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Encyclopedia > Rhythm


Rhythm- the variation of the length and accentuation of a series of sounds or other events.

Contents

Rhythm in linguistics

The study of rhythm, stress, and pitch in speech is called prosody; it is a topic in linguistics. Narmour (1980, p.147-53) describes three categories of prosodic rules which create rhythmic successions which are additive (same duration repeated), cumulative (short-long), or countercumulative (long-short). Cumulation is associated with closure or relaxation, countercumulation with openness or tension, while additive rhythms are open-ended and repetitive. Richard Middleton points out this method cannot account for syncopation and suggests the concept of transformation. Pitch is the perceived fundamental frequency of a sound. ... Bold text This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In linguistics, prosody refers to intonation, rhythm, and vocal stress in speech. ... For the journal, see Linguistics (journal). ... In music, syncopation is when a stressing of a normally unstressed beat in a bar or failure to sound a tone on an accented beat occurs. ... In music, a transformation consists of any operation or process that a composer or performer may apply to a musical variable (usually a set or tone row in twelve tone music). ...


A rhythmic unit is a durational pattern which occupies a period of time equivalent to a pulse or pulses on an underlying metric level, as opposed to a rhythmic gesture which does not (DeLone et al. (Eds.), 1975, A rhythmic unit is a durational pattern which occupies a period of time equivalent to a pulse or pulses on an underlying metric level, as opposed to a rhythmic gesture. ... A duration is an amount of time or a particular time interval. ... In music, a pulse is a series of identical, yet distinct periodic short-duration stimuli perceived as points in time (DeLone et. ... Metre is the measurement of a musical line into measures of stressed and unstressed beats, indicated in Western notation by a symbol called a time signature. ... A rhythmic gesture is a durational pattern which, in contrast to a rhythmic unit, does not occupy a period of time equivalent to a pulse or pulses on an underlying metric level. ...


Rhythm in music

Musicians make rhythms with musical instruments. A musician's role is to perceive and measure time. We consciously feel, shape, divide, and compose time to convey feeling. All musicians, instrumentalists and vocalists work with rhythm, but in modern music a rhythm section generally consists of percussion instruments, bass and possibly chordal instruments (e.g., guitar, banjo) and keyboard instruments, such as piano and organ. In recent years, music theorists have attempted to explain connections between rhythm, meter, and the broad structure and organization of sound events in music. Some have suggested that rhythm (and its essential relationship to the temporal aspect of sound) may in fact be the most fundamental aspect of music. Hasty (1997, p. 3), for example, notes that "Among the attributes of rhythm we might include continuity or flow, articulation, regularity, proportion, repetition, pattern, alluring form or shape, expressive gesture, animation, and motion (or at least the semblance of motion). Indeed, so intimate is the connection of the rhythmic and the musical, we could perhaps most concisely and ecumenically define music as the 'rhythmization' of sound." Another piece of evidence suggesting that rhythm is the most fundamental aspect of music is that percussion instruments were likely in use long before stringed instruments. Tribal groups dancing to music made only with percussion instruments is an ancient human practice, which reportedly continues today. The three fundamental elements of music are rhythm, melody, and harmony. A musician is a person who plays or composes music. ... Rhythm section refers to the musicians whose primary jobs in a jazz or popular music band or ensemble is to establish the rhythm of a song or musical piece, often via repeated riffs or ostinati. ... Percussion redirects here. ... A string instrument (also stringed instrument) is a musical instrument that produces sound by means of vibrating strings. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany The organ is a keyboard instrument played using one or more manuals and a pedalboard. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Look up melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ...


Origins of human appreciation of rhythm

In his series How Music Works, Howard Goodall presents theories that rhythm recalls how we walk and the heartbeat we heard in the womb. However neither would seem to have any survival value in Man's evolution. More likely is that a simple pulse or di-dah beat recalls the footsteps of another person. Our sympathetic urge to dance is designed to boost our energy levels in order to cope with someone, or some animal chasing us -- a fight or flight response. It is possibly also rooted in courtship ritual. [1] Howard Goodall Howard Goodall (born 1958 in Bromley, South London) is a British composer of musicals, choral music and music for television. ...


