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Encyclopedia > Rich Gossage
Goose Gossage
Relief pitcher
Born: July 5, 1951 (1951-07-05) (age 56)
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 16, 1972
for the Chicago White Sox
Final game
August 8, 1994
for the Seattle Mariners
Career statistics
Record     124-107
ERA     3.01
Saves     310
Teams
Career highlights and awards
  • Rolaids Relief Man of the Year Award (AL): 1978
  • All-Star (AL-NL): 1975-1978, 1980-1982, 1984-1985
  • Ranks 30th on MLB Career Hits Allowed/9IP List (7.45)
  • Ranks 40th on MLB Career Strikeouts/9IP List (7.47)
  • Ranks 10th on MLB Career Games List (1,002)
  • Ranks 17th on MLB Career Saves List (310)
  • Ranks 6th on MLB Career Games Finished List (681)
  • Yankees Career Leader in ERA (2.14) and Hits Allowed/9IP (6.59)

Richard Michael "Goose" Gossage (born July 5, 1951, in Colorado Springs, Colorado) is a former relief pitcher in Major League Baseball. He played 21 seasons for nine different teams, spending his best years with the New York Yankees and San Diego Padres, before retiring in 1994. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Goose Gossage was one of the earliest manifestations of the dominating closer, with wild facial hair and a gruff demeanor to go along with his blistering fastball. He now works in broadcasting. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) West Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Seattle Mariners (1977–present) Other nicknames The Ms Ballpark Safeco Field (1999–present) King County Domed Stadium (Kingdome) (1977-1999) Major league titles World Series titles (0) none AL Pennants (0) None... In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. ... Mariano Rivera, a closer for the New York Yankees, is currently fourth on the all-time save list. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Major league affiliations National League (1887–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 20, 21, 33, 40, 42 Name Pittsburgh Pirates (1891–present) Pittsburgh Innocents (1890) Pittsburg Alleghenies (1882–1889) (Also referred to as Infants in 1890) Ballpark PNC Park (2001–present) Three Rivers... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 6, 19, 31, 35, 42 Name San Diego Padres (1969–present) Ballpark PETCO Park (2004–present) Qualcomm Stadium (1969-2003) a. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1889) (a. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885-1957) New York Gothams (1883-1885) Ballpark AT&T Park (2000–present) a. ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1972–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 26, 34, 42 Name Texas Rangers (1972–present) Washington Senators (1961-1971) Ballpark Rangers Ballpark in Arlington (1994–present) a. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) West Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Seattle Mariners (1977–present) Other nicknames The Ms Ballpark Safeco Field (1999–present) King County Domed Stadium (Kingdome) (1977-1999) Major league titles World Series titles (0) none AL Pennants (0) None... In Major League Baseball, the Rolaids Relief Man of the Year Award, first awarded in 1976, is a distinction given to the top relief pitcher in each league at the end of each season. ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the manager (the managers from the previous years... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... The City of Colorado Springs is the second most populous city in the State of Colorado and the 49th most populous city in the United States. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 6, 19, 31, 35, 42 Name San Diego Padres (1969–present) Ballpark PETCO Park (2004–present) Qualcomm Stadium (1969-2003) a. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Mariano Rivera is the closer for the New York Yankees. ... The fastball is the most common type of pitch in baseball. ...

Contents

Pioneer of the closer role

The New York Yankees of the late 1970s and early 1980s arguably pioneered the set-up/closer configuration, which is used by most of the better teams today. The most effective pairing was Ron Davis and Gossage, with Davis typically entering the game in the 7th or 8th innings and Gossage finishing up. During one stretch with that pairing, the Yankees won 77 of 79 games in which they led after six innings. Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


One difference between Gossage and more recent closers is that Gossage often pitched as many as three innings to finish a game, while modern closers typically pitch the ninth inning only.


Gossage served up three of the more memorable and majestic home runs in major-league history. On Oct. 10, 1980, Kansas City's George Brett hit a tide-turning three-run homer off Gossage into Yankee Stadium's right-field upper deck to lead the Royals to a three-game sweep in the American League Championship Series. Almost three years later during the regular season, Brett got to the Goose again in the Bronx, blasting a go-ahead two-run home run in the top of the ninth in a game memorialized as the "Pine Tar Game." Brett had already rounded the bases and reached his dugout when New York manager Billy Martin contended that Brett had used a bat that had pine tar (a sticky, smelly substance used by batters to aid their grips) too far up the bat handle (exceeding 18 inches, per rule). Home-plate umpire Tim McClelland measured the bat (using the 17-inch-wide home plate as a "yardstick") and agreed, much to the dismay of Brett, who made one of the maddest dashes ever out of a dugout in protest, and the Yankees won 4-3. Later, American League President Lee McPhail overruled the umpire's decision, and the game was resumed on a day the following month (the Royals winning 5-4). A year later as a member of the Padres, Gossage, disdaining an intentional walk with first base open, yielded Kirk Gibson's three-run blast into the third deck at Tiger Stadium, which capped off the Detroit Tigers' 8-4 win in the fifth and deciding game of the 1984 World Series. In Major League Baseball, the American League Championship Series (ALCS), played in October, is a playoff round that determines the winner of the American League pennant. ... George Howard Brett (born May 15, 1953 in Glen Dale, West Virginia near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is a former American baseball player. ... Alfred Manuel Billy Martin (May 16, 1928 – December 25, 1989) was an American second baseman and manager in Major League Baseball who was best known as the manager of the New York Yankees five different times. ... Timothy Reid McClelland (born December 12, 1951 in Jackson, Michigan) is an umpire in Major League Baseball who has worked in the American League from 1983 to 1999 and throughout both leagues since 2000. ... Lee McPhail (son of former baseball executive Larry McPhail and father of Andrew McPhail) was president of Major League Baseballs American League from 1973- 1984. ... Kirk Harold Gibson (born May 28, 1957) is a former American two-sport athletic star, best known as a Major League Baseball player noted for his competitiveness and clutch hitting. ...


