggin Hill Airport London City Airport London Gatwick Airport London Heathrow Airport London Luton Airport London Stansted Airport see also Airports of the London region London, Canada London International Airport London, Connecticut Groton-New London Airport This is a... The Casa Iguana hotel in Mismaloya The Night of the Iguana is a play by Tennessee Williams about American tourists in Mexico. ... Becket is a 1964 film adaptation of the play Becket or the Honour of God by Jean Anouilh made by Hal Wallis Productions and released by Paramount Pictures. ... The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is a 1963 espionage novel by John le Carré, adapted into a 1965 film starring Richard Burton. ... Mike Nichols (born Michael Igor Peschkowsky) is an Academy Award winning movie director of films such as The Graduate and Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?. He was born on November 6, 1931 in Berlin, to a Jewish Russian family. ... Edward Albee, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1961 Edward Franklin Albee III (born March 12, 1928) is an American playwright known for works including Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, The Zoo Story, and The Sandbox. ... For the 1966 film adaptation, see Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (film) Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a play by Edward Albee that opened on Broadway at the Billy Rose Theater on October 13, 1962. ... George Segal George Segal (born February 13, 1934) is a well-known Jewish American film and stage actor who was born in Great Neck, Long Island, New York. ... Sandy Dennis Sandy Dennis (April 27, 1937 – March 2, 1992) was an Academy Award and Tony-winning American theater and film actress. ...


Burton and Taylor continued making films together, with their lively version of Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew (1967) being a notable success, but later collaborations The Comedians (1967), Boom (1968), and the Burton-directed Dr. Faustus (1967) (which had its genesis from a theatre production he staged and starred in at the Oxford University Dramatic Society) being critical and commercial failures. He did enjoy a final commercial blockbuster with Where Eagles Dare in 1968 but his last film of the decade, Anne of the Thousand Days (1969), was a commercial and critical disappointment. In spite of those failures, it performed remarkably well at that year's Academy awards (receiving ten nominations, including one for Burton's performance as Henry VIII), which many thought to be largely the result of an expensive advertising campaign by Universal Studios[3]. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Taming of the Shrew is a 1967 film adaptation of the William Shakespeare play of the same name directed by Franco Zeffirelli. ... NOTE: This article does not refer to the Graham Greene novel The Comedians. The Comedians is a British television show from the 1970s (later reprised in the 1980s) which gave a stage to nightclub and working mens club comedians of the era, including Stan Boardman, Frank Carson, and Bernard... Image:Faustusburton. ... The Oxford University Dramatic Society (OUDS) is the principal funding body and provider of theatrical services to the many independent student productions put on by students in Oxford, England. ... Where Eagles Dare is a 1968 film directed by Brian G. Hutton and starring Richard Burton, Clint Eastwood, and Mary Ure. ... Anne of the Thousand Days is an Academy Award-winning 1969 costume drama made by Hal Wallis Productions and distributed by Universal Pictures. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ...


Career decline

Burton's career went into decline after that, according to many critics who accused him of accepting roles in inferior projects to collect a quick paycheck. Films he made during this period included Bluebeard (1972), Hammersmith Is Out (1972), and The Klansman (1974). He did enjoy one major critical success in the 1970s in the film version of his stage hit Equus, winning the Golden Globe Award as well as an Academy Award nomination. Public sentiment towards his perennial frustration at winning an Oscar made many pundits consider him the favorite to finally win the award, but on Oscar Night he lost to Richard Dreyfuss in The Goodbye Girl. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 385 × 599 pixels Full resolution (485 × 755 pixel, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is of a poster, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher or the creator of the work... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 385 × 599 pixels Full resolution (485 × 755 pixel, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is of a poster, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher or the creator of the work... Equus is a 1977 film by Sidney Lumet. ... Bluebeard forbids his wife to enter a small room in the chateau. ... The Klansman is a 1974 American motion picture drama based on the book of the same name by William Bradford Huie. ... Equus is a 1977 film by Sidney Lumet. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Richard Stephen Dreyfuss (born October 29, 1947) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... The Goodbye Girl is a 1977 American comedy film. ...


He went back to appearing in critically reviled films like The Wild Geese (1978), The Medusa Touch (1978), Circle of Two (1980), and Wagner (1983) after his success in Equus, but his last movie performance as the villain O'Brien in the 1984 film adaptation of George Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four was critically acclaimed. The Wild Geese is a 1978 film about a group of mercenaries in Africa. ... The Medusa Touch is a British film released in 1978. ... Circle of Two is a 1980 Canadian film. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... Equus is a 1977 film by Sidney Lumet. ... Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 [1] [2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... This article is about the Orwell novel. ...