Rhythm notation and the oral tradition

Worldwide there are many different approaches to passing on rhythmic phrases and patterns, as they exist in traditional music, from generation to generation.


African music

In the Griot tradition of Africa everything related to music has been passed on orally. Babatunde Olatunji, a Nigerian drummer living and working in the USA developed a simple series of spoken sounds for teaching the rhythms of the hand drum. He used six vocal sounds: Goon Doon Go Do Pa Ta. There are three basic sounds on the drum but each can be played with left or right hand. This simple system is now used worldwide particularly by Djembe players. This page is about the West African poets. ... Babatunde Olatunji (April 7, 1927 - April 6, 2003) was a Nigerian drummer, educator, social activist and recording artist. ... A basic student djembe A djembe (pronounced jem bay) also known as djimbe, jenbe, jembe, yembe or sanbanyi in Susu; is a skin covered hand drum, shaped like a large goblet, and meant to be played with bare hands. ...


Indian music

Again an oral tradition. Tabla players would learn to speak complex rhythm patterns and phrases before attempting to play them. Sheila Chandra an English pop singer of Indian descent made performances based around her singing these patterns. In Indian Classical music, the Tala of a composition is pretty much the rhythmic pattern over which the whole piece is structured. Sheila Chandra (b. ... The origins of Indian classical music can be found from the oldest of scriptures, part of the Hindu tradition, the Vedas. ... Tala may refer to: Samoan tala, the monetary unit of Samoa. ...


Western music

Standard music notation contains all rhythmic information and is adapted specifically for drums and percussion instruments. The drums are generally used to keep other instruments in 'time'. They do this by supplying beats/strikes in time at a certain pace, e.g.: 70 beats per minute (bpm). A drum beat is used to keep a bass/guitar line in time. Music notation is a system of writing for music. ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ...


Types

In Western music, rhythms are usually arranged with respect to a time signature, partially signifying a meter. The speed of the underlying pulse, called the beat, is the tempo. The tempo is usually measured in 'beats per minute' (bpm); 60 bpm means a speed of one beat per second. The length of the meter, or metric unit (usually corresponding with measure length), is usually grouped into either two or three beats, being called duple meter and triple meter, respectively. If each beat is grouped in two, it is simple meter, if in three compound meter. According to Pierre Boulez, beat structures beyond four are simply not natural.[2] Western music is the genres of music originating in the Western world (Europe and its former colonies) including Western classical music, American Jazz, Country and Western, pop music and rock and roll. ... The time signature (also known as meter signature) is a notational convention used in Western musical notation to specify how many beats are in each measure and what note value constitutes one beat. ... In music, a pulse is a series of identical, yet distinct periodic short-duration stimuli perceived as points in time (DeLone et. ... putang ina. ... For other uses, see Tempo (disambiguation). ... In musical terminology, a bar or measure is a segment of time defined as a given number of beats of a given duration. ... Metre is the measurement of a musical line into measures of stressed and unstressed beats, indicated in Western notation by a symbol called a time signature. ... Metre is the measurement of a musical line into measures of stressed and unstressed beats, indicated in Western notation by a symbol called a time signature. ... In music, simple metre or simple time is a time signature or meter in which each beat (or rather, portion, 1/2 or 1/3 of a measure) is divided into two parts, as opposed to three which is compound meter. ... In music, compound meter, (chiefly British variation) compound metre, or compound time, is a time signature or meter in which each measure is divided into three or more parts, or two uneven parts (as opposed to two even parts, called simple metre), calling for the measures to be played with... Pierre Boulez Pierre Boulez (IPA: /pjɛʁ.buˈlɛz/) (born March 26, 1925) is a conductor and composer of classical music. ...


