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Encyclopedia > Rhyolite

This page is about a volcanic rock. For the ghost town see Rhyolite, Nevada, and for the satellite system, see Rhyolite/Aquacade. Rhyolite, Nevada is a ghost town in Nye County, Nevada west of Death Valley near Beatty, Nevada. ... Rhyolite and later, Aquacade are reportedly code names for a class of SIGINT reconnaissance satellites operated by the National Reconnaissance Office for the United States Department of Defense. ...

Rhyolite
Rhyolite

Rhyolite is an igneous, volcanic (extrusive) rock, of felsic (acidic) composition (typically >69% SiO2 — see the TAS classification. It may have any texture from aphanitic to porphyritic. The mineral assemblage is usually quartz, alkali feldspar and plagioclase (in a ratio > 1:2 — see the QAPF diagram). Biotite and pyroxene are common accessory minerals. Rhyolite Source: US Government File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Rhyolite Source: US Government File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Volcanic rock on North America Plutonic rock on North America Igneous rocks (etymology from latin ignis, fire) are rocks formed by solidification of cooled magma (molten rock), with or without crystallization, either below the surface as intrusive (plutonic) rocks or on the surface as extrusive (volcanic) rocks. ... Extrusive refers to the mode of igneous volcanic rock formation in which hot magma from inside the Earth flows out (extrudes) onto the surface as lava or explodes violently into the atmosphere to fall back as pyroclastics or tuff. ... “Rock” redirects here. ... Felsic is a term used in geology to refer to silicate minerals, magmas, and rocks which are enriched in the lighter elements such as silica, oxygen, aluminium, sodium, and potassium. ... The TAS classification can be used to assign names to many common types of volcanic rocks based upon the relationships between the combined alkali content and the silica content. ... An aphanite is an igneous rock with a fine-grained structure. ... (For other meanings of Porphyr, see Porphyry) The baptismal font in the Cathedral of Magdeburg is made of rose porphyry from a site near Assuan, Egypt Porphyry is a very hard red, green or purple igneous rock consisting of large-grained crystals, such as feldspar or quartz, dispersed in a... For other uses, see Mineral (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Quartz (disambiguation). ... Alkaline redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lunar Ferroan Anorthosite #60025 (Plagioclase Feldspar). ... A QAPF diagram is a double triangle diagram which is used to classify igneous rocks based on mineralogic composition. ... A Biotite slice Biotite is a common phyllosilicate mineral that contains potassium, magnesium, iron and aluminium. ... Figure 1:Mantle-peridotite xenolith with green peridot olivine and black pyroxene crystals from San Carlos Indian Reservation, Gila Co. ...


Rhyolite can be considered as the extrusive equivalent to the plutonic granite rock, due to their high content of silica and low iron and magnesium contents, rhyolites polymerize quickly and form highly viscous lavas. They can also occur as breccias or in volcanic necks and dikes. Rhyolites that cool too quickly to grow crystals form a natural glass or vitrophyre, also called obsidian. Slower cooling forms microscopic crystals in the lava and results in textures such as flow foliations, spherulitic, nodular, and lithophysal structures. Extrusive refers to the mode of igneous volcanic rock formation in which hot magma from inside the Earth flows out (extrudes) onto the surface as lava or explodes violently into the atmosphere to fall back as pyroclastics or tuff. ... In geology an intrusion is usually a body of igneous rock that has crystallized from a molten magma below the surface of the Earth. ... Close-up of granite from Yosemite National Park, valley of the Merced River Quarrying granite for the Mormon Temple, Utah Territory. ... Look up lava, Aa, pahoehoe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Breccia, derived from the Latin word for broken, is a sedimentary rock composed of angular fragments in a matrix that may be of a similar or a different material. ... Cleveland Volcano in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska photographed from the International Space Station For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... A dike in geology refers to a tabular intrusive igneous body. ... This article is about a type of volcanic glass. ... Foliation is any penetrative planar fabric present in rocks. ... Spherulites, in petrology, are small, rounded bodies that commonly occur in vitreous igneous rocks. ... A nodule in petrology or mineralogy is an irregular rounded to spherical concretion. ... A lithophysa (plural lithophysae) is a small cavity found in volcanic rocks believed to be caused by expanding gases in the still liquid lava before solidification. ...

Top stone is obsidian, below that is pumice and in lower right corner is rhyolite (light color)

Image taken in September 2003 by Daniel Mayer. ... Image taken in September 2003 by Daniel Mayer. ... This article is about a type of volcanic glass. ... Specimen of highly porous pumice from Teide volcano on Tenerife, Canary Islands. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Rhyolite - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (180 words)
Rhyolite is an igneous, volcanic (extrusive) rock, of felsic composition, with aphanitic to porphyritic texture.
Rhyolite can be considered as the extrusive equivalent to the plutonic granite rock.
Rhyolite, known as koga in Japanese, is indigenous to Niijima, Japan and Lipari, Italy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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