Record

During his career, Gossage pitched in 1,002 games and finished 681 of them, earned 310 saves. Per every nine innings pitched, Gossage averaged 7.45 hits allowed and 7.47 strikeouts. He also made nine All-Star appearances and pitched in three World Series. To save in a sport means to stop a goal or to maintain the lead. ... In baseball, a strikeout or strike out (denoted by K or SO) occurs when the batter receives three strikes during his time at bat. ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the manager (the managers from the previous years... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ...


He led the American League in saves in 1975 (26), 1978 (27) and 1980 (33).


He missed most of the 1979 season with the Yankees due to a thumb injury sustained in a locker-room fight with teammate Cliff Johnson. Ron Guidry volunteered to go to the bullpen to replace him. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Pitcher Ron Guidry Ronald Ames Guidry (Louisiana Lightning and Gator) (born August 28, 1950 in Lafayette, Louisiana) is a former Major League Baseball left-handed pitcher. ...


He holds the New York Yankees career record for ERA (2.14) and hits per nine innings (6.59).


In eight of his first first 10 seasons as a closer, Gossage's ERA was less than 2.27.[1] Over his career, right-handed hitters hit a minuscule .211 against him. In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. ...


On August 17, 1986, Gossage struck out Pete Rose in Rose's final major league at-bat. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Pitching

Goose Gossage was one of the few pitchers who employed basically just one pitch, a fastball. However Goose's fastball was one of the best of all time, routinely throwing in the 98 - 102 mph range in his prime, with pin point accuracy. Occasionally he would throw a curveball or a changeup, but mainly just came right at hitters with heat, not afraid to knock them down to keep them from crowding the inner half of the strike zone. Even into his 40s, in the early 1990s, Goose still threw regularly in the mid 90s, though he did not close games as often as he did in his youth, serving as a capable and intimidating set up man.


Hall of Fame candidacy

Gossage has campaigned openly for his induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame. He was first eligible for induction in the 2000 balloting, and received less than 32% of the votes of the BBWAA (75% are required for induction). His support has steadily increased, with his showing in the 2007 balloting of 71.2% his best yet. No previous candidate has ever received that high a percentage of votes without being inducted on a subsequent ballot. The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... The 2000 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame followed the same system in use since 1995. ... official logo The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) is a professional association for baseball journalists writing for daily newspapers and magazines. ... The 2007 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame are proceeding according to revised rules enacted in 2001. ...


Gossage's failure to be elected thus far is often attributed to a lack of appreciation of the role of closer, a relatively recent innovation in baseball strategy[citation needed]. The induction of Bruce Sutter in 2006 made Sutter only the third closer in the Hall (after Rollie Fingers and Dennis Eckersley), and Gossage is widely seen as next in line. Still, Gossage publicly voiced his displeasure at the decision of the writers to enshrine Sutter, at the exclusion of himself. Mariano Rivera is the closer for the New York Yankees. ... Howard Bruce Sutter (born January 8, 1953 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania) (last name is pronounced with a long U, i. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Roland Fingers giving his trademark handlebar moustache a twirl. ... Dennis Lee Eckersley (born October 3, 1954 in Oakland, California), nicknamed Eck, was a Major League Baseball player elected to Baseball Hall of Fame in 2004 (his first year of eligibility). ...


Retirement

Gossage lives in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and is active in the community promoting and sponsoring youth sports. In 1995, the City of Colorado Springs dedicated the Rich "Goose" Gossage Youth Sports Complex, which features five fields for youth baseball and softball competition.


He has written an autobiography, released in 2000, entitled The Goose is Loose (Ballantine: New York).


External links

  • Baseball-Reference.com - Major league career statistics

  Results from FactBites:
 
Rich Gossage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (340 words)
Richard Michael "Goose" Gossage (born July 5, 1951 in Colorado Springs, Colorado) is a former relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who played 21 seasons for nine different teams before retiring in 1994.
The most effective pairing was Ron Davis and Gossage, with Davis typically entering the game in the 7th or 8th innings and Gossage closing.
Gossage lives in Colorado Springs, Colorado and is active in the community promoting and sponsoring youth sports.
Another way to waste a few minutes: Baseball HOF 2006: Rich Gossage (399 words)
Gossage was a multi-inning reliever all year, someone almost never seen outside the postseason, and even then rarely seen outside of Mariano Rivera since 1996 or Brad Lidge in 2004.
Gossage bounced around, surely, playing for nine teams, but the bulk of his career was spent with the Chicago White Sox, the New York Yankees and the San Diego Padres.
Gossage has all of the above, and he was not the simple specialist that a closer is today (whether they choose to be or not, to be fair).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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