Syncopated rhythms are rhythms that accent parts of the beat not already stressed by counting. Playing simultaneous rhythms in more than one time signature is called polymeter. See also polyrhythm. In recent years, rhythm and meter have become an important area of research among music scholars. Recent work in these areas includes books by Maury Yeston, Fred Lerdahl and Ray Jackendoff, Jonathan Kramer, Christopher Hasty, William Rothstein, and Joel Lester. In music, syncopation is when a stressing of a normally unstressed beat in a bar or failure to sound a tone on an accented beat occurs. ... Metre is the measurement of a musical line into measures of stressed and unstressed beats, indicated in Western notation by a symbol called a time signature. ... Polyrhythm is the simultaneous sounding of two or more independent rhythms. ... Maury Yeston is a American composer and lyricist educated at Yale and Clare College, Cambridge. ... Fred Lerdahl, Fritz Reiner Professor of Musical Composition at Columbia University, is a composer and music theorist, best known for his work on pitch space and cognitive constraints on compositional systems or musical grammars. ... Ray Jackendoff (born 1945) is an influential contemporary linguist who has always straddled the boundary between generative linguistics and cognitive linguistics, committed as he is both to the existence of an innate Universal Grammar (an all-important thesis of generative linguistics) and to giving an account of language that meshes... Jonathan Donald Kramer (December 7, 1942, Hartford, Conn. ...


Some genres of music make different use of rhythm than others. Most Western music is based on divisive rhythm, while non-Western music uses more additive rhythm. African music makes heavy use of polyrhythms, and Indian music uses complex cycles such as 7 and 13, while Balinese music often uses complex interlocking rhythms. By comparison, a lot of Western classical music is fairly rhythmically simple; it stays in a simple meter such as 4/4 or 3/4 and makes little use of syncopation.
Musical genres are categories which contain music which share a certain style or which have certain elements in common. ... In music a divisive rhythm is a rhythm in which a larger period of time is divided into smaller rhythmic units, this can be contrasted with additive rhythms, which are larger periods of time constructed from sequences of smaller rhythmic units added to the end of the previous unit. ... Additive rhythms are larger periods of time constructed from sequences of smaller rhythmic units added to the end of the previous unit. ... Africa is a large and diverse continent, consisting of dozens of countries, hundreds of languages and thousands of races, tribes and ethnic groups. ... Polyrhythm is the simultaneous sounding of two or more independent rhythms. ... Indian music is: The music of India or Native American music This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Javanese gamelan at the Indonesian Embassy in Canberra A gamelan is a kind of musical ensemble of Indonesia typically featuring a variety of instruments such as metallophones, xylophones, drums, and gongs; bamboo flutes, bowed and plucked strings, and vocalists may also be included. ... Interlocking in railway terminology (US) is a term used to describe an at-grade crossing or other junction of two or more railroads, or any railroad switching complex in which the switches and the signals controlling train movement over those switches is interlocked so that it is impossible to give... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... In music, simple metre or simple time is a time signature or meter in which each beat (or rather, portion, 1/2 or 1/3 of a measure) is divided into two parts, as opposed to three which is compound meter. ... In music, syncopation is when a stressing of a normally unstressed beat in a bar or failure to sound a tone on an accented beat occurs. ...


Clave is a common underlying rhythm in African, Cuban music, and Brazilian music. Clave (pronounced clah-vay) is a rhythmic pattern or timeline which has its roots in West African music and was developed in Cuba. ... Africa is a large and diverse continent, consisting of dozens of countries, hundreds of languages and thousands of races, tribes and ethnic groups. ... The Caribbean island of Cuba has been influential in the development of multiple musical styles in the 19th and 20th centuries. ...

Claves Image File history File links Clave_pattern. ...