Oscar frustration

He was nominated six times for an Academy Award for Best Actor and once for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor - but he never won. From 1982, he and Becket co-star Peter O'Toole shared the record for the male actor with the most nominations (7) for a competitive acting Oscar without ever winning. In 2007, Peter O'Toole was unsuccessfully nominated for an eighth time, for Venus. The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Becket is a 1964 film adaptation of the play Becket or the Honour of God by Jean Anouilh made by Hal Wallis Productions and released by Paramount Pictures. ... Peter Seamus OToole (born August 2, 1932, accepted but presumed date[5]) is an eight-time Academy Award-nominated Irish actor. ... Venus is an Academy Award-nominated 2006 film staring Peter OToole, Leslie Phillips, Vanessa Redgrave and Jodie Whittaker. ...


Television

Burton rarely appeared on television, although he gave a memorable performance as Caliban in a televised production of The Tempest for The Hallmark Hall of Fame in 1960. Later appearances included the TV movie Divorce His - Divorce Hers (1973) opposite then-wife Elizabeth Taylor (a prophetic title, since their first marriage would be dissolved less than a year later), a remake of the classic film Brief Encounter (1974) that was considered vastly inferior to the 1946 original, and a critically applauded performance as Winston Churchill in The Gathering Storm (1974). A critically panned film he made about the life of Richard Wagner (noted only for having the only onscreen teaming of Laurence Olivier, John Gielgud and Ralph Richardson in the same scene) was shown as a television miniseries in 1983 after failing to achieve a theatrical release, but Burton enjoyed a personal triumph in the American television miniseries Ellis Island in 1984, receiving an Emmy Award nomination for his final television performance. William Hogarths painting The Tempest, depicting Caliban carrying a load of wood Caliban is a fictional character in William Shakespeares The Tempest, a deformed monster who is the slave of Prospero. ... For other uses, see The Tempest (disambiguation). ... Hallmark Hall of Fame is a long running anthology program on American television. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... Brief Encounter (1945) is a British film about a womans temptation toward adultery. ... “Churchill” redirects here. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM, (IPA: ; 22 May 1907 – 11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... Sir Arthur John Gielgud, OM, CH (14 April 1904 – 21 May 2000), known as Sir John Gielgud, was an Emmy, Grammy, Tony and Academy Award-winning British theatre and film actor. ... Sir Ralph David Richardson (19 December 1902 – 10 October 1983) was an English actor, one of a group of theatrical knights of the mid-20th century who, though more closely associated with the stage, did their best to make the transition to film. ... Ellis Island, at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor, was at one time the main entry facility for immigrants entering the United States from January 1, 1892 until November 12, 1954. ... An Emmy Award. ...


Television played an important part in the fate of his Broadway appearance in Camelot. When the show's run was threatened by disappointing reviews, Burton and costar Julie Andrews appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show to perform the number What Do The Simple Folk Do?. The television appearance renewed public interest in the production and extended its Broadway run. For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... The 1960 Original Broadway cast recording album cover Camelot is a 1960 musical play by Alan Jay Lerner (book and lyrics) and Frederic Loewe (music). ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948 to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by former entertainment columnist Ed Sullivan. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ...


Late in his career, he played himself in an episode of the Television Show The Fall Guy, repeating a stunt he made in 1970 when he and then-wife Elizabeth Taylor appeared as themselves on an episode of Here's Lucy as part of his unsuccessful campaign to win the Oscar for his nominated performance in Anne of the Thousand Days. The Fall Guy was an American television series produced for ABC. It ran from 1981 to 1986 and starred Lee Majors, Heather Thomas and Douglas Barr. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... TV Guide cover, promoting Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burtons famous appearance on a 1970 episode of Heres Lucy Heres Lucy was Lucille Balls third network television sitcom. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Anne of the Thousand Days is an Academy Award-winning 1969 costume drama made by Hal Wallis Productions and distributed by Universal Pictures. ...


In 1997, archive footage of Burton was used in the first episode of the television series Conan.[4]


Personal life

Burton was married five times, first to Sybil Williams from 1949 to 1963, and had two children with Williams, actress Kate Burton and Jessica Burton. He was married twice, consecutively, to Elizabeth Taylor (15 March 1964 – 26 June 1974 and 10 October 1975 – 29 July 1976). Their second marriage occurred sixteen months after their divorce, in the Chobe National Park, Kasane, Botswana. The relationship between them portrayed in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is reputed to have been similar to Burton and Taylor's real-life marriage. Kate Burton (born on 10 September 1957 in Geneva, Switzerland) is an American actress. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... Chobe National Park, situated at the Northwest of Botswana, is one of the largest games concentration in all the Africa continent and one of the worlds last remaining sizeable wilderness area. ... Kasane is a town located in the North-West District of Botswana. ... Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a 1966 film adaptation of the play of the same name by Edward Albee. ...


