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Encyclopedia > Rhythm Guitar

Rhythm guitar is a guitar that is primarily used to provide rhythmic and harmonic accompaniment for a singer or for other instruments in an ensemble. The term refers to the use made of the instrument, not to its construction. The role of the rhythm guitar may be regarded as the complement to that of the lead guitar. In music accompaniment is the art of playing along with a soloist or ensemble, often known as the lead, in a supporting manner as well as the music thus played. ... Lead guitar refers to a role within a popular music band, especially a rock band, that provides melody or melodic material, as opposed to the rhythm of the rhythm guitar, bass, and drums. ...


Purpose

The role of a rhythm guitar is to provide the pulse or rhythm for a song, and to provide harmony that supports the other instruments or voices, in contrast to the lead guitar, which provides melody. A guitar part can thus be classified as a rhythm guitar part whenever its function is primarily rhythmic or harmonic rather than melodic. The rhythm guitarist, bass guitarist, and drummer usually constitute the rhythm section in a rock band. A strict distinction between rhythm and lead guitar cannot be made, however, as good rhythm guitar players often incorporate melodic elements into their playing, and lead guitarists are seldom ignorant of rhythm playing, and may use chords or strong rhythmic playing in their solos. A rhythm guitarist supplies the layer of rhythm on top of which the melody is either played using another instrument or sung by a person. For the popular Tamil film, see Rhythm (film) Rhythm (Greek = flow, or in Modern Greek, style) is the variation of the length and accentuation of a series of sounds or other events. ... Harmony is the result of polyphony (more than one note being played simultaneously). ... Lead guitar refers to a role within a popular music band, especially a rock band, that provides melody or melodic material, as opposed to the rhythm of the rhythm guitar, bass, and drums. ... Martin EB18 Bass Guitar in flight case. ... A drummer at practice A drummer is a musician who plays the drums, particularly the drum kit, marching percussion, or hand drums. ... Rhythm section refers to the musicians whose primary jobs in a jazz or popular music band or ensemble is to establish the rhythm of a song or musical piece, often via repeated riffs or ostinati. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Rock and roll. ...


In rock music, the rhythm guitarist is typically expected to play a sequence of chords, called a chord progression, around which the song is constructed. Often this chordal accompaniment is simplified to a cluster of two or three notes, sometimes called a "riff", that is repeated. In metal, this is typically extended to more complex sequences consisting of a combination of chords, single notes and palm muted parts, while the more technical bands often play riffs which may use lead guitar techniques. In jazz or swing music, the rhythm guitarist is also expected to integrate a moving bass or counter-melody in his or her playing. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Rock and roll. ... Fingering for an open-position C Major chord (with the 5th, a G note, in the bass) played on a six-string acoustic guitar. ... A chord progression (also chord sequence and harmonic progression or sequence), as its name implies, is a series of chords played in an order. ... Riff is also an alternate spelling of Rif, a region of Morocco. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Heavy metal music. ... The palm mute, also known as palm muting, is a playing technique for the guitar. ... For other article subjects named Jazz see jazz (disambiguation). ...


There is no defining line between a rhythm guitarist and lead guitarist, and if there is only one guitarist in the band, or if the songs require it, the guitarist may have to play lead and rhythm at different times. Thus, the guitarist can play both rhythm and lead—it just depends on the parts played in each song, and the capability of that guitarist.


Trends

Rhythm guitarists usually aim to generate a stronger tone as the harmonics of the band, in contrast to the lead guitarists' goal of producing a cutting melody that can be heard through the sound of the rest of the band. As a result, rhythm and lead players may use different guitars. Rhythm guitarists may employ an electric acoustic guitar or a humbucker-equipped electric guitar for a richer and fatter output. Also, rhythm guitarists may use strings of a larger gauge than than those used by lead guitarists.[citation needed] However, while these may be practices, they are not necessarily the rule and is subject to the style of the song and the preference of the individual guitarist. link titlebearA semi-acoustic guitar is a modified version of the classical guitar with steel strings. ... Traditional humbucker pickup, uncovered A conventional humbucker (or Humbucking pickup) is a type of electric guitar pickup that uses two coils, both generating string signal. ...


See also

Portal:Guitar
Visit the Guitar Portal

  Results from FactBites:
 
Rhythm Guitar Licks in Tablature, Tabs (887 words)
A rhythm lick is a sequence of chords and notes that are used to build the rhythm section of music.
There are many tricks and techniques available to the rhythm guitar player to play and create powerful, musical works.
Guitar lessons / guitar instruction on morphing rhythm guitar licks and riffs.
Rhythm guitar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (423 words)
Rhythm guitar is a kind of guitar playing that provides accompaniment for a singer or other instruments.
The rhythm guitar is the complement to the lead guitar, which plays melody; for example during solos, or "lead breaks", or during short "fills".
A rhythm guitarist supplies the layer of rhythm on top of which the melody is either played using another instrument or sung by a human.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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