Four beats followed by three Clave patterns
Problems listening to the file? See media help.
standard notation of clave pattern on audio clip clave pattern.ogg
standard notation of clave pattern on audio clip clave pattern.ogg
Grid notation of single clave pattern
Grid notation of single clave pattern

In the 20th century, composers like Igor Stravinsky, Philip Glass, and Steve Reich wrote more rhythmically complex music using odd meters, and techniques such as phasing and additive rhythm. At the same time, modernists such as Olivier Messiaen and his pupils used increased complexity to disrupt the sense of a regular beat, leading eventually to the widespread use of irrational rhythms in New Complexity. This use may be explained by a comment of John Cage's where he notes that regular rhythms cause sounds to be heard as a group rather than individually; the irregular rhythms highlight the rapidly changing pitch relationships that would otherwise be subsumed into irrelevant rhythmic groupings (Sandow 2004, p.257). LaMonte Young also wrote music in which the sense of a regular beat is absent because the music consists only of long sustained tones (drones). In the 1930s, Henry Cowell wrote music involving multiple simultaneous periodic rhythms and collaborated with Léon Theremin to invent the Rhythmicon, the first electronic rhythm machine, in order to perform them. Similarly, Conlon Nancarrow wrote for player piano. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 126 pixels Full resolution (2625 × 415 pixel, file size: 110 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Notation of clave pattern I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 126 pixels Full resolution (2625 × 415 pixel, file size: 110 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Notation of clave pattern I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Composers are people who write music. ... Igor Stravinsky. ... Philip Glass (born January 31, 1937) is a three-times Academy Award-nominated American composer. ... Stephen Michael Reich (born October 3, 1936) is an American composer. ... In music the compositional technique phasing, popularized by composer Steve Reich, is that while the same part is played on two musical instruments, one instrumentalist keeps playing in steady tempo, while the other gradually moves ahead of the first until it becomes out of and then back in phase (the... Additive rhythms are larger periods of time constructed from sequences of smaller rhythmic units added to the end of the previous unit. ... Olivier Messiaen It has been suggested that List of students of Olivier Messiaen be merged into this article or section. ... In music, an irrational rhythm is any rhythm in which an odd number of beats is superimposed on an even number in the predominating tempo, or vice versa. ... The New Complexity is a primarily British movement of avant garde classical music dating from the 1970s. ... For the Mortal Kombat character, see Johnny Cage. ... La Monte Young (born October 14, 1935) is an American composer whose eccentric and often hard-to-find works have been included among the most important post World War 2 avant garde or experimental music. ... In music, a drone is a harmonic or monophonic effect or accompaniment where a note or chord is continuously sounded throughout much or all of a piece, sustained or repeated, and most often establishing a tonality upon which the rest of the piece is built. ... Henry Cowell (March 11, 1897 – December 10, 1965) was an American composer, musical theorist, pianist, teacher, publisher, and impresario. ... A young Léon Theremin playing a theremin Léon Theremin (born Lev Sergeyevich Termen, Лев Сергеевич Термен in Russian) (August 15, 1896–November 3, 1993) was a Russian inventor. ... The Rhythmicon or Polyrhythmophone was an early drum machine. ... A Boss DR-202 Drum Machine A drum machine is an electronic musical instrument designed to imitate the sound of drums and/or other percussion instruments. ... Conlon Nancarrow (October 27, 1912 - August 10, 1997) was an American composer who took Mexican citizenship in 1955. ... The player piano is a type of piano that plays music without the need for a human pianist to depress the normal keys or pedals. ...


See also

In linguistics, prosody refers to intonation, rhythm, and vocal stress in speech. ... In linguistics, the timing in a language comprises the rhythmic qualities of speech, in particular how syllables are distributed across time. ... Particularly, this article is not about Hymn meters, as often found on hymn tunes Meter (UK spelling: metre) is the measurement of a musical line into measures of stressed and unstressed beats, indicated in Western music notation by a symbol called a time signature. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... A riddim is an instrumental version of a song, which applies to Music of carribean (mostly dancehall and reggae) or other forms of Caribbean music. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Mithen, Steven (2005). The Singing Neanderthals: The Origins of Music, Language, Mind and Body.. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson.. ISBN 0297643177. 
  2. ^ In Discovering Music: Rhythm with Leonard Slatkin at 5:05

Leonard Slatkin (born September 1, 1944) is an American conductor. ...