He was an insomniac and a notoriously heavy drinker. However, ongoing back pain and a dependence upon pain medications have been suggested as the true cause of his misery.


His father (known as Dich Bach) also a heavy drinker, refused to acknowledge the son's talents, achievements and acclaim.[6] In turn, Richard declined to attend his funeral, in 1957.[7]


Burton was banned permanently from BBC productions in 1974 for questioning the sanity of Winston Churchill and others in power during World War II – Burton reported hating them "virulently" for the alleged promise to wipe out all Japanese people on the planet. Ironically, Burton had got along well with Churchill when he met the former Prime Minister at a play in London, and kept a bust of the great wartime leader on his mantlepiece. Burton courted further controversy in 1976 when he wrote a controversial article about his late friend and fellow Welsh thespian Sir Stanley Baker, who had recently died from lung cancer at the age of 49. The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... “Churchill” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Sir Stanley Baker (February 8, 1927 - June 28, 1976) was a Welsh actor. ... Lung cancer is the malignant transformation and expansion of lung tissue, and is the most lethal of all cancers worldwide, responsible for 1. ...


Death

Burton's fourth marriage was to Suzy Hunt, ex-wife of motor racing driver James Hunt, (maiden name Suzy Millar, whose father was a judge in Kenya) and his fifth was to Sally Hay, a make-up artist who later became a successful novelist. While married to Sally, he died suddenly of a cerebral hemorrhage at his home in Switzerland, where he is buried. He was only 58 years old. Burton was buried in a red suit, a tribute to his Welsh roots. [5] James Simon Wallis Hunt (29 August 1947 – 15 June 1993) was an English racing driver and Formula 1 world champion and subsequently a commentator and businessman. ... A cerebral hemorrhage is a bleed into the substance of the cerebrum. ...


Awards and Nominations

Academy Award

My Cousin Rachel is a 1952 mystery film/romance film directed by Henry Koster and starred Olivia de Havilland, Richard Burton, Audrey Dalton, Ronald Squire, George Dolenz and John Sutton. ... The Robe, a 1942 historical novel featuring the Crucifixion, written by Lloyd C. Douglas. ... Becket or the Honor of God is a Tony Award-winning play written in French by Jean Anouilh. ... The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is a 1963 espionage novel by John le Carré, adapted into a 1965 film starring Richard Burton. ... Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a 1966 film adaptation of the play of the same name by Edward Albee. ... Anne of the Thousand Days is an Academy Award-winning 1969 costume drama made by Hal Wallis Productions and distributed by Universal Pictures. ... Equus is a 1977 film by Sidney Lumet. ...

BAFTA Award

Look Back in Anger is a 1958 British film starred by Richard Burton,Claire Bloom and Mary Ure and directed by Tony Richardson. ... Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a 1966 film adaptation of the play of the same name by Edward Albee. ... The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is a 1963 espionage novel by John le Carré, adapted into a 1965 film starring Richard Burton. ... The Taming of the Shrew is a 1967 film adaptation of the William Shakespeare play of the same name directed by Franco Zeffirelli. ...

Emmy Award

  • Nominated: Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or a Special, Ellis Island (1985)

Ellis Island, at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor, was at one time the main entry facility for immigrants entering the United States from January 1, 1892 until November 12, 1954. ...

Golden Globe Award

My Cousin Rachel is a 1952 mystery film/romance film directed by Henry Koster and starred Olivia de Havilland, Richard Burton, Audrey Dalton, Ronald Squire, George Dolenz and John Sutton. ... Look Back in Anger is a 1958 British film starred by Richard Burton,Claire Bloom and Mary Ure and directed by Tony Richardson. ... Becket or the Honor of God is a Tony Award-winning play written in French by Jean Anouilh. ... Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a 1966 film adaptation of the play of the same name by Edward Albee. ... The Taming of the Shrew is a 1967 film adaptation of the William Shakespeare play of the same name directed by Franco Zeffirelli. ... Anne of the Thousand Days is an Academy Award-winning 1969 costume drama made by Hal Wallis Productions and distributed by Universal Pictures. ... Equus is a 1977 film by Sidney Lumet. ...

Tony Award

  • Nominated: Best Actor - Play, Time Remembered (1959)
  • Won: Best Actor - Musical, Camelot (1961)
  • Nominated: Best Actor - Play, Hamlet (1964)
  • Won: Special Award (1976)

The 1960 Original Broadway cast recording album cover Camelot is a 1960 musical play by Alan Jay Lerner (book and lyrics) and Frederic Loewe (music). ... Hamlet and Horatio in the cemetery by Eugène Delacroix For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ...