Sources

  • Hasty, Christopher (1997). Meter as Rhythm. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-510066-2.
  • London, Justin (2004). Hearing in Time: Psychological Aspects of Musical Meter. ISBN 0-19-516081-9.
  • Middleton, Richard (1990/2002). Studying Popular Music. Philadelphia: Open University Press. ISBN 0-335-15275-9.
  • Narmour (1980). Cited in DeLone et al. (Eds.) (1975). Aspects of Twentieth-Century Music. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall. ISBN 0-13-049346-5.
  • Sandow, Greg (2004). "A Fine Madness", The Pleasure of Modernist Music. ISBN 1-58046-143-3.
  • Yeston, Maury (1976). "The Stratification of Musical Rhythm".

Further reading

  • McGaughey, William (2001). "Rhythm and Self-Consciousness: New Ideals for an Electronic Civilization". Minneapolis: Thistlerose Publications. ISBN 0-9605630-4-0.
  • Honing, H. (2002). "Structure and interpretation of rhythm and timing." Tijdschrift voor Muziektheorie [Dutch Journal of Music Theory] 7(3): 227-232.
  • Lewis, Andrew (2005). Rhythm—What it is and How to Improve Your Sense of It. San Francisco: RhythmSource Press. ISBN-13: 978-0-9754667-0-4.

External links

Look up Rhythm in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
  • Portable Rhythm
  • 11 Different ways to play the beat
  • 1200 rhythmic etudes in different metres (with MIDI)
  • Educational drum beat notation and audio clips from every major genre
  • Research group specializing in rhythm, timing, and tempo, University of Amsterdam
  • Research group specializing in rhythm of the Young Academy of Sciences, Humanities and Arts of Germany
  • Melodyhound has a "Query by Tapping" search that allows users to identify music based on rhythm
Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Musical development is the transformation and restatement of initial material, often contrasted with musical variation, with which it may be difficult to distinguish as a general process. ... In musical notation, the staff or stave is a set of five horizontal lines on which note symbols are placed to indicate pitch and rhythm. ... In musical notation, a bar or measure is a segment of time defined as a given number of beats of a given duration. ... For other senses of this word, see clef (disambiguation). ... Look up coda in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Da Capo is a musical term in Italian, meaning from the beginning, often abbreviated D.C.. It is a composer or publishers directive to repeat the previous part of music. ... Segno In music notation, Dal Segno (pronounced [ˈdalˌ ˈseˌɲo] or [ˈdalˌ ˈseˌnjo] but commonly mispronounced as [ˈdælˌ ˈsɛgˌno]) (often abbreviated D.S.) is used as a navigation marker. ... This key signature – A major or F# minor – consists of three sharps placed after the clef In musical notation, a key signature is a series of sharp symbols or flat symbols placed on the staff, designating notes that are to be consistently played one semitone higher or lower than the... Ledger lines above the staff, using eighth notes. ... This article is about modes as used in music. ... In music, a scale is a group of musical notes that provides material for part or all of a musical work. ... A rehearsal letter is a boldface letter of the alphabet in an orchestral score, and its corresponding parts, that provides a convenient spot from which to resume rehearsal after a break. ... The time signature (also known as meter signature) is a notational convention used in Western musical notation to specify how many beats are in each measure and what note value constitutes one beat. ... In music transposition refers to the process of moving a collection of notes (pitches) up or down in pitch by a constant interval. ... A transposing instrument is a musical instrument whose music is written at a pitch different from concert pitch. ... Image File history File links Syncopation_example. ... An accidental is a musical notation symbol used to raise or lower the pitch of a note from that indicated by the key signature. ... Figure 1. ... In musical notation, a natural sign is a sign used to cancel a flat or sharp from either a preceding note or the key signature. ... Figure 1. ... Example 1. ... A grace note is a kind of music notation used to denote several kinds of musical ornaments. ... Parts of a note In music notation, a note value indicates the relative duration of a note, using the color or shape of the note head, the presence or absence of a stem, and the presence or absence of flags. ... A beam in musical notation is constructed as one or more lines used to connect multiple consecutive eighth notes (quavers), sixteenth notes (semiquavers), or smaller note values. ... The oval that is seen at the top or bottom of a note. ... Stems can refer to two things in music, relating to music notation and production. ... For other uses, see Octave (disambiguation). ... Pitch is the perceived fundamental frequency of a sound. ... A rest is an interval of silence in a piece of music, marked by a sign indicating the length of the pause. ... A semitone (also known in the USA as a half step) is a musical interval. ... Music notation is a system of writing for music. ... In music an articulation is a sign, direction, or performance technique which indicates or affects the transition or continuity between notes or sounds. ... “Fortissimo” redirects here. ... In music, ornaments are musical flourishes that are not necessary to the overall melodic (or harmonic) line, but serve to decorate or ornament that line. ... Ossia is a musical term for an alternate passage which may be played instead of the original passage. ... In music, an accent is an emphasis on a particular note created by length, as in an agogic accent, pitch, as in a pitch accent, and dynamics, such as dynamic accents. ... In musical notation legato indicates that musical notes are played smoothly. ... A tenuto marking on an individual note Tenuto (Italian, past participle of tenere to hold) is a direction used in musical notation. ... Marcato in the context of bowed string instruments is an arco technique for playing such a stringed instrument, such as violin, viola, cello, and the double bass, also called contrabass, bass viol, or upright bass. ... In musical notation, the Italian word staccato (literally detached, plural staccatos or staccati) indicates that notes are sounded in a detached and distinctly separate manner, with silence making up the latter part of the time allocated to each note. ... In musical notation, staccatissimo (plural: staccatissimos or staccatissimi) indicates that the notes are to be played extremely separated and distinct, a superlative staccato. ... In music, a tie is when multiple notes of the same pitch are to be played as one note with a duration equal to the sum of the individual notes durations. ... A slur is a symbol in Western musical notation indicating that the notes it embraces are to be played without separation. ... Musical development is the transformation and restatement of initial material, often contrasted with musical variation, with which it may be difficult to distinguish as a general process. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... Look up melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In music, a motif is a perceivable or salient reoccurring fragment or succession of notes that may used to construct the entirety or parts of complete melodies, themes. ... In music theory, the recapitulation is the third major section of a movement written in sonata form. ... putang ina. ... Particularly, this article is not about Hymn meters, as often found on hymn tunes Meter (UK spelling: metre) is the measurement of a musical line into measures of stressed and unstressed beats, indicated in Western music notation by a symbol called a time signature. ... For other uses, see Tempo (disambiguation). ... In music, a theme is the initial or primary melody. ... A chord chart is a simplified text document that typically represents lyrics with ASCII chord (music) placed above the appropriate syllables of the lyrics to associate the relative timing of the chord changes to the words of a song. ... Figured bass, or thoroughbass, is a kind of integer musical notation used to indicate intervals, chords, and nonchord tones, in relation to a bass note. ... Musical graphic notation is a form of music notation which refers to the use of non-traditional symbols and text to convey information about the performance of a piece of music. ... A lead sheet is form of music notation the describes the melody, lyrics and harmony of a popular song. ... Modern Musical Symbols are the marks and symbols that are widely used in musical scores of all styles and instruments today. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... Example of numeric vihuela tablature from the book Orphenica Lyra by Miguel de Fuenllana (1554). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Rhythm - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (836 words)
"Rhythm involves patterns of duration that are phenomenally present in the music" with duration measured by interonset interval (London 2004, p.4).
The study of rhythm, stress, and pitch in speech is called prosody; it is a topic in linguistics.
A rhythm section generally consists of percussion instruments, and possibly chordal instruments (e.g., guitar, banjo) and keyboard instruments, such as piano (which, by the way, may be classified as any of these three types of instruments).
Rhythm guitar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (414 words)
The rhythm guitar is the complement to the lead guitar, which plays melody; for example during solos, or "lead breaks", or during short "fills".
A rhythm guitarist supplies the layer of rhythm on top of which the melody is either played using another instrument or sung by a human.
In Rock and Roll, the rhythm guitarist is typically expected to play a simple sequence of chords, called a chord progression, around which the song is constructed.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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