Filmography

This is the filmography of british actor Richard Burton. ...

Stage career

Claudio and Isabella (1850) by William Holman Hunt Measure for Measure is a play by William Shakespeare, written in 1603. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Title page of the first quarto (1600) Henry V, also known as The Cronicle History of Henry the fift, is a play by William Shakespeare based on the life of King Henry V of England. ... Title page of the first quarto (1598) Henry IV, Part 1 is a history play by William Shakespeare. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Life and Death of King John is one of the Shakespearean histories, plays written by William Shakespeare and based on the history of England. ... Hamlet and Horatio in the cemetery by Eugène Delacroix For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... Venturia at the Feet of Coriolanus by Gaspare Landi Photo courtesy of The VRoma Project. ... Hamlet and Horatio in the cemetery by Eugène Delacroix For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... Twelfth Night has at least three meanings: Twelfth Night (holiday), celebrated by some Christians Twelfth Night, or What You Will, a comedic play by William Shakespeare Twelfth Night (band), a progressive rock band This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share... Title page of the first quarto (1600) Henry V, also known as The Cronicle History of Henry the fift, is a play by William Shakespeare based on the life of King Henry V of England. ... For other uses, see Othello (disambiguation). ... The 1960 Original Broadway cast recording album cover Camelot is a 1960 musical play by Alan Jay Lerner (book and lyrics) and Frederic Loewe (music). ... Hamlet and Horatio in the cemetery by Eugène Delacroix For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... Cover of 1993 Longman edition of Equus. ... The 1960 Original Broadway cast recording album cover Camelot is a 1960 musical play by Alan Jay Lerner (book and lyrics) and Frederic Loewe (music). ... Private Lives is a play written by Noel Coward in 1930. ...

References

  1. ^ Official Richard Burton Website retrieved August 25, 2007
  2. ^ p. 47 of Richard Burton, paperback edition by Melvyn Bragg
  3. ^ Inside Oscar, Mason Wiley and Damien Boa, Ballantine Books (1986) pg. 434
  4. ^ Conan at the Internet Movie Database
  5. ^ Dowd, Maureen. "Richard Burton, 58, is Dead; Rakish Stage and Screen Star", New York Times, August 6, 1984. Retrieved on 2007-07-21. “Richard Burton, a Welsh coal miner's son whose celebrity was defined as much by his rakish personal life as his remarkable acting skills, died of a cerebral hemorrhage yesterday in Switzerland. He was 58 years old.” 

is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Melvyn Bragg, Baron Bragg, FRSL, FRTS (born 6 October 1939, in Wigton, Cumberland) is a British author and broadcaster. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Maureen Dowd (born January 14, 1952) is a columnist for The New York Times. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Shipman, D. The Great Movie Stars: The International Years, Angus & Robertson 1982. ISBN 0-207-14803-1

External links

Preceded by
Eddie Fisher
Husbands of
Elizabeth Taylor
Succeeded by
John Warner
Awards
Preceded by
Jackie Gleason
in Take Me Along
Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical
in Camelot

1961
Succeeded by
Robert Morse
in How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying
Preceded by
Dirk Bogarde
for Darling
BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role
for The Spy Who Came in from the Cold

1966
Succeeded by
Paul Scofield
for A Man for All Seasons
Persondata
NAME Burton, Richard
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Jenkins, Richard Walter Jr.
SHORT DESCRIPTION Welsh actor
DATE OF BIRTH November 10, 1925
PLACE OF BIRTH Pontrhydyfen, Wales, UK
DATE OF DEATH August 5, 1984
PLACE OF DEATH Céligny, Switzerland

  Results from FactBites:
 
Richard Francis Burton - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5639 words)
Burton's best-known achievements include travelling in disguise to Mecca, translating The Arabian Nights (his title was The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night) and the Kama Sutra and journeying with John Hanning Speke to discover the Great Lakes of Africa in search of the source of the Nile.
Burton's interest (and active participation) in the cultures and religions of India was considered peculiar by some of his fellow soldiers who accused him of "going native" and called him "the White Nigger".
Burton died in Trieste early on the morning of 20 October 1890 of a heart attack.
Richard Burton - definition of Richard Burton in Encyclopedia (528 words)
Burton was banned permanently from BBC productions in 1974 for questioning the sanity of Winston Churchill and others in power during World War II--Burton reported hating them "virulently" for the alleged promise to wipe out all Japanese people on the planet.
Burton died suddenly of a cerebral hemorrhage at his home in Switzerland, where he is buried.
Burton is sometimes erroneously referred to as "Sir Richard Burton", perhaps due to the similarity of his assumed name to that of Richard Francis Burton, but unlike the 19th century scholar, he never received a knighthood.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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